18 Burst results for "Dr Schaffner"

"dr schaffner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

08:14 min | 2 weeks ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"That are that are coming next in the next vaccines they're using different kinds of production processes than what we use for. Our production of influenza vaccine influenza vaccine is produced chicken eggs and it takes a while. Because you only get a little bit from each edge you've got to have lots of kleenex. to produce it. in four the covid nineteen vaccines are being produced in bio reactors so there are more ways than that production can be scaled up. Can i just jump in your per second. So do we have enough reagents for those bio reactors. Do we have enough vials to store. Then the vaccine that's created in the in the bio reactors thing things like that. Oh yeah so so this year. everybody Is now thinking about supply chains on the one hand. That's great on the when supply chains during the news. This much it probably means it was the problem So certainly people have been looking at all of the different elements of the supply chain for these pharmaceutical product It's not just the bio reactors themselves so these bags that go in the bio reactors. There certainly are the glass vials. That you mentioned there. Syringes and gloves and all kinds of auxiliary supplies so we have been working on this part of it simultaneously wild the pharmaceutical Tests have been run so i do anticipate that we will have an off at least initially and i know that capacity worldwide is being scaled up across all of these there certainly is the potential that some component has been missed or some further disruption. Happens but a lot of people have been paying attention to all of the products of that are related to the production of these vaccines and just basic question. Where will they be made the great question. So i looked at that the other day. Pfizer has two main production sites as one in kalamazoo michigan. There's one in europe. I believe it's in belgium Moderna has several And then if you look at the upcoming vaccines Astrazeneca and johnson and johnson could potentially be next astrazeneca has announced a number of partnerships with manufacturers all around the world so the pharmaceutical companies have somewhat different models of visors. Probably concentrated on these main two locations whereas astor's annika will be Likely produced in multiple locations. I think moderna What we get in the us we'll be produced in the us at a couple of different sites So so that and the corresponding capacity to fill and finish the vaccine. I think of it like taking the syrup from coca cola and putting it into the bottle with the label in the path that part of the process is also being scaled up and they are partnering with organizations to make sure that they have enough capacity on that side as well. so dr schaffner It sounds. I mean we're not gonna get all of these doses out overnight right. It's this this is going to be a process over many months but do do you have confidence that all this the the the the scaling up is happening in the way it needs to i. Actually i do as a professor swans at a lot of people have been working on this for quite some time in anticipation that the trials will be successful. We're going to start the delivery process so all of these details. do we have enough needles and syringes. Alcohol pants as you mentioned. Glass vials stoppers for the while a for the vials. Labels put on the on the vials. Can they get printed up all of that. I think has been worked on for some time. And of course we'll keep delivering the vaccine over months really going forward. I would anticipate that We will be vaccinating in some form or another well into the summer of twenty twenty. One you can't do this overnight and then if we take an even larger view of course we'd like to vaccinate with the help of many partners around the world the global population. We're not the only place that this covert viruses causing so much misery. I magnin tucker body. This is on point. So let's talk a little bit more So that's production I i do wanna talk a little bit more about actually getting the vaccines to the places that it needs to get which is everywhere Because i think most people. I'll raise my hand me. Included never even gave a second thought to the fact that these things had to be cold stored let alone some sometimes in ultra cold-storage professor swan. What's the what was the technological infrastructure needed to get a pfizer's vaccine to rural hospital or rural doctor's office at minus seventy see. That is a great question and you you mentioned in particular. That is the one that has the strongest requirements on that cold chain There are others that have lesser requirements. It would be more similar to what we have for other vaccines already in our system. for negative seventy see. This requires One of two things if visor is the shipping it in a thermal container that we'll keep it at the appropriate temperature It has to be repacked with dry. Pella did i After five days and after five days again and then on day fifteen after production it should go into the refrigerator and it begins that last portion of the the phase when it's available for us support parishes and i think that's about five days is as well so really from the time that you would receive it. You have ten to fifteen days to utilize those vaccine if you're in the part of the phase of the campaign when we're trying to vaccinate as many people as possible anybody can come and get it. It's not limited to the population that might be a little bit easier because you could hold mass vaccination clinics and and get everybody within some region but in the early parts of the campaign. This is really going to be particularly hard because we'll be trying to reach these very targeted Groups such as medical workers who are caring for covid nineteen paycheck and there may not be nine hundred. Seventy five of those in one location now. If you did have a freezer special freezers called sub eighty freezer. Then you could store which are unlikely to have that infrastructure in place in advance in rural areas. There are some states that have bought some additional sub eighty freezers. So i look to the state plan yesterday. And they have twenty that they're going to be locating around the state State has a few distribution centers. They're planning on setting up but even if they don't have nobody freezers distribution centers. There are ways of using this vaccine. I've come up with three strategies. Certainly one is to send the pfizer. Vaccine preferentially two large cities or where there are lots of people and you would ask those people to drive to you A second one is that you You take the vaccine and you take it mobile so you take it to a particular location and then you try to reach populations by taking out a certain number of vaccines and try to deliver them to The partners in the local area to use up those nine hundred and seventy five does but well professor swan and dr schaffner stand by here for just a second. 'cause we do have to take a quick break. We are really trying to understand the very specific logistical challenges. Communication challenges training challenges around. What would effectively be. One of the largest vaccine distribution efforts in human history around a kobe nineteen vaccine. So we'll have a lot more when we come back. This is on point..

Pfizer professor europe us johnson belgium Moderna kalamazoo dr schaffner michigan astor Pella
"dr schaffner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

10:11 min | 2 weeks ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"More drive thru and clinics. That are spaced out or smaller. That timing's going gonna have to be different. So people are adjusting to that. Well dr jennifer dila is director immunizations for the arkansas department of health. Joining us from little rock. Arkansas dr dillon. Hey thank you so very much for joining us. Arkansas's lucky to have you. Well i'm so happy to be here thinking that we're gonna talk more about vaccine distribution when we come back. This is on point. This is on point. I'm meghna chakrabarti. Today we're talking about the fact that the facts fastest development program in human history regarding potential covid nineteen. Vaccines is now meeting a new challenge. The largest vaccine distribution challenge in human history. Well i want to bring into the conversation now. Dr william shatner. He's joining us from nashville tennessee. He's professor of preventative medicine and infectious diseases and immunization policy at vanderbilt university. Dr schaffner welcome to the show. Good to be with you. It's great to have you back. Also with us from raleigh. North carolina is julie's swan professor of industrial and systems engineering at north carolina state university professor swan. Welcome to you. Thank you so much so let me first of all start by getting a little bit of Reaction from both of you on what you heard dr dillon. Hey talk about a regarding concerns or challenges that She sees in arkansas regarding distributing a potential covid nineteen vaccine. She talked about every thing from communicating to public health professionals across the state the particular training. That's going to be required. Let alone the logistics around distribution tracking cold storage. Even down to planning around win vials. We're going to be opened and mixed. I mean it sounds like a great deal of it it. It sounds like a logistical challenge. That that could tax any public health systems. So dr. Schaffner your thoughts on that. Well dr dillon did it Very nicely she talked about the entire spectrum of issues. As i see it one of the important things will be indeed as she said at the beginning to communicate clearly transparently to the general population. People want to know. Is this vaccine safe. They've heard we're working so speedily to bring this vaccine to To the people is it safe and we're going to have to reassure them about that and then exactly how effective is it and for. How long will the protection last. Which we won't be able to tell them you know this whole vaccine development program. His has had a political veneer and we scientists and people in public health and going to have to try to strip away that political veneer and concentrate on the scientific a public health issues. And i think the fact that the election is behind us has eased that very very substantially The professor swan your thoughts. So my colleague is right after tila. Hey coverage so many of these important issues. I've looked a lot. At the distribution systems in logistics that st both used for distribution of the h one n one pandemic vaccine back in two thousand and nine and what. Some of them are planning This time around for covid nineteen she mentioned relationships partnerships or certainly going to be really important as we determine the best ways to use the pfizer vaccine to reach the population It certainly as she mentioned could be sent to places that are best able to handle that Based on their infrastructure and and how many people they need to vaccinate to use up those minimum nine hundred and seventy five doses efficiently so that were covering as many people as we can with that and making sure that we're still finding ways that we can reach people who are not in big cities perhaps maderno vaccine perhaps through partnering with commercial part pharmacies and perhaps even doing some secondary distribution with the pfizer vaccine if necessary to ensure that people across the entire state will have access to it. So i'm just going to repeat a question that i asked the doctor dila. 'cause i'm i'm really trying to get my mind around the scope of of the challenge right now so so dr schaffner had a ha- is this. Let me rephrase are the efforts that are going to have to be put forth for successful distribution and you know an administration of a covid nineteen vaccine is. Have we done anything like this before. How similar is it to previous global efforts for math mass vaccination or we really are in new territory here. Well i guess i would to analogize. In the following way dr dila and her counterparts across the country in state immunization programs have been ineffective mountain climbers. They've done the distribution of all kinds of different vaccines to all different providers in in their states. But this mountain is higher than any other that they've ever climbed so the challenge is very substantial but these are very experienced people who know about vaccines know about the providers have a good sense of the populace and what sort of information they need so yes. It's a large challenge but it is one that we can succeed at. It will take time if you want to vaccinate three hundred and thirty million people in the united states alone. We can't do that in a week. And a half this to take months and we'll have to communicate very very clearly when it's your turn to get the vaccine because they will be a prior art prioritization scheme that is Presented early vaccine will go to healthcare providers who take care of patients with covert an emergency medicine. Medical technicians people who work in nursing homes for example and then the second group may well be people at increased risk of severe disease people aged sixty five and older people with underlying illnesses and then on down the road the healthy population but that will be in the future. We'll have to communicate in each location in the big cities in rural areas. When it's your turn to get in line and roll up your sleeve. And i think we can do that. But it will take a really sustained very large effort and as professor swan. I'm certainly sure appreciates. This will be a sustained an elaborate logistical challenge. That's right up her alley. Yeah you know of one of the one of the silver linings to this. Terrible pandemic is for those people who care to to care to learn the work of public health officials. Now we're we're all trying to get educated on what public health officials have been toiling at a behind the scenes for other diseases for year after year. And i'm just thinking about the again the level of detail that has to go into the planning. Because as you know dr dillon hey said for flu vaccine clinics you kind of have everyone come in sitting. Sit down in the office and wait to get their their jab. but of course. You can't do that with kovin so even just planning on like the frequency with which people come in or doing it. Well folks are in their cars. It's quite remarkable. The thought that's going to go into a successful campaign to get a covert nineteen vaccine out. Now i want to also just encourage both of you. Please help us nerd out here. The technical details are actually quite important gays. Let's let's move upstream a little bit here. I wanna play a little of what modern as president. Stephen hoge said about their vaccine on monday. We have a lot of work ahead of us. Knowing the vaccine is going to be effective is great news but we still need to complete regulatory process which involves completing the study generating more data even some followup safety and then of course we need to get busy manufacturing so professor swan okay. The regulatory process one thing but getting busy manufacturing you are the systems engineering specialists here. What are the. What are the challenges in getting busy manufacturing hundreds of millions of doses of these vaccines. Well that's a great question and there are lots of challenges One of the good things is that because everyone knew that if really urgent all of the companies the pharmaceutical companies have been already working on their production processes simultaneously with the face trial to make sure that it's safe and effective and so that does make it easier to scale up sooner than what would normally happen when you develop a new product. And so that's why when the regulatory approval is their up to date has been reviewed. We'll start seeing doses. Come out pretty quickly. One of the other things is that because of the specific technologies chosen these m. r. a platforms and some of the others..

dr dillon professor Dr schaffner Arkansas flu vaccine dr jennifer dila Dr william shatner arkansas department of health dr dila covid dr. Schaffner raleigh nashville united states vanderbilt university North carolina director swan north carolina state universit
"dr schaffner" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:42 min | 2 weeks ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on WTOP

"To have a country that is strong, you need to have an economy and President Trump is right on that. Melissa how w. Two opinions and coming up in about 10? Minutes here on w T o P will hear from W T. OBY scan Duffy, who is following some of the rally members downtown today, 9 22, now in Washington, much like the entire country. Our region continues to see a surgeon coronavirus cases. In fact, Maryland today reports the largest number of coronavirus cases since the pandemic began more than 2300 cases. It also reports 20 deaths. Meanwhile, Virginia reports over 1500 cases today and 14 deaths, DZ reported nearly 150 new cases today and one death across the country Corona virus Infections are also surging. And there's no sign it will slow down any time soon. The nation hit a record number of hospitalizations this week and surpassed a million new confirmed cases and just the 1st 10 days of November and here in the capital region. We are seeing case counts peak in both Maryland and Virginia. Dr William Shafter, an infectious disease specialist. Said. The Vanderbilt Medical Center tells w. T o p that the surge was expected, but not quite like this. We didn't think it would come quite this early, and the steep increase is really ominous. Hospitals are filling up again and give it another week or two, and I'm afraid to death rate will go up. Dr. Schaffner says the U. S needs a new covert response plan that would take decision making away from governors and instead rely on a national strategy similar to the approach and many other countries. Japan South Korea, Australia, New Zealand China Blue Blucher W. T O P. News, the Federal Trade Commission recently said 20 warning letters to companies selling bogus coronavirus cures letters or in addition of a pile of hundreds that the FTC has sent to companies. Almost since the moment of pandemic began. The company's falsely claimed that their products can prevent treat or cure covert 19. The letters seemed to work almost all of the companies that have received them of either stop making the claims or stop selling the scam product or treatment. The FTC says. If there's a medical breakthrough, you're not going to hear about it for the first time in an ad or sales pitch, Christopher Cruz w T o P News 9 24. We'll check money news next Way make Yusa insurance for busy moms like Kate. She's a veteran made of flexibility to balance work home and her hobbies from starting the work day. Finishing her latest, Do it yourself Project. So one another car accidentally bumped into hers. While she was running an errand. Kate didn't let a little fender Bender put a dent in her schedule with just a few taps on our Yusa mobile app. She filed her claim and with back on track us a insurance has made the way.

Kate Federal Trade Commission Maryland Virginia Dr William Shafter President Trump Melissa Yusa Vanderbilt Medical Center Washington Duffy DZ Dr. Schaffner Christopher Cruz New Zealand China Japan U. S South Korea Australia
"dr schaffner" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:57 min | 3 weeks ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on WTOP

"This morning at 9 30, a Randall County executive, Stuart Pittman that Annapolis bear, Gavin Buckley will announce new actions. Stop the spread of the virus at 10 30 we hear from Prince George's County executive, Angela ALSO Brooks. Any developments in either case will keep you updated right here on W t o p e n n w t o p dot com. Unlike Luker here in the Washington area, much like the rest of the country, coronavirus cases are increasing exponentially. Dr. William Schaffner and infectious disease specialist at the venerable medical center says the surge is far more severe than expected and says a new plan is needed. We've done the experiment. Of subcontracting the control of this outbreak to the governors and the various states that's failed. Look at the data. We need a national approach. Dr Schaffner says A national plan will be needed to ensure necessary stockpiles of personal protective equipment will be in place that hospitals and even with news of vaccines being ready to roll out the pandemic is not over will take us months to vaccinate everybody whom we would like to vaccinate. And during that time Don't throw away your mask. W T O P News shutting down businesses at paying people for lost wages for 4 to 6 Weeks could help the Corona virus pandemic state in check and get the economy on track until a vaccine is distributed. That is the advice of Dr Michael Foster home. He's a coronavirus adviser to President elect Joe Biden poster, Homma said. Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota earlier this week, he said that the country is headed toward what he called Cove. It The hell, he said. Cases air rising as more people grow tired of wearing masks and social distancing. Plus, he says, colder weather is driving more people indoors, and that's where a virus can spread more easily up next. The president elect's names his White House chief of staff. It's a 35. And now on the every side of cyber report,.

Dr. William Schaffner Homma Randall County Dr Michael Foster President executive Angela ALSO Brooks Gavin Buckley Stuart Pittman Prince George Center for Infectious Disease Luker Washington chief of staff Joe Biden University of Minnesota White House Director
"dr schaffner" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:57 min | 3 weeks ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on WTOP

"And Jim's must close in person service at 10 P.m. way usually get big orders around 10 on you. We're gonna get the income anymore. New York City's positivity rate climbing to 2.5%. If the city hits 3% all schools will go remote. At CBS News correspondent Meg Oliver time locally. We're expecting new information today on the pandemic at 9 30 this morning and a Randall County executive Stuart Pittman and Annapolis Mayor Gavin Buckley will announce new actions to curb the spread of the virus and a 10 30. We'll hear from Prince George's County executive, Angela also, Brooke says she talks about the county's response in the path forward. Or stay with w T. O p and w t o p dot com will let you know what developments occur in those news conferences as soon as we get them? I'm Luke Luke ERT here in the capital region. We are seeing case counts peak in both Maryland and Virginia. Dr. William Shafter, an infectious disease specialist at the Vanderbilt Medical Center, tells w. T o p that the surge was expected. But not quite like this. We didn't think it would come quite this early and The steep increase is really ominous. Hospitals are filling up again and give it another week or two and I'm afraid to death rate will go up. Dr. Schaffner says the U. S needs a new covert response plan that would take decision making away from governors and instead rely on a national strategy similar to the approach and many other countries. Japan, South Korea Australia, New Zealand China Blue Blucher w T o P News No surprise. But the pandemic should mean that fewer Americans will travel this Thanksgiving, the triple A's expecting at least a 10% drop in travel this Thanksgiving, the largest one year decrease since the 2008 recession. If you are planning a road trip, the organization has these tips. Be aware of local covert restrictions along a route and at your destination pack facemasks, disinfecting wipes, hand sanitizer and a thermometer and thoroughly wiped down.

New York City executive Luke Luke ERT Randall County Meg Oliver Dr. William Shafter CBS News Brooke Jim Gavin Buckley Stuart Pittman Vanderbilt Medical Center New Zealand China Annapolis Dr. Schaffner Prince George Maryland Japan Angela
"dr schaffner" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:52 min | 3 weeks ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on WTOP

"County employees are being asked to return money they were wrongfully paid more than $100,000 in hazard pay was improperly awarded to Montgomery County employees in the Department of permitting Services. That's according to the report from the Montgomery County Inspector General, Meghan Davey, Lamar Z. She testified before the county Council Tuesday. Council member Andrew Freed since every single taxpayer dollars that was wrongfully payout must be returned immediately. That is not negotiable. It must happen, and it must happen immediately. The pay was supposed to go to inspectors carrying out front facing work work that requires contact with the public and county executive Mark L. Rich said he's working Rectify the situation and make sure it doesn't happen again. Kate Brian w. T. O p. New Corona virus Infections air surging in the United States and new hospitalizations also had a new record this week. Here in the capital region. We are seeing case counts peak in both Maryland and Virginia. Dr. William Shafter, an infectious disease specialist at the Vanderbilt Medical Center, tells w. T o p that the surge was expected. But not quite like this come quite this early and The steep increase is really ominous. Hospitals are filling up again and give it another week or two and I'm afraid to death rate will go up. Dr. Schaffner says the U. S needs a new covert response plan that would take decision making away from governors and instead rely on a national strategy similar to the approach and many other countries. Japan, South Korea Australia New Zealand China Blue Blucher W T O P News We'll be learning more about changes to the cova 19 response, as some county officials hold Rest conferences this morning at 9 30 Arrundell County executives to her. Pittman and Annapolis Mayor Gavin Buckley will announce new actions to curb the spread of the virus and Annapolis in Anna Randall County and a 10 30. We'll hear from Prince George's.

Montgomery County county Council Anna Randall County Arrundell County Dr. Schaffner Meghan Davey Mark L. Rich Dr. William Shafter Andrew Freed Department of permitting Servi Annapolis Kate Brian w. T. O Gavin Buckley Vanderbilt Medical Center United States Prince George Pittman cova executive Maryland
"dr schaffner" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:27 min | 2 months ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on KCBS All News

"The Bay Area's new station, KCBS. We have the first day of fall, Sonny and pretty seasonal temperatures before a big heat wave coming this weekend. Good afternoon. I'm Patty Rising along with Jack Bell. Here's what's happening. Daddy is we've been reporting the US has reached a tragic milestone at least 200,000 deaths related to covered 19 KCBS hazmat Bigler talked to two leading infectious disease experts who say many of those deaths could have been avoided. The 200,000 covert death count is more than any other country and the equivalent of a 9 11 attack every day for 66 days. Each of those deaths represent A human being with a family and there are so many people in morning. Dr. William Schaffner, a professor of infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University, says the real tragedy is that so many of those people could have been saved if there were a coherent national strategy for combating Cove it that was based on science, and it's sobering. Because going forward We still do not have that sort of guidance that exists in other countries, and there will be more deaths to come. Both Dr Schaffner and Dr George Rutherford, a professor of epidemiology at UCSF, are pleading with everyone to keep wearing masks, at least until a vaccine is available, and we're not asking people to wear a mask for the next 20 years. This's really a short term fix. For which vaccines are going to be a longer term fix. Matt Bigler KCBS three more Barry counties will be allowed to relax some of their corona virus restrictions as their covert 19 cases continue to fall. Hey, CBS reporter dug. Sovereign, says Alameda County, San Matteo and Solano counties could start re opening restaurants, gyms, houses of worship, and in two weeks schools all that covering your face and keeping your distance is paying off. California's secretary of health and human services. Mark Galley announced that three Bay Area counties are among the 18 now in the less restrictive red tear instead of purple. Meaning that while Corona virus remains substantial there, it's no longer widespread. We're starting to see some movement now. And I think tremendous movement this week. County's not just from purple toe orange, but orange, sari purple, the red, red, orange and orange to yellow now that it is beginning to move moving from purple to red means Alameda, San Matteo and Solano counties. And allow the reopening of indoor restaurant dining houses of worship in movie theaters at 25% capacity, or 100 people, whichever is fewer. It means indoor Jim's at 10% capacity, and if they stay in the red here for the next two weeks, they could reopen schools in person with protective measures in place. San Mateo will immediately implement the new reopening rules. Alameda County says it'll phase in the changes using the next two weeks to monitor its numbers before allowing more reopening Contra Costa and Sonoma County's air Now the on LY Bay Area jurisdictions in the most restrictive purple tear. Doug Sovereign. KCBS University of California is under fire for a state audit released today that finds four campuses wrongly admitted dozens of wealthy or well connected students. Hey, CBS is Carrie, who dissect reports. A majority of those cases involved One school here in the Bay area. UC Berkeley is said to have admitted 42 students as favors to donor's family and friends over the past six years inside higher Ed Editor Scott Jazz, IC says it's a strong indication of how the school is being run in wake of last year's college admission scandal. It shows that there are weaknesses in the system who that were taken advantage of. By some people. These are very tricky. Situations. If you run you see, because Universal California is very hard to get into. In total state Auditor, Elaine how found 64 applicants were wrongly admitted up four campuses. In 22 of those cases, applicants posed as student athletes. Margarita Fernandez speaks for the auditor's office. We may not have seen them. Your name's on a rusher. Precedent play or they weren't on the roster after year, so those were definitely questionable. Both you see President Michael Drake and UC Berkeley Chancellor Carol Kristen tell KCBS. They plan to address the audit findings in the coming weeks. Carrie Hood, a SEC KCBS just ahead on KCBS son, Tim Ryan with a new paid holiday for 22,000, Santa Clara County workers. Juneteenth Way have an accident.

Alameda County Bay Area Carrie Hood KCBS Daddy San Matteo California Solano Dr. William Schaffner Auditor Sonny professor Patty Rising Santa Clara County Dr Schaffner San Mateo Matt Bigler Jack Bell University of California
"dr schaffner" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

Erin Burnett OutFront

05:45 min | 3 months ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

"If you look at the study carefully, it compared essentially patients who got a higher dose of this convalescent plasma patients who got a lower dose and compared those two. You didn't have a a group of people who did not receive convalescent plasma at all a placebo. So that's what they're saying. We just don't have enough data to is this working? Is it something else patients were given or even the safety questions that you're raising? Tata's important. What are you Dr? Schaffner are you concerned that there was political influence with us? Well the political influence seems to have been widely reported and it certainly looks that way. You know the Food Drug Administration was established to provide safe medications and effective medications but particularly safe ones for the American people and since the beginning of covid in reputation has been tarnished because they've been a number of decisions this regarding convalescent plasmas only the most recent we had the whole Hydroxy Clark, quincy ESCO, and before some release of Syrah logic tests that had not been vetted very carefully leak. This is another agency that needs to restore its reputation because a very large decision is looming regarding that scenes and many of us are very concerned that that also might be influenced by politics. Right, I mean, that's the question. That you raise a great point. Does this a road trust? As we look ahead to a vaccine and the FDA is the one in charge of giving approval for vaccine and we just heard from on now he's saying he would resign if facing the pressure, but he had previously said that he would be willing Sanjay to approve a vaccine. Before it finished face the retrials. All this along very closely in Dr Schaffner is absolutely correct I mean you know what? We're hearing the same thing from our sources. There is this concern. There's concern about the trust now in this agency from many public health officials outside of the federal government and that's obviously a concern I will I will point out and Pamela you know this but you know.

Dr Schaffner Sanjay Tata Food Drug Administration federal government quincy ESCO FDA Pamela
"dr schaffner" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

02:50 min | 3 months ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"That's already passed every safety test so you can you can take it if it doesn't do anything, prove me wrong, But I personally know it's been a It's been a great big for me and my friends and family because any of them they get tested positive there find within two days. And you know, I could say that with, uh it's been a blessing, even if even if I did nothing else that leads to save them, and I could never get and I've been around. You know, I have loved ones that are, you know, 78 years old and I've been out the public and stuff and I can't give it to anyone and I can't get it. And and I with that confidence 100% confidence. I could be around them and not worry about transferring anything that I can't have. You can't get Past every safety test, not even close to the truth, not even close to the truth. And this idea, Dan that Mike thinks and I hope he never gets sick. I hope no one close to him ever get sick, But the idea because he's taking on ly Andren that he can't get it. And nobody around him can get it. There's zero proof of that. Also, so far, that's the part that really scares me about this. Even even if you want to take Mr Lyndall a his word that he is truly out of altruism, and he really does just want to help people. This is the kind I'm not casting a spring And I'm not saying, you know, I'm also willing to acknowledge me just chime in. If I'm also William knowledge, which he downplays again. He's on the board off the company and comm profit dramatically from this, But you could do both right. You could want to help. And you also want to make a lot of money. Sure, absolutely. You can do both. And it does. One doesn't necessarily negate the other. That being said when he says hyperbolic things like this, like it's past every safety test. Look all of all of those studies that he's referencing in terms of the state's safety testing on this thing, we're done prick over it. Right. It's not just this product hasn't been tested in humans and animals to treat Cove it so we don't know if it's safe with patients that have code. We just have no idea yet. And to say that he absolutely now is immune. Can't get it Can't pass it along. There is I mean, talk about zero proof about safety, then we have even gotten anywhere near testing that yet. That's just completely made up. Let's hear from a Dr Schaffner my coaster home on their points silly us. We'll play some comments from some doctors When we come back, you can chime in at any 0.651989 92 26 on his attacks. 651989 92 26 bad Hardman. Meet Chuck. Now meet Chuck's personal information. Hello, made up of things like account Loggins Bank info and Chuck Social Security number. Whenever Chuck's shops, banks and browses online his info travels all over the World Bulls you breathe yet.

Mr Lyndall Chuck ly Andren Loggins Bank Mike Hardman treat Cove Dr Schaffner World Bulls Dan William
"dr schaffner" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:48 min | 4 months ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Works. As well as how safe it is so we're looking forward to the vaccine will likely be far less than 100% effective as we were warned last week by Dr Anthony found T. But Dr Schaffner tells can exit does not have to be perfect vaccine comes in That's 60 or 70% effective That could have a huge public health impact, even though it's not perfect. So he's saying, you know. Don't expect perfection and you won't be disappointed. And he says that's crucial sense. Skepticism of a vaccine that was developed so quickly might hold millions back from actually going out to get it. Brian Ping, chaotic Sten 70 news radio just days after counting that they've been without a community infection in months. Strict new lock down has been imposed on New Zealand's largest city, Auckland. Because of four Corona virus infections within one family. Those cases of the first confirmed new ones in the entire country in more than 100 days that are being blamed on local transmission. The prime minister just in the Ardennes. His quick action is required to prevent a large outbreak is disruptive as it is I strong and rapid health response remains the beast. Long term economic response. We will be moving Auckland to level three restrictions for three days until midnight on Friday. The prime minister says. There will be an intense effort to track down anyone else that infected family members had close contact with freeway check coming right up. Let's see. We've got a brushfire, the fact affecting the drive right now we're talking the 1 18 freeway's shut down, it will be shut down at least some lanes. Through dependent Topanga Canyon. I believe for about an hour and we'll check in with Tom. See what he has to say on that. We'll check your drive in less than four minutes, 11 41 Big Mac Chicken McNuggets,.

Dr Schaffner prime minister Auckland Dr Anthony New Zealand Tom Topanga Canyon Brian Ping
"dr schaffner" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:03 min | 6 months ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Sheltering in place for several months now a lot of people ready to get out and go K. C. B. S.'s listen John asked about the safest way to do that summer vacation plans may involve travel by car or plane during the corona virus pandemic which is safer when you're in the car you're controlling your own environment and if you're careful when you get off at the car stops always wear your mask keeps social distancing and the like you and your family I think can be safer than if you travel by air for example where you're going to have to interact with all kinds of people Dr William Shatner is a professor of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University School of medicine he says if you do decide to fly somewhere be sure to bring lots of good hand hygiene products maybe some wipes if you're really concerned about the inanimate environment such as those tray tables always bring your masks and bring extras in case you lose them wear them absolutely all the time and try to keep six feet away from everyone else as much as possible Dr Schaffner has the same advice for those traveling by bus or train Liz Saint John KCBS course it gets tricky as you start to break this thing down and that's exactly the topic of this morning's KCBS ask an expert segmented nine twenty we'll bring aboard medical expert to talk about the decisions everybody's facing if they do decide to travel and any specific questions you may have today's the day to get a mansard ask us at KCBS radio dot com is the email address and they will get those questions answered at nine twenty here on KCBS you can also listen on the radio dot com app on the online at KCBS radio dot com and via smart speaker just say play KCBS radio this is virtual SNL moneywatch update sponsored by Kelly Moore paints Jason standards second wave of fears are weighing in on the stock market this morning although coming off the opening low the.

K. C. B. S. Dr William Shatner professor Dr Schaffner KCBS Vanderbilt University School o Liz Saint John KCBS SNL Kelly Moore Jason
"dr schaffner" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:43 min | 6 months ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Simple they loved and they're seen and so I think bring in food is a is the perfect way to demonstrate that love it may not seem like much but to someone living on the streets of San Francisco a sandwich and a bottle of water means another day of survival all of the policies definitely when you're stressed or struggling with always a blessing they in San Francisco Kerry had a sack KCBS with people flocking to the beaches and parks with the warm weather over the weekend some health officials say we are bound to see the ramifications of that KCBS is Jennifer Hodges has more forget six speed at some beaches and parks around the country it was more like six inches I'm afraid the corona virus had an opportunity to spread around and I wouldn't be surprised if here there and perhaps almost everywhere we get some spike in cases Dr William Schaffner professor of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University School of medicine says with large groups it's virtually impossible to do contact tracing and try to determine where the corona virus will pop up people came from everywhere and they went back to everywhere so I'm not sure we can select the states that are going to have the problem but the virus has to be part of the party and I think we will see some increase in cases I can't quite predict where Dr Schaffner says more than likely that increase will happen in the next two weeks Jennifer Hodges KCBS point set and match tennis courts are open again in Berkeley racquets are swinging balls are flying in case CBS's Jim Taylor's reporting.

San Francisco Kerry Jennifer Hodges professor Dr Schaffner CBS Jim Taylor KCBS Dr William Schaffner Vanderbilt University School o Berkeley
"dr schaffner" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

04:41 min | 9 months ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on The Big 98

"Some of the services in your house use any household disinfectant it will work I don't have a spleen docked at what yeah good question I had a I had a surgery they removed my spleen when I was a kid I didn't think about this what's up with that well the fact that you've had your spleen out does make you more susceptible to certain bacterial infections but not necessarily to covert thank goodness so I'm free to run around to be good everyone Dr Delano is everything no doctors under that internet would go would you go to a restaurant Dr Schaffner if it to pick up on people making new year yes I would still do that you know the restaurants are spreading their tables farther apart they're taking fewer reservations just so that people can be more distant and certainly pick up and delivery works and here's here's your dishes going out with one other couples to the restaurant I think that still okay we're not yet in a total lockdown circumstance but don't hang out at a bar you know they're closed anyway but don't hang out in large groups for any extended period of time avoid those groups well we very much appreciate you talking to us and we got listeners all over the country that are very appreciative of your time as well I know you got a lot to do so thank you so much for your time and hope you have a great day today and and you're out changing the world doctor stay healthy everybody thank you all right yeah bye bye Dr William Schaffner MD he graduated from Yale in nineteen fifty seven he attended university of Freiburg Germany as a Fulbright scholar Cornel in sixty two I just keep going but he is the disease control guy oh wow he then commissioned it's it's on us all the CDC stuff he I guess that is present in the infectious disease club that I love I love it I was so helpful yeah it was I like having a month when I first got the email though that we had a phone call with him I I didn't read the whole thing I just thought oh cool William Shatner's coming on the show William Shatner I just didn't I didn't like yeah I just glanced at the email so thank you guys makes more sense how he said respiratory or respiratory knows more than I think yeah for sure okay there you go J. that and you know it like he says wash your hands because that let's play it again here is the raging idiots wash your hands here on the Bobby bones show you can he we well people still get a bit I guess sports bettors.

Dr Delano Dr Schaffner Dr William Schaffner MD Yale Cornel William Shatner university of Freiburg Germany CDC
"dr schaffner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 9 months ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We want to take some time now to answer some of your questions about covert nineteen and the corona virus causing it and to do that we're joined by Dr William Shatner professor at the Vanderbilt University School of medicine he's in Nashville and Dr Schaffner welcome back to here now good to be with you Tonya so we spoke a few weeks ago and one question that we had early on and we still have from lots of our listeners is whether it masks are effective in slowing the spread of the virus they're selling out everywhere what do we know about how it is transmitted and is there any evidence that corona virus is airborne well what we know about masks used in the community is that the data supporting that his scant could they have a small role in preventing the transmission of the virus I suppose so one of the things they do is prevent you from actually touching your nose and your mouth which might interrupt transmission if you happen to pick it up on your finger tips but the use of masks is more a comfort and assign to others that you're doing your best rather than an actual prevention of getting the corona virus or influenza for that matter we've heard though it might be a little more effective for those who are sick verses you using it to prevent yourself from being sick what's the science on that yes that would be correct and we would then recommend that to be used within the home it's not a license for sick people to go out and about which a lot of people misinterpret okay let's get to some of our questions from our audience Petra in Portland Oregon asks how long can the covert nineteen virus survive in the environment which transmission of the virus be possible via contact with goods produced in an endemic area we think that that risk is very very low because the virus can survive for a period of hours but then it just dies off because that's not a comfortable environment for the virus and the way to protect oneself from potential environmental contamination just round in about is lots of good hand hygiene wash those hands use those wipes in jails and that's the way to protect yourself another question sort of related to all of this is about climate do we know about whether.

professor Tonya Oregon Dr William Shatner Vanderbilt University School o Nashville Dr Schaffner influenza Petra Portland
"dr schaffner" Discussed on Bob and Sheri

Bob and Sheri

05:54 min | 9 months ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on Bob and Sheri

"And I was like man. I Know Blue Cross won't pay for anything. Book is GRANDPA in twilight sleep before they operate on her foot. What were they don't know? But when the camera went in for a close up even I crawled out of my fog. Give her a shot to number and I think they gave her some Novicki Baba was so brutal see was hollering. It just hurt my heart to watch stuff like that. We don't feel good something that's beautiful. I couldn't I love you too. Much to say excerpts at that point I think our friendship would have been over. I'm like I don't need to see Dr Schaffner shaper carving into somebody's book after sent home sending time pictures. Let's see them like hell. No Gentleman Sch wonder what my father would have thought programming. He might surprise. You know I was just thinking the Peace Corps here later on in life. He might have been really enamored with old thing. I like that second so it makes me very uncomfortable. I think Dr Lee is a living breathing. Angel who helps people and never makes anyone feel awkward or embarrassed or judged. She is a wonderful human being. Although I have to say that the title of that show really really grabs you. My feet are killing me. The episode by the way. The one you're talking about it was called Fixing Frankenstein. Was the name of the episode for her. Be Give that lady sedation bio twilight sedation. Subtle just for its Bobby Sherry sharable taste of this show the fun size. Podcast drops every Thursday on the free Bob and Sheri Okay. It's time now for Bob and Sheri small plates. These are quick stories from around the world. And let's start out with boy you know there are some people that just go through life like me. You know doing a job and really. DoN'T INVENT ANYTHING. Things are around us all the time that need to be invented like whoever came up with the expandable dog leash you know we needed to have that and I should have thought of it. I had a great a lot through. I know you have to have really good follow-through Walt Disney did so much. I mean he was an animator. Creates MICKEY MOUSE? Are All these fantastic characters? And what does he do then he comes up with Disneyland and they does this Great Disney show on TV in the mousketeers and all of this stuff and not only that what is the invented enclosed garbage cans to keep Disneyland back in the fifties from smelling bed up until that point public trash cans were wire Mesh and didn't block any of the garbage smell. So he's they opened up. Disneyland Waltz walking around saying what could go wrong here it goes that smells bad and he says let's let's enclose them bang just like that. I mean I know it's not a genius idea but it's just so bright it just speaks to how detail oriented. He was pre every aspect of your experience at that park was Yep. That's exactly right. Well if you're the type of person who likes the taste of marshmallows rolled in sugar. Why not enjoy it in liquid form? Some eleven is now. Selling peeps flavored slurpee is for Easter. A few different people have posted photos on instagram. So it's not a knockoff. It looks like they're going to be doing an official partnership with peeps this year. It's not clear how close they taste of the real thing. And there's no word on whether all seven elevens will have them or just select stores but apparently they've started rolling them out and they will disappear shortly after April twelve. There's a certain age as a kid. Were the idea of something cold. That sweep is irresistible. It's it's a small window I still like slurpee. But a peep slur not a peeps or I'm really specific about the which I like the Cherry slurpee. And sometimes they'll have like lemonade. Slurpy about the blue the taste like raspberry while I'll do a blue slur blue become raspberry. I were just talking about this. Because raspberries are not blowing up luther. Golden he did it purple. People think it'd be grape and cherry. That's right that's right. And if they do yellow they think it's The dog pee on the snow. So there's speaking of raspberries and things like that. I have decided to do something illegal. Is I'm fed up. Paid like four dollars fifty cents for small a little package of blueberries. I just you know because they keep you from going insane Blah Blah stor and SARS so good so I brought them into work. They are rotten tasting blueberries. They're mushy. They're no good and they charged me for fifty and I know I didn't keep the receipt because I'm a jerk when I visit bursaries. Just throw it away. Popped into their Walmart neighborhood. Food market the cargo STU and bought a that of berries for four fifty and they were place unconcious opening like Graham. I know I knew you were going to say something like that. Hard getting screwed. That's Rondo eight. Thank you so much for listening to the BOB and Sheri podcast. And the BOB and Sheri Odd Cath. If you subscribe rate and review and share it with a friend on facebook twitter instagram wherever you go and thank you again for listening..

Sheri Okay Bob Novicki Baba Peace Corps Dr Lee Walt Disney Dr Schaffner facebook Bobby Sherry Disney official luther Graham
Nasty flu season hits US kids, with 92 related deaths, amid coronavirus fears

The Takeaway

10:38 min | 10 months ago

Nasty flu season hits US kids, with 92 related deaths, amid coronavirus fears

"The corona virus that originated in Wuhan China continues to spread their been more than seventy one thousand cases globally all but seven hundred of those have been in China so far the US is only seen fifteen cases total and no deaths on Tuesday the director of the wood Cheong hospital in Wuhan where the virus originated himself died of the virus but there is a more familiar foe that sickening and killing Americans right now and that's the flew across the country we've seen about twenty six million cases of the flu about two hundred fifty thousand hospitalizations related to a flu or flu like illnesses and about fourteen thousand deaths around the country and that is Dr Molly fleece assistant professor in infectious diseases at the university of Alabama at Birmingham while corona virus has some people worry flu season this year is bringing in you and troubling figure along with it the rate of infection in children is higher than it's been in decades as a February eighth at least ninety two kids have died from the flu this year now as we find ourselves in the second wave of the flu this season I spoke with doctor fleas and with doctor William Shafter professor of infectious diseases and preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University I began by asking Molly how the flu this year compares with other years so right now in terms of numbers and in terms of hospitalization rates these have been fairly similar to this time during recent seasons what has been different this year as we have seen higher rates of hospitalizations among children and younger adults during this time than in seasons past thankfully mortality rates as related to the flu and complications like pneumonia have been lower this year than in seasons past a bill is there anything that's different about the flu strains this year anything noted all are what people should be aware of well this year was distinctive as most seasons are the season began a bit early and it began with the dominance of an influenza B. strain now this is very unusual the strange usually smolder along during the season and then become more prominent toward the end of the influenza season but the flu virus didn't read the text book it began early and it was the dominant virus it caused outbreaks across the country now just as the B. strains were beginning to wane along came in a strain a H. one N. one so it looks as though we're having a double barreled influenza season this year and to what extent are we I guess collectively paying too much attention if you will to to what's happening abroad and the corona virus for instance verses just our own domestic of virus that you know that that is causing I guess just millions about Presa across the country well the influenza virus of course just as doctor fleece has said has caused a vast amount of illness and is still very active across the country in contrast the corona virus in the United States I think the last number is that we have a fifteen documented cases only fifteen and they're all doing quite well now it's understandable it's a human psychology to be more and trance and concerned about a novel new strain of the virus that comes up that appears to be threatening and is coming from a rather exotic place so we understand the attention given to the corona virus but we shouldn't forget flu and I'll get my message out numerous times it is late to be vaccinated make a delayed new year's resolution be sure and get vaccinated this fall of Mali exactly how bad are things in terms of infections of children how different is a picture look from last year so we have seen like I said more hospitalizations and children and young adults this year than in years past thankfully mortality rates have been low as compared to other years overall in the country we've had about ninety two the actor tests around the country and that's within range two years prior the because of the increased number of hospitalization in children and young adults around the country we have seen higher rates of school closure to two children being sick and teachers being second Sino that's put some strain more strain out into the community as well a bill the kids who are dying of the flu today ten have compromised immune systems anything like that well the story is as usual a substantial proportion of them have underlying illnesses those children who get flu and get and and die a flu unfortunately but a substantial proportion indeed the majority are normal healthy children and also I'll bet this year the data will show the same is that it has in the past most of those children profound sadly never were vaccinated so that's something serious to think about and is this is this at least partly due to people who refuse to vaccinate their kids to anti VAX components are people who are just as opposed to vaccinations I suppose the vaccine hesitancy group has contributed something to this but they usually don't focus on influenza vaccine per se influenza vaccine of course is something we all have to receive annually so it's a lot of work for pediatricians and family doctors as well as the parents who have to bring all those children in to be vaccinated fortunately we're vaccinating gradually an increasing proportion of children in the United States each year Molly work or doctors and researchers expecting the fluid levels that we've seen this year I think so I think we each year we know that the flu has the potential to be a significant circulating illness and so every year we are prepared we we ourselves get our flu shot we recommend everyone around us and everyone in the community to get their flu shot and then we prepare for the influx of patients into our clinics and into the hospitals who unfortunately do you come down with the flu and potential complications of the flu so I do think we were prepared at bill are there any big vaccine milestones in her eyes and things that might be coming down the pike well as regards influenza vaccine people are working to devise unique ways to would minister influenza vaccine there been some early studies showing that perhaps you could administer influenza vaccine via a capsule that you take by mouth that would be interesting another one is to put a patch on your arm with a bunch of micro little needles that you wouldn't even feel that would inoculate the flu vaccine for your arm but you only have a patch not an actual needle inoculation and then of course there are many people trying to make a flu vaccine the so called universal flu vaccine that would protect against a whole variety of strains and that perhaps in the future would mean we wouldn't have to get our flu vaccine each and every year but those advances are in the laboratory still in the meantime we have a pretty darn good flu vaccine not perfect but it's the one that we should use to prevent a vast amount of illness and as Molly said even if you get the vaccine and get flu your illness is likely to be less severe you're less likely to have to go to the hospital and you're certainly less likely to die of influenza what's wrong with that yeah I mean I am curious to when it comes to these kinds of innovations that are in the laboratory phase right now did he suggested there are a lot of people out there who simply just don't want to go get a shot every year a cyst yeah just a reluctance or an aversion to that well the national foundation for infectious diseases has done a survey and is found that the two top reasons people don't get vaccinated are number one they don't have a lot of confidence in the effectiveness of the vaccine and number two they are concerned about side effects and of course as to side effects other than a sore arm my arm is always sore for about three hours after I get my shot it is an extraordinarily safe vaccine we give it in the millions upon millions of doses each and every year Molly if if the flute does change so much every year how do researchers keep Bob so it takes a lot of people working really hard every year to look at the shift of the flu virus and they look at circulating flu viruses around the world and they ultimately come down with the circulating strange that they believe are likely to be what patients in the United States and around the world are going to be infected with every year and that is what they target the virus strains for or the vaccine each year we should have more information from the CDC later at this either this week or next week in terms of exactly how effective this year's flu shot is but I would encourage again even if you do get the flu after getting the flu shot it is important to remember that the severity of your illness is likely to be less as Dr Schaffner was saying and I'm I'm curious bill and to what extent is the corona virus complicating things at all this year well the corona virus appeared after most people have been vaccinated against influenza but the coronavirus certainly has created an outbreak of corona virus anxiety that has made people forget influenza that's for sure bill what what is something that you hear a lot or see a lot online something that you always try to nip in the bud when it comes to misinformation well the classic is that you can get flu from the flu vaccine I'm afraid that old canard is still alive and unfortunately well out there there's no way that you can get flu from the flu vaccine

Wuhan China China United States
"dr schaffner" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on WJR 760

"Been a great pleasure to be with you this morning filling in for Frank Beckmann. And we've had some good discussion today and a lot of great guests folks in this category of kind of unsung heroes. I'd like to welcome. Dr Robert Steiner, who's the superintendent of the Rochester community schools, a friend of mine. And and really I just a great leader in the community. Welcome Dr Schaffner. Thank you, Mike. It's a pleasure to be here. Well, I I gotta tell you. I I maybe partial because I'm graduate of Rochester schools, but boy is the community proud of the Rochester community schools, and all that they've done blue ribbon status on so many levels. I remember you coming into town into Washington DC to collect three of the blue ribbon awards of the very few that are are are given nationally three of them were in Rochester community schools. So I know you're gonna. If you give credit where credit is due, and that's to your educators and your team there at Rochester community schools. But once again, there's a lot to do a lot to say about leadership. Oh, thank you, Mike. And and you're right. I'm very blessed to work with a with a team of individuals. That's that's second to none. His, you know last year, we we did go to Washington DC to accept three national the ribbons. I the only school district United States to get three national blue ribbons in the same year. And we certainly appreciate your hospitality. When we were. We were in Washington. Just so proud of of our community, the support our community gets our public schools, and in just a great group of professionals that I'm I have the pleasure and honor of working with. Yeah. They are. They're great people. I know many of them, you know, I must also say the Rochester Adams, my alma mater is the only high school in the state have received blue ribbon status since two thousand fourteen. Is that correct? That is correct correct. Yeah. I was news a great school still have friends. They're teaching. And and you know, it's just you always been welcoming back. It's great very proud to be a graduate of that great school. That's one of the great things about Rochester community schools is the backing and support that the community gives it at each every every one of our high schools, there's. Such great community support that or academic events are art sedan center athletics. Yeah. Sure. Is you know, you you think it's all about education? That's all you'd have to focus on these days. But you have other challenges out there as well. And I admire you for your leadership in these in these areas one of them is the opioid epidemic. And you know, we don't talk too much about it. But unfortunately, the opioid epidemic is touched everybody, including our public schools so much talk a little bit about what you're doing. With regard to the task force you set up, and and what we might see in the future in the community. Sure. I appreciate the opportunity to do. So we we have been touched as a community by by opioid deaths. Diction is is an equal opportunity killer is we like to say, unfortunately, it's it's touched everyone in this community, recently, we launched social emotional task force with the help attend Daniels and the genie Daniels foundation it open university. Where we we asked three of our leaders in our school district to begin working on a task force to to to attack the needs of of not only addiction, but suicide awareness and mental health. It's just something that I know as a community if we double our efforts, we can have an even greater impacts at a positive, and the thing that I think was most moving at the press conference when we made this announcement was how many people came up afterwards and said my life's Benton touched by addiction. I've had a loved one that spits deceased because of addiction or bene- victim of suicide. There's so many people in the community that to your point. We don't talk about it. But it's touched on every life everywhere. It's just too sad. And we're not talking about those with chronic pain that demands their pain with with some form of opiate some folks out there who really need a prescription drug. We don't want to suggest that we're aiming our efforts at them. But we're talking about addiction here in how prevalent it is out there every parent should be aware of how prevalent it is in our community. And no one is is out of out of harm's way in this one. It's just it's just critical that all of us keep our eyes open for our our kids, if our friend's kids for our neighbors kids, and we talk about it. If you see something say something, and and that goes through with this opiate addiction to make sure that we we stay connected to each other for sure, and we enjoy a probably one of the longest histories of school liaison programs with our police departments in the state well over forty years, and one of the things that parents can do it. That's really a high leverage practices. Just to get the stuff out of her medicine cabinet with the help of the sheriff's department in the Rochester police department, particularly offs rainy dreamer, enter parent teacher conferences, we have a drug that drop off to our liaison officers now just to get the stuff off the streets participate with the children's hospital foundation and a child man lesson behavioral organization, and one of the things we talked about there to your point is there are people that do need these types of drugs for either paying maintenance or or other types of medical situations. And we're not suggesting that people shouldn't be doing that. What we're suggesting is making sure we we are getting people the appropriate support when they when they have addiction issues, and and something that we removed a stigma. I think that's the biggest thing was suicide awareness, and with addiction is removing this stigma and talking about it for what it is which is a disease, which is Alba. Health crisis. It's it's nothing more than that. And if we talk about it like that, I think we can work towards removing the stigma which gets people to support that they so desperately need. Well, this has been a passion of mine. I know it's something that you're going to work on a continue to work on. I thank you for your leadership. I thank you on behalf of the community for all that you do for our our community schools and for our students for our children. You really are a true leader in an unsung hero. And I wanna thank you for that. L I greatly. Appreciate it. And it wouldn't be possible without the without great community leaders like yourself, and I appreciate you inviting us on the show today. I would like to make one one plug for our children and adolescent behavioral summit that's going to be may fourteenth at the end at Saint John's behalf at the children's hospital foundation of Michigan you can register online again, it's the chil- child and adolescent behavioral summit at the at the end at Saint John's, I'll be there. I'm a part of this organization, and if we work together as a state, and as a community, we can we can make a difference in the lives of children for sure what does that have been start? It's may the fourteenth and it starts at nine o'clock in the morning. Okay. Sounds great. Dr saner. Thanks so much for being with us today on the Frank Beckmann.

Rochester community schools Rochester Frank Beckmann Washington Mike Rochester police department Dr Robert Steiner Dr Schaffner United States superintendent Saint John Dr saner genie Daniels foundation art sedan center Daniels Benton Michigan Alba forty years
"dr schaffner" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"dr schaffner" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Show another story in the news. A big story in the news this week this time, Alex trebek's, Alex trebek's went public yesterday released a very, and I'm not gonna say heart wrenching, but very heart felt announcement that he had stage four pancreatic cancer that he intended to fight it that he wanted our prayers and our good wishes to surround him during this battle and that he had three. Nettie had three more years on his contract. So he didn't think he was going anywhere about pancreatic cancer can be a fight. It can be a tough fight. Dr Suzanne Schiffman from the Allegheny health network is a surgical oncologist. She joins us now to give us some insight into why pancreatic cancer is so tough, welcome. Dr schaffner. Thank you so much for having me. Indeed. So what from what I understand one of the challenges with pancreatic cancer is there's no easy way to detect it. And that's absolutely right. Unfortunately, with pancreatic cancer, many of the signs and symptoms. We see aren't present until the disease is somewhat advanced. So generally people will present with John which is yellowing of the Skinner is weight loss of domino pain, nausea, vomiting, sometimes their diabetes can get a little bit worse or they could develop diabetes. But these are all things that are relatively nonspecific. And so then once it had what is the process? What is the testing process light to determine it? So generally when you present with these types of concerning symptoms. The first thing we'll do is obtained some type of imaging whether it's a cat scan and ultra sound or an MRI. Once we have concerned that there's a mass in the patriots are that we have concerned for pancreatic cancer will proceed to try to get a biopsy. That's you usually done by our GI doctors in which they go down into the stomach with the scope and try to biopsy the pancreas through the stomach. Okay. And then so often, I know many of the people in my immediate circle that have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer were very similar to Alex trebek's when they were diagnosed it was stage four, that's absolutely right. I I would say seventy to eighty percent of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, either locally advanced meaning that the cancer has grown beyond the pancreas and into surrounding vessels making them inoperative or they are stage for meaning the cancer spread outside of the pancreas to somewhere else in the body. So if. If it what would be a typical kind. Of course, I know that Alex trebek's that he was going to be receiving chemotherapy, I've heard about something before caught a Whipple procedure. But what is the traditional approach? Well, for stage four specifically surgery is not going to be an option in any type of curated sense surgeries generally reserved for making patients more comfortable in alleviating symptoms in in stage. Four pancreatic is when you said the Whipple procedure that's reserved for earliest stages. So people that have localized disease or are oftentimes respectable, meaning they're amenable to surgical reception. A Whipple procedure is removing part of the pancreas the head of the pancreas along with the duodenum the bottom of the bile duct and part of the stomach, and then everything is reconstructed. We only engage in these aggressive surgical sections when we're sure that we can get all get out all of the cancer. So I guess then what makes pancreatic cancer? So challenging is you know with breast cancer. We talk about getting mammograms. We talked about doing self exams, and you know with colon cancer. We. You know, there are things that you can do tasks that you can do. But it doesn't sound like there's much from a medical perspective that we can do that. I wanna say preventive. But what would the word be early diagnosis? I guess. All right. Yeah. Yeah. So you're absolutely right. Unfortunately, there aren't any good screening test. So for colon cancer, you have colonoscopy for prostate cancer. There's a blood test. You can do. Unfortunately, we've not found any type of useful marker for pancreatic cancer. In terms of as a as a screening marker in people that have strong family history of certain types of cancer and pay Graddick cancer in it which were concerned, they might have a genetic predisposition to develop this type of cancer. We can be a little bit more aggressive and do an MRI or doing endoscopic ultrasound. But that's not going to be for everybody. That's only in extreme cases. And are there any similarities like, I know a lot of times? We see a higher incidence rate of certain cancers in certain group of people. So for example, just and this is just been my own experience. I'm sure is not scientific at all. But most of the people. I've no thank reality. Cancer have been men. Are there any groups in society that are more likely or or more vulnerable to a pancreatic cancer? I'm not that I know of. Although there are some things that can increase your chances of developing it. So like with most cancers there is an association was smoking on the people who have had multiple episodes of pancreatitis right increase risk for pancreatic cancer as well. Oh, interesting. Okay. And so then I know that and Alex trebek's he recorded a video statement. I don't know if you saw that video statement or not he did say that the the chance of survival beyond five years was very low. But he wanted people to pray for him. And that he was gonna fight it. And I'm guessing as with most cancers, the attitude of the person makes a big difference not necessarily life changing. But a big difference. Oh, I certainly agree with that. And you know, like, you said the statistics for pancreatic cancer and not very encouraging. But what I tell my patients is that some people are going to do much better. Some people will do not as well. And you know in the beginning. We should always try to keep a positive attitude. And and think why shouldn't you be one of the people that does better last thing before we let you go. Dr Suzanne Schiffman on surgical oncologists with Allegheny health network. I understand there are a lot of very promising trials going on in the world of pancreatic cancer. Yeah. Things in the future things are moving towards more genetic type therapies, so we are there are some very promising things where we're going to try to identify damage jeans and repair them either through immunotherapy or other genetic molecular studies like targeted therapy. But that's also kind of in the earlier the earlier stages. So I would encourage all patients, you know, to speak with their medical oncologist and see if they might be a candidate for any clinical trials and to see you know, what might be available to them. And I noticed how carefully you answered that question. That Dr Suzanne Schiffman from Allegheny health network. Thanks so much. Sure. Thank you for having me hand. Did have a good day. You're listening to cut her off. You're listening to Katie. Looking to stand out from the pack at your first job when you earn a master's in management from Georgetown. You'll gain the skills employers value most elevating your career prospects.

pancreatic cancer cancer colon cancer Alex trebek breast cancer Dr Suzanne Schiffman prostate cancer Allegheny health network Dr schaffner Nettie Georgetown John Katie eighty percent five years