17 Burst results for "Dr Stephen Nicholson"

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes in churches hosted by dr stephen nicholson where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past asked travel back in time as we look the people events and even the places that have shaped the story of christianity. This is our story <hes> family history. Let's get started and on this episode of five minutes in church history. Let's visit the oldest city in georgia savannah when georgia was his majesty's colony savannah was the capital. It's a port city and go on to play a strategic role in both the revolutionary canary in civil wars. It's charming full of history horsedrawn carriages architectural features good food and it's also full of churches so let's talk about the church history of savannah. We start with john wesley. He set sail for georgia. Uh on october fourteen seventeen thirty five. He reached savannah on february eight seventeen thirty six and he would would leave on december twenty second seventeen thirty seven. There is the wesley monument in reynolds square. Savannah has twenty two squares throughout the town and one of them reynolds square has this great monument statue of john wesley and on it are these words my heart's desire for this place is not that it be a famous or rich but that it may be a religious ages colony and then i am sure it cannot fail of the blessing of god but alas wesley did not fare so well himself in the fair city of savannah. He considered his time there a failure and there was the matter of a very complicated court case that ended in a mistrial. Oh the drama well george whitfield fared much better in savannah. He arrived in savannah. The first time on may seven seventeen thirty eight he opened an orphanage called the bethesda orphan house. It's just south of savannah. It opened in seventeen forty forty. One of those twenty two squares is the whitfield square. It's beautiful and it has a gazebo and i'm sure that if whitfield were were alive today he'd be in that gazebo n._b._a. Preaching so we have wesley and we have whitfield and we also have many churches in savannah in christ church which was established by oglethorpe the founder of the colony of georgia in seventeen thirty three. This is where wesley would have preached this. This is where whitfield preached. There's also the first african baptist church it goes back to seventeen seventy four. This church has pews news that were made by slaves and they marked the pews with words that were from an african dialect and it was also part of the underground ground railroad the first african baptist church and then there's independent presbyterian church it was established in seventeen eighteen fifty five by charter of king george the second a fire destroyed the church building in eighteen eighty nine but it was rebuilt. He built as closely as possible to its original design. The marble baptismal font is still there in the church. It survived the the fire. The church has a magnificent pulpit striking breathtaking that is made of mahogany also breathtaking the tall federal windows the granite floors and the corinthian columns woodrow wilson was married in this church in eighteen eighty five five he married a daughter of the church's minister and of course the church has its famous steeple which towers over the city eighty you should go and see it or if you can't make it to savannah you can simply watch the opening scenes of forest gump a feather dances. This is around the steeple as it slowly descends upon the tree lined streets of savannah and lands right at the feet of tom hanks is character forrest gump as he sits on a bench in chippewa square and that is one of the charming churches of of the charming city of savannah and i'm steve nichols. Thanks for listening five minutes in churches for more ordination or to listen to past episodes. Please visit five minutes in church history dot com.

savannah john wesley george whitfield african baptist church georgia savannah georgia whitfield square reynolds square christ church dr stephen nicholson chippewa square woodrow wilson steve nichols bethesda orphan house tom hanks forrest gump king george founder five minutes
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes in churches hosted by dr stephen nicholson where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past asked traveled back in time as we look the people events and even the places that have shaped the story of christianity. This is our story <hes> family history. Let's get started. <music> charles simeon was born in seventeen fifty nine as a young man he went to eton england's fabled fabled boarding school eton was founded in fourteen forty and had a rich history while they're siemian quite good at sports enjoyed horseback riding and he was all prepared and ready to go off to king's college in cambridge up to this point in his life. Simeon showed very little in fact practically no oh interest in religion but as a student at king's college he needed to take communion and this prompted him to look into one of the christian societies there cambridge the society for the propagation of christian knowledge through the s. p. c. k. he encountered many books and one of them was the whole duty of man an anonymous devotional book that was written in sixteen fifty eight and that book and others all led to simeon's conversion on easter the day april fourth seventeen seventy nine at the time there was not much of a gospel evan jellicoe witness cambridge not much of a spiritual life at all aw with simeon started preaching even as a student at cambridge he preached at saint edwards church that church that had a prominent place in the reformation at cambridge and then he took a pastoral charge at holy trinity church in cambridge he was there from seventeen eighty two up until his death in eighteen thirty six holy trinity church urge was a center of evangelical witness and a center of spiritual life in cambridge but simeon's preaching had a mixed reception there some didn't like his gospel people centered preaching at all and so they locked their pews and they would refuse to go in protest but the students came in droves whereas whereas you look at simians ministry hit three emphases one was his influence on preachers in preaching from the eighteen tens on he held what he called a weekly conversation version party. This was for young men seeking ordination in anywhere from sixty to eighty would show up each week for this time with simeon he taught taught them how to preach and taught them about preaching semi and had a threefold criteria for sermon. He said you can ask these three questions. Does it humble a center secondly. Secondly does it exalt the savior and thirdly does it promote holiness. Well one thing to note about. Simeon was that he did not emphasize the or systematic theology in his sermons he called himself a bible christian and not a system christian well even in the nineteen hundreds people like martin roy jones and some others push back on that khusus but there it was simeon so i we see his influence on pastors and preachers and we need to realize that this was not only in his time but it lasted for two centuries stories in fact john stott is probably the the prime example of twentieth century figure who was influenced by semyon boasts thought and simeon were lifelong bachelors flers both were lifelong preachers and both had an intense passion for missions and that's simians second emphasis missions. He was involved in a number of missionary societies and in april of seventeen ninety nine he formed the society for missions to africa and the east he had a special interest in india and of course over his time at cambridge. He trained many missionaries through his conversation parties. Who took the gospel all over the world well the third emphasis of simeon he was through and through anglican and he worked tirelessly to reform anglicanism to bring gospel wakefulness to the church and to strive to make churchgoers become committed disciples of christ. He promoted the thirty thirty nine articles in the homilies which all the way back to kramer and the book of common prayer he was not for the status quo and he was not for nominalism he was for church that took the gospel and the bible seriously charl simeon died in the city. He spent his life's. I work in cambridge. He died on november thirteen eighteen thirty six well. That's the life of charles simeon in an anglican minister. I'm steve nichols. Thanks for listening to five minutes in church est for more ordination or to listen to past episodes. Please visit five minutes in church history dot com.

charles simeon cambridge dr stephen nicholson king holy trinity church steve nichols saint edwards church simians ministry eton england africa semyon john stott kramer martin roy jones s. p. c. india bible five minutes two centuries
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes in churches, three hosted by Dr Stephen Nicholson, where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past travel back in time. As we look the people of aunts and even the places, the shape the story of Christianity. This is our story, our family history. Let's get started. Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in church history and as promised. We are returning to our discussion with Dr Sinclair Ferguson and he is with us again from Scotland, Dr. Ferguson while SOGA to hear you again, Steve celebrity day here again in well, I'm glad that you still have sunshine and you're in Carnoustie, but this past weekend you are in now my pronouncing this properly door. Knock Don off exact or knock. Let's go to your book in the Irv, our Lord. And you've got a chapter here on the sixth century and you call it Christianity in Scotland. Now doesn't surprise me at all that you're talking about Scotland. Glad you are. So help us learn a little bit about the history of the church in Scotland. Do you mentioned two people Ninian and Columba? Yes, the truth is, but the story of the gospel came to Scotland is someone shrouded in mystery. And the two figures who are probably most significant, a thicker of tended to be shrouded in a little mythology on. So with many of these figures in the in the beginnings of what we sometimes call dockage is you have to try to all the material into a sieve unshaken day in Tryon get down to the roots of the meta. But what was true of both of these men both of these men while I think what we might call monk evangelists. One of the things I say in the book is, you know, that are that are people with regenerated hearts who have sometimes quite confused heads, Piot use sense that is not all of the understanding of the gospel that we would desire. People have not been as well taught as we are in the twenty first century. But here we have to individuals. Who in a sense gave everything, they had to try to establish a gospel centered communities on, although south criticisms on not usually Vati enthusiastic about monks. These were monks who sought that passion to pray for the gospel to spread and Scotland. The tax was interesting. They cleaned it in a sense, little Michigan, a components they would consent to bring the gospel travel vary widely unin many ways. Scotland does of Vati great deal spiritually booth to Ninian onto Columba. And I think in this tapper you mentioned that again, this point you're making about these aren't withdrawn monks or monastic sort of enclaves there right in the midst of people's lives. And you mentioned sometimes we sort of seek to build our churches next to an interstate or sort of somewhere where it's convenient. Get to not necessarily in the midst of neighborhood value. Interesting. But you know, I think an even Jellicoe wait, we tend to despise all monks and kind of through in Ninian and Columba with them. Meanwhile, we look at our selves as churches outside of the communities to which we belong, and their evangelistic thrust was to take community to places where the gospel had not been established. And in that sense, you might say that patch on was fairly apostolic. They traveled in small groups lightly. Also, Paul with some of his companions onto to instruments of Christ and building the judge in specific locations in that sense. I think that a great example to us if great line at the end of this chapter resale these two and others along with them were willing to go wherever God called the sets relate. It's such a challenge to. Actually in the twenty percent century. Well, thank you Dr. Ferguson for lifting our eyes off of the horizon of the twenty first century and putting them back on our past and specifically on sixth century and grateful for this book, ungrateful grateful for you. It's been great to be with you again. Well, that was Dr Sinclair Ferguson on the sixth century and the history of Christianity and Scotland. I'm Steve Nichols. Thanks for joining us for five minutes interest. For more information or to listen to past episodes, please visit five minutes church history dot com.

Scotland Dr Sinclair Ferguson Columba Dr Stephen Nicholson Steve Nichols Don Vati Michigan Paul five minutes twenty percent
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes in churches, three hosted by Dr Stephen Nicholson, where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past travel back in time. As we look the people of aunts and even the places for the shape the story of Christianity. This is our story, our family history. Let's get started. Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in church history. On this episode, we are visiting the Philadelphia museum of art fact will be here for a few episodes as we look at art within the walls of this wonderful collection and this very iconic art museum. The Philadelphia museum of art. For this episode, we're going to be looking at medieval art. Medieval art teaches us a great deal about medieval church life about medieval theology and even about the medieval world. The first thing we realize that the art is dominated by religious themes and depictions of events. This makes sense as this is the era of Christendom. The second thing we need to know is that medieval art was in a variety of media. Of course, there is painting and sculpture illuminated manuscripts. We have stained glass, but also artists worked with metals and with Jules we have mosaics we have the beginning of fresco paintings easer. The mural paintings using a wet limestone mixing pigments with water. This of course will come to its apex at the Sistine Chapel, and we also have tapestries well let's turn our attention to some of the medieval art in the collection of the Philadelphia art museum. The first thing we come to our what are called reliquary is these reliquary s- were shrines that were intended to hold relics relics of the saints, relics of the apostles. There were relics related to marry into Jesus, and you can find these reliquary all over cathedrals in Europe. They're highly jewelled and decorated boxes of various shapes. There's a dozen or so in the collection at Philadelphia art museum. One is a little round Lockett box with a carving of sheep on it has the Latin language agnus dei lamb of God. It's from the time of pope urban the fifth thirteen seventy eight to thirteen eighty nine and inside that round. And box is a metal made of wax from one of the Easter candles that was used in one of the services at Saint. John's Lateran church. This is before the Vatican and before Saint Peter's basilica. And so this understood to be holy service and this Easter wax and these would have been saved in all over to the pope's friends. In this one ended up in Philadelphia. There's also a reliquary that shaped like an arm. It's an armed raised with a hand, raised in the gesture of the priest or the Bishop giving a blessing, and this was a common form for reliquary. You see these all over Europe. This one is silver with glass stones and crystals, and it has an amethyst an inside that would be relics of the saints..

medieval art Philadelphia art museum Europe Philadelphia Dr Stephen Nicholson pope Sistine Chapel Saint Peter's basilica Lockett Jules Lateran church Saint John five minutes
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes in churches, three hosted by Dr Stephen Nicholson, where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past travel back in time. As we look the people of aunts and even the places for the shape the story of Christianity. This is our story, our family history. Let's get started. Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in church history. Do you know what you were doing on June the eighth two thousand thirteen wealth. Maybe some of our younger listeners were even born on June the eighth two thousand thirteen. But on that day, Google was celebrating the five hundred and fifth anniversary of the birthday of Primoz true bar Primoz to bar was born and June of fifteen eight. He is sometimes called the Slovenian Martin Luther, and he is the founder of the Slovene language. Not only was he celebrated by Google, but he's considered a national hero of Slovenia. He is on coins and on postage stamps. There are monuments to him and they're even been TV shows made about him. Well, you might never have heard of Primoz to bar before, but we're going to remedy that right now. As I said, he was born and fifteen. Eight is father wanted him to become a priest. And so he said. Him off to study to become a priest very much like Luther. He comes from a family of limited means, and so as Luther had to sing for his supper and literally sing on the streets to get money to support himself. So did true bar and so he would sing on the streets. And then finally, he saying in the church, choir and Salzburg, and all the while he was studying for the ministry. He went on to Vienna, Italy in fifteen twenty four. There. He was studying and ended his studies by being deigned as a priest in fifteen twenty nine. He returned to his home nation of Slovenia. And while he was there in Slovenia, somehow the writings of the reformers made their way into his hands, the works of Luther, the works of some of the Swiss reformers and over the period of about five years. Primoz true bar began to move from the Catholic side of things to the Protestant side of things in his preaching became noticeably different and noticeably Protestant by fifteen. Forty. He was administering the Lord's supper as they would say in a Protestant manner and by fifteen forty seven, he was banned from his town and he was excommunicated by the church. Primoz tube are long to have books in the language of his fellow countrymen and the Slovenian language. He saw Luther was doing for the German people's by putting not only the bible into the German language, but also theological works into the German language and how that was equipping the Christians there and encouraging them in their faith. And so he wanted to do the same thing for the people of Slovenia. The problem was that slow vein was not even a literary language yet it had lacked many of the basic elements. There was no consistent spelling. There was not a consistent grammar. He really needed to actually create the language. In order to write in the language, any even needed to create the alphabet. Well, he undertook all of this and remarkably, he worked on the gospels. He worked on the book of acts and over the course of a few years. He was able to publish the New Testament in the Slovenian language and addition to that, he published many other books. He translated number of Luther books and the books of the other reformers into the Slovene language. Overall, he published twenty two books and the Slovenian language over the course of his lifetime. And he also published two books in German because there were a number of German speakers who are also in Slovenia. In one of the prefaces to one of those books true bar quoted Romans fourteen eleven every tongue shall confess to God. Well, to bar died in June a fifteen eighty six. He was born and Juna fifteen eight and died June fifteen eighty six. And in between he was the Slovenian Martin Luther who brought the truth of the gospel in the truce of the reformation and the language to the Slovenian people. Well, that's Primoz true. And I'm Steve Nichols and thanks for listening to five minutes interest. For more information or to listen to past episodes, please visit five minutes in church history dot com..

Martin Luther Slovenia Google Dr Stephen Nicholson Steve Nichols Italy Juna Salzburg Vienna five minutes five years
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes in churches, three hosted by Dr Stephen Nicholson, where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past travel back in time. As we look the people of aunts and even the places for the shape the story of Christianity. This is our story, our family history. Let's get started. Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in churches. -tory we are actually recording at the site of the ligonier national conference twenty eighteen in our theme this year for the league international conference is awakening. Well, this subject of awakening is one that has a rich history and the Christian church and especially a rich history in terms of American church. And one of those key moments in American church history was the great awakening. We know this event seventeen forty to seventeen forty two, but I wanna talk about some of the moments that led up to that in one moment in particular just before the great awakening, there was a smaller awakening. The great awakening was a great awakening because it was all over the American colonies and it was Atlantic and it was quite a phenomenon. But before it and the seventeen thirty five seventeen thirty six. There was a revival and the Connecticut river valley. Of course, this is the home. Home to Jonathan Edwards and Jonathan Edwards had something to do with this Connecticut river valley revival. It was his sermons. I think that in many ways laid the groundwork for this revival of the Connecticut river, and then it was those revivals that may very well have been part of the Tinder that was used than in the flames of the great awakening. One seventeen thirty one Jonathan Edwards preached a sermon was actually his first sermon to get published God glorified in man's dependence. Well, another sermon stresses that this is a sermon from seventeen thirty four simply titled a divine and supernatural light. Well, actually that's the short title. The long title is divine in supernatural light immediately imparted to the soul by the spirit of God shown to be both a scripture oil and a rational doctrine and very typical puritan sermon form Edwards. Parts off with the text in the text to used for this one was Matthew sixteen seventeen, and Jesus answered and said unto him, blessed art, thou Simon bar Jona for flesh and blood Heff not revealed at unto the, but my father, which is in heaven. Of course, the it there, the pronoun refers to Simon's confession that Jesus is the Lord. And Jesus tells Peter very quickly that this was not something you came up with through natural light or from natural reason. But my father, Jesus says, which is in heaven, revealed this to you. Edwards takes from this the doctrine that there is such a thing as a spiritual divine light immediately imparted to the soul by God of a different nature from any that is obtained by natural means. Now the keyword there is immediately imparted by that Edwards means quickly, but he. Also means without a mediator. The idea is this is God's work. This is as Edwards would unfold in the sermon. This is specifically the work of the Holy Spirit, this spiritual supernatural, divine light, and it is of a different nature because it is supernatural than any that is obtained by natural means. He goes on to unpack this doctrine as many of these puritan sermons do with many points and sub points. One of the points he makes that this spiritual light primarily consists in a real sense and apprehension of the divine excellency of the things revealed and the word of God. He goes on to say that this sense of their divine excellency, their divine glory is what we see as the truth of the gospel. And what we see as Edwards will say, a spiritual and saving conviction. These things are true. These. Things are real. These things are in fact, the truly real things and Edward says, these things are not known by natural means or by natural light or by the light of reason. But these things are known by a divine and a supernatural light. Well, that's Edwards in his sermon from seventeen thirty four. That led to the great awakening. I'm Steve Nichols and thanks for listening to five minutes churches. For more information or to listen to past episodes, please visit five minutes in church history dot com..

Jonathan Edwards Connecticut river valley Jesus Dr Stephen Nicholson Steve Nichols Holy Spirit Matthew Simon Peter five minutes
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes in churches, three hosted by Dr Stephen Nicholson, where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past travel back in time. As we look the people of aunts and even the places for the shape the story of Christianity. This is our story, our family history. Let's get started. Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in church history. I am joined once again with a dear friend of mine. Actually professor of mine when I was in seminary. My favorite Scotsman Dr. Sinclar true. We wear seminary to go weren't seminary together, and I believe you were the professor in. I was the student at that while I lounge from student. So I'm sure I learned a lot from your lovely to see you. It's good to see you Dr Ferguson. So I'm here s you single question. I'd like you to talk to us about your favorite figure from Scottish church history next to John Knox. So besides John Knox, who's your favorite Scotsman? Well, that's a difficult question because I've a number of them, but today I think I'll choose Robert money, McCain. Tell us about Rover, Shane was young Scottish minister beginning of the nineteenth century. He was brought up in kind of upper middle class Eddin, but a home very well educated, very gifted intellectually. Great. Poetic spirit brought up within the church, and then his older brother was converted. And I think then he began to realize that he himself had never been a true Christian and his brother really pointed him to Christ. His older brother died prematurely. As we would say on this left, I really deep impression on McShane. He sensed a call into the gospel ministry. He studied with a number of friends. Very remarkable group of friends may be best known to people in the United States would be Horatio bar order him writer. Also his brother, Andrew. Number of other men greatly influenced by Thomas Chalmers was another great Scottish figure in the mid nineteenth century and that he was called a young man. Probably he was only twenty two at the time to be minister of a completely new church that was being planted in the city of Dundee called. It was called Peter's churches and Peter street on. It's actually the church in which I'm a member and also Salva son elder. And so I sometimes lean against the wall and say, speak to me and tell me what it was like here. And in his day, there was a very remarkable awakening, took place in different parts of Scotland. And the interesting thing is that took place at really kind of ignited when he himself was away from the church and he he had. A sense that maybe it would be when he was away that God would come and move, and he was away for six months with Andrew, Bon of seeing the condition of Jews throughout Europe. And when he returned that chuch packed and alive that people were desperate for the word of God, they were coming every night for preaching, and it was a really glorious season in the life of the church, not without its problems, but behind all that he'd been a really faithful pastor fairly upper middle class. That's very poor area of Dundee, and he visited and cared and trade and gave an really family wonderful stone. I think most people probably nam through the bible readings. Yes, has through the bible in a year. He wrote one or two hymns that I think are still sometimes son and every Christian ought to read Andrew Bonner's book memoir and remains of Robert Manning Chan it has. It has just meant a tremendous amount to me and he's, he's been a constant stimulation to grow godliness unto faithful preacher of the word. So I all my great and there you are and the church every Lord's day where he worships over which that is a great privilege. What's always enjoy to speak with you. Dr Ferguson, there are many more figures from Scottish church history, so we're going to have to have you come back, but thank you. I've seen Nichols. Thanks for listening, five minutes interest. For more information or to listen to past episodes, please visit five minutes in church history dot com..

Andrew Bonner Scottish church Dr Ferguson Thomas Chalmers McShane Dundee Dr Stephen Nicholson professor John Knox Robert Manning Chan Dr. Sinclar United States Scotland Shane Robert money Nichols Europe Peter writer McCain
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes in churches, three hosted by Dr Stephen Nicholson, where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past travel back in time. As we look the people of aunts and even the places for the shape the story of Christianity. This is our story, our family history. Let's get started. Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in church history. On this episode of a very special guest, I have Dr Kevin young, and we're going to give you your dream, Kevin. We're going to send you to a deserted island and let you just read books so you can take five books with you to this deserted island. So let's start. What are you going to take a lot of pressure for sure. Turan. Excellent. I'm gonna take her ten. I'm gonna take the three volumes. Can I tell you something very cool. Yeah, I was just reading one of our seas books, a contemporary book on the doctrine of God in the back flyleaf he wrote every reformed student should study turtle. Yeah, so he'd be so happy with your your goodness. I know I could tell all these years that knew that Dr ten is there. It's like in there. I'm gonna take a hymnal so I can saying so I can study screen, I guess. I'll do the trinity hymnal it's short that I don't know if I want to use up, but again, my background and my heritage. Okay, here's what I'll do. Take sinuses commentary on the Hilbert catechist so you get the catechist get the catechism and I get, I get the commentary and this is echo riots or sinus. That's right. Who is one of the writers? The principal author of the attic them. So I'm going to take that. You know if I haven't finished my dissertation yet. I'm gonna take the works of John Witherspoon if I have probably want to not see those for a while. So maybe maybe I'll do that. I don't know how many up to the one book. I remember reading Witherspoon was his lectures on moral philosophy. Yeah, that's that's gonna be a longer conversation because he's known chiefly through that book which was published posthumously and in its given a little bit of a skewed version of who Witherspoon as he has a wonderful doctrinal pastoral worse, sir. Well worth reading. So we've got turtle territory and got a hymnal n we will let you append a psalter assault or take. No, we have our sinus commentary on the Heidelberg catechism, and we've got the works of Witherspoon last one last, I want something really long. You can choose the novel to, oh, a novel, vocab free took with him Warren piece. Okay. I don't wanna do that though. I don't have a hundred piece. I mean I'm tempted to say the complete works of Shakespeare. That would seem to be a noble thing. But how about instead if there's a, there's got to be a complete value. Of peachy Woodhouse. There you go. We will let that go. Yeah, so good. So let's go back and pick up just very briefly what attracted you to Witherspoon. So I was I was thinking about doing doctoral program and decided to church history for a number of reasons. At that time, I was reading on religious liberty. That's been a big topic in our country, and I was looking at our founders history and constitution. And so I came upon Witherspoon sort of reading who he wasn't, and I thought he is kind of a fun irascible sort of fellow. I didn't know all this. I didn't know he was the only clergyman to sign a declaration of independence. All this stuff forgotten, founder fairly forgotten, the founder, and then his satirical works. When he was a minister in Scotland, lampooning the moderate party there. I really liked this guy and there wasn't a whole lot written on him. So I thought I would like to study him. I can learn about him and it's been. It's been fascinating is helped me learn more about the Scottish enlightenment about the great awakening about late reform. North of docs about early Princeton, and it's a lot in there. That's great. We look forward to that one thing you can do..

John Witherspoon Dr Kevin young Dr Stephen Nicholson Princeton Scotland peachy Woodhouse assault principal founder Warren five minutes
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Yeah. Welcome to five minutes in churches, three hosted by Dr Stephen Nicholson, where we take a little break from the present to go exploring the past travel back in time. As we look the people of aunts and even the places that have shaped the story at Christianity. This is our story, our family history. Let's get started. Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in church history. This is part to last time we were together. We had Dr Dole's all with us, and here he is again Dr Dole's. All welcome. Thank you. Thanks for having me good to have. You were talking about the history of the doctrine of God. And last time we talked about the unity of God, the Tri unity of God and that God as trinity. And then we talked about an, here's a tongue twister, unfathomable -ness of God. And that's that's where he left us. So thank you for that. We've got this solid foundation. Let's go from there. What next do we need to see or what do we see in the history of this doctor? Good. Some of the early attributes that are confessed are attributes like God's simplicity, which is the argument that God is not composed of parts. God does not have his godless as the result of his attributes sort of being added together and making God God's so that God. God is not the summation of something more basic than himself. And I think this is really driven in the early church by their deep fundamental commitment to God as the absolute creator of heaven and earth, and all that is in them. If God is the one from whom and through whom and to whom are all things is Romans eleven thirty six as then God can't be composed of parts because things that are composed of parts actually have sources of being more basic than themselves. Parts are constituents on which holes depend. And since God does not depend upon anything that is not God in order to be God, he must be simple. In fact, Erin AS in his great work against heresies that's an early apology for the church's confession and belief, and he makes a statement in there about divine simplicity. And he says that all the pious are want to speak this way concerning God and you get the. Sense that early on here in the late second century, a doctrine like simplicity is already sort of doctrine of God one. Oh one. It's standard language in the is thinking about very few people talk about that when they talk about the nature of God and the attributes of God. Very few start with simplicity. In fact, it sounds wrong to us. Perhaps God is simple, seems insulting if I called you simplistic. Yes, that wouldn't be a compliment. I I might not have you back by not if I call God's simple though. I'm not saying that God's simplistic or even easy to understand. I heard you say this and you said you say this to your students, here's where we can see how this sort of connects to living the Christian life if God were made of parts he'd fall apart. That's right. Yeah. Is that getting that quite? I think you're getting the sense of it because the whole point of God's simplicity, especially for the Christian is that if got a simple. God does not depend upon something other than himself to be himself, and it's for this reason that God is absolutely and utterly dependable, and I will say to my students, the reason you can utterly depend upon God is because he won't fall apart. And the reason he won't fall apart is because he wasn't made of parts to begin with. That's beautiful will. Thank you for. That's the simplicity of got I wanna ask you about one more word. I hear some people call this a CAT some say a eighty Osei itty what is the SAT of God? This is that Christian doctrine, the argues that God is of himself Osei the Latin of himself, which means that the reason for God is God and that God does not in any respect, depend upon something, not himself in order to know what he knows to do, what he does. The ultimate reason for anything you say God is or does is in fact just God and his perfection of godless. The early church is very insistent. On these attributes on the absolute irreducible -bility of God in his glory. We're back again to the unfathomable -ness of God, aren't we miss? We are. And from that comes his goodness to us into his creatures. Thank you. Dr does all for helping us get a little bit of insight here into the history of the doctrine of God. I'm Steve Nichols. Thanks for listening to five minutes interest. For more information or to listen to past episodes, please visit five minutes in church history dot com.

Dr Dole Dr Stephen Nicholson Steve Nichols Osei Erin five minutes
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes and churches dri hosted by dr stephen nicholson where we take a little break from the present to go exploring the past travel back in time as we look the people of ants and even the places that have shaped the story of christianity this is our story our family history let's get started on this episode of five minutes in church history let's talk about a plaque this is a plaque that commemorates an event in eighteen twelve now of course and the united states we had the war of eighteen twelve but that's not what this is about well let me just read to you at the plaque says it reads alexander hall cornerstone laid on september twenty six 1815 named to honour the reverend archibald alexander first professor of the seminary 18 twelve to eighteen fifty one and in the plaque says across the bottom this is the first structure built for use as a seminary by the presbyterian church while it was dedicated to archibald alexander there were actually three men who contributed to the founding of princeton theological seminary the first was the of forementioned mentioned archibald alexander he was joined by asheville green and also samuel millar and this is their story as belgrade was born in seventeen 62 he fought in the revolutionary war and then he studied under john witherspoon who was president of course of princeton university and assigner of the declaration of independence and oppressed metairie administer he was the only ordained minister to a fix his signature to the declaration of independence and asheville green was one of his students from the irs eighteen twelve to eighteen twenty two for a decade asheville green himself served as the president of princeton university just as a side note he had one slave anti freed her her name was.

dr stephen nicholson united states archibald alexander professor presbyterian church samuel millar belgrade john witherspoon president princeton university asheville irs alexander hall princeton theological seminary forementioned five minutes
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes and churches dri hosted by dr stephen nicholson where we take a little break from the present to go exploring the past travel back in time as we look the people of ants and even the places that have shaped the story of christianity this is our story our family history let's get started peng this episode of five minutes in church history will be looking at five responses to modernism first we need to define modernism i suppose modernism means many things too many peoples i'm using this to refer to a movement that was started at the turn of the 20th century so we need to go back in time here hundred and twenty years or so it was a time of great optimism it was a time of rethinking a number of things that were part of this sort of mental furniture and part of the world view of culture if you will it was in an era of darwin in an era of alternative ideas from the origin of humanity and the origin of all things it was a time when the bible was severely being questioned and it was actually at a time when even religion itself was being questioned modernism pushed to its extreme is basically secularism the idea that christianity no longer works in the twentieth century in this modern world we can build skyscrapers we can accomplish great things we can geno cross the skies we can move at great speeds christianity religion is no longer relevant well there were five responses from the church to modernism the first was liberalism and liberalism basically was saying hey hold on don't throw out religion just yet what if we accommodated to your sensibilities we'll be glad to soften edges here will be glad to sort of downplay these things here that are distasteful for you or will to sort of downplay that or softpedal that you can still be modern you can still be christian we will accommodate christianity to fit you that was by and large liberalism it did not just exist at the beginning of the 20th century it roles right on to the present day always wanting to accommodate to where culture is in where the world is and just simply bring christianity into the modern moment that was one response a second response was pentecostal ism if we look at the.

dr stephen nicholson darwin five minutes twenty years
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes and churches dri hosted by dr stephen nicholson where we take a little break from the present to go exploring the past travel back in time as we look the people of ants and even the places that have shaped the story of christianity this is our story our family history let's get started welcome back to another episode of five minutes and turks history on this episode we will be talking about the third child of the eleven children born to jonathan and sarah edwards this is esther edwards burr she was born on february thirteen seventeen thirty two into this minister's home in northampton massachusetts she would go on to live through the great awakening as an eight to ten year old in its fascinating how that event formed in shape turn she would refer to it often as her life unfolded in seventeen 52 she was married after a whirlwind courtship two aaron burr aaron burr was the pastor of the presbyterian church in newark new jersey and he was president of then the college of new jersey which was meeting and housed in newark he went to massachusetts specifically with the goal of using to an marrying esther edwards after five days she said yes to his proposal and then he returned to new york in two weeks later she went to new york her mother sarah edwards accompanied her and when she got to newark she was married and she remained maher heat two aaron burr in seventeen 52 she also had a visit from a friend of hers her name was sarah prince sarah was the daughter of thomas prince he was the pastor of old south church in boston and a supporter of edwards through the great awakening and a close friend of jonathan edwards it'd be natural as esther made many trips to boston that she would spend time in the prince household and sarah was about her age in those two became deep in great friends she would visit often there in newark and there was a time when she was no longer able to visit in both of them syrup rinse and esther edwards burner decided.

dr stephen nicholson esther edwards massachusetts aaron burr presbyterian church new jersey president newark new york thomas prince boston jonathan edwards sarah edwards maher sarah prince sarah five minutes five days two weeks ten year
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes of churches dri hosted by dr stephen nicholson where we take a little break from the present the go exploring the past travel in time as we look the people but vince and even the places that have shaped the story of christianity this is our story uniao family history let's get started who is with a heavy heart that i welcome you back to this episode of five minutes in tortuous jewelry we acknowledged the passing of dr are cease parole dr sprawl of course was no stranger to five minutes and torches we even had him on here talking about his books for his time on a deserted island and he will be missed on this episode we're going to spend a little bit of time talking about his life and he was a figure in church history and we'll have a legacy in church history i remember reading that he was an american born theologian well i'd like to modify it at a little bit and say he was a son of pittsburgh yes he wasn't american but he was born in pittsburgh on february thirteen nineteen thirty nine his dad also r c sproul was the proprietor of our seas perot and sons accounting offices were right downtown pittsburgh on christmas eve of nineteen forty two dr sprawl just a young kid at the time his father landed in casa blanca and morocco to serve in world war two when you talked to our see about his early childhood he will tell you it was about the war it was a time these early years of the 1940s that were dominated by world war two fact he remembers typing his very first letters they were axes in owes he was sitting on his mother's lap as she was typing letters to her husband and he would hop on her lap in at the bottom of that letter type his lines of axes endo's hugs and kisses for stat he would spend much time behind to typewriter for the rest of his life it wouldn't have known it if he popped in on our see as a high school kid you would have thought he was all about sports he said he loved hockey the best but he was probably the most proficient at baseball he was good enough at sports to get a scholarship to college athletics scholarship.

dr stephen nicholson vince pittsburgh c sproul christmas casa blanca morocco world war hockey perot five minutes
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes and churches dri hosted by dr stephen nicholson where we take a little break from the present to go exploring the past travel back in time as we look the people of ants and even the places that have shaped the story of christianity this is our story our family history let's get started welcome back to another episode of five minutes in torture serie on this episode we are talking about j s b and i imagine some of you know to whom those initials belonged they belong to johannsebastian bach and usually we follow up those three initials with another set of initials s d g solely deo gloria but in this instance i went to follow them up with a set of two different initials jay jay yes to uvira latin for jesus help sometimes bach who say j h which would be switching to the german which also comes off in the english as jesus help he would put those initials at the beginning of a composition whether he was writing something for the court to as the often did for his friend prince leopold or he was writing something for the church he would begin his work by petition in christ to help him and when he was all done he would add those initials s d g for all of his work was done for the glory of god let's talk about bought a little bit he was born in the town of ice the knock which has a great luther connection eisenach sits in the valley below the castle of the varberg and that's where luther was holed up after his time at the defeat of firms where he made his famous here i stand speech and frederic though eyes had him taken before his death sentence could be carried out and had him holed up in the castle there the word berg and they're luther worked through many of crucial writings especially the text of the german new testament but growing up down in the town below was bok and so he literally grew up in the shadow of martin luther and he also very much appreciated luther at one time box library had about eighty theological.

dr stephen nicholson johannsebastian bach gloria prince leopold berg martin luther jay jay bach frederic five minutes
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes and churches dri hosted by dr stephen nicholson where we take a little break from the present to go exploring the past travel back in time as we look the people of ants and even the places that have shaped the story of christianity this is our story our family history let's get started welcome back to another episode of five minutes in church history on this episode we're going to look at the history of the church so what do i mean by that will first let's take a look at the church around the world wants to to stick informs us that there are three hundred thousand churches that is congregations local congregations across the united states another statistic tells us that if we go out to the globe and look around the world we're looking at thirty seven million churches local congregations across the globe i have a simple mile commute to work and over that mile commute i go by four churches i used to live up in lancaster and as i would drive around in lancaster pennsylvania attended count silos these would be the grain in the corn silos attached to farms and churches i don't know how many of the thirty seven million churches in the world were in lancaster but a lot of them were up there archaeologists tell us that the oldest church dates back to to thirty eight d this is a northern jordan is a fascinating building it's actually underground and there's an inscription on the floor member this is the time of persecution this was the time or the church and christians are persecuted by the roman empire and so this is literally an underground church building that was built and they are inscribed in the floors this inscription the seventy beloved by god so there it is this congregation of seventy people dating back to the two hundred cedi course the earliest churches were actually house churches and there were synagogues were the members of the synagogue converted to christianity and it became a church and since those churches they have spread all around the globe and many local churches have fascinating histories the church i grew up in we had church first and sunday school afterwards and it turns out that goes all the way back to the beginnings it was a circuit church with that meant was the pastor preached therein in had another church it which he.

dr stephen nicholson united states lancaster lancaster pennsylvania five minutes
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes and churches dri hosted by dr stephen nicholson where we take a little break from the present to go exploring the past travel back in time as we look the people of ants and even the places that have shaped the story of christianity this is our story our family history let's get started welcome back to another episode of five minutes in church history on this episode we'll be returning to our trending series we have looked at a few of these trending series in the past taking a look at what would be the big events of a century if there was a social media buzz in the fourteenth century what would the busby all about well we have three honorable mentions and three of the top three items that were trending in the fourteenth century first under an honorable mention and i have to say i'm just throwing this and 'cause i think it's fascinating but we have as an honorable mention in the fourteenth century vladislav the first is the roar in poland for thirteen years now it's fascinating about vladislav the first is what he was called more popularly and he was called the elbow high now i'm not sure what that's all about it might have to do with his shortness of stature but there you go second as an honorable mention is to mention the hundred years war now one hundred years war was actually not a hundred years long it was one hundred in sixteen years long went from thirteen thirty seven all the way into the fifteenth century to 1450 three it was between england and france and i guess if you can have a winner after a hundred sixteen years the winner was france one of the things that the hundred years war led to were more wars in england and so the outcome for england of the hundred years war was the war of the roses of this was the house of lancaster symbolized by the red rose and the house of york symbolized by the white rose so there you have it the 14th than fifteenthcentury where centuries of wars the third honorable mention goes to what is known as your seen at pestis bacterium we might just call it the black plague one third.

dr stephen nicholson poland vladislav england the house lancaster york social media france hundred years five minutes hundred sixteen years one hundred years thirteen years sixteen years
"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"dr stephen nicholson" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes and churches dri hosted by dr stephen nicholson where we take a little break from the present to go exploring the past travel back in time as we look the people of ants and even the places that have shaped the story of christianity this is our story our family history let's get started welcome back to another episode of five minutes in turks history on this episode we are returning to our deserted island and i'm going to send out to that deserted island no stranger to five minutes and that is the doctor burke parsons stocked persons is co pastor of st andrews chapel he is the editor of table talk magazine and he is the liga near teaching fellow and he's all set to be shipped off to his island it is good to see you dr parsons thank you steve always good to be with you so have you given some thought to the books that you'd like to take with you i have given some thought to it and we even spoke about this the smart put tie thai recently i always i've always heard other people's lists and what they would bring and i have to concur with our see that probably the first and foremost book i'd wanted take with me is how to get off a deserted island they'd follow it up with edible fruits bush has deserted island how to build a boat you know that sort of thing so there's all the all the classics that many of your interviewees have mentioned and the big question for me is how many multivolume sets can i bring that's really the question multivolume sets count as one that which is great go right that's very generous as a fulltime pastor i spend the majority of my time in commentaries i'm they are my closest companion commentaries are far and away the most beloved thing that i get to read in life it's that which i turn to throughout the week various passages and preaching both in romans an exodus right now in sunday's lord's day morning and evening is i think about this whole deserted island question i can't.

dr stephen nicholson burke parsons st andrews chapel editor turks teaching fellow dr parsons steve five minutes