17 Burst results for "Dr Scholtz"

"dr scholtz" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

05:31 min | 3 months ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"You ever heard someone say that they know. A storm is coming because their joint start to ache. And they have a Migraine well. There's a scientific basis to that, but what about general pain receptors during calm, weather patterns in past decades it was difficult to answer such a general science question, but not anymore. Today's guest is Dr David Schultz from the University of Manchester to talk about this study, and how smartphones help his team complete. The research Dr Scholtz. Thank you for joining us on the weather. GEEKS podcast. Thank you for having me well. First of all, let me just say Dave Schultz is one of the sort of in my opinion, giants of the Field of meteorology I've known of him and had a chance to interact with him. For many years now, and followed his work and people who know me, your Gino his name, so it's not or have you on the whether podcasts. Let me just give a little of your background just so people will know what I'm talking about. He's a professor of synoptic urology at the Center for Atmospheric Science in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences and the center, for Crisis Studies and mitigation at the university, in Manchester, England and he's been there since two thousand nine has won multiple teaching awards at the institution cheese, a chief editor of the monthly weather review, which is one of the. Most, significant and important journals in the field of meteorology. He's also the author and I. Hope to talk to You more about this of of really nice book called Eloquent Science, a practical guide to becoming a better writer speaker in atmospheric scientist, there are more things that I'm going to sprinkle in throughout the podcast day, but before I do that day the question that I ask everyone on the podcast. Right out of the gate. How'd you get interested the urology? I think as a child. I was always interested in sciences the outdoors. I enjoyed. Hiking around in the woods, walking around into streams, turning over rocks, see what lives underneath it, and so it was. Natural that I would take some kind of. Earth. Science or natural science that is is my career. To talk to my mom says. That she recognized. Meteorologist an early age building Whether instruments with my dad and I grew up south of Pittsburgh, so we had. We've listened to. Bob Kuzma on Katie K. and. My mother ran into him in the grocery store, and so he sent me a letter invited me. Down to the studio, which never took the took him up on that offer, but it was. It was very nice and so. I ended up going to mit for undergraduate and. At the time I thought I'm going to be meteorologist, but at the time MIT didn't have a lot of depth in terms of their undergraduate program, so I kind of dabbled around for a couple of years took the required courses. For Generic degree within your Science Department and I made a decision. Okay well. Maybe I should not just dabble, but but take a pretty consistent. Curriculum and so I I did a lot of geology courses and graduated with that, although by the third and fourth years I started taking more environmental science courses, hydrology carry manuals, introduction, damage, feerick, science, and and those kinds of courses and so When I started applying to graduate schools. Doubts that background I think. Has Helped, and certainly it's been quite. Now in my career, because I am in an earthy environmental science department, and and the fact that I know what a difference between a solid and a granite is. I think sometimes. You know. The ears in eyes will pull up a little bit among my colleagues when. I can. I can talk to them about this stuff. It's interesting to hear some of your background sin some ways very similar to mine, because I was always that kid curious about what was going on in nature, building weather instruments, my sixth grade science. Sixth grader predictable weather. Building weather instruments, but now I'm also a department. That's not a traditional meteorology department. Although that's what I come out at Florida state, but myself in your couch. We both know very well John Knox. Geography Department are Home Department at the University of Georgia. Though we also have an atmospheric sciences program, talking with Dave, Schultz now to continue with some of his background, two thousand six to two, thousand, nine, hundred Professor Experimental Meteorologist University of Helsinki and Finnish Meteorological Institute, and for Ten Years Nineteen Ninety six to two thousand six. T worked for Noah's national severe storms. Lab is a research meteorologist in. He led a field campaign called Which is the Inter Mountain precipitation experiment has the speed as you heard from MIT master's from university Washington and a PhD from University of Albany, all very sound a major atmosphere. Sciences programs, a small correction I Chola the becks okay. They don't want to take away the credit of the other side room. We will make sure that our colleagues understand that now just a curious question because we want.

professor Dave Schultz Dr David Schultz Dr Scholtz University of Manchester Center for Atmospheric Science Department of Earth and Enviro Migraine Professor Experimental Meteoro Field of meteorology University of Albany Katie K. MIT University of Helsinki Manchester Geography Department England Inter Mountain Florida becks
"dr scholtz" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

09:03 min | 7 months ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on Ologies

"For the Flimflam question? I debunked the Flimflam now. Is that when you see a bird? That's really brightly colored parrot for example. You have to think about where it's coming from and actually these bright bright bright green parrot. We think being bright but it's actually very cryptic in the habitat that it's from and so if you ever try and find a pair in Green Tree you'll query quickly understand that these birds are actually super hard to see. And so if you ever burning in the tropics actually find. It's very difficult to see many birds. And it's because you know there's this great variety of habitats and light environments There's you know that makes it really hard to see all these there are some flocks of parrots in La. Yes do you ever get to see them? Oh yeah we see almost every day you know. There's a yellow. Chevron parakeets will come and feed in our trees here at the museum. Is it true or false that some of those parents that green parents were like a pet store fire and burbank have heard that I have heard that urban legend false probably there's a grain of truth there? I mean the truth is that so we've got ten to twelve species of Here in L. A. That are now what we call naturalized which means they're breeding And so all of these birds came from the pet trade parrots by the by our from tropical and subtropical regions so like not southern California from elsewhere. These stunning beauties arrived here on the hopes. It makes someone a buck but they ended up breaking free this system and then just bubbling about kind of aimless. Just like most of us. La Transplants and you know it's probably a combination of pets getting away you know. Potentially shipments of birds getting loose. It makes sense that if you have like a small flock for example would be more likely that they would become established. And so you know a pet store fire could have had something to do with it but probably not everything okay. Yeah I told Allison that I see some in my neighborhood when I go for walks lately have been more frequent so yeah the red Crown Paris up there. Yes I think that's what we I think. That's what I see. I heard them at night there so loud and I couldn't. I was what animals that and I realized later that it was a parrot back. It's okay cited when I see them. It's like oh I know it's I love seeing the blocks appearance and you know. They're very apparent when they're coming because they're so loud. How come there aren't more blue birds that would blend in with a Sky. Goo Good question so part of that has to do with. How blue as made so. Let's circle back to that point that I was making earlier about how bird colors are made so there are two main ways that birds can make colors. I mean not just there are only two ways. The birds can make colors. One is by refracting color off of the structure of their feathers. So that means when light comes in it's reflected at certain wavelengths might be reflected based on how the feather nanostructures how the feather molecules are shaped And the other is based on pigments that absorb certain wavelengths of color. Okay okay so color can be straight up. Pigment or structural got it so You know we talked about Melanin. So browns and blacks those are all melanin molecules. So that's you know Melanin as a pigment that absorbs almost all wavelengths of light. There's a pigment called Keratin AIDS which is the other most common bird pigment. So this is produces almost all oranges yellows and reds and birds but Bloomberg's is not produced payment and it's produced by the feather structure. Oh Yeah and so you know you might be might be harder to of all the blue feather structure for example. That's kind of the evolution of these coloration mechanisms. It's something that's some somewhat knew and kind of up and coming in the field. That's so interesting. Never knew that okay so I look this up. And it's almost like there's a spongy layer made of Carrollton an air that sits on top of a melanin layer and it's the structure of that sponge that throws light in the blue range back. Now your colours have a few layers of Melanin that scatter light depending on your angle to the sun and the feather now. All of this is happening. Deep in the teeny barbs embar. Buell's to make up birds in all shapes and sizes and degrees of flamboyance what about head crests is that mostly just display yes so there are certain regions of the bird that we often see more colorful and crests are are one way that birds can use for display and for social signaling and one kind of convenient thing for birds about Chris and head in these crest colors is that they can show off when they went to or they can hide them when they don't they can. Yeah thanks and just have it up exactly so then when they you know want to show off to you know they're lady or their you know their guy. Depending 'cause sexual selection works both ways. It's not just females. You know trying to get males males drank it feels too But you know when there's maybe their foraging and they don't want to be attracting a predator. They can put down their crest and make themselves less conspicuous. That's genius. I never realized that. The ultimate crest This bird Monarch Flycatcher what is it like? Catcher is a birds and insectivores spurred literally the crest looks like a crown. It's called a monarch because it looks like a crown into this bright orange and blue. I highly recommend googling Dr Scholtz because she's awesome emailed me after our chat to let me know that she meant to say Royal Flycatcher not a monarch flycatcher. Now she also attached a picture of a royal flycatcher. And y'all imagine if on your face you grew like a traffic cone. Orange Polka dotted fan. Just a fan right between your eyes. It's spunky it's bold in the photo she sent. The birds mouth is just slightly open. And the quarters. Kinda raised in an expression that read Idaho Right now. I will now change the subject to bird legs Al Legs. So Harry who knew does it ever. Does it ever freak you out that Alice have such long legs? They're discovered in furry pantaloons. That's good. Yeah so that's another. You're full of great question. I'm I'm just peppering you with so many such a barrage so first of all. Actually a lot of birds do have much longer legs than you think of they are. They're just covered there. They kind of will hold them close to their body. Cavities see. Don't realize just how long bird legs aren't And Free I think furry legs are so cool yeah weird sub probably has something to do with both Moore. Actually owls aren't the only ones that have free legs. They're birds that live on ice and snow like these birds called ptarmigan also have furry furry legs for feet so keep them warm not all else have free legs. Only some of them. Do you sign important paperwork with a quill pen. I don't but I should be I. I like it. Ps there are many many youtube videos that can usher you down a rabbit hole of making your own authentic goose quill ink pen and they involve baking the quill in a skillet of hot sand to cure it and then slicing it at a precise angle and I watched several with just wrapped curiosity and then I saw them used the quilter right and they can like one splashy word before having to read dip it and I was like fuck this dude. Unibond GEL pens an indoor plumbing forever. Antibiotics I'm good with modern times. Thanks so yeah. Quilt pens can hold much ink. But what about the feather barbs? What can those things Sop can? I just tell you a quick feather fact that so. There's like this really unknown right. Really cool species of bird called a sand grouse. There's a species that lives in the desert and actually the adult birds have very specialized belly feathers that water and so they'll fly for kilometers every day to the watering hole and soak their bellies then fly back to their baby birds and bring them back. These like you know water so they can drink it so they actually like you know. Drink the water from the belly of the adult bird. Oh that's really cool looking like spiraling feathers. You look at them under a microscope. Okay yes so I looked up and instead of straight barbs there he local kind of like a curly ribbon on some festive gift. Wrap just learn of water for the Bibi's so next time you're in the kitchen just like dunk. Your permanent two liter of mountain dew suck dry back at your desk which is.

Royal Flycatcher Al Legs La Green Tree burbank California Crown Paris Chevron Idaho youtube Allison Bloomberg Bibi Dr Scholtz Buell Alice Harry Moore Chris
"dr scholtz" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

08:34 min | 1 year ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"I celebrate Dr king by remember his beyond Vietnam speech. It's available on YouTube. I think all of you should just listen to it because all week long or at least the next couple of days. I'm sure we're going to have I have a dream. And that's an important part of that king's legacy. His dream about equality in this country. But I think people overlook his real militancy and how people turned against him. I in after he made his beyond Vietnam a speech in New York one year to the day that he was to be killed you need to listen to that. It's the same kind of things that I tell you about violence in American imperialism, and the things he was talking about in Vietnam was still doing in Iraq, and Libya and Syria and Afghanistan, you should listen to it beyond Vietnam. Okay. The conservative road back on name used to scared to put their names out there. Is that we would do something about it? I got your phone number. I'm not going to bother you. Man, discussion of ideas. The person says I would ride to commuter train every day you tell me what kind of lawsuits you have to go through from the liberal plaintiffs. If you tried to put rails back in on their precious bicycle trails, if it were in the national need, I'm sure we'd find some other places to wrap our bicycles. If you just wouldn't run us over on the streets. And that's why I still suggest you get a bicycle. I don't think that there'd be a lot of lawsuits there. If the word they'd be and overcome fossil fuels are renewable. That's the only intelligent thing. Jerry is ever said. How do you think they got here in the first place? Well, it did means a years. According to my eighth grade, science classes almost dinosaurs had to die. Have you seen any of those late late before they could be renewed into fossil fuels as Serena call him fossil fuels takes awhile while to gain Derek from Brentwood says about the native American it's hard to find. But there is a full video where they aren't even paying any attention to him. And he walks up to them beating his drum after watching that full video in my opinion. He did all that gesture provoke into reacting. I'm reading it as written. Well, I've seen one video and it lasted for about seven or eight minutes. And I thought that the kids would be in ridiculous. Will they were paying attention to it? Manatt mocking people is not a good way to go. I really don't believe in the Indian Magara had kid video. Then tell me the kid is responsible. You won't it's the Indian and his friends were shouting the gay f word. Re relay on that relay on net. Now, okay. Mr. Moore, thanks for being bipartisan on there. You welcome. Now that lady is your typical liberal Trump hater. Rant and rave listening to your show. First time, I'm enjoying it. Tom, isn't that one? I don't surely believe from this climate change the way they're saying it, However, I do see what harm as a matter of fact, it's a positive to do solo on every house every building every business even five thousand watts supplemental in the sun belt more if you can afford, it it would be hundreds of billions in energy, one of the reasons think climate change people think climate change is BS is the problem the individual has control money money money hybrid cars, one hundred miles per gallon, easy. Don't know why money science CJ. All right. Let's go back to the phones. Let's go to George and Apollo George Joan Katie k Hello, Chris Georgia, and I've talked to while over the time. But. The the. Some known as anti gravity joy for all these reasons, and I heard a now the people in ahead of them here about energy, and I just wanted to say that STI back and Reagan years is space, skin invasion, and that was related to an anti gravity machine. Anti gravity machine is both a generator when it's at low speed and a fire at high speed, I experience real experience. Now, we built one in two weeks without a doctor sholls deceased and the help of a Cyril and Englishman. So I know it's on the books, but it's not I don't know. The. What practical energy? Evola mutation would anti gravity machine. Half an anti gravity machine is an example, doctor sholls headed so structured that we don't take us three point four days to get to the moon and back Mars and six weeks. Machine would be flying at sixty thousand. I mean, it goes faster. But we were only designed for sixty thousand miles an hour. If you know that that's three snaps a your finger around this planet. Sounds like dad Smith's space coupe from the dick, Tracy. The market has been died. It's STI is the Blackhawks I don't know if it's how far it's gone in that it's not my area. But I do know this it come into the public domain, for instance, anti gravity property structured for trucks instead of having a size and thousands of pines road. You can lighten him up, but you have to have resistance to drive down a road you understand, but you could fly away, but it's also an energy. It's an machine and what it does is it. Guitars. I'll say that for simplicity space time when you can buy you have a just a river Allegheny river, if this technology is so readily available why hasn't someone taking advantage of it seemed to me that the United States or Russia would pull it to military use. I well, the the the the the Russians tried to duplicate it now and he went into economic ruins back. So it's too expensive to use them. No, it's not they just don't understand it. And I'll give you an example, if I call Carnegie tech, which I have recently there isn't one PHD Elise. So advertising their age that studying anti gravity. Penn State's doing it a little bit on there. And the reason that it isn't known doctor Scholtz did it when he put it up, George. I got this named fine. But I wanna tell you something there's nothing in the science here that could describe why it's working in. I know why it's working. There's a thing called the fourth rule, which is a balanced imbalance of the electromagnetic phenomena. Which somebody who's going to get a PHD on? But once they get over that. And put the fourth rule Newton where it's supposed to be you will have anti gravity. But it's the thing is that I just happened to fall into it. By way of cereals work over in England. It does work, and we have you have you demonstrated. How it works to anyone? The demonstration was by Dr Scholtz down in Pittsburgh area, sitting in and one of the nuclear building a nuclear profession. He's probably the craft laying up against the wall. And no everybody's scratching their head. What it is forty eight inch would seems to me if if if it were developed someone would recognize the value of and and try to develop it further, Chris the STI project is most likely those flying triangles you see out of area fifty four. Fifty one rather tell you he built this thing. And he says he called me, George. He says I got the thing going up and down. I can't get any motion to the side one. I says, well, that's I saw him as simple as a three legged costal. And he says, what are you talking about ISIS? We put three Motors on that one for balancing the center, George. I I was I had more time to explore this. But it seems to me if it would there somebody like you smart guys would develop it, we'll take this break and come back..

George Joan Katie Vietnam doctor Scholtz STI Dr king YouTube Chris Georgia New York Iraq Allegheny river Cyril Jerry Penn State Serena Mr. Moore Blackhawks Syria Tom PHD Elise
"dr scholtz" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

08:48 min | 2 years ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on KCBS All News

"More Americans died of drug overdoses than in the entire Vietnam. War while Schulz ended up in jail now in cross the pharmaceutical company that flooded Florida with hundreds of millions of oxycodone pills paid a relatively small penalty. The question now being debated in congress and in federal court is who is responsible for the opioid epidemic. The doctors who prescribed the pills or the opioid manufacturers and distributors who supplied them. Dr Barry Schultz is an inmate at Florida state prison where he will likely be incarcerated until the day. He dies in. This is only interview short said he wanted to go on camera to explain that. He has been singled out unfairly, I'm a scapegoat. You're a scapegoat. I mean, I was one of hundreds of doctors that were prescribing medication for chronic pain prosecutor called you killer. I see myself as a healer in my mind, what I was doing was legitimate in the early two thousand shorts was a pioneer on the wild West Frontier of paying treatment doctors drug dealers opioid users and abusers were flocking to Florida or powerful pain pills were being prescribed and dispensed by new type of business pain clinics. We had more pain clinics and years twenty ten and twenty eleven then we had McDonalds in. Those years. There was one St. in Broward County Oakland park boulevard that had thirty one different pain clinics on the one St. Florida state attorney Dave Arron bergh's office, prosecuted berry Scholtz, he told us pain clinics were loosely regulated medical offices where patients could pick up pills usually for cash. Few questions asked you could get the prescription and get the drug right there on the spot one. Stop shopping people would race down to Florida because we didn't have the same controls as other states. We fed the entire nations addiction this mob scene shot on a cell phone in two thousand nine is inside of Florida pain clinic, dozens of patients waiting to get their opioids Schulz operated a clinic like this in Delray Beach where he treated thousands of patients. How would you describe? Dr Barry Schultz. He was one of the most notorious drug dealers we had he prescribed in agree GIS amount of pills to his patients. The numbers would shock the conscience. DA records show in two thousand ten one patient of Dr Schultz was prescribed nearly seventeen thousand of the highest potency oxycodone pills in a seven month period. Another got more than twenty three thousand over eight months. That's more than one hundred pills a day business was so good shorts was making more than six thousand dollars a day. Prescribing and selling opioids to his patients the numbers of pills that your prescribing astronomical who takes that many pills and puts them into their body. What were you thinking? I was thinking at the patient was a genuine patient who had real chronic pain who's complaints. And then I was prescribing medication that they needed doctor you prescribe a thousand opioid pills to a pregnant woman. I don't think most doctors would prescribe one thousand aspirins were pregnant woman I would like to stop. Just like you to explain your your thinking. This is not expect. I believe it's unfair. What is it? What is unfair? Dr. I'm just uncomfortable with with these these charged questions these are questions that people have this is why you are sitting here wearing this jumpsuit this alternate leave. He agreed to continue. This is your he claimed some of his patients needed extremely high doses of opioids for long periods of time to alleviate severe persistent pain, and what I started treating people with chronic non cancer pain. I felt it was unethical and discriminatory to limit the dose of medication. And if I had known that the overdose incidence had increased dramatically the way it had. I would have moderated my approach doctor. How could you have not known all you had to do pick up the paper in two thousand nine more than twenty nine hundred people died in Florida of drug overdoses mostly from prescribed opioid pills. In one sixteen month, period. DA records show berry shorts dispensed eight hundred thousand opioid pills from his office pharmacy people who've become addicted to these drugs people have died because of these drugs people in your practice died from overdoses of opioids a person. One is enough. Monster in my son. Carrollton son, David went to Dr Schultz for pain management after a car accident shorts prescribed an assortment of pain pills. Even after David became addicted in two thousand ten David died of an overdose of opioids prescribed by Dr Scholtz, so should Dr Scholtz of prescribed these pain pills tour. He didn't even examine him seen him in four and a half years. He just. Just wrote road at these scripts concerned, he's a murderer and not a doctor. He murdered my son. He could he didn't need a gun. He used his pen to Martin, and my son also showed says he was inspired to prescribe high doses of opioids after attending a lecture by this, man. Dr Russell Portnoy who was the influential president of the American pain society. Portnoy traveled around the country, giving lectures and made promotional videos like this one in two thousand touting opioids as wonder drugs, urging doctors to use them aggressively to relieve pain, the likelihood that the treatment of pain using an opioid drug which is prescribed by a doctor will lead to addiction is extremely low but ten years later as opioid addiction exploded, Dr Portnoy said he had been part of a broad campaign funded by pharmaceutical companies to encourage the widespread use of opioids I gave innumerable lectures in the late nineteen eighty s and nineteen ninety s at which I said things about addiction that we're in true. He said he believed at the time he was operating in good faith and was not unduly influenced by the pharmaceutical industry still he has been named in dozens of lawsuits don't Russell Portnoy. He was paid by the drug companies. And has said that there is no proof that these that high doses of opioids are effective intriguing chronic pain. That may be true. But there's true. This is there's no science to backup. What you were doing. There's there's only anecdotal information. I guess what? I find troubling. Is. Your lack of acceptance that what you did was wrong. I don't believe what was wrong. When you're giving somebody sixty oxycodones day. How could they not abuse? It. Sixty day is a large number. I admit that's a very large. If it's taken properly. How can you take sixty quote on a day properly? Some people leave that us there is no scientific evidence to support that claim with so many opioids prescribed by Schultz and other unscrupulous doctors pills started flowing into the streets and resold for profit what the DA calls diversion. Sixty six percent of all the oxycodone in Florida came from just one company Mellon crowd. One of the.

Dr Barry Schultz Florida oxycodone Dr Russell Portnoy Schulz Dr Scholtz McDonalds congress Vietnam berry Scholtz David Broward County Russell Portnoy Delray Beach prosecutor St. Florida Dave Arron bergh Martin
"dr scholtz" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"I believe it's unfair. What is it? What is unfair? Dr. I'm just uncomfortable with with these these charged questions these are questions that people have this is why you're sitting here wearing this jumpsuit this alternate league, he agreed to continue. This is your claimed some of his patients needed extremely high doses of opioids for long periods of time to alleviate severe persistent pain. And when I started treating people with chronic non cancer pain, I felt it was unethical and discriminatory to limit the dose of medication. And if I have known that the overdose incidence had increased dramatically the way it had. I would have moderated my approach doctor. How could you have not known? All you had to do is pick up the paper in two thousand nine more than twenty nine hundred people died in Florida of drug overdoses, mostly from prescribed opioid pills. In one sixteen month, period. DA records show berry shorts. Dispense eight hundred thousand opioid pills from his office pharmacy people who've become addicted to these drugs people have died because of these drugs people in your practice died from overdoses of opioids person. One is enough that monster in my sense. Carrollton son, David went to Dr Schultz for pain management after a car accident shorts prescribed an assortment of pain pills. Even after David became addicted in two thousand ten David died of an overdose of opioids prescribed by Dr Scholz. So should Dr Scholtz have prescribed these pain pills tour. Yeah. He didn't even examine him. He hadn't seen him in four and a half years. He just. These scripts. Concerned. He's a murderer. And none doctor. He married. My son is he could eat didn't need a gun. He used his pen Martin and my son. Also, be sure says he was inspired to prescribe high doses of opioids after attending a lecture by this man. Dr Russell Portnoy who was the influential president of the American pain society, Portnoy traveled around the country, giving lectures and made promotional videos like this one in two thousand touting opioids as wonder drugs, urging doctors to use them aggressively to relieve pain, the likelihood that the treatment of pain using an opioid drug which is prescribed by a doctor will lead to addiction is extremely low but ten years later as opioid addiction exploded, Dr Portnoy said he had been part of a broad campaign funded by pharmaceutical companies to encourage the widespread use of opioids gave innumerable lectures in the late nineteen eighty s and nineteen nineties which I said things about addiction that weren't true. He said he believed at the time. He was. Operating in good, faith and was not unduly influenced by the pharmaceutical industry still he has been named in dozens of lawsuits don't Russell Portnoy. He was paid by the drug companies. And said that there is no proof that these that high doses of opioids are effective in treating chronic pain. Then maybe true. But there's an honest true. Because there's no science to back up what you were doing. There's there's only anecdote all information. I guess what? I find troubling..

Dr Russell Portnoy Dr Scholz Dr Scholtz Russell Portnoy David Dr Schultz Florida Martin president one sixteen month ten years
"dr scholtz" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

11:11 min | 2 years ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Stop shopping people would race down to Florida because we didn't have the same controls as other states. We fed the entire nations addiction this mob scene shot on a cell phone in two thousand nine is inside of Florida pain clinic, dozens of patients waiting to get their opioids Scholz operated a clinic like this in Delray Beach where he treated thousands of patients. How would you describe? Dr Barry Schultz. He was one of the most notorious drug dealers we had he prescribed in agreed amount of pills to his patients. The numbers would shock. The conscience. The records show in two thousand ten one patient of Dr Schultz was prescribed nearly seventeen thousand of the highest potency oxycodone pills in a seven month period. Another got more than twenty three thousand over eight months. That's more than one hundred pills a day business was so good shorts was making more than six thousand dollars a day. Prescribing and selling opioids to his patients the numbers of pills. You're prescribing astronomical. Who takes that many pills and puts them into their body. What were you thinking? I was thinking at the patient was a genuine patient who had real chronic pain who's complaints were legitimate. And I was prescribing medication at they needed doctor you prescribe a thousand opioid pills to a pregnant woman. I don't think most doctors would prescribe one thousand aspirin to a pregnant woman. I would like to stop. Which is like you to explain your your thinking. It's unfair. What is it? What is unfair? Dr. I'm just uncomfortable with with these these charged questions these are questions that people have this is why you are sitting here wearing this jumpsuit this alternate lead. He agreed to continue. This is your he claimed some of his patients needed extremely high doses of opioids for long periods of time to alleviate severe persistent pain, and what I started treating people with chronic non cancer pain. I felt it was unethical and discriminatory to limit the dose of medication. And if I had known that the overdose incidents had increased dramatically the way it had. I would have moderated my approach doctor. How could you have not known? All you had to do is pick up the paper in two thousand nine more than twenty nine hundred people died in Florida of drug overdoses, mostly from prescribed opioid pills. In one sixteen month, period. DA records show berry Scholz dispense eight hundred thousand opioid pills from his office pharmacy people who've become addicted to these drugs people have died because of these drugs people in your practice died from overdoses of opioids a person. One is enough that monster in my son. Carrollton son, David went to Dr Schultz for pain management after a car accident shorts prescribed an assortment of pain pills. Even after David became addicted in two thousand ten David died of an overdose of opioids prescribed by Dr Schultz. So should Dr Scholtz of prescribed these pain pills to her. He didn't even examine him. Hey, hadn't seen him in four and a half years. He just. I just wrote run-up these scripts. He's concerned he's a murderer and not a doctor. He married my son. He could eat didn't need a gun. He used his pen. And my son also showed says he was inspired to prescribe high doses of opioids after attending a lecture by this, man. Dr Russell Portnoy who was the influential president of the American pain society, Portnoy traveled around the country, giving lectures and made promotional videos like this one in two thousand touting opioids as wonder drugs, urging doctors to use them aggressively to relieve pain, the likelihood that the treatment of pain using an opioid drug which is prescribed by a doctor will lead to addiction is extremely low. But ten years later as opioid addiction exploded, Dr portnoy's said. He had been part of a broad campaign funded by pharmaceutical companies to encourage the widespread use of opioids I gave innumerable lectures in the late nineteen eighties and nine hundred ninety s in which I said things about addiction that we're in true. He said he believed at the time he was operating in good faith and was not unduly influenced by the pharmaceutical industry still he has been named in dozens of lawsuits two Russell Portnoy. He was paid by the drug companies. And said that there is no proof that these that high doses of opioids are effective in treating chronic pain. That may be true true. There's no science to back up what you were doing. There's there's only anecdotal information. I guess what? I find troubling. Is. Your lack of acceptance that what you did was wrong. I don't believe it was wrong. When you're giving somebody sixty oxycodones day. How could they not abuse? It. Sixty day is a large number. I admit that's a very large. If it's taken properly. How can you take sixty actually quote on day, proper, some people leave that there is no scientific evidence to support that claim with so many opioids prescribed by Scholz and other unscrupulous doctors pills started flowing into the streets and resold for profit what the DA calls diversion? Sixty six percent of all the oxycodone in Florida came from just one company Mellon crowd. One of the country's largest opioid suppliers. Florida state attorney Aaron bird told us between two thousand eight and twenty twelve the company flooded the state with pain pills battlecry sent five hundred million oxycodone pills to the state of Florida state with a population of twenty million people. We're talking about enough pills to give every resident Florida twenty-five oxycodone pills. How's that possible? I mean, you're talking about enough pills to create a entire state of addicts internal Justice department documents obtained by sixty minutes reveal that quote Mellon Croats owned data on berry Scholtz indicated that he was purchasing large amounts of oxycodone in a suspicious pattern indicating diversion yet. The company kept shipping the drugs to the distributor. It new supplying Schultz the company's behavior was so flagrant it triggered a DA investigation. Led by Jim Rafalski. So what role does melon crop play in this opioid crisis? They're responsible. They are responsible. Especially for the conduct in Florida. That's a big statement. How can you not be responsible? How can you walk away from five hundred million pills to a geographic area like the size of Florida and knowing at the time this was occurring? There is an opioid crisis. There that wasn't a secret reform ski now an expert witness for states and municipalities suiting drug companies told us his team identified almost forty four thousand orders Mellon crotch should have reported as suspicious, which the government says the company is required to do by law reforms he says melon reported none. But when D investigators handed their evidence to the Justice department government, lawyers fearing long uncertain legal battle decided not to pursue the case in court, but to settle instead of gone after. Melon crop for everything you saw them doing. What would define have been? Two point four billion dollars. And the actual fine was thirty five million. The penalty amounted to less than one week of the company's annual revenue melon Pratt declined to do an on camera interview. But told us it never sold directly to doctor sholls only two distributors in a press. Release the company denied it violated any applicable laws but said going forward, it would analyze all internal data and identify suspicious sales. Both Trump and Obama administrations have sent hundreds of doctors to jail for their roles in the opioid crisis. So far, not one executive of an opioid manufacturer or distributor has been sentenced to a single day in jail. Now called order. Now, the pharmaceutical industry is coming under scrutiny. In may a congressional committee called the heads of the five leading drug distributors the middlemen that ship the pain pills from manufacturers like melon crop to drugstores around the country. Mississippi congressman Gregg Harper asked if they were complicit in causing the drug crisis. You believe that the actions that you or your company took contributed to the opioid epidemic this to Barrett. Sorry. I do not believe that we contributed to the opioid crisis. Doctrine must Andrea. Yes. Only one of the five said yes to Hamilton. Now. This house committee has launched an investigation into Mellon crowd and other drug manufacturers. The Justice department has formed a task force targeting opioid manufacturers and distributors when you were convicted of fifty five counts of drug trafficking as for Barry Schultz shortly after our interview he received a final sentence. One hundred fifty seven years the longest sentence of anyone so far in this opioid crisis. Store the.

Dr Barry Schultz Florida oxycodone berry Scholz Dr Russell Portnoy Justice department Dr Scholtz Delray Beach David congressman Gregg Harper Mellon Hamilton aspirin melon Barrett Andrea
"dr scholtz" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

11:13 min | 2 years ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Stop shopping people would race down to Florida because we didn't have the same controls as other states. We fed the entire nations addiction this mob scene shot on a cell phone in two thousand nine is inside of Florida pain clinic, dozens of patients waiting to get their opioids Scholz operated a clinic like this in Delray Beach where he treated thousands of patients. How would you describe? Dr Barry Schultz. He was one of the most notorious drug dealers we had he prescribed in agreed amount of pills to his patients. The numbers would shock the conscience. DA records show in two thousand ten one patient of Dr Schultz was prescribed nearly seventeen thousand of the highest Putin's the oxycodone pills in a seven month period. Another got more than twenty three thousand over eight months. That's more than one hundred pills a day business was so good shorts was making more than six thousand dollars a day. Prescribing and selling opioids to his patients the numbers of pills that you're prescribing astronomical who takes that many pills and puts them into their body. What were you thinking? I was thinking at the patient was genuine patients who have real chronic pain who's complaints. Legitimate. And then I was prescribing medication at they needed doctor you prescribe a thousand opioid pills to a pregnant woman. I don't think most doctors would prescribe a thousand aspirins were pregnant woman I would like to stop. Just like you to explain your your thinking. Fair. What what is it? What is unfair doctor? I'm just uncomfortable with with these these charged questions these are questions that people have this is why you are sitting here wearing this jumpsuit, this autumn it he agreed to continue. He claims some of his patients needed extremely high doses of opioids for long periods of time to alleviate severe persistent pain. And when I started treating people with chronic non cancer pain five felt it was unethical and discriminatory to limit the dose of medication. And if I had known that the overdose incidents had increased dramatically the way it had. I would have moderated my approach doctor. How could you have not known? All you had to do is pick up the paper in two thousand nine more than twenty nine hundred people died in Florida of drug overdoses most. From prescribed opioid pills in one sixteen month, period. DA records show berry Scholz dispense eight hundred thousand opioid pills from his office pharmacy. People have become addicted to these drugs people have died because of these drugs people in your practice died from overdoses of opioids a person. One is enough that monster in my son's. Carrollton son, David went to Dr Schultz for pain management after a car accident Scholz prescribed an assortment of pain pills. Even after David became addicted in two thousand ten David died of an overdose of opioids prescribed by Dr Scholtz, so should Dr Scholtz of prescribed these pain pills. Her. He didn't even examine him seen him in four and a half years. He just. Just for these scripts. Zayn concern. He's a murderer and not a doctor. He. Murray, my son as he could eat didn't need a gun. He used his pen to Martin, and my son also showed says he was inspired to prescribe high doses of opioids after attending a lecture by this, man. Dr Russell Portnoy who was the influential president of the American pain society, Portnoy traveled around the country, giving lectures and made promotional videos like this one in two thousand touting opioids as wonder drugs, urging doctors to use them aggressively to relieve pain, the likelihood that the treatment of pain using an opioid drug which is prescribed by a doctor will lead to addiction is extremely low but ten years later as opioid addiction exploded, Dr Portnoy said he had been part of a broad campaign funded by pharmaceutical companies to encourage the widespread use of opioids I gave in new. Horrible lectures in the late nineteen eighty and nine hundred ninety s which I said things about addiction that weren't true. He said he believed at the time he was operating in good faith and was not unduly influenced by the pharmaceutical industry still he has been named in dozens of lawsuits. Russell Portnoy he was paid by the drug companies. And has said that there is no proof that these that high doses of opioids are effective intriguing chronic pain. Maybe sure. True. No science to back up. What you were doing. There's there's only anecdotal information. I guess what? I find troubling. Is. Your lack of acceptance that what you did was wrong. I don't believe what was wrong. When you're giving somebody sixty oxycodones a day. How could they not abuse? It. Sixty day is a large number. I admit that's a very large number if it's taken properly how can you take sixty quote on a day properly? Some people need that us. There is no scientific evidence to support that claim with so many opioids prescribed by Scholz and other unscrupulous doctors pills started flowing into the streets and resold for profit what the DA calls diversion. Sixty six percent of all the oxycodone in Florida came from just one company Mellon crowd. One of the country's largest opioid suppliers. Florida state attorney Aaron bird told us between two thousand eight and two thousand twelve the company flooded the state with pain pills sent five hundred million oxycodone pills to the state of Florida of state with a population of twenty million people. We're talking about enough pills to give every resident of Florida twenty-five oxycodone pills. How's that possible? I mean, you're talking about enough pills to create a entire state of addicts internal Justice department documents obtained by sixty minutes reveal that quote Mellon crafts owned data on berry Scholtz indicated that he was purchasing large amounts of oxycodone in a suspicious pattern indicating diversion yet. The company kept shipping the drugs to the distributor. It new was supplying Schultz the company's behavior was so flagrant. It triggered a DA investigation. Led by Jim Rafalski. So what role does Mellon crowd play in this opioid crisis? They're responsible. They are responsible. Especially for the conduct in Florida. That's a big statement. How can you not be responsible? How can you walk away from five hundred million pills to a geographic area like the size of Florida and knowing at the time this was occurring? There is an opioid crisis. There that wasn't a secret for false. Now, an expert witness for states and municipalities suiting drug companies told us his team identified almost forty four thousand orders Mellon crowd should have reported as suspicious, which the government says the company is required to do by law reforms he says melon crop reported none. But when D investigators handed their evidence to the Justice department government lawyers fearing, a long uncertain legal battle decided not to pursue the case in court, but to settle instead of gone after. Melon crop for everything you saw them doing. What would define have been? Two point four billion dollars. And the actual fine was thirty five million. The penalty amounted to less than one week of the company's annual revenue Mellon Pratt declined to do an on camera interview. But told us it never sold Oxy Khotan directly to doctor sholls only two distributors in a press. Release the company denied it violated any applicable laws but said going forward, it would analyze all internal data and identify suspicious sales both to Trump and Obama administrations have sent hundreds of doctors to jail for their roles in the opioid crisis. So far, not one executive of an opioid manufacturer or distributor has been sentenced to a single day in jail. Now called to order. Now, the pharmaceutical industry is coming under scrutiny in may a congressional committee called the heads of the five leading drug distributors the middlemen that ship the pain pills from manufacturers like melon crop to drugstores around the country. Mississippi congressman Gregg Harper asked if they were complicit in causing the drug crisis. You believe that the actions that you or your company took contributed to the opioid epidemic. Mr Barrot started do not believe that we contributed to the opioid crisis documents. Andrea. Yes. Only one of the five said yes to Hamilton. Now. This house committee has launched an investigation into Mellon crowd and other drug manufacturers. The Justice department has formed a task force targeting opioid manufacturers and distributors. You were convicted of fifty five counts of drug trafficking as for Barry Schultz shortly after our interview he received a final sentence. One hundred fifty seven years the longest sentence of anyone so far in this opioid crisis. Sally.

Dr Barry Schultz Florida berry Scholz oxycodone Justice department Dr Russell Portnoy Mellon Delray Beach Dr Scholtz David Putin Mellon Pratt congressman Gregg Harper Hamilton Mr Barrot berry Scholtz Murray
"dr scholtz" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

09:21 min | 2 years ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Your your thinking. Fair. What is it? What is unfair? Dr. I'm just uncomfortable with with these these charged questions these are questions that people have this is why you're sitting here wearing this jumpsuit this alternate, he agreed to continue your claims some of his patients needed extremely high doses of opioids for long periods of time to alleviate severe persistent pain. And when I started treating people with chronic non cancer pain, I felt it was unethical and discriminatory to limit the dose of medication. And if I had known that the overdose incidents had increased dramatically the way it had. I would have moderated my approach doctor. How could you have not known? All you had to do is pick up the paper in two thousand nine more than twenty nine hundred people died in Florida of drug overdoses, mostly from prescribed opioid pills. In one sixteen month, period. DA records show berry Scholz dispense eight hundred thousand opioid pills from his office pharmacy where people who've become addicted to these drugs people have died because of these drugs people in your practice died from overdoses of opioids a person. One is enough that monster in my son. Carrollton son, David went to Dr Schultz for pain management after a car accident shorts prescribed an assortment of pain pills. Even after David became addicted in two thousand ten David died of an overdose of opioids prescribed by Dr Schultz. So should Dr Scholtz of prescribed these pain pills tour. He didn't even examine him. He hadn't seen her in four and a half years. He just. Just wrote these scripts. I'm concerned. He's a murderer. And none doctor. He married. My son has he could eat didn't need a gun. He used his pen Martin and my son. Be sure says he was inspired to prescribe high doses of opioids after attending a lecture by this man. Dr Russell Portnoy who was the influential president of the American pain society, Portnoy traveled around the country, giving lectures and made promotional videos like this one in two thousand touting opioids as wonder drugs, urging doctors to use them aggressively to relieve pain, the likelihood that the treatment of pain using an opioid drug which is prescribed by a doctor will lead to addiction is extremely low but ten years later as opioid addiction exploded, Dr Portnoy said he had been part of a broad campaign funded by pharmaceutical companies to encourage the widespread use of opioids gave innumerable lectures in the late nineteen eighties and nine hundred ninety s at which I said things about addiction that we're in true. He said he believed at the time he was op. Operating in good, faith and was not unduly influenced by the pharmaceutical industry still he has been named in dozens of lawsuits. Russell Portnoy he was paid by the drug companies. And has said that there is no proof that these that high doses of opioids are affected intriguing chronic pain. That may be true. But there's an honest true this there's no science to back up what you were doing. There's there's only add all information. I guess what? I find troubling. Is. Your lack of acceptance that what you did was wrong. I don't believe what was wrong. When you're giving somebody sixty oxycodones a day. How could they not abuse? It. Sixteen day is a large number. I admit that's a very large. If it's taken properly. How can you take sixty Oxy quote on the day, proper, some people need that there is no scientific evidence to support that claim with so many opioids prescribed by Scholz and other unscrupulous doctors pills started flowing into the streets and resold for profit what the DA calls diversion? Sixty six percent of all the oxycodone in Florida came from just one company Mellon crotch one of the country's largest opioid suppliers. Florida state attorney ehrenberg told us between two thousand eight and twenty twelve the company flooded the state with pain pills sent five hundred million oxycodone pills to the state of Florida state with a population of twenty million people. We're talking about enough pills to give every resident of Florida twenty-five oxycodone pills. How's that possible? I mean, you're talking about enough pills to create a entire state of addicts internal Justice department documents obtained by sixty minutes reveal that quote Mallon Christ's own data on berry Scholtz indicated that he was purchasing large amounts of oxycodone in a suspicious pattern indicating diversion yet. The company kept shipping the drugs to the distributor. It new was supplying Schultz the company's behavior was so flagrant. It triggered a DA investigation. Led by Jim Ralph ski so what role melon crop play in this opioid crisis responsible. They are responsible. Especially for the conduct in Florida. That's a big statement. How can you not be responsible? How can you walk away from five hundred million pills to a geographic area like the size of Florida and knowing at the time this was occurring? There is an opioid crisis. There that wasn't a secret reform now an expert witness for states and municipalities suiting drug companies told us his team identified almost forty four thousand orders Mellon crowd should have reported as suspicious, which the government says the company is required to do by law reforms he says melon reported none. But when a investigators handed their evidence to the Justice department government, lawyers fearing long uncertain legal battle decided not to pursue the case in court, but to settle instead of gone after. Melon crop for everything you saw them doing. What would define have been? Two point four billion dollars. And the actual fine was thirty five million. The penalty amounted to less than one week of the company's annual revenue Mellon Pratt declined to do an on camera interview. But told us it never sold oxycodones directly to doctor sholls only two distributors in a press. Release the company denied it violated any applicable laws but said going forward, it would analyze all internal data and identify suspicious sales both to Trump and Obama administrations have sent hundreds of doctors to jail for their roles in the opioid crisis. So far, not one executive of an opioid manufacturer or distributor has been sentenced to a single day in jail. Now called order. But now the pharmaceutical industry is coming under scrutiny in may a congressional committee called the heads of the five leading drug distributors the middlemen that ship the pain pills from manufacturers like Mellon crowd to drugstores around the country. Mississippi congressman Gregg Harper asked if they were complicit in causing the drug crisis. You believe that the actions that you or your company took contributed to the opioid epidemic. Mr barrot. No sorry. Do not believe that we contributed to the opioid crisis. Doctrine must Andrea. Yes. Only one of the five said yes to him. Now. This house committee has launched an investigation into Mellon crowd and other drug manufacturers. The Justice department has formed a task force targeting opioid manufacturers and distributors. And you were convicted of fifty counts of drug trafficking as for Barry Schultz shortly after our interview he received a final sentence. One hundred fifty seven years the longest sentence of anyone so far in this opioid crisis. Seven thirty five a WCBS.

Florida oxycodone Barry Schultz Dr Russell Portnoy Justice department berry Scholz Dr Scholtz David Mellon Mellon Pratt Mellon crotch Jim Ralph Martin congressman Gregg Harper Andrea berry Scholtz Oxy
"dr scholtz" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Takes many calls and puts them into their body. What were you thinking? I was thinking that the patient was genuine patient who real chronic pain who's complaints religious. And then I was prescribing medication if they needed doctor you prescribe a thousand opioid pills to a pregnant woman. I don't think most doctors would prescribe a thousand aspirin to a pregnant woman. I would like to stop. Just like you to explain your thinking. I believe it's unfair. What is it? What is unfair doctor? I'm just uncomfortable with now with these these charged questions these are questions that people have this is why you're sitting here wearing this jumpsuit this. Ultimately, he agreed to continue. This is your claims some of his patients needed extremely high doses of opioids for long periods of time to alleviate severe persistent pain. And when I started treating people with chronic cancer pain. Five. It was unethical and discriminatory to limit the dose of medication. And if I had no that the overdosed incidence had increased dramatically the way it had. I would have moderated my approach doctor. How could you have not known? All you had to do is pick up the paper in two thousand nine more than twenty nine hundred people died in Florida of drug overdoses, mostly from prescribed opioid pills. In one sixteen month, period. DA records show berry Scholz dispense eight hundred thousand opioid pills from his office pharmacy met people who've become addicted to these drugs people died because of these drugs people in your practice died from overdoses of opioids person. One is enough that monster in my son. Carrollton son, David went to Dr Schultz for pain management after a car accident shorts prescribed an assortment of pain pills. Even after David became addicted in two thousand ten David died of an overdose of opioids prescribed by Dr Scholtz. So should Dr Scholtz of prescribing these pain pills too. He didn't even examine him. He hadn't seen her in four and a half years. He. These scripts. I'm concerned. He's a murderer. And not a doctor. My son has he could eat didn't need a gun. He used his pen Martin, and my son also be short says he was inspired to prescribe high doses of opioids after attending a lecture by this, man. Dr Russell Portnoy who was the influential president of the American pain society, Portnoy traveled around the country, giving lectures and made promotional videos like this one in two thousand touting opioids as wonder drugs, urging doctors to use them aggressively to relieve pain, the likelihood that the.

Dr Scholtz Dr Russell Portnoy David Dr Schultz overdosed aspirin Martin berry Scholz Florida president one sixteen month
"dr scholtz" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Likely be incarcerated until the day. He dies in this. His only interview short said he wanted to go on camera to explain that he has been singled out unfairly, obfuscate, your scapegoat. I mean, I was one of hundreds of doctors that were prescribing medication for chronic pain prosecutor called you killer. I see myself as a healer in my mind, what I was doing was legitimate in the early two thousands shorts was near on the wild West Frontier of paying treatment doctors drug dealers opioid users and abusers were flocking to Florida or powerful pain pills were being prescribed and dispensed by a new type of business pain clinics. We had more pain clinics and years twenty ten in twenty eleven then we had McDonalds in those years. There was one St. in Broward County Oakland park boulevard that had thirty one different pain clinics on the one St. Florida state attorney Dave Arron bergh's office, prosecuted berry Scholtz, he told us pain clinics were loosely regulated medical offices where patients could pick up pills usually for cash. Few questions asked you could get the script and get the drug right there on the spot one. Stop shopping people would race down to Florida because we didn't have the same controls as other states. We fed the entire nations addiction this mob scene shot on a cell phone in two thousand nine is inside of Florida pain clinic, dozens of patients waiting to get their opioids Schultz operated a clinic like this in del Ray beach, where he treated thousands of patients. How would you describe? Dr Barry salt. He was one of the most notorious drug dealers we had he prescribed in agree GIS amount of pills to his patients the numbers, which shock the conscience. DA records show in two thousand ten one patient of Dr Scholtz was prescribed nearly seventeen thousand of the highest potency oxycodone pills in a seven month period. Another got more than twenty three thousand over eight months. That's more than one hundred pills a day business was so good shorts was making more than six thousand dollars a day. Prescribing and selling opioids to his patients the numbers of pills. You're prescribing astronomical. Who.

Florida Dr Barry salt Dave Arron bergh Dr Scholtz berry Scholtz McDonalds Schultz St. Florida Broward County prosecutor del Ray beach oxycodone attorney six thousand dollars eight months seven month
"dr scholtz" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

09:45 min | 2 years ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on KTRH

"Thanks for your time today. Doc scholtz. Thank you for having me, sir. Appreciate it. Let's start with a simple definition. The simplest one. You can offer to this audience for what Alzheimer's disease is so dementia is the category like a cough, and there's many causes of it and the most common cause of dementia in the United States is out timers disease, and it's caused. By the accumulation of a protein in the brain that should be metabolize and gotten rid of. And in some people at hangs around and starts a whole sequence of events that eventually leads to the cognitive issues like memory loss that people associated with it is this is this protein metabolize in youth. And it just slowly gets less and less kind of like fat hangs around. And it doesn't get burned off. That's exactly right. Okay. All of the proteins in our body get turned over over time. And there's one protein that we all have in our brain that we're all turning over in some people turn it over just slightly less than everybody else. Like ten percent. So by the time, you're fifty sixty seventy eighty that's enough time that it's accumulated enough to cause symptoms, and it just kind of blocks the transmission of signals through the brain. That's right it, and then it directly affects the health of the brain cells. So eventually start losing brain cells as well. And that's when people notice a lot of symptoms, of course here. About how many people have Alzheimer's our country or at least five and a half million. It might be more than that. Because it's hard to say for sure, and there's several million people with other causes of dementia as well. So you put all that together. And almost everybody in the United States has relatives or friends that are suffering from one of these are there any specific categories of people, Dr Scholtz who tend to get Alzheimer's more often than the rest of the population. More men and women the reverse about the same. What what groups maybe? Yeah. That's a good question. So, you know, men have their own problems. But it's twice as common to have Alzheimer's and women as men. Well, people that had had series of concussions are more likely people with post traumatic stress disorder like our veterans across the street from ram twofold, increase in in dementia, and then all the cardiovascular risk factors that, you know, about, you know, heart high cholesterol, high triglycerides, all of those are also risk factors smoking's a risk factor in that category. As well. So there's lots of things that are that we can't do something about. But there's lots of things we can do something about like all the cardiovascular risk factors to try to reduce the chances of getting one of these bad disease hereditary at all. A little bit. Okay. Yeah. There's there's a certain percentage where it's every generation. There are also genetic risk factors that don't cause the disease, but they make it more likely. There's a gene call April lightbulb protein, for example, that raises the risk a couple fold. It seems logical that our brains would would show signs of age like any other organ is that is that the short answer as to why are odds of getting Alzheimer's increase with age. Really? Well, we do lose about forty percent of our memory by the time. We're eighty normally. But alzheimer's. It's folks that are also that curve and have lost more than that, you know, sixty or eighty percent we think that it's age related because the accumulation of proteins sets in series of cascade of events and accumulation takes a long time to occur. Now. I saw poor gentleman this morning that had the onset of age thirty five. Oh my gosh. You can't have real bad luck too. But the normal person starting at about age sixty it's about one percent of the population. And then it doubles every five years just because of the way to protein accumulates so two percent at sixty five. And then it's about a third of people at eighty-five, maybe half of people at age ninety get Alzheimer's disease. The forty percent memory loss at what did you say eighty or eighty five? If if only we could choose what we're gonna forget that might not be so bad that would work is there any change over the past few decades in the frequency of early onset, Alzheimer's like you were mentioning not that we can tell it's real hard to tell because honestly up to six years ago. We did not have a way of diagnosing it while people were alive. Oh boy. That's not good. Yeah. And that made it a problem ten years ago twenty years ago, you don't know what people really had back then. So the statistics are a little tough. But as far as we can tell other than certain lifestyle things like, you know, more football players now than two hundred years ago. They don't seem to be anything so far that we've been able to identify that is making it more common in nowadays. You mentioned a better way to diagnose how how do you do that? Well, we for diagnosing we have a whole series of things we do cognitive testing MRI bloodwork the advance in the last six years versus before that is we now have pet scans. That can tell us whether someone has accumulated this abnormal protein in the. Yeah. We can see it on imaging. Okay. In fact, the fascinating things we can see it up to twenty years before someone has their first symptom. Holy cow. Yeah. So if any of your audience members are worried about Alzheimer's because they have a loved one with it like a parent, and they're over age sixty they might wanna come in and see us either for studies or so we can advise them about how risk factor management how to reduce the chances of getting this Dr Paul Schulze here on fifty plus before we scare everybody. Duck. Can we agree that occasionally forgetting where we put our keys or somebody's name doesn't mean we've got Alzheimer's or dementia. Well, not depersonalize it. But I'm hoping that putting my keys in the icebox doesn't mean that I'm getting it. For example. Hypothetically, if somebody were to do that every now, and then I'll I'll stumble over something and think, okay, what's this? And fortunately, I've interviewed you here in a couple of other doctors over the years who have said, that's okay. That's okay. So so when a person comes to you, though with increasing memory laws neighbor, she here, she's forgotten a couple of doctors appointments, you put them through these tests, and you can pretty much tell definitively whether they are either they already have a certain stage of Alzheimer's or it's coming, right? That's right. And it's painless so don't don't be and remember to that all of our treatments. Whether it's the currently proven once or are testing ones, they're all best. The earlier someone comes in. So that's critical to come in early. The other thing is use your loved one as your guide like if I'm forgetting more than my wife who's the same age as that would be a sign that I should come in. Okay. And it's important to catch it early because there are some. Treatment options. It'll at least slow the progression. Right. Yeah. The medications we have now are very helpful. But they're they're symptomatic. We call them. Meaning they don't have a big effect on the underlying process, but they definitely worth being on. And the earlier you get on better. The big thing is that we have lots of treatment trials going on. Now, really fascinating and wonderful. And honestly, I have to say blessed. We're blessed to have these opportunities to be testing new medications out and all of them that we've tested so far seemed to work much better than people who are early. So come in early. Let us put you in a treatment trial and God willing. We'll find something that helps you and other people down the road do the treatments you're working with now are you do you foresee a cure, or are you able to just delay the onset of the worst of the symptoms? Well, I'm an optimist. So everything I say with a grain of salt. But I, you know, there's an Alzheimer's Association commercials saying the first person, we cure is probably alive today. And I think. That's true. I don't know when that's going to be. But we're seeing so many hints of positive signals in our trials that I'm thinking that as we tweak things a little bit further. We're going to start seeing positive trials come out, whether they delay it or prevent it. We'll have to see if it only delays it and doesn't prevent we'll keep tweaking it. We're gonna be here long time doing this. But I think somewhere in the next five to ten years there's gonna be some very significant announcements on this. What's what's the average time line doctor Schulz currently for diagnosis to the onset of really serious symptoms? And maybe having to move somebody into a memory care facility. It varies a lot by person then also by age, so the younger on sets tend to be faster unfortunate. Remember that the pathophysiology in the brain the process has been going on about twenty years the day. We I see someone. That's a good point. Yeah. Yeah. And then and then things are continuing on from there, you know, and anywhere from a few years to a decade or more is when people need significant care, but I tell you it's very sad. But it motivates us every day when we see that to keep studying this disease. It's what makes us getting here every day and do these trials knowing that we're seeing everyday these poor folks who are just like you, and I who suddenly start losing their capacity. And and it breaks your heart breaks their loved ones heart to see their loved one losing different functions. Every day we're down to about the last few seconds. But this is really difficult on the families, isn't it? Oh my God. It's terrible. It's absolutely devastating to families. Don't do a come in and see us. Let us help you. Let us do studies on this and and God willing we're gonna find some good stuff here before I put my keys in the icebox. Exactly. Crossed. All right. Well, yeah, you're okay. I'll bet you're okay. I'm I'm certainly glad to have you on this team doctor Schultz. Thank you very much. It's been really insightful. I appreciate it. Thank you for having me, so much pleasure..

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease Doc scholtz United States Alzheimer's Association cough Dr Paul Schulze football doctor Schultz doctor Schulz cure twenty years forty percent six years ten years two hundred years eighty percent one percent ten percent
"dr scholtz" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

09:43 min | 2 years ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on KTRH

"Thanks for your time today, doc Schultz. Thank you for having me. Appreciate it. Let's start with a simple definition. The simplest one you can offer to this audience for what Alzheimer's disease is so dementia is the category like a cost, and there's many causes of it. The most common cause of dementia in the United States is out timers disease, and it's caused. By the accumulation of a protein in the brain that should be metabolize and gotten rid of. And in some people at hangs around and starts a whole sequence of events that eventually leads to the cognitive issues like memory loss that people associated with it is this is this protein metabolize in youth. And it just slowly gets less and less kind of like fat hangs around and doesn't get burned off. That's exactly right. Okay. All of the proteins in our body get turned over over time. And there's one protein that we all have in our brain that we're all turning over in some people turn it over just slightly less than everybody else. Like ten percent awhile. So by the time, you're fifty sixty seventy eighty that's enough time that it's accumulated enough to cause symptoms, and it just kind of blocks the transmission of signals through the brain. That's right it, and then it directly affects the health of the brain cells. So eventually you start losing brain cells as well. And that's when people notice a lot of symptoms, of course here. About how many people have Alzheimer's in our country or at least five and a half million. It might be more than that. Because it's hard to say for sure, and there's several million people with other causes of dementia as well. So you put all that together. And almost everybody in the United States has relatives or friends that are suffering from one of these are there any specific categories of people, Dr Scholtz who tend to get Alzheimer's more often than the rest of the population. More men and women the reverse about the same. What what groups maybe? Yeah. That's a good question. So, you know, men have their own problems. But it's twice as common to have Alzheimer's and women as men people that had had series of concussions are more likely people with post traumatic stress disorder like our veterans across the street from ram twofold, increase in in dementia, and then all the cardiovascular risk factors that, you know, about, you know, heart high cholesterol, high triglycerides, all of those are also risk factors smoking's risk factor in that category. As well. So there's lots of things that are we can't do something about. But there's lots of things we can do something about like all the cardiovascular risk factors to try to reduce the chances of getting one of these bad diseases as hereditary at all. A little bit. Okay. Yeah. There's there's a certain percentage where it's every generation. There are also genetic risk factors that don't cause the disease, but they make it more likely. There's a gene called apolipoprotein, e for example, that raises the risk a couple fold. It seems logical that our brains would would show signs of age like any other organ is that is that the short answer as to why are odds of getting Alzheimer's increase with age. Really? Well, we do lose about forty percent of our memory by the time. We're eighty normally. But alzheimer's. It's it's folks that are also that curve had lost more than that. You know, sixty or eighty percent, we think that it's age related because the accumulation of protein sets in in series of cascade of events, and that accumulation takes a long time to occur. Now. I saw poor gentleman this morning that had the onset age thirty five. Josh you can't have real bad luck too. But the normal person starting at about age sixty it's about one percent of the population. And then it doubles every five years just because of the way the protein accumulates so two percent at sixty five. And then it's about a third of people at eighty five maybe half of people at age ninety get Alzheimer's disease. The forty percent memory loss at what did you say eighty or eighty five if it if only we could choose what we're gonna forget that might not be so bad that would work is there any change over the past few decades in the frequency of early onset, Alzheimer's like you were mentioning not that we can hell no it's real hard to tell because honestly up to six years ago. We did not have a way of diagnosing it while people were alive. Oh boy. That's not good. Yeah. And that made it a problem ten years ago twenty years ago, you don't know what people really had back then. So the statistics are a little tough. But as far as we can tell other than certain lifestyle things like, you know, more football players now than two hundred years ago. There don't seem to be anything so far that we've been able to identify that is making it more common in nowadays. You mentioned a better way to diagnose how how do you do that? Well, we for diagnosing we have a whole series of things we do cognitive testing MRI bloodwork the advance in the last six years versus before that is we now have pet scans. That can tell us whether someone has accumulated this abnormal protein and call. Yeah. We can see it on imaging. Okay. In fact, the fascinating things we can see it up to twenty years before someone has their first symptom. Holy cow. Yeah. So if any of your audience members are worried about Alzheimer's because they have a loved one with it like a parent, and they're over age sixty they might wanna come in and see us either for studies or so we can advise them about how. Risk factor management. How to reduce the chances of getting this Dr Paul Schultz here on fifty plus before we scare everybody. Doc. Can we agree that occasionally forgetting where we put our keys or or somebody's name doesn't mean we've got Alzheimer's or dementia? Well, not to personalize it. But I'm hoping that putting my keys in the icebox doesn't mean that I'm getting it. For example. Hypothetically if somebody were to do that. Every now. And then I'll I'll stumble over something and think okay, what's this? And fortunately, I've interviewed you here in a couple of other doctors over the years who have said, that's okay. That's okay. So so when a person comes to you, though with increasing memory laws, maybe she's here. She's forgotten a couple of doctors appointments, you put them through these tests, and you can pretty much tell definitively whether they are either they already have a certain stage of Alzheimer's or it's coming, right? That's right. And it's painless so don't don't be and remember to that all of our treatments. Whether it's the currently proven once or are testing ones, they're all best. The earlier someone comes in. So that's critical to come in early. The other thing is use your loved one as your guide like if I'm forgetting more than my wife who's the same agency. That would be a sign that I should come in. Okay. And it's important to catch it early because there are some treatment options, it'll at least slow the progression. Right. Yeah. The medications we have now are very helpful. But they're they're symptomatic. We call them. Meaning they don't have a big effect on the underlying process, but they definitely worth being on. And the earlier you get on better. The big thing is that we have lots of treatment trials going on. Now, really fascinating and wonderful. And honestly, I have to say blessed. We're blessed to have these opportunities to be testing new medications out and all of them that we've tested so far seemed to work much better than people who are early. So come in early. Let us put you in a treatment trial and God willing. We'll find something that helps you and other people down the road the treatments, you're working with now are you do you foresee a cure, or are you able to just delay the onset of the worst of the symptoms? Well, I'm an optimist. So everything I say with a grain of salt. But I, you know, there's an Alzheimer's Association commercials saying the first person we care is probably alive today. And I think that's true. I don't know when that's going to be. But we're. Seeing so many hints of positive signals in our trials that I'm thinking that as we tweak things a little bit further. We're going to start seeing positive trials come out, whether they delay it or prevent it. We'll have to see if only delays it and doesn't prevent will keep tweaking it. We're going to be here long time doing this. But I think somewhere in the next five to ten years there's gonna be some very significant announcements on this. What's what's the average time line, Dr Schulz currently for diagnosis to the onset of really serious symptoms? And maybe having to move somebody into a memory care facility. It varies a lot by person and also by age, so the younger on sets tend to be faster. Unfortunately, remember that the pathophysiology in the brain the process has been going on about twenty years the day. We I see someone. That's a good point. Yeah. Yeah. And then and then things are continuing on from there, you know, anywhere from a few years to a decade or more is when people need significant care, but I tell you it's very sad. But it motivates us every day when we see that to keep studying this disease. It's what makes us getting here every day and do these trials knowing that we're seeing everyday these poor folks who are just like you, and I who suddenly start losing their capacity, and and it breaks your heart and it breaks their loved ones heart to see their loved one losing different functions. Every day, we're we're down to about the last few sex. But this is really difficult on the families, isn't it? Oh my God. It's terrible. It's absolutely devastating to families yet. Don't do a come in and see us. Let us help you. Let us do studies on this and and God willing we're gonna find some good stuff here before I put my keys in the icebox. Exact singers crossed. All right. Well, yeah, you're okay. I'll bet you're okay. I'm certainly glad to have you on this team doctor Schultz. Thank you very much. That's been really insightful. Appreciate it. Thank.

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease Dr Paul Schultz United States Alzheimer's Association football Dr Scholtz Josh Dr Schulz cure twenty years forty percent six years ten years two hundred years eighty percent one percent ten percent two percent
"dr scholtz" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Puk winds up on the king's badge jali matter the defenseman came in and pinch their so brown had to try to make contact with the partnership would optic lasted as he was in the way he ends up just busy the pc glass it was looking for goes off into the bench area so get a up deeply king joe roff we're going to have a penalty against brown yep that what might have gone off with a glass he resigned the king's banks which is a also a nono so a three forty five here in the third period pittsburgh with their fourth powerplay tonight the league's number one powerplay is over three they withdraw onetimer balkan rightside events than at castle on the left wing boards through a download again so he could reach the puck away with it the kings and muhsin will get a down the ice near dodges a little bit of a bullet is the penguins get their stick on it prevented going from all the way into their own in malkin gauge entries crossice pass broken up pittsburgh will reboot schultz for against a lot of right wing sweetened behind the king's that cooked will play it off the wall for bosnian muslim reaching ford hasn't a muzzle we'll get it down smart play their by quick reversing the puck back the other way penguins weren't anticipation of dottie was going to bring the puck around the other side they sealed off the boards by quick bringing back this way it open up elaine allowing the king's to get it out of 12 on the pittsburgh power play a one one tie as the reset of his old winds up download the corner feeds it up dr scholtz schultz plays at the lap circle and then a crossice feed by cancel was broken up for balkan kings got a stick in that passing lane and the puk now the ice now with trope retiree kenyan with a sticky advantage of having guys that have the hockey sense and apparently killed and then the reaches coq car has he's well really pay dividends on outlook now in the old saybolt his facet of.

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"dr scholtz" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Point that you raised in your opening statement as well as your written testimony i'll just repeated you point out a paradox the possibility that north korea as in iran an international effort intended to prevent a radical regime from developing at the stabilising capability will coincide diplomatically with the regime perfecting that very capacity for the second time in a decade an outcome that was widely considered unacceptable is now on the verge of becoming irreversible julabbi rate on why you think that's the case and what we could learn from the situation with expected north korea it's the idea that the green shoot that there might be a negotiation based on uh a freeze will freeze uh might the concern i had with the iranian agreement in the way italy you've been through the emergence of as a nuclear power it only delayed deflated by some the situation trade with north korea each more acute because it on the math yet to have a nuclear weapon but if wanting to go into a freeze of the existing situation violates they abide the ability and if that is establish other countries in the confronting their own security of likely to come to the conclusion that it it's safe to proceed with with their nuclear program people would face a totally new situation it is also an accumulation of nuclear weapons line it's crossed troops for the dog you out than in the world in which we have no his feelings about its age but it's difficult to establish the principle and if this would in my opinion sequined to have you been enriched some countries to a good food stamps and other countries would insist on a two day of war i think the denuclearization of north korea which is not at that overwhelming threat to outs it's important for the evolution of the international strategy with of the nonproliferation at the therefore i we need to make a distinction between measures that might leave the media attention but make crisis of the most severe measures need to be taking a good do faith the issue of denuclearization of could here all the modes of it's the problem of it on its gum vetoed evening under the existing dealings that is my basic thank you dr scholtz uh in your conversation about four disruptive forces the first when you mentioned was the.

north korea food stamps media attention iran italy nuclear power nuclear program nuclear weapons two day
"dr scholtz" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on WLAC

"Ninety nine on fox the seemed it's referenced in this photo django in a house everybody at this point is trying to say carry washington's character broom held dr scholtz who is kristoff vaults this character shoots leo leonardo dicaprio calvin in the film and stephen whose basically the house slave that samuel l jackson he is so forlorn and upset that his master has been killed basically a henchman ends up killing scholtz tries to kill django django has to do a django does and we know how that film ends with them walking away victoriously but that scene is basically to indicate that the house slave in this film is standing up for his white master and that is the comparison that nasa of hot ninety seven an mtv tallink avenue exgirlfriend decided was in his best interest while he's trying to get a job for the baltimore ravens in a very contentious situation and this was the moment jeff where we both realised that we were going to have to talk about this yes and um look i think the slippery slope with with spouses and girlfriends you'll i i know my wife is very fiery on and choosing rude you social media at all and i know that she is at times tried to defend me on instagram with so me for comment him and i get the motion will part of it and it's hard i would say is a spouse to to understand they don't eat away you talk on twitter and social media in general reflects on your husband i don't think it should at times but it does in this situation it's going to reflect poorly on cap reneged is that fair i don't know i mean is it probably not but that's the way they interviewed in society the this will be viewed as as captain of talking about the situation even though it it's his girlfriend and all this and like i said earlier all these don't help catholic you you know this had nothing to do with football but it has to do with wearing the ravens owner says look i'm kind of deciding if we want to sign him and these are factors in some of the factors are social media the backlash said that he might get for for sign recap and this doesn't help that in all these people on this very loses pointed is that all these people are talking for.

fox washington dr scholtz stephen social media twitter football the house samuel l jackson mtv baltimore ravens jeff ravens
"dr scholtz" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on Overdue

"Now then when their kids grow up and they've paid off their mouths college and their mortgage just now spoiled is on their prey and they're looking back of their mouth wedding photos and she's like kunal you haven't changed a bit and he's like no co your beautiful honey so she obviously again is like wow this is all very interesting but she has to go saver kid and so she goes in a drug the cat and the plan is like for to sneak into this kitchen and all that kind of stuff and this is one like the book is wrapping up its like this kind of adventure stuff were she's the euro which is supercool timothy stills hick and do we got to save him and she gets caught there's a kid like catches her in a colander i hate mr fitzgibbons kids and sixfooter in an empty birdcage because they're bird died but they still have the birdcage so they put the my the mouse in there and she over here's them talking about a bunch of rats that tried to steal a motor at a hardware store and got electrocuted who do you think those rats are as probably jenner leads generate hayes crew jenner gang jenner gangs the senator linked saying yes so they're dead and now there's this guy like going around town dr scholtz looking for smart rats because he knows if he sees a newspaper article about rats trying to steal from a hardware store he knows yeah like if people die and radio shag it's not a big deal but if there's there's rats dying in there he knows that he's up seven kids were gnawing on a cord and radio shack and died people kind radio shack all the times the big wall of adapters fault.

jenner hayes senator dr scholtz radio shack timothy stills mr fitzgibbons
"dr scholtz" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"dr scholtz" Discussed on Overdue

"However that lake so they're like anthropomorphic ice in the book though right layouts how ratty yard they would you say not very ratty at all there's a lot of skittering product we had that's the worst way anything can move by away as to skater anywhere anything the skaters miss me of that thank you miss me with skittering please i gave myself a headache with that he realized slow so these definitely above the board researchers captured rats opted damn street in a market and now they're germ experiments on yes so they take them to the vote to the laborde tori of dr scholtz who has like two assistance or whatever what the rats end up getting super smart and superstrong because they just get injected with dna is not specified what type of dna or how much were wear their injected but there are three groups of rats they're of science i just put demands yeah group a which is where our coal rats come from group b who get like the weaker stuff and are like not as cool and those days get d n yeah not a and then there is out there and there's group c which i guess just gets injected with water or something i don't know they're the control group they'd ours doesn't happen it's very unclear if they're running any sort of like we have male rats we iffy it's very shoddy science i think they're not obviously like what are they even trying to approve to accomplish so a couple of things start to happen they start to notice that the rats uh in group a are getting bigger and stronger and are probably going to live at least double their normal lifespan okay sounds pretty cool zafar sounds pretty cool so far they start getting really smart so they're start bear putting them through lab mazes and stuff in the floors electrocuted and they learned not to go on that and then they start like teaching them to read.

dr scholtz zafar