35 Burst results for "Dr Stephen"

What's Causing Your Swarming Summer Allergies

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

02:17 min | Last week

What's Causing Your Swarming Summer Allergies

"Dr lewis. Can you tell us why allergies or here. Why are people having runny snotty sneezing snorting things happening to them. I don't have a clue. But i can tell you. Some of the root causes in the pray people can figure it out. Yesterday is doing a consultation with katharina. And she's very interesting lady and she was talking about the different immunoglobulins and she's asking some incredibly brilliant questions. she's very very educated and she was talking about the immunoglobulin a g e etc etc. And she says well how come this. How come i said. Let's let's boil it down. Because i'm good at that for example What happens is and we'll talk about all kinds of things coz normally do Most of the time. It's microbiome induced inflammation. That means you have a gut flora. That's not what it should be and it can to a very large degree disrupt your metabolism which can cause weight gain folks if you're five ten pounds overweight or more you have despite houses. Gut inflammation The tendency toward well allergies if nothing else are histamine reactions or asada kane storm and what happens is and she was asking. Well why do we have this The problem is it's normal for the nutrients as you digest to pass through the line of your intestinal wall and that's called epithelium But what happens is we have most of us have low stomach acid not enough digestive enzymes because of the interference with the heavy metals and plastics and pesticides. So we don't get Complete digestion then. The partially digested food. What happens is it seeps through the epithelium and since it's only partially digested it's a molecule that your immune system doesn't recognize and so it starts putting out antibodies or immunoglobulins against this and it it detects it so to speak as an intruder And thinks it's toxic and baiter and that's where the antibodies come

Dr Lewis Katharina Asada Kane
Biden Wants 70% of American Adults Vaccinated by July 4

WBZ Midday News

00:57 sec | Last month

Biden Wants 70% of American Adults Vaccinated by July 4

"In the fight against covert 19, and the date is familiar. It's July 4th of this year, but now he wants 70% of American adults who have gotten at least one shot by Independence Day. There is resistance, especially in rural America. CBS's David Begnaud continues our coverage. The Biden administration is also planning to work with more local doctors, who they believe will be key to breaking through that vaccine distrust in local communities. Dr. Stephen Lakey is the chief medical officer at a hospital in Fort Collins, Colorado, in the northern part of the state. There aren't any demographic that are gonna be suspicious or or have not heard the message from either you know, national sources or from national news, And I think having that impact of having our local leaders in those rural environments is gonna be critical. Back in Maryland vaccine administrator Cornell candidate says some people have been able to overcome their vaccine hesitancy. In a game

David Begnaud Biden Administration Dr. Stephen Lakey CBS Fort Collins America Colorado Maryland
COVID-19 vaccine trial to start on children as young as 6 months old

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

COVID-19 vaccine trial to start on children as young as 6 months old

"Today announcing a new trial in young Children. The company will enroll nearly 7000 Children in the U. S and Canada ranging in age from six months. Toe 12 years old. Dr Stephen Plympton is working on the trial in Phoenix, Arizona. The 1st 7 50 kids, isn't it what's called an open label study. They're gonna get the maturing of vaccine. The two shots the same doses that all of us get the study. Part of it is watching the kids afterwards, including blood test for the kids. Dr. Plimpton says he's getting hundreds of calls from parents hoping to enroll their kids in the trials morning when I got here has gotten there on the phones, hang up another call and another call. The Children will get the same doses of them Attorney vaccine that are being given to adults. We hear more

Dr Stephen Plympton Dr. Plimpton U. Phoenix Canada Arizona
Should Emergency Rooms Be Equipped to Deal with Addiction?

All Things Considered

04:01 min | 3 months ago

Should Emergency Rooms Be Equipped to Deal with Addiction?

"Visits to hospital emergency departments plummeted. But a new study shows more people than ever are turning up at hospitals seeking help for drug addiction and overdoses. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Mann found many emergency doctors have struggled to respond. Emergency departments are great at treating things like chest pains and asthma attacks After the pandemic hit. A lot of those people stopped showing up at hospitals. They were scared of catching the coronavirus. But Kristin Holland, a researcher at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says patients experiencing addiction needed help. So desperately They kept coming. The thing that really stood out to me about all drug overdoses and opioid overdoses. Those were the only two for which we saw. An increase. Holden study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, analyzed roughly 190 million emergency room visits. The data shows even people who didn't catch the coronavirus were hit hard by the pandemic. People are indeed experiencing poor mental health, suicidal thoughts, substance use, potentially as a coping mechanism. But there's a problem. Experts say Many emergency departments aren't well staffed or trained to help patients with these kinds of problems. Dr. Mark Rosenberg is president of the American College of Emergency Physicians. Emergency physicians have always been able to treat the overdose, but we did not have tools to treat the addiction. Or the dependency. Rosenberg's organization has worked for years to convince emergency departments to improve addiction care. But he says, reform has come slowly. He points to the fact that most emergency doctors still don't use buprenorphine. It's a drug proven to help people with opioid addiction, avoid relapse. Only one third patients get medications for Opioid use disorder in the emergency department. Experts say regulatory hurdles and stigma around people with drug use disorders have kept many emergency departments from improving their addiction care. Dr Stephen Veal heads the emergency team at Halifax Medical Center in Daytona Beach, Florida. I think there was a lot of hesitancy because it's not what we've done. It's not what I've trained in, and it seems like somebody else should do it. But I think that what finally pushed emergency physicians out of their comfort zone to do something is just the number of people that we've seen die. After a spate of overdose deaths. Three years ago, Veal changed his department using buprenorphine and also adding a new member to his team. Larry Brooks is a trained addiction counselor who now works with patients in the ER as soon as they're revived the overdose patients that comment to an emergency room They're at their most vulnerable. They're at their lowest point that they've ever experienced. You know, the you know, been dead. Or at least near dead. And brought back to life during the pandemic. Brooks Hospital has seen a new spike in drug cases, Brooke says. It's made a big difference. Having an addiction program in place. This is the best time for us. As health organization and a community as a whole. To make an impact and say, Look, somebody is here. You're not going to get kicked right back out the door and go into withdrawal and have to find something else and then be back here in two hours, But experts say emergency Department addiction programs like this are still rare. CDC researcher Kristin Holland says she hopes data from her study will convince more hospitals to change our takeaway from this is meeting people where they are and if people are coming to the emergency department for these outcomes, that's where we need to meet them. Well, death from covert 19 have dropped from their peak. The CDC has fatal overdoses nationwide keep rising with more than 220 drug day. Brian Mann NPR news

Kristin Holland Brian Mann Centers For Disease Control An Dr. Mark Rosenberg Opioid Use Disorder Dr Stephen Veal Halifax Medical Center Journal Of The American Medica American College Of Emergency NPR Holden Asthma Rosenberg Brooks Hospital Daytona Beach Larry Brooks Veal Florida Brooke CDC
Drug executives: Big jump in vaccine supply is coming soon

WBZ Midday News

00:42 sec | 4 months ago

Drug executives: Big jump in vaccine supply is coming soon

"Today in Washington with executives of Big Pharma as members of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce. Look for ways to expand the availability and supply of covert 19 vaccines. Modern is president Dr Stephen Hold in his opening Collins. Hold the committee. The Cambridge drug maker has been able to ramp up its facilities already more than 100 million doses, and they're on track to beat their already ambitious production goals. They're not targeting delivery of the 2nd 100 million doses of our vaccine. By the end of May and a 3rd 100 million doses by the end of July, a full two months ahead of schedule. Hold also says they will continue to collaborate with manufacturing partners and the federal government to increase the Efficiency of their production process without compromising quality or safety.

Dr Stephen Hold House Committee On Energy And Big Pharma Washington Collins Cambridge Federal Government
"dr stephen" Discussed on Health Quest Podcast

Health Quest Podcast

03:19 min | 4 months ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Health Quest Podcast

"To quest. I'm your host steve langford. Thanks for joining me. I'm glad you're here. I'm very excited about today's show. And about being able to present to you. Dr steven sinatra. Dr sinatra is a board certified cardiologists. He's perhaps one of the most influential doctors in the natural products industry because of his work on exploring the true cause of heart disease. And what you can do about it. He's written a book called the great cholesterol myth. And i think this is perhaps one of the biggest challenges that consumers face these days is understanding the true role the cholesterol and heart disease. If any and that's going to be the topic of our discussion so it's in that capacity. I'm pleased to introduce to you once again. Dr steven sinatra dr sinatra. Welcome back to health quest. Hey steve is good to be here. Well i appreciate your taking the time. I know a few people who are as busy as you are so when when we have an opportunity to speak. I'm very grateful. This book just intrigues me. So much because i felt for a long time. This is what people needed to hear. And you set the stage for this book in your previous book on metabolic cardiology which really opened our eyes to a lot of the myths surrounding heart disease. And this is one of the big ones. Your book is also subtitled. Y lowering your cholesterol won't prevent heart disease and the staten free plan. That will so your premise is. Cholesterol has nothing to do with heart disease. Let's start there. Let's talk about the cholesterol myth. A little bit. Why are we in this situation where we think. Cholesterol has such a profound impact. It runs decade. It really started with. Ike eisenhower. When i used to love his bacon and eggs and butter and toast and he had a heart attack. And some of the scientists and researches we're looking at cholesterol and then the seven countries study came out where and sell keys sort of cherry pick this data and when mcgovern was secretary of health education and welfare the bulls got rolling and then all of a sudden this myth propagated that saturated fat and cholesterol was of course a heart disease. And i believe the too. And i've been the cardiologists since nineteen seventy seventy eight. I pass my boards. I gotta tell you. I really believe in cholesterol theory. I mean it made sense over the last ten.

steve langford steve sinatra steven sinatra seven countries today one dr nineteen seventy seventy ten mcgovern eight
"dr stephen" Discussed on Health Quest Podcast

Health Quest Podcast

06:02 min | 5 months ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Health Quest Podcast

"Proteins that accelerate aging now these tolerated aging can currently. I am cause. Blindness can cause kidney disease or it can cause heart failure and he's a major ramifications of diabetes. These are the worst outta sex of diabetes. Blind this heart failure as well as kidney disease. It's vitally important for our children. Really to avoid sodas high-fructose fructose corn syrup the sugars and also do more exercise in our society as well as take nutrients that improve metabolic function and the pudding. Nutrients is a great place to start. It is certainly a wonderful collection of information and resource for our listeners. I've i've really appreciate it. Well we're just about out of time dr sinatra. I'd like to give you the last word. Is there anything that we didn't cover that you'd like to make sure that our listeners here pointing about health is this health is all in the cell. We think it's in the oregon but it starts in the cell and we have to look that up bodies electrical bodies and think of our body. It's almost like a school of fish. A school of fish go go's edison's slows water. Has it's beautiful synchrony of it. Well those are our cells in the body is important to have this fiber tori capacity of ourselves and the way to invigorate ourselves is to avoid leconte. He'll toxins like certainly like pharmaceutical drugs. A lot of model conjugal toxins avoid nutrient depletion. Because that'll wear down. Michael kanji very quickly certainly in void environmental toxins heavy metals as much as possible and most importantly i have a good emotional spiritual base to work from things like anger and rage or resentment when no love in your heart or no spiritual base to work from these emptiness in the body ungrounded in this in the body and the combination of emotional and mental toxicity that literally destroys conjuring in ourselves because remember online will county Particularly the model conjugal dna. They have no defense mechanisms so we have to protect them and whether we protect them from that eating mercury late and fish orb watching insecticides pesticides or watching radiations from too much microwaving Th there's a whole host of things people must be aware about and they must be aware of how to protect ourselves once they know how to protect ourselves by drinking healthy waters and out toxins. Because you remember steven file analysis as if the cellphones taken hormones nutrients and expel waste. That's what you want the problem with these cells when the voltage decreases. The membrane becomes disturbed. Nutrients can't get in toxins. Can't get out and when that happens you get microbial invasion and when there's more viruses bacteria that penetrate these cells then these tissues and cells become diseased and then all of a sudden we get the fallaji so that the secrets optimum health is everything from drinking healthy waters that eating good food to try to avoid pharmaceutical drugs taking nutrients to pull at put some love in the a life framework. Laugh more pech dog through these things that are going to give you a sells vibrancy capacity. Well i think that's such a wonderful message because what you've done is you summed up the importance of lifestyle. We certainly want to focus on these nutrients because they play such a profound role. But let's not forget we have diet. We have exercise. We have emotional. Health are connectedness to our surroundings and the people and a purpose in life and those are all part of your messages. Well and just extremely important. So dr sinatra. I'd like to thank you so much for taking the time to share your expertise with us through the interview through your book. I hardly recommended. And just kudos to you for continuing this mission and bringing it to the lay people like myself. Thank you so much. Thanks for the questions. You're very welcome. Thank you dr. Take care and we'll hopefully talk again someday. Okay bye-bye i think. The information presented by dr sinatra is some of the most important comprehensive and beneficial information for somebody that has cardiovascular issues. I urge you if you have a significant concern with cardiac health or you've had a cardiac event. Please get dr. sinatra's book on metabolic cardiology read it. It's not hard to read. But it will explain to you exactly why your heart needs these nutrients and i urge you to give them a try. Try it for six months and see what happens. You may start to see some results very quickly when your heart gets the nutrients it needs. Your body can start to repair. Can start to provide the energy that elements for healing. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain. Listen to some of these interviews begin to make a change the lifestyle you live the nutrients that you take can make a difference. You can be healthier. I've seen people do it. Following the program of dr sinatra. If you would like additional information please visit health. Quest podcast dot com. We've provided additional details and links on the podcast page remember. This is your process of discovery. Continue to search continued to learn the more. You know the better choices. You can make better choices. Lead to better outcomes if you like health class. Podcast dot com. Please recommend to your friends and social networks. We sincerely appreciate every like every star and every review together. We can lead others to better health one listener at a time. Thank you for joining me today. I'm glad you're here. Make it a good day and join me for another interesting. Health class podcast. Thank you for joining us today. On health quest you want to improve your health. Health west can help for more information and interviews that help you visit health quest. Podcast dot com..

six months Michael kanji today dr dr. steven every star dr sinatra one listener every dot com com Quest sinatra
"dr stephen" Discussed on Health Quest Podcast

Health Quest Podcast

07:42 min | 5 months ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Health Quest Podcast

"That's a brief analysis of the awesome foursome awesome foursome and. I've gotta tell our listeners. Here if they'll read your book they'll understand the importance of that because you've done just a a wonderful job of elucidating the importance of those nutrients i notice in all of your programs. You mentioned fish oil and this is something that a lot of people are going to know about. But what specifically does fish oil do for cardiovascular health. It does everything right. I'll tell you that one of the things that fish oil does is that it puts a nice calming blanket over to heart. Remember the hearts and electric logging. It's the most electric organ in the body. And sometimes the hot can misfire. That can sputter. We skip talk. Beats that can be the pac to pvc's where the hot get out of rhythm and one of the reasons why fish oil had like a forty five percent reduction in sudden death in eleven thousand patients in italy a few years ago when he is a glycine prevents the study was the fact that fish oil has an enormous impact on we'll be cooling proving heart rate variability. And what that means. It's like it's calming the heart down. This is one of the reasons why fish oil is so instrumental in heart. Disease is that it helps to decrease. The amount of skipping beats ectopic beach from the heart. That's probably the most important aspect official fish oil also in calming heartbeat. Also lowest blood pressure it. Lowest triglycerides and the body has a tremendous impact on will the membrane stability of cells lining the in a blood vessels. It also gets inside a plaque inside the hot and within three days it can permeate plaque and it gets an actually prevents plaque rupture. So that's why instrumental in using and people lifts hidden black. Because i it will help prevent sudden death. That's why eating to fish meals a month eating to fish meals a month. You'll store enough. We'll because dha and epa get inside that plock to they belies plaque in preventing it from russia official a big fan of and i talk a little bit about fish oil in the book and also include fish. Oil is one of my must have nutrients in anybody who wants to obtain optimum health. I noticed that one of the things that i was so grateful to see in your book was your list of the individual types of cardiovascular issues and with each of those issues you described a specific nutritional program with specific dosage ranges which varied from one type to another. Which is i think going to be so helpful to anybody who read your book. Who has these issues is going to at least have an initial understanding of what to take. How much and that answers the fundamental question. I think for most patients is what do i do. And you've actually outlined that very well actually was doctors who gave me the idea that because i was getting calls from other cardiologists cardiovascular surgeon dr even doctors who run marathons and they would say. Well what should i take. I'm running the boston marathon. I don't wanna run out of gas. What should i do. Another doctor called me. She had mitral valve prolapse. She understood about what. We call diastolic dysfunction. She does what. Can i do to help myself and i said. Oh my gosh here. Doctors calling me about their issues. This is perfect. What i gotta put in a book to help people deal with their own issues. It's very important. Because i've talked to many people over the years and of course they want to know what to take and how much they also want to know. Then what can they expect. And i know that there's a wide range of outcomes here that are certainly possible. Could you give us just a little overview of the types of problems and what kinds of things people might experience. Certainly when you're treating advanced disease like heart failure or fans dan china or or arrhythmias. Me is what people can expect is a difference in how they feel. I can tell you that. I've had people waiting heart transplantation Come off heart transplant. List because metabolic cardiology they refuse to our transplantation and that gives me the greatest joy because these people are sick and basically the bottom line heart disease. Steve is that a sick heart. It can be hot from any situation. I mean the most common to cod. There's somebody would longstanding high blood pressure where they get coalescence for purchasing and the muscle of the heart is still at of outgrowing. Its blood supply even know these people feel good one of the reasons why we call longstanding high blood pressure in the silent killer is that these people are almost like a time bomb. What's going on in the hot. Is that the hawks leaking. Atp now it can be a diabetic car could be somebody with a stent or a bypass or previous heart attack or heart. Failure much prolapse valvular heart disease or medical disease or somebody who drinks too much alcohol any of these factors Result in the heart leaking out. Atp that problem is the body can make it back fast enough. It may take up to one hundred days to really get people. Stabilized after an atp deficits such as we'll be cooling acute ischemic episode which means that the heart was starving for oxygen. And it only may take a minute to wipe the body out of the heart of us reserves of atp so the trick is to refertilize the hot given these energy supporting substrates like talked about and these people feel incredibly better. I have to tell you. I've had people tell me with heart. Failures say you know doctor also was painting my sense and if the three days of right bows and q ten carnitine i was out painting. Offense or patients would say seventy five years old. I just wanna play around a golf. Or media's old and i you know. I used to play doubles tennis. I just can't do it anymore. That's what really gives me great satisfaction because these people just sore in their quality of life issues now healthy people i recommend the awesome foursome to When i work with my personal trainer i always take you ten contin magnesium and right bose just before and during the workout and even after the work out because i get cramping my muscles and in anybody who's an athlete or anybody who plays doubles tennis or golf and saw the next day to kick it out of bed that they will improve one hundred percent if they take the awesome foursome nutrients be coolest. Can once you give the body back. The p the muscles don't go into spasm all and should also mention steve. The greatest utility of the four nutrients isn't chronic fatigue syndrome. And some of the plan that by accident but these poor people who have their muscles locked up a have faulty metabolism of atp that's one of the hallmarks of the fibromyalgia chronic fatigue syndrome. And once you give these people nutritional support their muscles can unlock because remember. It takes more energy to relax. The muscle takes more. Atp to stimulate the muscle so these poor people with chronic fatigue fibromyalgia. They're always living in a state of muscle contraction and that's why they're exhausted fatigued because consuming so much energy and they have to give them back the energy that's lost. I've learned a lot about writing this book to tell you that it's it's been a real joy to make it. Certainly is a a wonderful asset to the rest of us. You mentioned diabetes and insulin. Resistance is this emerging as a causative factor of cardiovascular disease or a contributing factor in some way. oh yeah absolutely insulin. resistance and type two diabetes. Unfortunately it's what we call accelerated aging the horror that we're going to have to go through in our society is that our children are not going to outlive the previous generation. Because if you do. Have insulin resistance. Type two diabetes. You'll probably lose about fifteen years of your life and the reason being is that too much sugar in the blood on metabolize sugar plums what we call h products and these age products. It's basically a combination of proteins in the blood and sugar in the blood that forms. These conjugated.

italy Steve eleven thousand patients one hundred days forty five percent seventy five years old one hundred percent one each russia dha about fifteen years two diabetes three days triglycerides one type a few years ago a month valve one of the reasons
"dr stephen" Discussed on Health Quest Podcast

Health Quest Podcast

08:04 min | 5 months ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Health Quest Podcast

"All the energy and body. It's made millions of times per second. It gets hot. The function of voices to talk are larynx to have this. Conversation and eighteen is vitally important for function. But when i didn't know and this is and this is really the high. Had when i learned about ri- bows and other energy supporting nutrients. Is that what i didn't know is that. Atp not only helps us. Function but repairs sells it restores and repairs and revitalize ourselves so when atp levels drop like they do in all forms of heart disease and when there is an atp deficit in the body people suffer and they have a poor quality of life the trick is to restore energy back into the body once you do that people. They haven't improved quality of life and his suffering really goes way down and even longevity is improved as well so it gives me really great joy. Really talk about metabolic cardiology. Because we're talking about a concept here of restoring the body with atp it's almost like fertilizing lawn steve a out there and his drought and whether it's insecticides pesticides and it's hurt the lawn or there's too many weeds whatever is going on in your lawn. Needs help the same thing with the body. And when we fertilize the body mentioned coenzyme q ten that's my premiere number one and then she enhancing nutrient but there's others as well and when you fertilize the body you'll literally accelerating the body to greater heights because the secret of medicine is i'll tell you this it's the vibrancy capacity of ourselves when you enhanced ourselves when you make ourselves dance instead of being stagnant or pulse eight if the pulsating dancing quality of those cells that gives us the energy to go on with a healthy life is certainly a critically important because as you noted in your book and his maybe commonly known heart disease is the major problem comprising fifty percent of the major diseases that people experience so it is very profound in terms of its impact on health and quality of life and just life itself. Let's talk about some of those nutrients. Because i know you target four in particular not exclusively but it seems like these four nutrients form the core of your metabolic cardiology programs. Could you describe these nutrients and their individual roles for us first of all the one nutrient that behaves like the glue of keeping this whole process together is magnesium doctors say used to magnesium back in nineteen o seven magnesium was used for what we call a clancy pregnancy which is really basically the high blood pressure and pregnancy so magnesium. It's been around for over a hundred years. The problem with magnesium is that most americans efficient and we know that magnesium is for example in post-menopausal weight gain and women the deficient in we know that magnesium deficiency is involved in type two diabetes and insulin resistance and the problem is you know magnesium does not in the water supply. It's not in the soils anymore. It's sort of a forgotten depleted mineral and a mineral is like i said before steve that makes ourselves dance. It gives us this. Electric charge in the body so magnesium has been around for a long time just physicians need to understand it. Even further in optimum health. This is one that most physicians will agree. That this is vitally important to the body. And any cardiologists are internists. Who prescribes diuretics for for blood pressure. Lowering or congestive heart failure. They know to replace magazine museum in the body. So magnesium is is number one. It's involved with the three hundred enzyme reactions in the body and it really is important of for the this process of producing energy and south. Now coenzyme q ten. I've been using since one thousand nine hundred six ever since i met a meal. Bliscoll off the road to co q. Ten miracle back in eighty six. So i've been using that for a little more than twenty years and co q. Ten is one of the spark plug that gets the energy process going co q. Ten think of it this way. Think about your car. You need to put fuel in the car and the fuel in that car is going to be. Let's say we'll call it right. Bows and magnesium and then that fuel needs to be burned or carried into cells. And that's where i'm going to bring in a carnitine but the burning or the ignition of the fuel requires co q. Ten co q. Ten does an electron donor and transports electrons down. The we call a model conjul train and basically helps form the atp it causes a turnover of atp co q. ten is important problem co q. Ten is there are millions of people out there. Let's co q. Ten deficiencies and don't know it. The problem is that co q. Ten levels flow with age particularly after the age of forty. The other major problem is that co q. Ten is found in the animal kingdom so pure. Vegetarians tend to be insufficient in it. And the other major problem and probably the most important problem in this country is that millions of people have taken high blood pressure drugs. Diabetic type drugs. A statin drugs that lower cholesterol and all these drugs interfere with the endogenous production of co q. Ten in the body. So i have seen enormous deficiencies and people and when co q. Ten levels plummet. What happens here. is that our energy systems. Tends to sputter. It's like having a car work on four or five cylinders instead of eight and our immune system goes down that's why people with low co q. Ten blood levels in their body of very prone to heart failure heart disease thyroid disease and even cancer those two nutrients magnesium and co q. Ten the third nutrient which i wrote about in the nineteen nineties wrote a book on clementine in the heart And then what carnitine team does is well. First of all teen is made in the kidney as well as deliver body and carnitine is really a a combination of the two major amino acids in the body lysine scientists which we get from a food but what content does contain like a freight train it shuttles in fatty acids inside the hot michael contrary to be burned. And more importantly it's takes. These did the toxic metabolites with a few leads. Burned out of the mitochondria. So think of it as a freight train bringing in fuel to be burned the fuel is burned and now the toxic metabolite taking out. So this is vitally important. Because what people don't realize is that sixty seventy percent of all. The energy of the hot comes from the burning of fat. Not sugar but fat remember. The brain relies on sugar. The heart relies on fat but carnitine with carnitine. Does it actually participates in what we call the beta oxidation of fats in the transporter these fats in and out of the minor contra so as a whole system here working steve we had the magnesium that's involved in the enzymatic reactions we have co q. Ten that enhances the turnover of the atp by igniting the fires of oxidation. We have carnitine that transports facts into the milo conjure and now we have rivals and this is sort of the way call the fourth ingredient. In what i talk about in the book about the awesome foursome and the awesome. The ri- bows forms. The fuel in the atp molecule the at molecule is made up what we call an adding ring and three phosphate groups. And it's the cleavage of a phosphate group. That gives us all the energy. However at the center of that ring is a five sided sugar. We call it a penthouse sugar. This pinto's sugar. Five sided sugar is called right boast and this forms the fuel that is at the center of the atp molecule so what right does does is robust literally provides the rate limiting step in the production of atp so now we have a perfect system we have a system that not only helps produce atp but it helps turn it over and fire these awesome foursome nutrients provides the energy substrates for the heart to work. Optimally and remember. It's not just the heart. When we're reading. The heart cells are also treating the brain. That liver the pancreas kidney. So when we treat a person from a metabolic cardiological approach by providing energy. Though cells all the cells in the body being health.

fifty percent steve sixty seventy percent Five sided one thousand over a hundred years fourth ingredient four five cylinders eighteen four nutrients three hundred enzyme more than twenty years millions of people two major amino acids millions of times per second third nutrient nineteen o seven five sided sugar Ten blood levels
"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

09:22 min | 6 months ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Enough interpersonal tear interpersonal stuff. Not just seeing you can happen seeing an explosion or a war or something but it is particularly something of interpersonal tear. When you say yeah but also even an indirect season with basically clinical medicine trauma fi diagnosis. Oh oh i know listen i. I was shocked one day when i was in california. We have to go to these pain conferences so to keep up our license and i went to one and the director of the pain medicine program gets up and says a funny thing about these pain. Patients are ninety. Six percent of them are sexually or physically abused anyway. Let's go onto the talk to you. How how we're going to describe those. Opiates for those patients. I mean so what. I've really as the story starts coming out in terms of this higher because both system the symptoms. That are clustered around Different levels of the legal system meeting this shutdown old on annihilated primitive vegas versus sympathetic nervous system that turns off the subtitle vegas meaning you get constipated your tightly wrapped. You're anxious person. Who's constipated and but the face is now flat. But i is the person who's faces animated and has lots of collectively through the heart there basically a much more integrated individual okay. So now we're moved up to the mammalian what you call them. Alienated may mammalian or mylan it system. Which is something that evolves in relation to the branko pouches where our face and our in our all of our. How do you help people understand this. All everything see above the neck sorta revolves in the same area. All the type of mussels. They're called straight muscles of the face and head come. The control comes from the same area that regulates this newer vegas. Okay so this stuff to the facial nerve material a drag interface is is is related to the source of this new vegas now what this means we wear our heart on our face and this and that source is something called a nucleus ambiguous of marine. And of course how do we wear our feelings in our heart on her face we in terms of our facial muscles work but also in terms of the prosodic where the intonation of her voice. And you said something very interesting to. There's even a relationship between the muscles that adjust the obstacles in our ear. And i guess but you've done your homework i material. Are you read your stuff like script. W wow wow. I am more than flattered But we'll discuss that off line basically The middle here. The one of the defining features of mammals that most people don't realize is detached middle ear bones and that enable mammals through the through During the transition from reptiles mammals enabled the mammal to survive by literally having a a a niche to communicate vocally that the reptiles couldn't hear because they're middle your bones didn't detach and then we can literally adjust our our to attune to those prosodic changes only only if we're in safe environments because if we're not in safe environments we wanna hear those big reptiles now you mentioned that. The animated faces an important piece of the vega function. Are you you must be familiar. With peter fonda gi and his his his stuff he puts a lot on The back and forth facial expression and what that is communicating to a childen. And i think. I i over laid your theory on his and said and then thereby activating this vehicle function. Yeah i if it's reciprocal and it becomes a neural exercise. And this is really the word i like using now that talk therapy your social interactions or just being with another human being talking listening engaging smiling. These are neural exercises of this face heart connection. Isn't that interesting face heart. That's a fascinating way to say it because again when you say face heart. Immediately everyone intuitively knows when you bring your heart into an experience that some again bodily based emotional feeling based experience and what he says. He says that he's he looks at mothers and infants. Says you know. The infants is awash and feeling states. Can't doesn't have language yet necessarily can't identify the feelings can't regulate the feelings and the first thing. That child is an object of scrutiny by the mom and the mom tries to attuned to the child's Biological state and then read it like. What's the content of the child's mind and then he says when as soon as she knows it's something that was It was win or somebody said which is that. Mom looks like what she sees. In other words what she perceives to be going on the child's mind it immediately becomes reflected on her face not that she is reflecting to the child her constitutional state. The mom doesn't catch the feelings of the child. But she's reflecting an appreciation of the child's primary emotional state and then then that exchange becomes a means for developing emotional regulation. I totally agree but there are a couple important points here If you recall back about twenty or thirty years ago well the you're not that old but earlier in your medical career was thirty years ago. I'm not preterm babies were abandoned and the rea. The reason for that was. The parents felt that the trial didn't love them. One of the one of the gate one of the aspects. And when i asked my medical students graduate students what to parents participating children parents of severely hyperactive kids and parents of preterm children often say they say i love my child. But my child doesn't love me and this goes back to this paradigm describing because in all those Populations those populations face is not working. Is it also though which is first the chicken or the egg that they don't appreciate what the content of others minds and don't reflect it or they can't attach that vega mechanism they. It's it's it's the attachment because the children have feelings and the system is just poorly organized and accused that the parent is picking up may not be truly represented representative of the child state. Have we we now sort of. We've sort of walked through the probably vaguely theory right pretty much. Okay how does the polly bagel theory relate to attachment. Can you make that understandable to people. I okay so i would. I like to say is you don't just have attachment. You have a preamble to being attached and whether we're talking about with infants or talking about up here peer relationships you have to be providing signals to the other In a reciprocal way that signals safety okay and then you get proximity okay. It's funny we know we're talking about some again. I'm trying to make a reliable for people. We're talking about very specific biological organism sorts of experiences. But they these are the substrate for intimacy. This is how we build closeness with other humans. And by the way in closeness we build the capacity for emotional regulation. We find meaning we find love. We find self and all of this stuff you're talking about is the requisite for those nice things to happen. Would you agree. I totally agree. But i also say it supports general health because we have an overlapping circuit with the social behavior describing with the neural mechanisms that promote health. Here's what i'm going to gonna take a quick break. And we'll be right back with more of dr steven steven w puertas isn't that tag. You can call me steve. Is there a steven porges to. Because i thought the w on everything at then the as sounds funny The doctor puertas we sort of walked. We sort of walked through the polly bagel theory. You have a new book by the way coming out called clinical applications. Apolo vegas theory. When is that coming out. I can't wait to see that. Well it's actually. He should be the second part of the tidal. Which is the transformative power of feeling. Safe you. You just mentioned feeling safe is what what you think this builds. Yes everything about in. My now is about the triggers to our nervous system that enabled us to feel safe and that when we feel safe. What we what we get from that in terms of the accessibility of different Cognitive functions different emotional functions and health and everything so not being scared is not the same thing as feeling safe and it imparts. The medical community is kinda miss this because they're very driven by pharmaceutical treatments and drugs can incense damp in certain systems but they don't necessarily potentiate the systems that we need to be more engaging. I'll tell you. An interest in interpersonal therapies when people are dealing pig emotionally based interpersonal therapies Marriage and family therapy that kind of thing. The number one.

vegas peter fonda california dr steven steven w puertas steven porges Apolo vegas steve
"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

08:11 min | 6 months ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Apnea preterm babies. They're vaguely mediated. They can kill you not adults much but babies well it potentially can happen in adults. Also but this literally got a sponged out of lot the literature so that's like a turtle or reptile immobilizes under threat and their heart rates. Go very very slow and they stopped breathing because they have to go. Underwater and reduced metabolic activity preterm. Babies do this in sept almost as potentially lethal go into brady cardi at the heart. We get very slow and then stop. Let me let me hook this up right away. Early in this story too. So people can relate to it. It's also oftentimes what we do. In extreme circumstance of terror we go. We go from hyperstimulation in fighter flight to hyperion edition where the body is going into a metabolic conservative state. To anticipate like if you're standing in front of a lion if that line hits you you're ready for it. You can no longer run away but you're prepared and also at the same time. This is the connection. They'll people make that same time as vegas nervous. Putting out a bunch of stuff into the body the brain is getting flooded with cortisol and opioid blocking types of chemicals. So so actually. It's raising pain. Thresholds people are dissociating and going someplace else and what you'll find as the story unfolds. Is that fits the description as you're saying of any people who had been abused From ptsd and there was no explanation about their symptoms because people thought it was all quote a stress response and stress. People talk about is increase of thank activity and not vegas and then let me again. I'm gonna kind of. I don't wanna lose people so i'm going to jump in with stuff that's awesome hoax. It back to you know everyday experience you know. I think we all know. Let's say when you fall in love you feel a warm feeling in your chest or people point to their chest. The heart the source of all kinds of feelings bodily based feelings. We all know what we're talking about when we talk about that yet when you talk about the brain how does the brain gets you to feel things in your heart. Well if i remember part of your political theory theory is it something like eighty percent to the vegas is gone the other direction right right. So it's it's actually a feeling instrument as well. It's a feeling instrument. But it may be may not have the specificity so when we get these feelings we may have difficulty labeling it chest yeah so we have you know some we know we have a change and we may not have a vocabulary or having developed vocabulary to describe those feelings The the you're right on target in the sense that this is a very primitive system. It's a defensive system but this was not the bagel system. That i was studying right. Yeah it was a protective system The here's what it was. You were studying the automatic nervous system. Here's what happened medical school your study the sympathetic and the paris pathetic system and you study the pharmacology of blocking the various various chemicals that come out of that system or the synoptic pathways and that system and you go oh this one speeds things up you block it things slow down this slows things down you block it things speed up. That's about that was the cement listrik way we were that. That's the stent. Trust me the extent of the nervous system training we had becomes interesting when you look at the history. I wanted to put one more point in. And that the type of vegas activity that this gentleman was describing was is potentially lethal response. But what i was studying was a protective response back to they. Neonatologist pediatrician with creative. I called the vegas paradox. I had to figure this one out and the answer really came out of studying the evolution of the automatic nervous system in in invertebrates and happened. Is that literally we have. We don't have a simple paired antagonist system just like you described. We have a sympathetic and the para sympathetic. We do have that. But they're not always at battle we really have hierarchical systems that inhibit Other systems so in a sense we have a very ancient fagel shutdown response. We have sympathetic. Motorization fight flight which inhibits the shutdown. And then we have this new mammalian vegas which is linked to the muscles of the face in hits when people are smiling when there's good property voice and when the upper part of the faces alive. That's inhibitory of the sympathetic. So you can see you know how nervous system of social behavior and social interaction is the same as the nervous system that supports health. Make that connection with people again because you packed a lot into that. So the the the the primitive primitive system which is an unmitigated system. it's an unmanned system but don't think of it nearly as a system that creates It's lethal system but it's the system that we share with possums and reptiles when reptiles share with bony fish right and so And it's it's the it's the escape when there is no other escape. It's the it's the it's very simple. It reduces metabolic demands round our body in your when it does so it also activates dissociation which is a very problematic psychological neurobiological thing. We can talk later but that but that's the thing that's the system of last resort. That's when there's no escape right and those of us I should say many people are fortunate that the system is triggered so they don't suffer pain in either dying or being abused because they just disappear. The problem is when this becomes the predominant means of reacting to stress or unpleasant feelings. Now you have a big problem absolutely. We evolve not to use this system for defense. We evolve to use the system To support our home static our health in growth. And so the the this old on my own vegas was there and it's very important for health for digestion but when the system is being used as a defense system we're in really deep trouble and that's largely goes in addition to being able to do shut down it goes also below the diaphragm and sends a regular diaphragm. And of course when you mentioned this and start asking. What are the internal medicine Symptoms of people who have problems. It's always going to be gut problems they have. They have bowel. They have abdominal pain. They upheld kinds of stuff. And it's one of the thing that's linked to this as well. The after in france of that vegas coming from the subject from attic area actually helps regulate notes receptive pain so emma. Translate that for you. So so the the information coming back from the gut through this old vegas changes pain perception. Yeah yeah yeah. So so. People who have problems with god who often have problems even with blood pressure regulation also have fibromyalgia which of course people that are traumatize. Often have all kinds of pain syndromes. Then there's the flight or fight response. Which was the next layer. Which is this predominantly sympathetic system. Yes right and we have to think of everything not is good or bad. But as being adaptive and once we take that moral veneer off then we can be helpful. So a lot of people are basically highly mobilized lilly in panic a good portion of time many of those people have histories of being immobilized in what dr is. Talking about sexual abuse physical abuse impregilo strangely enough interpersonal tear interpersonal stuff. Not just seeing you can happen seeing an explosion or a war or something but it is particularly something of interpersonal tear. When you say yeah but also even an indirect season with basically clinical medicine trauma fi diagnosis. Oh oh i know listen i. I was shocked one day when.

vegas Apnea preterm brady cardi paris emma fibromyalgia france lilly
Interview With Dr. Stephen Porges

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:19 min | 6 months ago

Interview With Dr. Stephen Porges

"Doctor porges. Are you there. i'm here yeah. I want to gush about you for a second because i am a giant fan of your work and the observations that you brought to light. I thought it was time we took your material to the public. Which i know is going to be a little bit of a task because it's very physiological and very technical but this is the future. Are we off line. No we're on. We're on the rock. I know it sounds like i'm not talking. Okay then go ahead and gosh yes. Dr borjas develop. Something called the polly vega theory. And it is that may not be a term that is immediately apparent what it means everybody. But he basically has shown how a part of our central nervous system that has been ignored for longtime or at least marginalized. Maybe at the core of understanding. How i describe this. How are emotional. Landscapes work I i came to work. Dr portas through alan shore. I may humble disciple of his work and his his work informed. Everything i do and he is backed by the Will be on in a couple of episodes to talk to you about his work But he has been able to show you know how the emotional landscape is built how the self is built and how this is a a. We've missed the fact that this is a bodily based experience and that the auto onomic nervous system sort of breaks accelerator of our system has been marginalized in our understanding of this thing. We call motions and feelings. Is that a good way to sort of bring it start actually going if you don't mind me dancing in spring it I actually Realized i finally realized that you were trained as an internist. And what i would say is to start this. I would say that. What i do is really the interface between internal medicine and psychiatry. Yes so You should find yourself feeling very much at home. With the linkage of the on a nommik nervous system to behavioral mental health disorders will and it. Maybe that's why you ended up in addiction medicine too. Because that's a similar crossroad You know it's it's very much you know medical. There's a lot of medical stuff going on. It's there's neurobiology that's completely out of whack there's interpersonal there's dynamic issues psychiatric issues but ultimately it is about the body and the body's relation to the brain and that is something that i think has been when people talk for instance talk. I'm getting off topic completely right away here but whenever hear people talking about you know Computers or artificial intelligence. I think wait a minute. Humans have this all other thing that they're embedded in that informed so much of what they're experiencing maybe it's all of what they're experiencing but it also informs what they're thinking how they remember things and how they process information. It's why there's things like intuition and why we have insights those actually our bodies creating those those sorts of moments. I suspect well. We are biological. I mean that's what we are and whatever we do whether it's art or music or social interactions. It's really based on our biology. And this tends to be you know marginalized this importance and as you've already realized that we live in a world that is very i'll use the term cognitive centric or cle biased. It's being the same thing that this little part of the brain that deals with our awareness and our alertness in our consciousness is the major role of our brain and it's not really To help our body run and the way. Our body is functioning also feedback and provides porto's of accessibility to different mental competencies. Well let's try to talk about the vagus nerve and what you observe to talk about the poly vegas theory. I by the way gave a lecture at the usc university southern california. I know where you are. You're at dr professor of psychiatry university of north carolina By the way you can find more information at steven porges. Pr ge's dot com and the book. Which will be on. Our website is the poly bagel theory. gave a lecture not university of southern carolina near you. The university of southern california which is our usc and I tried to tip toe into your material. It was interesting because I do think. I do use it so much. In terms of helping people understand. Emotional regulation and inter subjective experiences. And they were pretty receptive. I even wrote an exam question about it which is about basic theory based in a national in a format that we're all accustomed to talk about what you observe how you got into this. Well i i'll talk about the history of getting into it in a moment but i The theory is extraordinarily logically based. But it's also intuitive. So now you have this balance between really deep science and the history of neuro anatomy off the allergy in the study of evolution on one side and the other side. The intuition of it this is this is how we feel that we act and when you put those layers together suddenly demystify. The unusual experiences people have had especially those who have been traumatized health issues. how i got into. This is really backwards. I think We all get into things that interest us about feelings and trying to understand our our body but we often go into profession so i started off in psychology and i was interested in physiological markers or parallels of psychological processes with kind of a dream that you could put electrodes on people and you Understand a lot about them without talking to them okay so you could understand A lot about their physiological states. And as i started to do my work and this is actually several decades ago i started to ask more serious questions not Simply where there correlates or relationships between ordinary activity and talking to prophecies or emotional states

Porges Dr Borjas Dr Portas Alan Shore Usc University Southern Califo Psychiatry University Of North Steven Porges University Of Southern Carolin USC GE Vegas
"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:12 min | 6 months ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Welcome to dr podcast today. I am very excited. I am privileged to welcome to the program <hes>. A gentleman who has eye doctor porges. Are you there. i'm here yeah. I want to gush about you for a second because i am a giant fan of your work and the observations that you brought to light. I thought it was time we took your material to the public. Which i know is going to be a little bit of a task because it's very physiological and very technical but this is the future. Are we off line. No we're on. We're on the rock. I know it sounds like i'm not talking. Okay then go ahead and gosh yes. Dr borjas develop. Something called the polly vega theory. And it is that may not be a term that is immediately apparent what it means everybody. But he basically has shown how a part of our central nervous system that has been ignored for longtime or at least marginalized. Maybe at the core of understanding. How i describe this. How are emotional. Landscapes work <hes>. I i came to work. Dr portas through alan shore. I may humble disciple of his work and his his work informed. Everything i do and he is backed by the <unk>. Will be on in a couple of episodes to talk to you about his work <hes>. But he has been able to show you know how the emotional landscape is built how the self is built and how this is a a. We've missed the fact that this is a bodily based experience and that the auto onomic nervous system sort of breaks accelerator of our system has been marginalized in our understanding of this thing. We call motions and feelings. Is that a good way to sort of bring it start actually going if you don't mind me dancing in spring it <hes>. I actually <hes>. Realized i finally realized that you were trained as an internist. And what i would say is to start this. I would say that. What i do is really the interface between internal medicine and psychiatry. Yes so <hes>. You should find yourself feeling very much at home. With the linkage of the on a nommik nervous system to <hes> behavioral mental health disorders will and it. Maybe that's why you ended up in addiction medicine too. Because that's a similar crossroad <hes>. You know it's it's very much you know medical. There's a lot of medical stuff going on. It's there's neurobiology that's completely out of whack there's interpersonal there's dynamic issues psychiatric issues but ultimately it is about the body and the body's relation to the brain and that is something that i think has been when people talk for instance talk. I'm getting off topic completely right away here but whenever hear people talking about you know <hes>. Computers or artificial intelligence. I think wait a minute. Humans have this all other thing that they're embedded in that informed so much of what they're experiencing maybe it's all of what they're experiencing but it also informs what they're thinking how they remember things and how they process information. It's why there's things like intuition and why we have insights those actually our bodies creating those those sorts of moments. I suspect well. We are biological. I mean that's what we are and whatever we do whether it's art or music or social interactions. It's really based on our biology. And this tends to be you know marginalized this importance and as you've already realized that we live in a world that is very i'll use the term cognitive centric or cle biased. It's being the same thing that this little part of the brain that deals with our awareness and our alertness in our consciousness is the major role of our brain and it's not really <hes>. To help our body run and the way. Our body is functioning also feedback and provides porto's of accessibility to different mental competencies. Well let's try to talk about the vagus nerve and what you observe to talk about the poly vegas theory. I by the way gave a lecture at the usc university southern california. I know where you are. You're at dr professor of psychiatry university of north carolina <hes>. By the way you can find more information at steven porges. Pr ge's dot com and the book. Which will be on. Our website is the poly bagel theory. <hes> gave a lecture not university of southern carolina near you. The university of southern california which <hes> is our usc and <hes>. I tried to tip toe into your material. It was interesting because <hes>. I do think. I do use it so much. In terms of helping people understand. Emotional regulation and inter subjective experiences. And they were pretty receptive. I even wrote an exam question about it which is about basic theory based in a national in a format that we're all accustomed to talk about what you observe how you got into this. Well i i'll talk about the history of getting into it in a moment but i <hes>. The theory is extraordinarily logically based. But it's also intuitive. So now you have this balance between really deep science and the history of neuro anatomy off the allergy in the study of evolution on one side and the other side. The intuition of it this is this is how we feel that we act and when you put those layers together suddenly demystify. The unusual experiences people have had especially those who have been traumatized health issues. <hes> how i got into. This is really backwards. I think <hes>. We all get into things that interest us about feelings and trying to understand our our body but we often go into profession so i started off in psychology and i was interested in physiological markers or parallels of psychological processes with kind of a dream that you could put electrodes on people and you <hes>. Understand a lot about them without talking to them okay so you could understand <hes>. A lot about their

porges Dr borjas Dr portas alan shore usc university southern califo psychiatry university of north steven porges university of southern carolin university of southern califor vegas ge Vegas indiana apnea
"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:06 min | 6 months ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Welcome to dr podcast today. I am very excited. I am privileged to welcome to the program <hes>. A gentleman who has eye doctor porges. Are you there. i'm here yeah. I want to gush about you for a second because i am a giant fan of your work and the observations that you brought to light. I thought it was time we took your material to the public. Which i know is going to be a little bit of a task because it's very physiological and very technical but this is the future. Are we off line. No we're on. We're on the rock. I know it sounds like i'm not talking. Okay then go ahead and gosh yes. Dr borjas develop. Something called the polly vega theory. And it is that may not be a term that is immediately apparent what it means everybody. But he basically has shown how a part of our central nervous system that has been ignored for longtime or at least marginalized. Maybe at the core of understanding. How i describe this. How are emotional. Landscapes work <hes>. I i came to work. Dr portas through alan shore. I may humble disciple of his work and his his work informed. Everything i do and he is backed by the <unk>. Will be on in a couple of episodes to talk to you about his work <hes>. But he has been able to show you know how the emotional landscape is built how the self is built and how this is a a. We've missed the fact that this is a bodily based experience and that the auto onomic nervous system sort of breaks accelerator of our system has been marginalized in our understanding of this thing. We call motions and feelings. Is that a good way to sort of bring it start actually going if you don't mind me dancing in spring it <hes>. I actually <hes>. Realized i finally realized that you were trained as an internist. And what i would say is to start this. I would say that. What i do is really the interface between internal medicine and psychiatry. Yes so <hes>. You should find yourself feeling very much at home. With the linkage of the on a nommik nervous system to <hes> behavioral mental health disorders will and it. Maybe that's why you ended up in addiction medicine too. Because that's a similar crossroad <hes>. You know it's it's very much you know medical. There's a lot of medical stuff going on. It's there's neurobiology that's completely out of whack there's interpersonal there's dynamic issues psychiatric issues but ultimately it is about the body and the body's relation to the brain and that is something that i think has been when people talk for instance talk. I'm getting off topic completely right away here but whenever hear people talking about you know <hes>. Computers or artificial intelligence. I think wait a minute. Humans have this all other thing that they're embedded in that informed so much of what they're experiencing maybe it's all of what they're experiencing but it also informs what they're thinking how they remember things and how they process information. It's why there's things like intuition and why we have insights those actually our bodies creating those those sorts of moments. I suspect well. We are biological. I mean that's what we are and whatever we do whether it's art or music or social interactions. It's really based on our biology. And this tends to be you know marginalized this importance and as you've already realized that we live in a world that is very i'll use the term cognitive centric or cle biased. It's being the same thing that this little part of the brain that deals with our awareness and our alertness in our consciousness is the major role of our brain and it's not really <hes>. To help our body run and the way. Our body is functioning also feedback and provides porto's of accessibility to different mental competencies.

porges Dr borjas Dr portas alan shore usc university southern califo psychiatry university of north steven porges university of southern carolin university of southern califor vegas ge Vegas indiana apnea
Trump slams the FDA ahead of expected vaccine authorization

VB in the Middle

00:22 sec | 6 months ago

Trump slams the FDA ahead of expected vaccine authorization

"Pressure on the FDA too soon Announce it is authorized emergency use of fighters. Covert 19 vaccine, calling the government agency quote a big old, slow turtle. The president, adding quote, get the damn vaccines out now and urging Dr Stephen Hahn, the FDA commissioner, to quote Stop playing games and start saving lives. Karen Travers, ABC News Washington president has not addressed the

FDA Dr Stephen Hahn Government Karen Travers Abc News Washington
Trump slams the FDA ahead of expected vaccine authorization

WBZ Midday News

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

Trump slams the FDA ahead of expected vaccine authorization

"President, Trump is anxious for the FDA to announce the big news of the Fizer covert vaccine, getting emergency use authorization and now Oh, The New York Times is reporting. The FDA will make that announcement sometime tonight. ABC is Karen Travers. President Trump on Twitter Friday morning. Putting pressure on the FDA too soon announce it is authorized emergency use of fighters. Coben 19 vaccine, calling the government agency quote a big old, slow turtle. The president, adding quote, get the damn vaccines out now and urging Dr Stephen Hahn, the FDA commissioner, to quote Stop playing games and start saving lives, The FDA said Friday morning. It has told Fizer it will rapidly work toward finalization and issuing that authorization that's expected to come within days. Karen Travers, ABC

FDA Karen Travers President Trump Coben Donald Trump The New York Times Dr Stephen Hahn ABC Twitter Fizer Government
Oregon doctor who refused to wear mask has medical license suspended

WBZ Morning News

00:31 sec | 6 months ago

Oregon doctor who refused to wear mask has medical license suspended

"306 Electoral College votes and Oregon doctor who said at a Trump rally that he doesn't wear a mask while working at his clinic. Has had his medical license suspended. The Oregon Medical Board suspending the license of Dr Stephen Let Tulip for making that comment at a rally as well, is saying that He encourages others not to wear masks of state order requires health care workers to wear a mask and health care settings. The medical board voted to

Oregon Medical Board Electoral College Dr Stephen Let Tulip Oregon
2nd coronavirus vaccine shows early success in U.S. tests

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 7 months ago

2nd coronavirus vaccine shows early success in U.S. tests

"A second corona virus vaccine is showing promise in the U. S. maternal says preliminary data from an ongoing study show its vaccine is nearly ninety five percent effective last week Pfizer announced its own cold at night scene vaccine appeared similarly effective both companies are now on track to seek permission within weeks for emergency use in the U. S. virus cases in the country top eleven billion over the weekend materna president Dr Stephen Hogue says having similar results from two different companies is most reassuring hug says it's going to require many vaccines to meet global demand I'm Mike Hampton

U. S. Pfizer President Dr Stephen Hogue Mike Hampton
CDC Report: Officials Knew Coronavirus Test Was Flawed But Released It Anyway

Morning Edition

04:37 min | 8 months ago

CDC Report: Officials Knew Coronavirus Test Was Flawed But Released It Anyway

"We're also tracking the pandemic where the United States remains the world leader in cases and deaths this election week the U. S surpassed 100,000 cases per day for the first time, and today we have more of the story of how we got here. And NPR investigation has revealed news of a failure of Corona virus testing early in the pandemic. In February, a test designed by the Centers for Disease Control did not work, which set back U. S efforts now on internal investigation from the CDC, obtained by NPR shows the microbiologist who produced that test new it was flawed. And send it to the nation's labs. Anyway. Here's NPR's Dina Temple Raston. The covert tests arrived in New York City on a Friday in early February, when there were just a handful of confirmed cases in the United States that there was a little box with a few little tiny screw cap test tubes in it. That's Jennifer Rickman. She's the director and assistant commissioner of the New York City Public Health Laboratory, and she was one of the first people to learn that the cove in 19 tests the CDC sent to labs around the country. Actually didn't work. It became clear as soon as her lab technicians tried to verify the test. But the e mails from the lab stuff for saying something looks not quite right. Call us what jumped out at them. When the lab brand specimens that were supposed to be negative. The tests seem to indicate those samples contained a low level of the corona virus. It was truly an oh, crap moment like what are we going to do now? Everybody is waiting for us all over the city to have this test online. Everybody was holding on to this moment that we were going to have a test and now we don't have it and they wouldn't have it. It turns out until nearly a month later in March, which meant public health officials were hobbled from the earliest days of the pandemic health officials across the country reporting a shortage of tests. Despite promises from the federal government comes amid growing criticism that the delay in testing may have compromised the nation's ability to detect cases The CDC lab appear to have failed in a spectacular way. Though, as recently as July, the agency was still saying the test didn't have a problem. Here's CDC director Robert Redfield. When we did try to expand that test to give it to each of the local health departments, there wasn't manufacturing problem in one of the re agents that had to be corrected. That took about five weeks, But the agency's internal review suggests that isn't so It determined that the scientists who built the test used the wrong quality control procedures. The review also found problems with the lab's quality standards and problems with the management of the Latin more generally. The infectious diseases lab was run by a highly regarded scientists, Dr Stephen Lindstrom. He'd been an expert in influenza at the CDC for more than a decade and became director of the infectious Diseases lab a couple of years ago. The CDC declined to make Lindstrom available for an interview and declined to comment for the story. But Kelly Rib Lusky, director of infectious diseases at the Association of Public Health Laboratories, Said she was surprised that Lindstrom's lab would be called out on a report for something basic like quality control. That hadn't been her experience with him. I've done studies with Steve, and he's meticulous. And so the documentation failure was really surprising, So that was one thing the CDC found. A problem in the way the lab was run. The second thing that review found was that right before the test, we're going to be sent to hundreds of public labs. The lab ran a final check that showed the kids might not work. Ah, third of the time. But rather than pull the kids back, lab officials sent them out anyway. Kelly Rib less key again. The thing that hangs me up the most is probably the the 33% and not recalling you're not immediately going toe remanufacture or something at that point, because 33% is clearly a lot. To ensure this never happens again. The CDC review has recommendations for change. It sets clear criteria that must be met before the kids could be sent out rather than allowing lab directors to make a judgment call. An outside group must review all the CDC test kits before they go out. Stephen Lindstrom, for his part, no longer runs the lab and none of the same people who oversaw the making of that test. Are in charge. Now. New York's Rickman says that month they lost was crucial to the outcome in the response nationally as well as in New York City would have been different if we were able to have all the tools we needed in our toolbox earlier than we did not having the CDC tests, she said, was like building a house with just a saw and not a hammer. They needed a hammer, she said. Dina Temple Raston NPR news

CDC NPR Dina Temple Raston Jennifer Rickman New York City Public Health La Robert Redfield United States Dr Stephen Lindstrom Lindstrom U. Kelly Rib Lusky Association Of Public Health L New York City Federal Government Kelly Rib Influenza Stephen Lindstrom Steve
Seattle health officials concerned about health risks associated with poor air quality in the area

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:40 sec | 9 months ago

Seattle health officials concerned about health risks associated with poor air quality in the area

"Extremely poor throughout much of the West Cairo TV reporter Deborah Horne is in Seattle. The smoky air is like an Impenetrable cloud over Seattle. Not even the sun could break through. This air quality is very poor. Dr. Stephen Morris, an emergency room physician at Harbor View Medical Center, says the health risk is high. Even if you don't suffer from a respiratory ailment, Dr Morris says the best masks for working outdoors are the in 95 or P 100. Those air the best you can get it. Maybe the bus is the best place to ride this out to the states. Pretty fresh in here. I think the filters air keeping it pretty good in here. The National Weather

Dr. Stephen Morris Seattle Deborah Horne Harbor View Medical Center Reporter
How Much Vitamin D is Right for Me?

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

05:39 min | 10 months ago

How Much Vitamin D is Right for Me?

"Hello and welcome to this week's edition of the Green Wisdom Hell show I'm Janet Lewis after Louis and we are going to educate you today a little bit of `Bout Vitamin D. a lot of you already know about vitamin D or You're beginning to learn it. But I think that you know one of the burning questions that we seem to be having is how much vitamin D is right for me and there's really It's different for everyone and there was a book called optimal dose that Dr Louis Read. There was some other of our. Clients that ask about that book they wanted to know well, how much do I take because? I think it was very high levels and Dr Lewis is going to answer all that for you. Today he's going to help you discern how much is right for you because there are other factors involved as I just loading up on a bunch of D. and he's going to tell. You what can happen when you do too much of that, and we are also going to answer a whole lot of questions that we've received from our audience via our shooting straight with Dr Louis facebook group, and if you're not a member of that, all you have to do is go there and ask for yourself to be invited in either by email or send him A. Message on facebook and he'll accept shooting be part of our community. You can also answer or ask US questions online. There's an online forum for the PODCAST. So anything we don't cover here today that you still want to know or any other topic Please reach out to us that way we try to work it all in and make it a very enjoyable show. So Dr Louis. Vitamin D seems to be the thing immune system right now can you tell us how much what the difference is and is there anything wrong which is loading up on it? You ever been just one drink away from telling people what you really think. Never. have been quite often Yeah, you know I'm GonNa talk a lot about this, and you know it's absolutely amazing facebook The shooting straight has been a good thing. There's people that follow me there that actually work for some really big. Supplement. Companies. Which is afforded US Janet and may an opportunity to do some really big things I was called salt of the Earth yesterday which I thought was funny. In longhorn Texas as well as we thought, that was even funnier. We've renamed our town from Longview to Longhorn now I I love it. I guess SOCI- eight that we owe steers and Texas I. was kind of funny Yeah. But I've got lots of and this all started about five years ago when I was on a podcast as guests from Jack, Speer Co, the survival podcast, and he is crazy crazy smart, incredibly intelligent. man he he really knows what he's talking about and he's tastes certainly blonde by giving his opinion and you need to listen to him. But I got a lot of people from being on his podcast and people would say there I'm taking five thousand or ten thousand years and you know of course I'm looking at Lamma. It's not working. But I'm taking over ten thousand I said, it's not working MO- supplements don't work. And some of them are actually very toxic to you and there's reasons for that too. I finally did the percentages on it with the help of my count it because I'm not good at percentages good Lord I skipped that class in high school probably when fishing or something and ninety three percent of what people were buying and taking not working ninety three percents your odds of getting something niche. Good. Yeah and Jack Speer Co was talking about it and again spare 'cause a really crazy smart guy. You check him out he's he's really good he. He'll tell you what to do during times of stress and trouble where I'm just good for telling you how to be healthy, which is not bad too but. And I was in Tulsa. and. He he was talking about that Nina is getting involved in his facebook group and he said, well, you ought order this book and you know it'll change your per-. Paradigm about what you think about bottom of day and I said with the books already been ordered. It's on the way coast read books all day long. And Yeah, I don't know this change paradigm I try to push it in any way but I do think what this book outlines, which this guy says take thirty thousand a day. It's like one Manana don't do that not without testing and that this is from the book. Now from Jack Sparrow one of the things that people talk about is I can't sleep dog do you have any kind of thing for sleep? Well, if you're low in Vitamin D. That can cause you to not sleep well. At date threes plays a very pivotal role in the body achieving the state needed for deep sleep and very, very important and I have people at tight. You know five, thousand, ten, thousand and some it gets them up for you need to be I think the sweet spots hundred. Seventy, five or this book says more than that, and there's no evidence of it being toxic, but there's more to that some teach you that. But when you're three levels are optimal, you your your immune system, the depth of sleep in the rest that you get there and your metabolism, your metabolism becomes primed to function more edge greatest potential.

Dr Louis Janet Lewis Facebook Jack Jack Speer Co Jack Sparrow Longhorn Texas Texas Longview Speer Co Lamma Nina Tulsa.
DeWine enters the hydroxychloroquine debate, asks Ohio pharmacy board to reverse ban

WZFG Programming

00:37 sec | 11 months ago

DeWine enters the hydroxychloroquine debate, asks Ohio pharmacy board to reverse ban

"Mike DeWine says the state's pharmacy board has reversed its ban on the use of hydroxy chloral Quinn at his request, calling the band fundamentally flawed. What they should have done, I believe has had a full hearing. On this full opportunity and really sought out Ah, additional medical Ah, advice in regard to this two lines request based on comments by Dr Stephen Han, commissioner of the FDA, who says the decision to treat Corona virus should be between doctors and patients as the battle over the effectiveness of hydroxy chlorate, Quinn continues. Jeff

Quinn Dr Stephen Han Mike Dewine Commissioner Corona FDA Jeff
"dr stephen" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

08:43 min | 1 year ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on The Working Experience

"Any described at the Lyndon Johnson. Library. Out of Austin and I've seen those boxes. He's describing. And overwhelmed is not even the word. Like, they a cards and he's like some of them were just labeled miscellaneous Yup. And he describes just almost like diving into the middle. You just gotTa see there. No it's. Not In essence it's It's very much. Should you know some combination of detective? Work and treasure hunting Because yeah, I certainly had the experience of going to an archive hooping to find certain kinds of materials, and then they're just not there where nobody can find them. And then you walk away. You Know Kinda empty handed and you have to hit the reset button and start over again. I like doing archival research I think that's part of the fun of being a historic is a ten. Be Incredibly time consuming You know the very first archival project I ever did. and. This was a long time ago. Involved a a woman is a project that was rooted in the mid nineteenth. Century and and and there was a particular woman's correspondence that I wanted to look at so I went down to this archive where it was at as a young woman. Let's say I think she was in her early twenty s. she'd suffered a gruesome horse riding accident, and so she had actually become a laudanum addict to deal with the pain. So by the time you would get to some of the end of these letters. The handwriting would become totally illegible you could. You could watch the effects of the law. was taking, and it would just get loopy and it would start to go in the wrong direction, and it would just and so I. I didn't I couldn't actually read like the last twenty percent of a lot of these letters. Because because that's what happened to her. So you find stuff like that, which is really cool, but also really frustrating if you're trying to do your historical research. Yeah, it almost seems like you would be looking for one thing and you come across something else. That's interesting. That's correct. Yeah I think that's right and one of the things that you get trained to do as a as as a historian is It is is really to let the sources speak to you, you may have a set of ideas about a particular topic, but if the archival source material is telling you something else then you're obligated to listen. And to to change your preconceptions, hypotheses whatever in order to recognize what these sources are really saying. I guess must be hard I've always struggled a little bit with the autobiographies particularly. People running for office SORTA like. Like I can almost see it coming. There I started to read on by Ted. Kennedy, and US God. It was just like as I gazed out of my window. Like You. Already lost me guy. I'm done. That so. But I guess if you really respect, somebody really admires somebody. You're doing research and you start to find some things that are not so respectable and laudable. I thought that You, you've already brought up. Robert Kiro a couple of times. I have always thought that doing a biography is It's it's just not something I think. I can do I think it's really easy to write a biography because the the narrative organizes itself right. There's a beginning a middle and there's an end. So that are pretty easy. But I think it's really hard to write a good biography because it is so tempting I think just to get lost in the weeds. You have this all this material so when you read a bad biography. What you're getting is you know what somebody had for lunch? On Tuesday January thirteenth, and you just don't care, but this person was writer has found the stuff in the archive and they don't WanNa. Throw it away, so I think. There are lots and lots of biographies out there, but the but the number of really good biographies I think is, it's actually pretty small in my opinion. Yeah I guess I'm always suspicious of agendas with anything. With the movies or even fiction or you know, just don't come to me with an agenda although I guess is very difficult I, you know we all have our agendas. Yeah, this is one of the things I think I work on with my students. I think that we have a a a a kind of conventional understanding that we can be objective as star. And I think. You know that's pretty naive. Notion we all bring a set of interpretive lenses, and so. What you really need to do is to be honest both with yourself, but also with your reader about what those lenses all and. And I think the you can't. You can't really do objective history. That's not that's not really the goal. The goal is to do honest history. Very interestingly, putting it being honest about where you're coming from Yup yeah. So the reason I came across. Your work is We did a podcast on elite business schools. Eating. For lack of a better word international students that do to Kobe nineteen. You know like some guy from Brazil. He couldn't come Cornell University wouldn't even refund is closet of two thousand dollars? Cornell University as Many tens of millions of dollars in endow Vince and all that. and. Then you know we were talking about before we started podcast the whole online thing there get out of jail. Free Card seem to be like well. You can just take the courses online. And one student from by said like I'm not paying hundred seventy. Grand Watch Youtube Channel. It's lake. Basically business schools seems like ninety percent of. Its networking is meeting people's internships to never gonna get that online, yeah! Go ahead. I'm sorry. No I, I think you're spot on. This is what the I'd never thought about it this. Why do I guess too because I don't I didn't go to business saliva about it particularly, but what cotton I was, you said. Your quote was in the vein of during recessions. Business schools actually see an uptick in your enrollment, and during good times they don't so I was wondering if you could I mean this podcast called working experience, behold like learn something from it. Why is that? So that's So I I, noticed this started to happen in in the recession of that started in the early nineteen seventies, so before that business schools on college campuses. Everybody knew that the worst students went there. If you. If you flunked out of the Spanish department, you went to the business school. As late as the nineteen seventies as lay this, let's say the late sixties for sure God yes, when a certain person might have been attending a certain wharton, business. School the The worst students on campus and everybody knew this right. Open joke, an open secret The recession and the seventies is when business schools got a lot more competitive because they were getting a lot more applicants, and the the you know the credential, the qualifications of these applicants all went up their test scores there as all that sort of stuff, so all of a sudden what people began to notice? was that the the economic anxiety that the recession. flation nineteen seventy s recession was causing. Business, schools seen to be the safest harbor in that storm. And it I think it has something to do with the fact that that's also the moment when that the the world of high paying. Blue Collar employment. is really shrinking. You know that that sort of de industrial rust.

Cornell University Lyndon Johnson Austin Robert Kiro Ted Kennedy writer Brazil WanNa Kobe Vince
Are Vitamins Just Expensive Urine?

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

06:42 min | 1 year ago

Are Vitamins Just Expensive Urine?

"Hello and welcome to this edition of the Green Wisdom Health. Show I'm Janet Lewis Sir. Lewis and we're here to give you a very informative show today, Hopefully we'll try to keep all this straits can is going to be a bunch of information and we hope all of you enjoy it, and we hope all of Y'all are doing well out in green wisdom land. this show is going to be called our vitamins, just expensive urine, and for those of you that are taking vitamins and know what they can do. There are many of you out there. That are new to listening to hell shows and are taking vitamins at. Maybe you're buying a big box store, and you don't really notice any difference and could say well. Maybe they're just expensive urine, so Dr Lewis is going to dispel some of those myths. He's GonNa tell you the differences. He's going to tell you. What a good vitamin and a different! Grade of category will do on lab work. What it what it can move for as far as lab value numbers, which is why we run lab and what a bad one can do as well but I I think we WANNA. Start this show off. We've got a bunch of questions but we have got a letter from one of our very loyal patients for many years at was kind enough to refer his friend to us. Who in turn had his wife do her lab with us? Michelle and so. Eric the one that actually did the referring to start with. Thank you very much Eric we love you. wrote a very nice letter to us over the weekend. And you guys as much as we try to inspire. You really helps when you inspire us as well and this did that for us, so I'd like to read that letter to you and then I'd like Dr Lewis to comment if that's okay this. He's ready to comment I know he is. So he wants to pass on, Eric wants to pass on some really good news Michelle did her lab with us and followed our instructions after a doctor visit that said her blood was out of whack, and she needed a bunch of prescription medications, and honestly that's when we get. A lot of people is when they don't want to take all these prescriptions. They Kinda. Wait until they've been hit with Oh my gosh, you're you're really sick, so let's lay all these drugs on you. So she got scared and her lab with us. Fast forward to this week when she went back to the doctor and told him well I. Did this Doctor Lewis Thing, and he looked at seven labs of panels and gave me some supplements to take. The doctor looked at the nurse. They chuckled and said you're peeing that down the drain, and they don't work, and you just need this ten dollar prescription and your cholesterol and triglycerides and blood pressure will be fine. So. He ran her blood work again call two days later and said he apologized I. Don't know who this guy is, but keep doing what you're doing and don't take these prescriptions. had better than fifty percent improvement in three months. How cool is that? Thanks for all you guys do. And you know the basics the. Of this I guess. The doctor actually wanted to know who Dr Lewis was so that was pretty cool. So Dr Lewis you want to tell us a little bit about What made you different? What made you do something different with her lab? Been What? Anybody, else would do I. Guess Well, because I'm a car proctor. I wouldn't prescribed drugs. Even if I could which I can't, but and I'm not against drugs, at all I love her medical profession, and but I've seen many many years ago where the medical doctors and osteopaths. they got were. They cannot really practice the the the and they have so called standard of care, which is not necessarily what's in the best interest of the patients, and they're frustrated, too. I've never seen an MD or do that wasn't just a wonderful person and had good intentions. But they're not trained that way. You know. I'm a contractor I. think everything's nerve supplier nutrition and he know sergeant everything's What can I do surgically to fix it, so we're all good people they're trying to help. Just you know one has opinion you like and so. Eric sent this email and he told me said. Don't let Janet Reba below the line. He had a little colorful remark about what he had to the doctor to see it at all. Eric, actually, she didn't until I pointed it out your Eric you're funny. I'm going to go down to port. Nitrous Texas wherever that is southeast. Texas Word Northeast Texas I'm. Go visit them sometimes. Some David I talked to Michelle. and. She's a sweetheart and she told me the story also and you know I'm not anti medical. They've saved my bacon more than once, but here's the problem. And unfortunately I'm pretty simple guy. Maybe unfortunately but. Since. When do we think that God is not involved in this process and why you know this thing, Oh, you just have expensive urine and I said on this one huge huge podcast I was a guest in. This guy has like quarter million listeners. Said something about expensive year and I said well. I just had a forty two dollar rib. I do. I have expensive excrement? You know it's foolish to think that your body doesn't take what it needs from that and use it for good. you have to take vitamins. You have to take good ones I've seen vitamins. Put out by famous doctors. You get famous by paying somebody ten or twenty grand route a book you know. Most of these books are not even written by the doctor. That's the only reason I could write a book. Have somebody do it better than me, but what happens is. Are The reason why you need vitamins and they have to be good ones. You know I've had a good wife and a bad one, so there's a difference in women. There's a difference in vitamins say. one of the things you have to realize that God's in control and he works in your body. Whatever you think God is, but North America is probably the most well fed, but undernourished people in history, the the souls been depleted of this nutritious at least for one hundred years. and now we're saturate and it with chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and it's Kinda. Killed The microorganisms that allow the nutrients to get up into. into the plant itself, and then we're feeding mannerly in inside and vitamin deficient. Food to our livestock, so they're not what they should be.

Dr Lewis Eric Janet Lewis Michelle North America Janet Reba Texas David Michelle.
The Kidneys Connection to Our Emotions

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

09:48 min | 1 year ago

The Kidneys Connection to Our Emotions

"Today. We're going to go off on a different subject here about kidneys. You guys haven't heard us discuss kidneys very much in the past episodes but we thought with everyone being a little bit on the fearful angry side we would address kidneys because they very much have to do with those emotions. So the name of this show today is called the kidneys connection to our emotions. And we're going to tell you a little bit about what to look for when you might suspect it your kidneys what you can take to help. Get them better and we also have a question at the end that we're going to answer. So Dr Lewis. Could you tell us why you have chosen to discuss the kidney connection today on our podcast? Well Yeah I'd love to. I chose to do this because Janet wanted to. That's right that is true. You know I think the main thing is is because the throughout this Kobe stuff that I think is you know crock. Crap but You know we. We've been told things so long so loud. You know you can tell a lie long enough and loud enough people begin to believe it and so saying stay safe Co home. Stay home be safe in. Its implying that US people like me. That think it's a crock that get out or sinful and where. The enemy were being brainwashed. Folks you've got to think past that and I'm absolutely amazed at the people that choose. It's a choice. They choose to cower down in fear and and we've noticed that people are more agitated more irritated and that's me because I can't believe that idiocy that's going on like trying to get into home depot and his lap. Geez there's one hundred and fifty feet between everybody but you're worried about how many people walking in the store and one of the reasons that we as a society besides the mental spiritual they're throwing at us is because we're eating incorrectly. We're drinking to excess with when it talks when you talk about alcohol. Excessive to me is very little but Done tight much and we get irritated because we're putting our her kidneys under stress. One of the worst things you can do is have high blood pressure that you don't take care of either medically or naturally or both because at high blood pressure can really calls all kinds of problems with the kidney so please please please take care your kidneys. It it's incredible is super important but kidneys are their damaged from all sorts of things like certain drugs are really really tough on the kidneys and you have to watch that and you know. Have your doctor that puts you on the medications to monitor that but heavy metals our society full of heavy metals. It's full of solvents. It's of a chemotherapy. Does that Different Benham's snake insect spider and I went through a lot of that after God only knows how many Brown recluse spider about gotten and it will wreak havoc on your kid. He's poisonous mushrooms. I don't know anything about that because I don't experiment with those mushrooms that grow on cow patties like some people. I know Do it because it's a psychedelic psychogenic psychotic or something Pesticides and we know we've got pesticides all over the. It's really really really common in our food. Which is a sad thing and herbicides and people say but I'm not around our besides York Janet. I was coming to work two days ago. And there's the Texas highway department spraying herbicides. Oh Good God but you know us a goat to eat but we have done that to ourselves with the poisons in our society and renal failure and not even failure but when you put your kidneys in stress it can add to things like congestive heart failure diabetes or diabetes slash Metabolic Syndrome. Can put pressure on your kidneys. It can go both ways and lock said before the chronic hypertension a bad thing liver disease liberal ever you got. The liber is like a woman. The Lib rain happy. Ain't nobody happy. And then you have diseases. The autoimmune diseases like Lupus and sickle cell. Things like that There are people that have genetic tendencies the have issues with Kidneys like poly cystic. Disease and kidneys. Are They Tennessee to have mineral accumulations that she usually calcium? And we see that into your analysis. It'll say crystals calcium oxalate. Now you know. We can't make any claims about supplements but if you're having calcium oxalate stones that usually means you have a lack of magnesium or potassium to offset because we get minerals that out of balance. And that's the problem with our society mentally and physically because we get out of balance we forget to laugh. We forget to you know have a good time and I just love people that come in here and I'll go hug their neck and watch them freak out or I'll shake their hand and it's like you know we've been doing this for tens of thousands of years and it's not an issue in. Don't you enjoy the HUG and s? You're actually I do I. I like the way you social distance dot because I don't social distance. That's one of the things we're missing. Now is the social interaction. That is way way more important than any other thing now again. I I said disappear. Podcast AGO that they're scripture somewhere to Bible. I forget probably proverbs but is a wiseman foresees danger and takes precautions K. And I think that's a smart thing to do but the Bible also says in Titus very plainly. God didn't give you a spirit of fear so quick fear crap You talk about stones oxalate downs in nineteen seventy four when you say stoned rattling talking about oxalate stones. The ones that are GONNA be urine. Just what would those manifest in normal? Layman's terms that someone might understand that. They may have a kidney problem. Kidney Stones you know very sharp pain in the back and you know This is because one sweetheart of a sweetheart patients or no the different parts of magnesium and we're getting people that say well. I have this symptom and they want me to diagnose Office set a symptoms everytime time Janet. I give a list I say. Be careful though because these same symptoms can go with a different organ. Be careful how you diagnose off of just symptoms but one of the things That you can bet your bottom dollar as you're deficient in magnesium so I had this sweetheart patients they can you explain the different types of magnesium. I'm saying that because there's plenty of research says if you take magnesium it buffers The bad side effects of calcium or calcium oxalate stones that that's research that and it says be six. Pp and potassium so let's talk about. Magnesium purchased a little while because magnesium can take the anxiety irritability that we are feeling and. I think is obvious in my voice. It's like oh good. God quit despair crap but if you take magnesium there's actually research says magnesium if it's the right form can work even better. I'll stress anxiety. Depression era ability and anger than many many many drugs and again we can't make claims that but the research says it so let's talk just briefly about the different types of magnesium if you poop once a day or less unietd magnesium citrate now. We have that for people. They say about once as normal permissiveness common. But it's not normal. He got three trains in three trains. Out Is Janet says about three meals and three meals out so citrate because it was bound citric acid. And that's a pretty large molecule. And that's why you don't get enough in a multi vitamin or multi-mineral. Because it's a large molecule. Takes up too much. Real Estate It's a mild laxative. And so it's it's a great choice. Then you've got magnesium oxide folks it. They're putting oxide in your multi-donor multi-mineral throw it away. Because that's the cheap crap that yes it works as a laxative. But you don't really absorb it where you can absorb more the cows of magnesium citrate then you got the magnesium glassy night and it's a pretty gentle form that's what I'd generally suggest for people that have hypertension It slower going through the system. It absorbs a little bit less water. So you end up. Absorbing more of it It glasses night. Actually it's Connected to an Amino. Acid glossing blessing is incredibly incredibly incredibly important amino acid to help form neurotransmitters and calms your nerves.

Janet Bible United States Dr Lewis Different Benham Liver Disease Metabolic Syndrome Lupus York Texas Kobe Disease Tennessee Layman Wiseman Titus
You Cant Outrun Your Fork

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

11:53 min | 1 year ago

You Cant Outrun Your Fork

"And today. We are going to cite you with a show about gluten called. You can't outrun your work. Dr Louis came up with that. Catchy Title I think he stole it. Perhaps from someone else but We liked it so extra. That's right but so we're GONNA talk to you about foods that might cause you to want more of the same and some very exciting testing information that we have been waiting very long time for Where it would be convenient for you and great reports and ways for you to determine gluten or wheat sensitivity so to day Dr Louis Would you explain to us about gluten and why it such a big problem? And why would someone be intolerant to it and you know what does it? 'cause what's the big deal with gluten gluten free so big deal right? I think it is a big deal. some of the research says is one out of one hundred or two out of hundred. That has gluten intolerance ILIAC disease. You know if you have that kind of Gi Issues go see your Gi doctor. So you're in tarnished Get the test made. Although we're going to tell you about tasks that you can do with us that I found to be. Oh my God blow you into new reality of knowledge and understanding again. I'M GONNA go down too much rabbit. Trails You know when I read this thing in interior. Was you know everybody should follow Tara? She really good health coach and she rat some pretty intelligent newsletters. Just like brandy does for Janet May You know I think anyone that puts beans chiles kind of a heathen might not love the Lord. But it's not just about beans beans can have issues too but mostly we don't talk about. Grind grain is not good and some of the myths. 'cause I I really think Janice going to get into more detail than me but and I hear this all the time but I'm eating whole wheat bread because I'm getting whole grains well usually Whole wheat break usually doesn't contain very much of the whole grind because the number one ingredient he's usually called wheat flour There's nips but I love my oatmeal. It's like well. I two or three bowls boat meal per year and I think it's the most nutritious thing you can eat breakfast. I personally think that's very very not true. And I think it's better than a breakfast. You know of sugary cereal but OATMEAL has a pretty high glycemic load. And so I don't think that's a good thing because it generally means when you have a high glycemic stuff. It usually means that you're going to spend the rest of the day over eating because you're hungry because of glycemic index Well you know I think we need to back up a little bit here and tell people why we got so involved with gluten you know before we we tell people. Don't eat gluten you know. It's not good but at the same time we didn't have a personal experience with it or where we could relate to own my goodness. That's what's causing it. If it's many of you have been listening to us for years. Thank you so much or someone that's new. You know the personal history there with why we found this out is because Dr Lewis was experiencing severe stomach pains to the point. He thought he was going to die. I mean I was bitterly I. I was giving him everything that I knew to give him. And you know we know all about nutrition for those of you that don't like me Janice WanNa keep me alive so ninette and happy but he I would give him so many things and it was like nothing was making it right and it got so bad. He tried to take out extra life insurance because he was sure he wasn't going to make it. And you know how God works. He sends people longer path. When it's just your bleakest darkest hour and shows you something you would not have listened to previously and incomes a Representative or actually. We had a a one of our bottom representatives. Tell us about this country. This company called vibrant labs and they did A lot of blood work with just a little bit of blood and we were very excited about it because we thought well you know. We don't really know what we need to have run. We've got a pretty good deal going with our lab companies. Now you guys get great pricing on the labs we you know. I don't know how this is going to help us. And she said but they'll do a gluten test on you and wheat sensitivity and food sensitivity testing and and maybe Dr Lisk and find out what's wrong so when we did the testing at that time it was a blood draw and it had to be a person that came to your office or they came to your house and they drew the blood and then it was sent off Which we did and Dr. Louis came back that he was not only gluten intolerant but he was borderline Celia disease. Which is what that turns into if it's uncontrolled so you know telling someone to quit eating gluten and then seeing it on a on a report where it's glaring at you telling you this is the result of you. Eating gluten is two different things which made us want to start offering this test. So Dr Lewis Stop Gluten. He thought well that's the issue. I'll stop it. He did and immediately. He started feeling better and I thought so. I did the test mine. Wasn't that bad. It wasn't great turns out that anybody who lives in the United States has it to some degree because of the Chemical crawls and the increase in gluten in the grange compared to what it was a few decades ago right and so we both more so than I will make sure he does not eat gluten in a meal and I cannot tell you the difference in how you feel with your digestive system. You know if you're suffering from you know things like bloating and brain fog and and you eat something that you just feel like it. Just you can't. You're not gonNA ever process it. It's probably because you have some sort of an allergy to it But belly pain diarrhoea. Muscle pain anxiety. Headaches nausea confusion numbness. They're all signs of it. And frankly with the lab testing the way it was at the time. And I know many of you and I'm sweating explaining this many of you've been asking us when you're GonNa get this going because we really want to do this We couldn't count on having a person that would draw the blood all the time everywhere because we are able to to draw lab across the United States. It's not always convenient place for someone to get drawn so vibrant look really just came out with The ability to have it as a finger prick test in your home so the way it works is we've said everything up on our website. It's under Specialty panels tab at the top and it explains to you. What all is in this test? And these tests that we've seen before because Dr has looked at them many times from different companies there about three thousand dollars to run what we're running for six hundred dollars and the fact that it can be a finger prick test in your home so you're secure. You don't have to go to a lab which a lot of people are scared of now and it doesn't take that much blood to do. All of this is just. We're just so excited to be bringing it to you But they have what? You're what you'll get for that six hundred dollars as a wheat. Zumur panel a leaky gut panel and a food sensitivity profile panel of ninety. Six foods Where'd you fill out the Hell Star Bay? If you've not done our health survey it'll ask you it. It includes Wheat Gluten and electons. And then you'll be able to pick two more primary foods that you eat the most of and those are added but it it detects wieght and gluten related disorders it aids in this specific recognition of antibodies to wheat peptides including gluten and non gluten components along with intestinal permeability. It allows detection of protein. Antibodies associated with wheat and gluten sensitivities. Were information to reduce monitor and manage the inflammatory effects of those sensitivities. So you'll be able to tail and it. It gives it to you in beautiful reports. It tells you what you may be missing nutritionally not specifically our products but just in general which Dr Lewis will turn around and come up with products that are ours to correlate to these tests. So that you'll know which things you need. So Dr Lewis. Can you explain to us? How Leaky Gut. Why why would we test for that so much? You know what? What is it? We're trying to see with leaky gut. Well the Gluten Causes Zanjan Zanjan opens up the gaps and then the leaky gut can absorb poorly digested food. Proteins back to our microbes and it gets things in your blood stains bloodstream. You don't really want It's just a bad thing. A you know anybody. Listen to enough my podcast. Now that I get in different moods well. I'm in a different mood today. You know you know my main thing I want to say. Today's it's you know we. We named this thing. It's hard to run your Fort It's also hard to lose weight when you have overactive knife and fork so folks you've gotta take responsibility Lake Innis is very very very common number. We'll get into maybe a little bit of detail but you know I looked up. Some research and it said leaking can be reduced by Herbs Courson Journal and Pharmacology And we have had trouble keeping our courson slash Brahma Lane in stock although we have in stock now because there was plenty of research that says corser tend to really really good for things that are Respiratory illnesses you. Draw your own conclusion there but It's really good because it has not just the Carson but rude and Brahma Lane. Pat Pain Pancreatic and which includes lap as protease and analyze. Because you need the enzymes and it's really really good. My Barranca have always always been a my weak area and I've been talking to in the morning to at night and you know it also lowers inflammation because that shows in your c reactive protein. Her chance heart attack and stroke and I've been taking it home I got. I feel better than I felt in years but given up. The gluten was good thing so think about the gut leak in this can be reduced by taking a course. It's not just about lowering your c reactive protein. It's about all kinds of other things. I'd say get away from grains I have plenty of stuff here depend on how much you WanNa get into but You have to you know. Had One patient says well. I did a test and I learned to get off of whatever food was bothering her. The number one is weight Number two is milk like if you have colitis or IBS and again if you WANNA really

Dr Lewis Dr. Louis Food Sensitivity Janice Wan Herbs Courson Journal And Phar United States Headaches Dr Lisk Zanjan Zanjan Tara Representative Pat Pain Janet Barranca Brahma Lane Bloating IBS Carson Corser
45 states are lifting restrictions

Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis

02:49 min | 1 year ago

45 states are lifting restrictions

"Five states are taking steps to lift restrictions that were put in place because of code nineteen but it isn't fast enough for some people the owners of the C. and C. coffee and kitchen in Colorado opened their dining room for mother's day even though restaurants in that state are still limited to take out and delivery numbers will return in mass when they feel safe we'll see videos of people packed into a restaurant with no social distancing and no mass people feel less safe and the widespread economic pain will only be prolonged to governor Jerry policies Spender the restaurant's license indefinitely Pennsylvania governor Tom wolf with a message to local officials who planned to defy shut down order to agents who are encouraging the people they were elected to lead to quit the fight are acting in a most cowardly way this is not the time to give up this is not the time to surrender in Tesla CEO Elon musk restarting is California factory despite local orders president trump talking up he was testing for covert nineteen resident trump says the United States has met the moment and prevailed on testing for the corona virus in the span of just a few short months we've developed a testing capacity unmatched and unrivalled anywhere in the world claiming that everyone who wants to get a test before returning to work will very soon be able to get one but the reality is that most Americans being asked to return to work won't have quick access to testing and public health experts have warned that the US continues to lack the widespread testing necessary to properly track the virus Jordan Phelps ABC news the White House senior administration official telling ABC news that president trump and vice president pence will maintain distance from each other for the immediate future after two aids tested positive there were special elections tomorrow in Wisconsin in California there's a presidential primary in Nebraska in all three states they are encouraging mail in voting but allowing some in person voting you're listening to ABC news radio eight forty WHAS your news now a ten year old boy in Kentucky that has contracted the corona viruses known a better later fighting for his life governor Andy Beshear announced the case during his Monday news briefing while covert nineteen hasn't been as hard on children Dr Stephen stack said there are a small number of children who can get a syndrome where their immune system becomes hyperactive and they have an extreme inflammatory response in their body for kids who get this syndrome it's serious the the young a patient that we have in Kentucky is critically ill at this time and for those who get this it's serious right now it appears this child is the only one in Kentucky with the syndrome I'm Suzanne Duval the governor announced one hundred five new coronavirus cases today along with four new destined at in Sunday's new cases and deaths along with them total cases now sit at six thousand six hundred seventy seven and three hundred eleven in Kentucky have died I'm

"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

10:53 min | 1 year ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"To sell her train your car check out truecar today. I'm up wholeheartedly agree. I like I said I used to I I I would do two things as the cornerstone of my interventions one described them this physiology so they understand a how they got into this mess. You know what what they were doing when they 'cause the family's always okay understand that motivation disturbance but why did they use in the first place well we can explain that and now you have two problems you have trauma trauma and you have addiction and their related and they overlap in terms of how they're affecting each other and then the other thing and this was the more artful piece getting them into a frame where they feel safe in proximity with other humans that is that is actually requires a massive skill set on behalf of the Practitioner Commissioner because you have to you have to weave your way and and you have to be deeply tuned to what that person has experienced experiencing because it's very chaotic and if you can experience in the social vehicle exchange the heart hedge exchange if you can experience reince things that are real net person and identify. It's very powerful for them because that is that that's ultimately as you say what they're looking for. Yeah my my theme or Gazon contributing to development of a treatment center under for that has detox than Rehab after is how you can start giving the patients tools that they can take take out of the practice because people will graduate or being a graduate from the treatment miles and they'll come back because US I was talking to one up director and he says it's great business planets revolving door yeah fortunate on average on average for severe alcoholic. Alchoholic is five to four treatments to get one year of sobriety yeah well. That's not really an acceptable formula. Yes we like better okay so I will just say that that you know so many good outcomes in mental health interventions have to do with the empathic atonement of the practitioner and this is no exception because getting them to receive the material. You're talking about you. You gotTa have the that person that connects with them so they will trust listen and follow through you see in part what we were doing doing is really working with the staff having them go through all these tools as well that was better work said that the staff can understand physiological article state shifts again very important. That's very important. I hope they how wh- learning it then they figure it out. They love it yeah. I Bet I and again when they're outside. The addiction so-called settles down. This stuff is extremely useful for them extremely yeah yeah. It's it's. It's a world that was so foreign to me when I was contacted. I assume that there was some magic formula that was going on in these addiction centers and what I realized is that much of it was really was pep talks group therapy. It wasn't necessarily bad but it wasn't stuff that they could use they left. They didn't have tools bright and what I wanted it again. This goes back to my my earlier work. When I started to give talks about probably BAGEL Theory Y to shift the paradigm of treatment for many forms of of mental health from going at the actual behavior to shifting the physiological state of public behavior emerged so if we start understanding addiction as a valiant attempt originally late stage because social behavior can do that or isn't doing that in person and the point is if the scenes were trauma which is is is really a high hit a and gives you an explanation why social behaviors longer working then you start understanding understanding that the pathway to physiology is not through social behavior at least on initially it has been through some other channel? It's not drugs it. It has speak through teaching people how to breed how to control their physiological state and actually gained more conversant with their body reactions being more in body. Let me a couple minutes left. I want to do one one more thing that I wanted to raise with you. I noticed in the raise. I'm so you think of my little idea. you're talking some manner about rituals with one in one of those interviews I don. I forget the context in which came up I would you remember what you were saying about ritual because it had something to do with the physiology yeah oh yeah rituals historically occurred long before organized religion but if you start to Deacon compose them or destruct look at the components at what rituals rituals are most of them happen to be exercises of the Vega system they were dealing with posture shifts which were blood pressure regulation. They're dealing with chance which he's really the social engagement system breathing out there it was it was like someone had left this manual of how do you create. How do you create efficient neural exercises of Bagel function in the wheel call the rituals and will form religions around them and that's that's what appeared take an issue is we then think of organized religion as emergent property of feeling safe with others due to the rituals and you know you can start building your model from that but at the same time evoking off right yeah that's that's the invoking awe is I would say is it is later attribute of rituals? We go back to earlier ones. They were posture ships chance the breathing in in these are what I think I wrote a paper was called portals to Vegas pathways as portals to compassion and that's it was really saying that they were very very insightful. People around a long time ago they did have the same language that we have the have the understanding of neuro anatomy but they knew something about these systems dot had they make people feel and they became the cornerstone of rituals and I think we need to is understand that rituals are can be very personal enabled us to get into those physiological states and make us feel safe and we get all the benefits from that. It's I wish anthropologist at a deeper study on rituals and broken down the way you're describing this. This'll be one thing I think another function of ritual. Humbly is an offloaded memory marine in other words. I mean think about the ritual around say Passover if if we didn't do the Jews didn't do the same thing every year as a way of remembering what happened it would be a game of telephone and it would shift into myth and fairy tales and all kinds of stuff as opposed to no no no every year we have this meal. Where we we tell you what happens if we act out what happened and we eat it and that to me is a way of offloading a memory of a profound trauma that you Never WanNa forget and that has the that has sort of evolutionary biological applications? I wouldn't have chosen ADT example. I would think that would appear to be very different but are similar. No one is the actual transcription of the Today Bible Dude written in if they make a mistake in transcription destroyed interesting so every letter every word is checked out. It's all hand done. It's been done the same way for. I don't know at least two thousand years maybe longer Kirk but it meant that something was so important that any modification of it was a deterioration of what the message was back the other one is something very strange which was the Hula. Hula gets used to be performed by men but it wasn't performed exactly what it was supposed to be. People were killed today. Jim Accept so again. It's this concept of something is is imbedded into something. It's so important to that culture. Keep it exact so it's like a time capsule of information yet is a a and whether we call the collective memory or time capsule. It's something that keep a long time ago so it was so so important to their for generations to come yeah survival that this should never ever be forgotten interesting when you use the castle overbid that's quite derivative as much later in terms of creating the Haggadah in doing that but the actual writing of the text ext of the Old Testament in Hebrew is a very very ancient tradition and in fact. If you go to Tel Aviv where you have begun to trying the book in Tel Aviv now owns it's actually it's interesting spiritual experience because they have it at that displaying they display play the fact simile not the real one of Isaiah and this is this is the oldest scripture they could find is David back over four thousand years Friday The Hebrew writing is the same as they would write it today. He said there's this conveyance of information the continuity of the meanings of what was being conveyed in the chorus. All these things are five different levels of reading or interpretation Asian. There's the the actual words and then there's the potential of indebted codes and that's the intellectual part of all these rituals plays out Stephen. We have to wrap it up. Where can people find you now or do you want them to go? Steven PORGES DOT COM yes and it's been updated webpage and US it's actually accessible accessible now and it is always exciting for me inappropriate talk to you and I thank you for coming in today. Well thank you. It was good talking to you again. Look cooking for X..

Tel Aviv Practitioner Commissioner Alchoholic director Stephen US Vegas Steven PORGES Hula Deacon Jim Accept Kirk David Isaiah four thousand years
"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"I mean my interactions with new clearly that you are a very creative integrative the person who wants to explore these that's now. That's now the recovered. I'm recovering. Whenever you're going back in the day I felt like I was on a wheel and you know it was a wheel that would get you going faster and and faster and faster and I couldn't seem to control it? Oh see for me. I need the wheel I had to be on the real to succeed in the world that I was as one now I have now now experience. The wheel is a merry-go-round right on and well you see if you enjoy it as pragmatic yeah keep cost academics. The Democrats are really were. It's a workaholic environment of constant productivity constant defensiveness meaning is always evaluation so the ability to take on the attributes that I think would be optimizing. Human experience are not consistent with academic environments interest. Well it takes a lot of ugly music. Take a lot of success releasing self acknowledgement that success to be transformative in that type of environment meeting to say I don't need the environment tie can leverage the environment to do interesting things so bacteria observation about addiction so not what what we're talk ways to describe it to patients is which is that if you have bad enough addiction that you need to see me you had a hundred percent champ probability of childhood trauma and and so the disk and I would explain it to them as the regulation from the trauma and I would describe the polly Bagel theory very to them to help them understand how regulatory systems are built at some assuras theories and stuff that you have exited that frame builds the regulation you have the liability the emptiness you have the mobilization that you're talking about and that mobilization is a liability is looking for solutions to the pain and emptiness and those solutions if you're genetically set up a certain way where you find yourself using things that work that then trigger a second problem which is addiction. I think that that's is phenomenal logical level. That's quite accurate on physiological level. It's actually quite simple. The merely attempts to regulate physiological state in in that addiction therapy or treatment should really go at that well no. It's it's more complicated. It's more complicated because it addiction is the second problem that you've triggered in the genetically prone individual which is now a motivational disturbance. Now you've disturbed the reward system and the brain bundle and that system is going do that again do that again do that again do that again no matter what do that again well. Let's let's ask this question if you can give a addicted person tools to shift their physiological state. Can they break that cycle ah it helps them but it's not so so what I what so there are plenty of tools that we give them to help them. Manage this motivational problem and you know it's it's all about give Regan re entering a say frame with another human which which is which you would argue with the same thing. The problem is that it's also sometimes so evocative that motivates more using so that's the that's conundrum always is. How do you get them in? How do you hold them? And how do you not re- revoke their primary. Issue is when you see and what I'm trying to do trying to conceptualize the addiction treatment model is due shifted from. I'm a more it's psychological narrative model to saying though let's give you some tools that when your body starts shifting into these physiological article state you can regulate and tool such as simple as learning pre differently so very excellent for mild addicts severe veer addicts they are really in altered states where they'll have trouble following directions like that they'd have trouble remembering that and they would have trouble most importantly trusting that because their motivational disturbance would have them go. That's bullshit. I just need to use the well. They're the Portland we use term motivational. They're they're really they're learned patterns of getting out of the abyss not going to you're right. They're not going to trust these very powerfully built circuits so I'm actually working on a brain breathing biofeedback and shifting the notion of discussion within addiction therapy to focus on bodily St the cross sparkling.

Portland polly Bagel Regan hundred percent
"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

13:10 min | 1 year ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Breath too. It seems like when people before they mature are traumatized. They're more likely to activate the ventral system and I think I'm tecoma. It's sort of a question mark after that and then let's get people are more likely to activate Dorsal indefens- and the let's let's go into what I view is the the primal trauma which is becoming coming HYPOC HYPOC during delivery okay now if you did you ever do any rotations in obstetrics Osha delivered about baby's okay now you remember this stuff called Makoni which we call it here Corolla right but when when did that come out during delivery when what were the characteristics of delivery that would produce a traumatic delivery basically hypoxia. I say the law lack of oxygen or even compression here on the cord so that was the dorsal big reacted did to life threat and one of the questions I'm still off pondering and I've been pondering this for over twenty five years is whether that release Lisa at that moment of birth creates setting condition of vulnerability to be more as a vulnerable to traumatic events later life I am working with actually with my wife sue on a longitudinal database from Bristol in the UK as coal all the Avon Longitudinal Study of pairs children. They had fourteen thousand families. I wish they measured got information for Glass Trimester after the kids are now in their late twenties and we'll we're looking at is actually even incidences of abuse and sexual abuse of what's happened to these kids kids whether spending are married and have other issues in life now want to see whether those carrying NATO variables are lead indicators voter Vilakazi me very interesting but it seems to me that that children that are traumatized. It just seems to me the repeated episodes of dissociation first of all rupture the trust as you said so people don't on kit children don't reenter the frame that gives them the capacity to build a regulatory system so they rely on whatever they've got and what they seem to get is reliance on dissociation as a primary means of regulating emotion. What's the physiology of that before we get physiology? Let's kind of generalized assistant. Bring it back to what you mentioned about. Allen shores sure yeah okay so what you when you start looking at children in trauma and I'm doing work with a group called the Australian Childhood Foundation which is dealing with foster children children taken away from the biological parents in the question. Can I ask is how do you work with them because they have no memories of ever feeling safe with another person so it's the issue is out the the human individual in our nervous system can deal with lots of things even traumas. If we have mental images that we used to buffer so we don't always need that trusting person with us but we need the memory of that trusting Peter Fonda gear refers that as the what is interface between the genetics of the individual and the environment and now he is attachment. I think that's yeah so so he's Framingham Cashman as that mental image and the physiology of that is really saying that cues of safety don't have to be physical they can be mental visualizations as well and and they become stronger as we have more experiences with them so it's this whole notion that that if you want to be creative and bold exploratory you don't really need could be a cuddled every moment if you have strong draw mental image of safety and trust letting you can is as move away from the secure base in be very very exploratory and then again people have often come upon these things you know whether it's in psychoanalytic literature psychological literature and this phenomenon you're describing driving sometimes called reproche mom or the child as a secure base and then goes out in the world it comes back for refueling now you asking physiology of it. The ALTEA ALTEA is really that they have access to that social engagement suspending the eventual fatal complex that they can move into that state to a top down mental image but if they they've been traumatized they just they don't go back and they stay away because that's the source of the trauma and they try to rely on the day sociation yeah right. They don't have that Resource Have Mentally Mitch and I think I was saying is that the best example of this. It's our children taking out of abusive family situations where they have no history of positive trusting relationship nation ship if they so when I met people I haven't appear to experience survive the most gruesome traumas I always ask them. What whether there was a person in their life that they had a vision of a memory of does that help them traverse those those situations? I've noticed you have been emphasizing in the in the treatment of trauma the idea of they top down making sense of or narrative yeah yeah. I've been working on the notion that bottom up is critical but if you don't have a narrative you're going to understand the bottom up and I'll give you the example even on roller coasters. You've I'm sure you've taken your kids on roller coasters and I mean physiologically. That's no different than jumping out at ten storey window but you're psychological logical experience of it is different is being framed by the fact that you know you'll be heard lease your hope you will be hurt and so you now take those physiological article feelings and you reshape the narrative and then it becomes something like now. I WanNa do it again. I'll give you an example when my oldest son who's now now of thirty nine when he was a two and a half years old I took on space mountain and we're on space bound in his showing up the hill hill end the whole he's in my arms and we're not even unto the real ride and he says I want out okay and I said to him. It's almost done because all the half when it gets going he comes out of it and he's really looking almost green. I really am I look at him. I said wasn't that fun. He thinks about it for a moment. He says let's do it again. You help bring the narrative framed it. Yes and I mean he's he's still loves amusement parks in my younger son loves onto as well and because it gives you these visceral experiences that in other the times of human evolution they would be is life threatening and we can experience these and we can create a narrative inside that was exciting and and then at the same time humans are looking for quietness or stillness Ryo Ryan holiday has a new book called the stillness called Import and go ahead okay listen. This is one of the interesting questions of life that I love to ask people that is how did a view stillness do they view it as a positive moment or a positive experience or they as uncomfortable experience of course anyone with a trauma history will tell you don't WanNa go there still misses. The key is right HOLIDAYSBURG limit limit. Let me use me as an example because I'm a little bit of a bit of trauma and trauma treatment myself and I can tell oh you that I would experience anxiety now I will you want Ankara goes plus who craves still this time slows up yeah. We'll time with slow up well here. Here's the thing that I found and I I'm one of offer this as a personal experience and see if it can help you modify some of your ideas because for I have found true short talks about trauma associated dead spots and I experienced those and what happened to me was in stillness I I would just experience anxiety but in a therapeutic context of holding and safety and all the stuff we've been talking about I would occasionally fall into these almost fugu likes dates dates that were were when I was outside of them. I experience as dread an emptiness but I could experience it on a deeper level in the safety the of that holding environment and found a way to regulate myself out of them that made sense and in those empty spots the self ceases to exist and that's what is so dreadful about them. I think to the brain and also how you bring him do it on its own yeah but there's I mean we really need to unpacked what you said and because under some settings the self not existing is not necessarily a feeling of of loss and despair or fully integrated piss it right it can be the d. m. t. does for you and it could be a sense of connectedness. What is he? I think the the part that I really find kind of really really interesting is the use of asking people how they feel about as loosely a diagnostic tells you whether or not they can deal with immobilization Jose tion or immobilization falling into the abyss losing boundaries leads the dead spot Yep Yep Yep yeah in a these are things that I never thought about or discussed with other people to the past couple of years and then realized that my experiences of this Burnett getting a degree of respect for at but this leads us into something I really wanted to talk about because I think when people people don't feel comfortable instill this it leads to adaptive behaviors to keep them mobilized and this follows that hierarchy of the political sulfuric which says if my body feels like it's going to shut down to the abyss I have to mobilize or what you're calling the anxious anxiety yeah so I get my sympathetic nervous system on board going because I still can send signals to my whole other nommik nervous system the same and so the arousal of flying through the air on a roller coaster or the experience of stillness as as a point of experienced variance where it can be creative or could be spiritual or it could just explore under EEO without the constraints of indifferent former dissociation not association to to hide from something or get away from something but at this Association of Creativity so I've been kind of like thinking about how one can move into those different roles I remember James Masterson and old self psychologists used talk about the creative solution that creativity was what he saw as one of the prime movers of healing and what I'm saying and this is where the legal theory comes in it saying that as we move through these states there's different physial this actually given physiological states in what were experiencing our functionally emerging properties of those physiological states and now I broke a line of thought for a moment now have it back in I tonight for the reasons. I wanted to talk to you. Yes was that I felt that part of this are seeking a mobilization to stay out of the abyss leads people into addictive type behavior whether it's drugs or exercise addiction or this idea that people have to keep moving right so for me for me. It was working well that say move move move move moving right but I would would say that Abi being a worker whole doesn't have to always move move move part of it can be explore explore explore and in evening ninety giving you..

Avon Longitudinal Study Bristol ALTEA ALTEA UK Osha Peter Fonda Makoni Lisa Framingham Cashman sympathetic nervous system space mountain Mitch Allen James Masterson Abi d. m. t. Australian Childhood Foundatio Burnett
"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"This is a big deal and right now for a limited time blink as a special offer for our audience go to blink. SBA Lion K. I. S. T. dot com slash drew start. Your seven-day trial just drew not Dr Drew. That's a seven day unlimited free access trial to read or listened bleakest massive library of books that is blinking one more time be a Lyon K. I S. T. BLINK DOT com slash true to start your free seven-day trial think would get done those seven days. Why wouldn't you do it? Blankets dot com slash drew do do it now. Why wouldn't you get get some more Camano? BLINK DOT com slash drew. Where do you see yourself in ten years? If you need a little help than check out the next ten on podcast one joint Lindsey McCormack Powell Pollen Holland and Kate Edwards three women with wildly different backgrounds as they talk about personal growth discuss their career in pinpoint key moments when their lives changed forever along with exciting guests like rapper rule rule and many more so sicher goals and download new episodes of the next ten every week on apple podcast and podcast one gains wave. I want to touch on a subject that it gets too much negative press and people uncomfortable with it of course it's erectile dysfunction even the way some of the companies that offer solution talk about the condition leave people feeling ashamed or embarrassed through through this as many as thirty million men affected by some far de Giorgi of cases. The cause is not something they can control vascular neurological medical even even more devastating is the fact that every case erectile dysfunction really affects two people the man and his partner stress and strain that puts relationships that can be damaging. I've seen it now. We all know about the pharmaceutical options that had been helping for twenty years plus now for some those treatments are not adequate. The temporary may even be insufficient in some cases and that it is we're gains wave. Maybe a great option gains waves a breakthrough shockwave based treatment that addresses what is the root cause possibly. Ed build up of micro plaque in the penis the buildup can severely impede blood flow necessary for a sustained erection. The gains wave treatment uses sound waves to break up the micro black and approve restore blood flow. It's noninvasive drug free option very promising Cedar takes about twenty minutes. Most men are able to enjoy the benefits the same day best part gains reports a seventy five percent success rate.

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"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

13:19 min | 1 year ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Welcome Dr Podcast there buddy. Thank you for supporting our body. The sports US appreciate very very much. I am I get get checkout dot dot com check out the website. There don't forget after dark. Don't forget unlisted stuff website and sign up for the contact list. We appreciate it very much but I'm very excited to get to my guests which isn't listen Dr Steven Porges. He's been on at least two or three other times. He did one with Adam without to purchase and Gary is GonNa tell me which particular number interviews we've done sixty three ninety and then there's an unnumbered duck adamant Jerusha right though that was the Ataman but so stephen and welcome back. It's Stephen is Distinguished University scientists at the Kinsey Institute in Indiana University Bloomington Professor Department Psychiatry at UNC Chapel Hill North Carolina Carolina and welcome. Thank you very much. Thank you for having me back again. I very kindly sent me a couple of videos of some recent interviews you had done and the generates mentioned questions in my mind and I can't wait to get to those but before we do you did a really great job in one of those videos summarizing getting the polly Bagel theory which is what you're for. I noticed you you speak about it in a way now that I think is has greater clarity and a little more shorthand into it. I wonder if you would go over to our audience so often say this is the least popular question that I that I deal with because pige sometimes. I don't want to stop so I'll probably make grieve basically party Dago theory provides emphasis on the importance of our physiological allstate in our life experiences so in a compensate simple way it's intervening variable between the context in our environmental stimulating what we're being affected by in our responses so when our body changes physiological steinle get mobilized highly aroused we we asked the world very differently that will get a com safe off physiological state probably vaguely theory emphasizes that but does something else with nick price is an explanation of how we shift those physiological states talks about our nervous system's ability to risk in the environment meeting being whether the environment safe whether it's dangerous or were they accused or life threatening in under each of those situations our body goes into a different state and add the system where the sequence of going into different states follow the evolution of our automatic nervous system in vertebrates but it follows in reverse meaning that we started with our newest one which is our social interaction with her voice with face expressively in that functionally is a circuit that comes astound and we can co regularly because mammals ball the diets reports of other people's social networks to to be connected and when we can't corroborate with another person are are we then become our physiology becomes defensively vulnerable to defensiveness of this and we become mobilized or hyper aroused but that doesn't always work to put us in a safe situation in sometimes people shutdown is the symptom the many people who've experienced severe trauma have their body shutdown and this theory explains not knowing the reaction or how we go in those states. It's also explains our adaptive behaviors to try to stay out of those states so that if we have shut down full into this abyss we tend that'd be highly mobilized to do high risk behaviors and this is where addiction comes if the story where people keep moving but underlying underlying that is is that we when we have the severe disruptive thought experiences we don't have access to connecting with other people regularly so what the theory announced explains the consequences of of trauma disruption but also indicates pathways of treatment or how we can rehabilitate that in basically rehabilitation comes when our bodies feel safe to cues of of support from others and alarms don't have cheers they'd get our physiology hyper rows so trauma sort of found you right you originally observed this. They're not thinking of it as a trauma paradigms so much correct that is true I I would say I'm one of the few people in this area trauma that can enter it because of their interest interest in trauma. I came into it because I built the model I created theoretical perspective and at theoretical perspective mapped on the experiences princes of people who've had trauma and suddenly the dialogue the end so let's get a little deeper into it so the vagus nerve is what we're talking about. which is the major for its cranial nerves at the major outflow of the Para sympathetic nervous system from the central nervous system? we were always taught in medical school. I pointed out in our previous interviews that they serve slows the heart down and maybe create some acid secretion by the stomach and that's about all you need to know move on and it turns out the Vegas is a trunk that has dramatic reach into the body but more importantly I believe the numbers eighty percent of it is coming back up from the body right right. It's truly our brain body bridge and it's it's we're all concepts of brain in the brain. Body medicine need to focus on because it's conveying information. It's your surveillance system of your body but it's also the way that your brain can enter into your bodily system and unregulated. Now you mentioned in one of the interviews you gave originally watch. I always wondered what the evolution okay so we have a para sympathetic and a sympathetic system and in gross generalizations the sympathetic is the arousal in the mobilization system is the one that mediates fighter flight some hormonal systems and the Para sympathetic is more towards the shutdown sort of zone well the way it has to be reconceptualized is that when you got when mammals evolved aw they needed to be able to be taken care of labor born unable to survive so they need nurturance and end functionally we still need to be connected to others so the the evolution of the nervous system brought some other things into into play so it brought facial expressively in vocalisations tied them ingrained Sam with the regulation of a newer Mammalian Bagel Bagel pathway that turned all or down regulated hyper arousal compass down. I'm GONNA get it. I'm going to get into the demo hold you because I want to get break it all down just a second before before we do though let's turn to the sympathetic system if you don't mind and you it meant and I always wondered where did that I I get this blared evolution of the Para sympathetic which we'll get into in a minute but I was sympathetic. Come from why is it organized the way it is. Why don't we ever talk about and what does it processing for God's sakes these little ganglion each each at each vertebral level what a weird thing and it travels with the Para sympathetic system except when it doesn't and you mentioned and you mentioned that it came from fish which then I thought oh this is really a primitive system well? It's it came from the spinal Sipa. Thanks before a a spinal sympathetic nervous system which links sympathetic mobilization with actual straighted somatic muscles it was a basically only a chemical system of dropping hormones on the heart and other organs so you you start to get a neural system that gave better coordination moven who've been cooperation so even with fish they swim together. They move quickly they when things become neural you have much more control than when they are merely it chemically regulate systems hormones yeah yeah and so in a weird way so I look out synthetic and I go oh that's just a Dermot Tomo meeting meeting sort of muscle layer wrapping around your body feedback loop. It's a feedback for the movement and this is why thinking speaking of sympathetic nervous system as a fight flight system is an injustice to the sympathetic nervous system. It's part of our moving system is part of our system of exuberance. Prince excitement is feeling good but it can also go into defense in the same thing occurs with with the order nominee nervous system so he talk about it as a break it can become a shutting down system that results in reflexive defecation which gets translated into to irritable Bowel Syndrome it can be related to Basil Bagel syncope or fainting so you see all these symptoms symptoms associated with mental health issues but they're all gonna Nominate Co Morbid. They're part of the same process I I have since we last talk. I've become a little bit fascinated with the insular cortex attacks on the spinal tract. Does the and again just I don't want to get to Germany for our listeners but spot trap is is a small system along the that the the outside. Let's say of the spinal cord that we always were trained sort of worked with movement and coordination stuff but I'm beginning to think that it's carrying information and that the body uses to understand itself. Maybe it's putting it. He's slide over to the insulin insulin as is a mid for literally grounds the CORTEX to the body yeah because it's kind of a continuation of those brain-stem circuits that are monitoring the orchids L. Slowdown mean the ones that we associate with the Vegas or the one. That's okay okay so we think in terms of the day guesses be his surveillance nerve of organs. It goes into brain stem areas brainstorm areas project into the in Salah Indian. Sula functionally is communicating with retire critical areas so if we think in a more abstract way of a system's type model if the CORTEX is not getting information from the body meaning meaning it's disembodied metaphorically the CORTEX start self organizing start self organizing we start talking about psychosis any the emergent properties that are not healthy in our mental health has been dissociation. SAY THE INSULIN I. There's a book called how we feel look serve. What are they gonNA? How do how do you feel or something like that and it's the one that Mona? I'm blanking on her name. The the musician Neuro neuroscientist interviewed she was she has a book about how old the Insulin is organized and on one end it's highly holistic and almost like cloud like and other end it starts to organize into almost a self kind of organized monkey. Let's Yes yes and in many different hunky mapped out on different parts of the body and you see these areas literally communicating with each other. It's so fascinating to me. I I is sort of a zone that's out of control in chronic pain and in addiction it's right and there's actually quite a bit of research now. Look at concepts like body awareness and how it maps into insulin how do you feel because how do you feel by. AD or Bud Craig Greg and it was I know bud to great book to give it's not not for the faint of heart. It's a neuroscience textbook almost a good scholar scholars so I wouldn't expect it to be light reading and he and he came up through his interest in the surface temperature perception in this monotheistic automatic system and he found his way up in the insulin he was moving up the the brain to brock and he's focused on the construct the he is intro -ception knee ceilings in detection of changes in your body and that's where the body organs coming start being able to detect those this contest is her name thanking interest interest Wisconsin's all right so let's go back. We're we're. I hope everyone stay with us. I really want people to if you if you don't follow US DR purchase does a couple of other. Can they find those youtube interviews. You sent me really I find him is go to Youtube in ice search you to Bali Bagel during during the last month so that would see the new ones Fagel and looked at it last month and they'll find the more recent ones and so we we've we've sort of talked around lots of different systems. We're GONNA focus back to the parents of that exist in the Bay so the Vegas as you said has three systems that have evolved over human evolution let me just interrupt per second the autonomic nervous system has three yes and let me just kind of get it give it a clue early..

sympathetic nervous system Vegas US Youtube Stephen Dr Steven Porges insular cortex nick price Bali Bagel Wisconsin Germany Basil Bagel Adam Dermot Tomo UNC Chapel Hill North Carolina brock Gary
"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Thanks for listening to the Dr Drew podcast on podcast one brain news from sprint. The wait is finally over the new Samsung Galaxy note ten with powerful Espen has arrived at sprint and you can get it for fifty percents off in the sprint flex lease. That's right get the power of performance and productivity of the Galaxy Note Ten for less than twenty dollars per month. There's never been a better time to switch to learn more visit your local sprint store sprint dot com slash galaxy note ten or call eight hundred sprint one today nineteen seventy nine a month after one thousand nine hundred credited by two those who grew credit eighteen month lease and new line of Service Lillian Balanced Dukes who snacks coverage now for not available everywhere destination theme restrictions black at farmers insurance we know there's a the crucial difference between a kick drum pedal and your car's accelerator pedal because we covered it click for more underwritten by farmer's truck fire insurance exchange affiliates available in every state. CBD MD it's a leader in the CBD industry. It's known for promoting natural sport recovery relaxation they have topical tinctures Gumy's bath bombs all sorts of alternatives things for your pet in addition escaped the ordinary experience the full range of CBD's properties best of all their products addicts are THC free made from us grown hemp using organic farming methods and unique production processes that include third party testing for both safety and effectiveness and of course everyone's turn the anecdotal reports people are using I sleep anxiety joint pains pain of various types I think also people that were at the clinical sciences not yet caught up with this be were looking with great enthusiasm awesome to see how the research plays out and to make it even easier for our listeners to experience the powerful properties of CBD CBD MD is offering twenty percents off your next order when use the Promo Code Dr drew a checkout again that is CB MD DOT COM Promo Code Dr Jerry W one word at checkout only get twenty percents off your next order of premium CBD oil products from CBD The MD CBD MD everything you want and CBD and nothing you don't financial you is complicated. There's the you with debts and bills that never stop the you would like to put a few bucks away the U. who'd rather buy a place then in pay rent forever. All of you need apps and advice that work for all of you..

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"dr stephen" Discussed on Swimming Upstream Radio Show

Swimming Upstream Radio Show

11:05 min | 1 year ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Swimming Upstream Radio Show

"Well. I actually <hes> did these. He's talks for about ten years and gathered all the moms questions <hes> and all my answers into to a book called. Does your child really have a._d._h._d. <hes> and it's <hes> you can get the book <hes> if you go to rocket phonics dot com <hes> and <hes> <hes> you got questions like how do you how do you handle the angry child because they oppositional defiance. Disorder is very real and house bills. Truth is ask a question. You must give the answer. Yes hi good so the key to <hes> the oppositional defiance. <hes> child is the fact that he blames everybody else for his behavior and the reason he does that is because he doesn't have the <hes> self talk to <hes> <hes> let go of the pain and he doesn't believe that self talk ken. Let go the payment. If my mom said once she said it a million times use your words to which one day i said you know i think i ran out of my words at eight thirty this morning. You know the next time somebody nice man. I'm just gonna punch them out which is okay for a little kid but it's not okay for an adult and and so we often end up in jail any rank the key he to it is to use a tool that we call the love letter for parent or fair fight <hes> because the high auditory tori tend to talk over the low auditory until the low auditory so tired of upping hurt they just figure you know if i punch him in the mouth they'll stop talking and that relieve my pain so <hes> so if you've got a little child and you've got him drunk i highly recommend you weaned him off the drugs and you let his angers <hes> his anger outbursts come but before you do that get get the book. Does your child really have a._d._h._d. Look up the oppositional defiant and how to do it because you've got to teach this child that words which will make him chiel better and you do that. You have opened up a window. That has future wife. We'll be grateful for and you again are absolutely right because see i'm coming. I did not have a medical degree but i do have six kids than the sixty five years behind me and everything you're saying just rings so true and i had to find it out by myself you know but but exactly early and you have already noticed of i'm real high auditory and you you do. You've got to get the words out. It's almost like you think i might die before the question my case. It's a real likelihood but i might die before. I ever finish saying what i got to say. You really have that feeling. I remember by aspen spend jet me home and my dad's saying to him. Someone hasn't been letting this girl talks so that that one is really good at. I should mention at this point that if people come to our website in this case my generation gap dot com they will be able to hear your <hes> <hes> interview plus. They'll be information about getting the book and seven the notes from the from the interview interview so we're doing spotlight interviews now and i just made you a spotlight or you happy. Oh yes. I'm excited say sundays as that's it. Well you know i mean we must take it where i just want you to know that my book has been been nominated mandated for the l. A. press award for books for the air and i don't think the fact that the by my daughter-in-law should make any difference at all to you seems fair and balanced me okay well quickly. I know this is. You're exactly right we do have to have i think you just this became one of our regulars. I just like you a lot. Consider that your burden so before we meet again. What like a couple of <unk> probably next month. What do people that you know. Moms are hanging school disclose started by the time this show will air in september and mom's hanging on by the skin of our teeth if she's like my kids. Were they have already. He sent home message. Is that the kid doesn't there. I remember my oldest son. There was a long long list of things he didn't do he was he it was always getting he ended up a coastguard commander so all right. You know what but what you have to do is learn it with patrick. I remember saying to him honey. You're not wired like other people. Let's find out how your wiring works right yes and sprays reasons and she does so well in the coast guard because he can move to perform so you were going to ask me something. I and i was how i was. I was asking you for five minutes. Unbelievable isn't it but i am asking you for now now. The school has started and mother is starting to get these knows. I know she is can you give an inspirational a word or two to hold her till next month all right well first of all. Let me just say that starting in kindergarten. I was a basically threatened to be kicked out of every school ever went to medical school so my kindergarten principal sat my mother down and said you will never bring this child to school again. Ah the same a different principal at a different school for elementary school <hes> begged my mom to take my take me out of the school and and put me into <hes> a military school and <hes> in high school <hes> my father got the duty and i i have been expelled a month before graduating highschool so if i can become a doctor your child can do anything tame. Let me just say. I didn't actually burn danny sullivan's house down but i did send you a little. You know you go go ahead so really. I you know as one mom said. My child's wasn't as bad as you. You'd have been put in jail but nowadays we have. I'm i'm a taichi practitioner in one of our instructors is very very. Obviously you know it's in the a._d._h._d. Category he's an adult never learned all of these things and he's just gotten fired times but you know stevie my my my first one that we had these is problems with you will be not surprised to know that he was happy. As we were in taiwan at the time he was happy as sliding down a hill in a brown down box around the water buffalo. This was upsetting for mother but he really saw so the only child in our family to drop his baby brother. They're in a banjo ditch presumably with that so i when i say that i am an akin spirit to should the other moms that are listening. I'm serious about it so anyway we we we will so next time. I asked oh nutrition. Do you think next this time where we can talk about nutrition or do you want if you want one of the things that you your mom's really ought to know about little boys because they are totally different than little girls highest. Your highest priority is a mom of a little boy who's to keep komo lives until he grows some common sense. Yes no that will be a lot longer than you think. Shoes is necessary in your boy is not mentally retarded which is just mail so you might wanna talk about the difference between boys and girls. We'll you know talk about nutrition well. I i think i actually think i'd love to talk about the difference between between boys and girls because once again you're absolutely right stevie. We love see the la- he'll be so mad. I said his name on the air but he the last time he earned himself. When he was twenty. Four he dropped a barbell on his nose. No is on his head and said thank goodness. Thank goodness. It wasn't any place you could hurt yourself but they do an any that doesn't think boys and hey girl. You can't just say they are socialized differently. That simply isn't true. A little girl makes them cute little cute <unk> movements and she she colors and she does all these things that have boy wants to make kind of jerky motions and he wants. He's happiest. I said to my son steve. Tell lee tell me an engineering story because exit engineer now and he said mother engineers have no sense of humor. We laugh at bridges that fall down if we didn't build them and otherwise there are no engineering jokes because we're serious so i thought that was humorous. It was a lot of a lot of fun. Would you like a last word while the chance to get it in there <hes> if you're interested in how if a mom's interested susan how to discipline <hes> the little boys <hes> that is also in the book to as your child really have a._d._h._d. Okay and do they order that. May they order it directly from you or from amazon as well directly from me gotten around to putting it on problem <hes> okay good on rockets dot com shirt rocket phonics dot com tom that will be on the website so they can go to that and and see and get a little bit more background on you. I will put it in all whole introduction introduction and ordered that book which sounds to me like it. Has that refreshing common sense. We've all been looking for. I i know from having having been in the trenches myself. Dr steven guffawed once again. It's been justice delight having you with us now. Look talking to you next time. Thanks for listening to swimming upstream upstream dorothy wilhelm. We'll be back.

principal Disorder ken amazon l. A. press Dr steven guffawed dorothy wilhelm stevie commander danny sullivan taiwan patrick komo steve lee engineer sixty five years
"dr stephen" Discussed on Swimming Upstream Radio Show

Swimming Upstream Radio Show

15:14 min | 1 year ago

"dr stephen" Discussed on Swimming Upstream Radio Show

"Hello welcome. It's time to join dorothy wilhelm who had his very minute is swimming upstream because it isn't crowded there. This new show show is for people who want to break away from the ordinary and live as if it mattered. Let's get going dorothy gets crappy. If you keep waiting well hello this is dorothy earthy wilhelm and we are swimming upstream as you know. We do that every every week with a new a new guest because it isn't crowded up there and you meet people that you wouldn't meet anywhere else today. We're especially delighted to have back dr steven galanti who calls himself himself with very little disagreement the poster boy for a. d. h. d. and he is returned to talk without with us about how readers are board and now dr steven you. You have kind of what we'd call a checkered past right well. I'm kind of the black actually for the family. My brothers still has no use for me and my sister lunch me because i'm her brother but that's as far as the cost will old well. That's good news in really i but i sympathize. I know how it is because you haven't done anything the way that you were expected to have you. Although your your accomplishments literally took up two pages i printed them out and you've done a lot you focused focused on creating education that meets the needs of all children and served as medical director at a clinic specializing in learning disorders and then this is kind of interesting has a studied nutrition and its effects on learning. Can we start there or is that a good place. 'cause i'm very interested stood in l. You'll have to have me back for another really need to focus on. That is the focus on something. You wondered where my kids got their a._g. Different okay. Here's the thing you you know i'd. I'd like to take you through a._d._h._d. From the mindset a good doctor okay okay sure. I i think good doctor does is. He looks at the symptoms now if you look at the symptoms of a._d._h._d. Some of you only need six out of eighteen symptoms uh-huh <hes> to be qualified as a._d._h._d. And if you're chilling eat fine but some of the quiz some of the symptoms are he climbs seems too much so squat. I mean from my point of view. I didn't climb too much but my mother who i don't think ever climbed a tree a day or life from her point of view. I climbed too much <hes> one of the other sentences. He gets out of his chair <hes> inappropriately well. Actually i get out of my chair. When i'm tired of sitting you know that doesn't seem inappropriate to me but to the teacher who expects me to sit in the chair for eight hours hours or six or whatever it is longer than than to make sense <hes> i get out of the chair tour and so my what the symptoms of a._d._h._d. Illustrates is <hes> these kids which were in through movement and the people making the diagnosis do not now just second. Let let me let me clarify that a little so and i'm seeing my chris and my at this minute everybody i'm sure that has one of these wonderful people in their houses seeing there's so the fact that they move all the time do not seem to respond appropriately or even in the same room with you. That's all oh part of how they interact with right out they that's how they absorbed information and if you take a hands on learner who learns through movement and touch and you make him sit in a chair who is like twenty i q points really and <hes> yeah <hes>. It's i mean we're always thinking of is a don't move. Don't move. Don't don't move right rather than what you're talking about so okay go ahead so from that viewpoint you should see roughly one third of of the population being called a._d._h._d. But but you don't so there's something more going on but one of the things <hes> that that you look at <hes> objectively is that <hes> these kids half of <hes> our <hes> what they call oppositional defiant <hes> my wife will tell you i'm still oppositional defiant the because i'm the doctor i figure i i am the authority and i'm no longer oppositional defiant. We have mild disagreement of that from time to time anyway. We'll say with that. Why why oppositional defiant is basically an angry kid who <hes> argues with anything. You ask they all do that. That's some do it more than others but really what's driving driving. Them is anger because the things don't go the way for them that they seem to go for everybody else. <hes> you could say that way. I used to tell my father. If you didn't want me to be angry. Stop annoying me. I'm not saying got as a child. I had great insight okay. So why are they. Why are they angry. Why that's a good question and so from so let's let's take a look at what learning styles are and then what they do okay so a learning style preference <hes> basically is you prefer to have information <hes> given to you either by touch or promotion or by visually some of the visual learners auditory now the auditory learners love to discuss things. Things are many lawyers as children. He'll discuss debate visual learners like everything in its place in a place for everything and if you move stuff out of their place you'll you'll hear about it. They know hands two <music>. Thirds of of teachers are visual learners so when i'm moving in the back of the room the teachers driven crazy right because i'm not in my place which is why <hes> they developed the teachers. I mean ninety five percent of all a._d._h._d. For referrals referred report by a teacher but she's just you've just touched on the catch twenty two though the teacher decided what your place was. You know no no. You didn't think that was your place. Well you know let me let me just say as far as i was concerned. As long as some part out of my body was touching some part of my seat. I might say well. Actually that sounds good to meet you. Continue doctor okay okay so <hes> to develop a learning style. You have to filter out input from from one of the other alternatives so i'm developing my hands on learning style. I'm filtering out either. My auditory input like my mom would say i would say it went in one ear and out the other but i don't think he'd even made it in one ear or i'm i'm filtering <unk> out my visual learning style assuming that your population is evenly distributed that means that half of you will will will filter out your auditory learning stuff because you filter it out. You don't develop the language skills at the high auditory orrey have now two things happen. One of the most valuable things happen of talking of developing those language skills. Is that win. Tings upset you when things hurt. You can talk them out well. The low auditory can't so so they hold onto their pain until they're basically <hes> angry. Hall the time or parents are walking on eggshells even even suicidal are we were a case where it went so bad so that we couldn't reach each other and and my jason was actually thinking of hurting himself yeah yes that's when the anger turns inward so and that's a consequence my my theory right. I can tell you what the regular theory is but just let me explain my theory and then i'll tell you the regular theater in a minute so that's a consequence of filtering out auditory input that the brain naturally does to focus on the input wants wants so the hands on learner has a fifty fifty chance and all my when you look at the data what you find wind is that fifty percent of hands on learners or a._d._h._d. Are also oppositional defiant. No my perception section my my perception of the way of of reality fits the data okay then one third of those people are so <hes> auditory deprived that their dyslexic <hes> dyslexia is low finn. Mika awareness cynical awareness live live in the parietal lobe right next to the year and it's part of auditory processing dr connecticut awareness this. Did you say awareness. Now you remember found a you have a country here on the world. What what does that word mean steering the sounds within a word. Oh so that was it can yeah okay go ahead. What makes it sir okay so <hes>. Do you know what i have. Just have you have visited inspiration. Pardon me. I have just realized you know i went to a one room schoolhouse. I'm i'm you know the typical radio personality learner in a one room schoolhouse us with seven grades in one room. You learn very fast because you get to pick. The all of the learning styles are being offered once for different grade a loan that is right. That's what i did a wonderful person dr ed okay so <hes> <hes> if you know so one of the things is my viewpoint picks the data right so now you have the diagnosis of a._d._h._d. In the medical world after you have symptoms and you have object to findings and you make a diagnosis and in the medical world the university custody <hes> the oregon health and sciences university has looked at over five thousand studies on a._d._h._d. Remits and they have found that zero. None of the meds solve the three major issues of a._d._h._d. Which is <hes> <hes> hyperactivity impulsiveness and inattentiveness right so you would think <hes> zero out of five thousand. That's really bad batting thing average. You would think they stop that. You know like maybe twenty years ago but no they just keep failing. So why does their treatment fail because they have the wrong insight. Now we all agree both me and and the experts in the field if agreed agreed that a._d._h._d. Is a genetic disorder right in other words who turned it down so if it wasn't you it was their father. Actually it was thank you very much but it was. My brother had it my <hes> my my dad. <hes> thought he was a failure all his life because everyone told him he was in those days you know really he was. He was really clever person but he didn't fit the mold and then by <unk>. I'ma youngest son of course was very dyslexic and but he's an attorney so that's okay you make right yeah so <hes> what happens is <hes>. If you go and do the research you'll find that the same genes that code for a._d._h._d. Code for entrepreneurship right. It'd be entrepreneurs. The people that are solving the problems of our society today hey are currently being drugged so that they can sit still in their classroom and then they'll like a in child who is not hands on learner. You are absolutely three thousand percent right. I know that you were worried about that. But did you all well. I've seen it so what i used to go to to homeschool conventions enchants. I gave talks on how to educate a hands on learner <hes> without drugging him so i bet a hands on drooler. That's very good but you know what's interesting. Though is that <hes> when because my kids of course i render their fifties now in a way we were lucky because they didn't know exactly what the trouble was. I mean they got punished a lot but they didn't get drugged and we never never took the attitude that they couldn't learn that. They couldn't go to college and they're all they. We're allowed to do that and and i think today are not what are we.

dorothy wilhelm dr steven galanti dr steven medical director oregon chris attorney three thousand percent ninety five percent fifty percent twenty years eight hours