35 Burst results for "Dr Sarah"

US coronavirus hospitalizations break 90,000 as new cases spike

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:58 min | 1 d ago

US coronavirus hospitalizations break 90,000 as new cases spike

"Rota virus continues to be a struggle for the US over 200,000 new cases have been reported setting a new single day record on Lee. About three weeks after the nation first broke 100,000 new cases one day The numbers continue to be staggering, and they're straining hospitals in many areas. Correspondent Jennifer King reports number of Americans who have been diagnosed with the coronavirus past 13 million and according to Johns Hopkins University, the country is averaging more than 1650 deaths per day. Experts warn that testing numbers were likely to Be erratic over the next week or so due to the Thanksgiving holiday. The grim news has been rolling in from around the country. In Wisconsin, The federal government reported that 294 nursing home residents had died of the disease between October 12th in November, 8th more than 10 times, the number reported the previous month cases they're straining hospitals in Texas, with El Paso and San Antonio, issuing partial curfews through Monday morning in California, Los Angeles County officials announced a safer at home public health order. In one month, the county has gone from 800 to 2000. People hospitalized for virus related problems. I'm Jennifer King. Virtually every state in the nation is now struggling to keep the virus from spreading on checked in California one day after Los Angeles County announced a new stay at home order, another county is reimposing pandemic rules. Correspondent Alex Stone report. 14 day quarantines will be mandatory for anybody in Santa Clara County who has traveled over 150 miles. Hotels were being closed toe leisure travelers open only to essential travel and contact sports are now banned, including home games for the San Francisco 40 Niners. Hanford University and San Jose State. Santa Clara County Health officer Dr Sarah Cody is a matter of life and death and we must slow this train or it will derail. As newly diagnosed cases and deaths have risen this month. So of hospitalizations, an all time high of 90,000 coronavirus patients are now in the hospital with the nation's seeing 50 deaths an hour

Jennifer King Rota Los Angeles County Johns Hopkins University LEE Correspondent Alex Stone El Paso Federal Government California Wisconsin Santa Clara County San Antonio United States Texas Hanford University San Jose State
Miami’s Jackson Health System will be among first to receive Pfizer coronavirus vaccine

The South Florida Morning Show

01:11 min | Last week

Miami’s Jackson Health System will be among first to receive Pfizer coronavirus vaccine

"The us death toll from coronavirus has reached two hundred fifty thousand but we have a vaccine and two hospitals in south florida receiving it. I don't usually get the ever. Get the flu vaccine. But i would probably get this vaccine. This kobe thing is no joke. You seen kovin toes. Oh god oh no. Don't go there. it's so bad anyway. but this band name covert does have to be a punk band. Yes is vaccine. Will be available at miami's jackson memorial hospital and also Fort lauderdale's memorial regional medical center. And this is the chief of critical medicine at memorial. His name is dr sarah alley and he warns. The vaccine is not a magic bullet. I think that the initial that is reported from the vaccine is very encouraging. However i think that's only one piece of the puzzle. Okay you know. What does the public any good to drop water on this right down. Shut off pretty amazing that it's come out so quickly. It's a it's incredible. It's one of our greatest american accomplishments. Not ever forget that so it should be available to people over sixty five down. The higher end mental also healthcare workers initially

Memorial Regional Medical Cent Dr Sarah Alley Jackson Memorial Hospital South Florida Kobe FLU Fort Lauderdale Miami United States
"dr sarah" Discussed on Secular Buddhism

Secular Buddhism

07:53 min | 3 months ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on Secular Buddhism

"Dr Sarah Shah, Faculty member, and lecturer at the University of Oxford. She has taught and published numerous works on the history and practices of Buddhism including an introduction to Buddhist Meditation and the spirit of meditation. Without further delay years the audio from my interview, with Dr. Sarah. What inspired you to write this book I something. That's always interested me. I always noticed that mindfulness gets described in different ways in different historical periods and then Chased Kim and Nicola as. Shambala actually. Asked me to do is short history of mindfulness to make it very short, which is very, very difficult at, but I enjoy doing something that's just always interested me, bitch. I read articles about mindfulness and they can be quite rigid about it's this or it's that or it's this. Anak must have hundreds of my computer on some of them are really quite dogmatic but what I liked to its way in different settings would just get his slightly differently and has a slightly different feel and application with an underlying threader voltages. Pull that keep things alive by soon changing formulations wraps looking at them in you setting so. That seems the mindful way to approach the subject. So I. Really. Enjoyed it. It's great. It's interesting how? Like you mentioned how? Many different ways there are to use the word right when somebody says, I'm trying to be more mindful. You almost have to ask what what does that mean to you because there are so many interpretations of what it means to be mindful I think the people. In what's one person needs may be different from another person so I wouldn't want to be rigid about how it should be interpreted. Well that's great and and tell me a little bit about your background with with Buddhism with mindfulness Where did you? Where did all that start your interest in this topic? I started meditation many years ago. When. I was at Manchester University and that's what I I really encountered word mindfulness in Buddhist searching. Amusingly my meditation teacher told me that he hadn't met many people who is so unmindful the tolerating needs to didn't. Have I think that's A. Problem for academics, you can get very over focused. News surroundings. So I was intrigued by then and I try to sit down I have ever since I'm not sure I've ever really found out what she chews. On still craft it enjoy trying to rouse. I love how the title of the Book you know brings up right away to things where where does it come from and what does it mean if you had to answer that short way to somebody in an elevator? How would you answer that? Where where does it come from and what does it mean? And I would say it comes from is, is any one place Lipa come from coolest A cells that cindy the only person who can be mindful and do something about which is on self. And what it means. I would say. An attentive alertness to. Worship brings health to the mind. Something like that. Yeah I like that I think it seems like sometimes at least the way at. That mindfulness has evolved in the West. there seems to be a tendency to think of mindfulness as an altered state. and. It seems to me like what you're describing as more of an altered trait. It's a way of being. I can affect everything that we do rather than thinking. Well, here's my normal ordinary life and when I mindful I'm separate from that. It's this other state that I'm in. It it would be nice to be mindful of time I think we will have lapses one consent it'd be mindful day life it helps. Hopes to be mindful in daily life and one one needs to, of course in meditation. So it's something that can be there all the time how you arouse it sounds different circumstances might be different but the quality. Certainly according to the Buddhist tradition is that when the mind is healthy and Alert. Does a Buddhist fishing called the epidemic and it says that when mindfulness is present, lots of other factors come into play too like. Confidence. In this. Huma. Balance a lot of these other qualities come in as well. Yeah. What's Nice as the moment that we are mindful of the fact that we're not mindful we've already started right? We've already. A good a good point. Yeah So, what would you say is the biggest Maybe, misconception that you've encountered about mindfulness. I'm. Really, think very much in those terms actually oddly enough because I am an academic, that's what we're trying to do a misconception. I would say that the notion that it's somehow something that is very different from daily experience and I think that's probably one and does something that. Is owned by anybody at. The. Particular A. Just, save it. Psychology knows what mindfulness is in a way to. Practice, space traditions. Up Stem tool that Everybody will have found some way of arousing alertness and the attentiveness of mindfulness under different circumstances. So Am. Possibly I'd say the biggest misconception will be thinking that it was something you couldn't do. On Everyday Yeah I like that and I I would agree that seems to be a very common misconception people. I will tell me from time to time You know this, the topics are interesting, but mindfulness isn't for me. I'm not capable of it or something like that. Now say well, they would take mindfulness than they even make that assessment. Exactly. What. People might tradition say to meditate when they come Oh I didn't sorta person who can meditate numb to anxious. So worried. and. We will say, well, let's just the human mind. It's not you'll your no different from anybody else I can consume as people realize that they realize they can do something about it. That to me is is the most important..

Dr Sarah Shah Buddhist Meditation University of Oxford Manchester University Kim Faculty member Nicola cindy lecturer
Mindfulness Interview With Dr Sarah Shaw

Secular Buddhism

06:50 min | 3 months ago

Mindfulness Interview With Dr Sarah Shaw

"Dr Sarah Shah, Faculty member, and lecturer at the University of Oxford. She has taught and published numerous works on the history and practices of Buddhism including an introduction to Buddhist Meditation and the spirit of meditation. Without further delay years the audio from my interview, with Dr. Sarah. What inspired you to write this book I something. That's always interested me. I always noticed that mindfulness gets described in different ways in different historical periods and then Chased Kim and Nicola as. Shambala actually. Asked me to do is short history of mindfulness to make it very short, which is very, very difficult at, but I enjoy doing something that's just always interested me, bitch. I read articles about mindfulness and they can be quite rigid about it's this or it's that or it's this. Anak must have hundreds of my computer on some of them are really quite dogmatic but what I liked to its way in different settings would just get his slightly differently and has a slightly different feel and application with an underlying threader voltages. Pull that keep things alive by soon changing formulations wraps looking at them in you setting so. That seems the mindful way to approach the subject. So I. Really. Enjoyed it. It's great. It's interesting how? Like you mentioned how? Many different ways there are to use the word right when somebody says, I'm trying to be more mindful. You almost have to ask what what does that mean to you because there are so many interpretations of what it means to be mindful I think the people. In what's one person needs may be different from another person so I wouldn't want to be rigid about how it should be interpreted. Well that's great and and tell me a little bit about your background with with Buddhism with mindfulness Where did you? Where did all that start your interest in this topic? I started meditation many years ago. When. I was at Manchester University and that's what I I really encountered word mindfulness in Buddhist searching. Amusingly my meditation teacher told me that he hadn't met many people who is so unmindful the tolerating needs to didn't. Have I think that's A. Problem for academics, you can get very over focused. News surroundings. So I was intrigued by then and I try to sit down I have ever since I'm not sure I've ever really found out what she chews. On still craft it enjoy trying to rouse. I love how the title of the Book you know brings up right away to things where where does it come from and what does it mean if you had to answer that short way to somebody in an elevator? How would you answer that? Where where does it come from and what does it mean? And I would say it comes from is, is any one place Lipa come from coolest A cells that cindy the only person who can be mindful and do something about which is on self. And what it means. I would say. An attentive alertness to. Worship brings health to the mind. Something like that. Yeah I like that I think it seems like sometimes at least the way at. That mindfulness has evolved in the West. there seems to be a tendency to think of mindfulness as an altered state. and. It seems to me like what you're describing as more of an altered trait. It's a way of being. I can affect everything that we do rather than thinking. Well, here's my normal ordinary life and when I mindful I'm separate from that. It's this other state that I'm in. It it would be nice to be mindful of time I think we will have lapses one consent it'd be mindful day life it helps. Hopes to be mindful in daily life and one one needs to, of course in meditation. So it's something that can be there all the time how you arouse it sounds different circumstances might be different but the quality. Certainly according to the Buddhist tradition is that when the mind is healthy and Alert. Does a Buddhist fishing called the epidemic and it says that when mindfulness is present, lots of other factors come into play too like. Confidence. In this. Huma. Balance a lot of these other qualities come in as well. Yeah. What's Nice as the moment that we are mindful of the fact that we're not mindful we've already started right? We've already. A good a good point. Yeah So, what would you say is the biggest Maybe, misconception that you've encountered about mindfulness. I'm. Really, think very much in those terms actually oddly enough because I am an academic, that's what we're trying to do a misconception. I would say that the notion that it's somehow something that is very different from daily experience and I think that's probably one and does something that. Is owned by anybody at. The. Particular A. Just, save it. Psychology knows what mindfulness is in a way to. Practice, space traditions. Up Stem tool that Everybody will have found some way of arousing alertness and the attentiveness of mindfulness under different circumstances.

Buddhist Meditation Dr Sarah Shah Dr. Sarah University Of Oxford Manchester University KIM Faculty Member Nicola Cindy Lecturer
"dr sarah" Discussed on Anxiety Slayer

Anxiety Slayer

04:27 min | 3 months ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on Anxiety Slayer

"Through the natural world we are. Sleeping at the Ab Ryan. This. Algae. Bryan and Brian is constantly wash and threatening with Aaron Tire on the back. The Brian. And Edison stretches, for Mac choice recognition rose. The aside in world. Nab Ryan's evolved. Essentially what what kind of fashion be? Moving through natural? WHOA. Whoa Bush ladder along the beach we and directing with Mother Nature. We are one of the night really the outside wounded enter Brian trouble. Bar. IS I. Have Brines here what we? What we say experience heavy Are Incredibly how and a Human Brian and directing way up eight missile wanted. Primary and that's why pay any sunshine this section direction. On. Equity is like seriously nichols elite soon, streets lanes headed out the yet like it an address in. The. Caught about hottest will are. Talk. Down Influences Rei grind and I are at odds are emotions and my seats lace. carrying ran that he he also sculpt Brian. Influence happens. Let's talk about habits and behaviors and motivation. And this This Phenomena where even with the best intentions to become healthier. Bottom up top down. Why, why we often stop or why we get so far, and then it almost feels like a form of self sabotage or something like that show. What let's talk about that yet slightly. Simony paypal Many of us do by the sounds. Were a teacher. Or parent. To someone, China might change. The struggle is real is very hot from. I go. I to. STAY BEHIND BAY WE WANTED TO? Raise likely. Had saw worrying agreement is you sign much at Brian is essentially quite lazy. And outposts as I described. Dan. Bryan wants. To really be focusing on pricing new ad relevance and having a nation and might be. A one is. Nick. Brian. Does is essentially anything that it doesn't h thinking about we want to consider as energy. Any that doesn't make me Becky that last night. So Taking high yet famer pages overnight. Nets of ships that have been part of. The Dan areas check your review, your Bronco This is Walter managed the highs off works out who knowing how to ride by. Rabin. Had these concerns Chinese it off? Cabinet Wyan computer table. Chiseled is parties is stored and route. Ten automatic. Behaviors such enormity draw recall. that. Never, guys. So. That's what we habits when we are trying to hide chime drink. Back what is this particular behind you that on in wine to do and the struggle? We. Love wasn't struggled behavior change wasn't hard wouldn't nate changes in psychologist beer. We typically do it. The. Thing, it's the.

Brian Bryan Ab Ryan Edison Aaron Tire Ryan Mac China nate Dan Rabin Becky Nick Walter
"dr sarah" Discussed on Anxiety Slayer

Anxiety Slayer

05:46 min | 3 months ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on Anxiety Slayer

"Anxiety slayer podcast I'm Shannon Vander leak and today I'm speaking with Dr Sarah MCI about the neurobiology of Womanhood. Sarah is an Oxford University educated neuroscientist educator media commentator director of the Neuroscience Academy and author of the Woman's brain book. The neuroscience of Health Hormones in happiness Sarah lives on the northern beaches of Sydney Australia with her Irish and together they're raising two boys and a Cocker Spaniel. And They can be found sailing surfing mountain biking or skiing. Welcome to anxiety slayer Sarah. Off Thank you so much for Hindi Shannon it's a privilege to speak to you. It's wonderful to speak with you. I'm really grateful that you reached out and wanted to have this conversation because. Our brains are just so fascinating and I'd love to begin talking about why you decided to write a book about the female brain and then we'll take it from there. So. I've been neuroscientists pretty much my entire professional career skuld university my second year role in university degree in your signs. This is a New Zealand the early nineties. Actually that's kind of my career path I would admit academia abouts. Five years past my PhD racist breaking during his research primarily focused on unraveling the neurobiology of new. York City and a half wide is at Brian Change in response to experience. That is really what I was fascination, and then I moved more into science communications and education sort of the last ten years and I've been logging and talking and teaching within this nearest science dice Nath about twenty, twenty, five years. One of the gigs that I had was what he was ABC here in Australia rotting in your science log beam and as part of on an article on filmon of menopause in Brian Fog, we had an absolute outpouring of fascination with that topic essentially the idea awards batch. when they're going through Perry Municipals Minneapolis, feel a bit fuzzy. Feel a bit kind of lazy mind and it turns out that sort of hormonal fluctuations all the of means the Khanakala base around. Four forties fifties wasn't eventually result in these. These kind of feelings of rainfall in time goes why we had this enormous or in. Twenty six, eight, I was find out by book published. A very charismatic and Dynamic Lady Jam, Redman's and she..

Dr Sarah MCI Sydney Australia Shannon Vander Nath Neuroscience Academy Oxford University director Perry Municipals Minneapolis Brian Fog Redman New Zealand York City ABC
Pediatricians Are Concerned Children May Be Falling Behind On Vaccines

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 4 months ago

Pediatricians Are Concerned Children May Be Falling Behind On Vaccines

"About about vaccines vaccines for for their their kids. They want to get the word out now early about covert 19 vaccines if and when they become available vaccine goes through a rigorous and robust testing process that has to be approved by the FDA vaccine will need to be tested and trialed in Children. Dr. Sarah Schaffer Taru is the pediatrician at Children's National Medical Center. And so families should feel confident that if it's being offered by their pediatrician That it is safe. Schaefer Drusus doctors sharing personal anecdotes about being immunized and immunizing their family members can help encourage vaccine hesitant families. Christi King W. T O P. News, a new study

Dr. Sarah Schaffer Taru Children's National Medical Ce Schaefer Drusus Christi King W. T O FDA
Pediatricians Are Concerned Children May Be Falling Behind On Vaccines

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

Pediatricians Are Concerned Children May Be Falling Behind On Vaccines

"Are used to hearing questions from parents about that scenes for kids. They want to get the word out early about Cove in 19 vaccines. If been win, they become available. Every vaccine goes through a rigorous and robust testing process that has to be approved by the FDA vaccine will need to be tested and trialled in Children. Dr. Sarah Schaffer Drew was a pediatrician at Children's National Medical Center, and so family should feel confident that if it's being offered by their pediatrician That it is safe. Schaefer Drusus doctors sharing personal anecdotes about being immunized and immunizing their family members can help encourage vaccine. Hesitant families. Christi King

Children's National Medical Ce Dr. Sarah Schaffer Schaefer Drusus Christi King Cove FDA
Colleges take different approaches to tracking COVID-19 as students return to campus

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

Colleges take different approaches to tracking COVID-19 as students return to campus

"And universities to resume on campus classes and sports have now finally been released by state health officials. California schools in counties that have been on the state's monitoring list for three consecutive days, which is the case for all Southern California schools won't be able to return to indoor lectures and, well, some students might still enter the campus at USC. It's chief student health officer, Dr Sarah Van Orman says. There will be restrictions. Anyone coming onto campus or residing in our dorms are actually required to go through a daily wellness screening process, And that's you know, based on best practices from CDC, it's also a requirement of the Department of Public Health if we re open among the requirements for college athletics is that players, coaches and staff must wear masks when they're not engaged in a match for high contact. Sports like football schools must share virus testing results with each other within 72 hours of competition and games. Well, they can resume must be played without Spectators. Chris C. Eden's

Dr Sarah Van Orman California Department Of Public Health Chris C. Eden USC CDC Officer
COVID-19 gender gap: Study shows men are more than twice as likely to die

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

COVID-19 gender gap: Study shows men are more than twice as likely to die

"Research into Coben, 19 shows that men are more likely to suffer worse outcomes than women. Experts are finding that man or as much as 2.4 times Mohr likely to die from Corona virus than women. So some doctors now are looking into giving men female hormones and whether that could help. Dr Sarah Ganda Hari is studying whether the Koven 19 gender gap could be linked to the hormones that make men and women different estrogen, testosterone and progesterone, which supports pregnancy. The hope is that progesterone will Get will get to the disease when it's at a level that there's not overwhelming amount of inflammation. 40 men with covert 19 and Dr Gondo Hari study will receive a five day course of progesterone to see if it raises their odds of surviving on par with women. That is CBS's Dr Tara. No,

Progesterone Dr Sarah Ganda Hari Dr Gondo Hari Dr Tara Coben Mohr CBS Testosterone
"dr sarah" Discussed on Not Another Anxiety Show

Not Another Anxiety Show

05:14 min | 6 months ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on Not Another Anxiety Show

"The One and only the love of my life Dr Sarah. Circus hello my friend. How good is it to be called that? I'm great and thank you for having me. It's so nice to be a return guest. Always, you're like you know top top. I Love Yeah. I know the second, I was I just keep reaching out like. Are you ready now? How about now you're so so busy? You're making a big move. I'm so excited to have you back close to me. We're GONNA. Meet Up. Yeah I think you should, so I mean I'm not going to give away where you're from I. Know You from the Boston area, but hopefully you're close enough to the Albany area. Yeah, no, it's all close. Yeah, we're making a big move no time like a tandem to. You know when you're looking up desk times to relocate. From a non existent pandemic caseload, Hawaii to the hardest hit region of the country. We are your poster children so Yeah, we're headed back in a month. That's why if anybody hearing this here's a A Nice Echo in the background. It's because we're literally living in a condo on to mattresses on the floor. Sometimes a little fun you know. How. It. Really. Moving is what top five stressors yeah. I think it's. Moving financial distress, marriage children and of course death. And you're doing all those doing pretty much getting all of those except to death in there. But you know. Financial stuff with moving and lots of uncertainty. But I was saying to you before we recorded that You know I also really keep in mind that We're doing this from a place of choice and that choice to embrace it as chaotic, but exciting is also available to us. Ran So, we're really excited, and also part of it is that we've been in Hawaii for a decade and have just psych such a solid family and friend network here that we feel like we can leave and explore because we have such deep roots, so it's so good. It's all good I'm ready for winter I'm ready over road trips. I'm.

Hawaii Dr Sarah Boston Albany
"dr sarah" Discussed on Not Another Anxiety Show

Not Another Anxiety Show

05:14 min | 6 months ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on Not Another Anxiety Show

"The One and only the love of my life Dr Sarah. Circus hello my friend. How good is it to be called that? I'm great and thank you for having me. It's so nice to be a return guest. Always, you're like you know top top. I Love Yeah. I know the second, I was I just keep reaching out like. Are you ready now? How about now you're so so busy? You're making a big move. I'm so excited to have you back close to me. We're GONNA. Meet Up. Yeah I think you should, so I mean I'm not going to give away where you're from I. Know You from the Boston area, but hopefully you're close enough to the Albany area. Yeah, no, it's all close. Yeah, we're making a big move no time like a tandem to. You know when you're looking up desk times to relocate. From a non existent pandemic caseload, Hawaii to the hardest hit region of the country. We are your poster children so Yeah, we're headed back in a month. That's why if anybody hearing this here's a A Nice Echo in the background. It's because we're literally living in a condo on to mattresses on the floor. Sometimes a little fun you know. How. It. Really. Moving is what top five stressors yeah. I think it's. Moving financial distress, marriage children and of course death. And you're doing all those doing pretty much getting all of those except to death in there. But you know. Financial stuff with moving and lots of uncertainty. But I was saying to you before we recorded that You know I also really keep in mind that We're doing this from a place of choice and that choice to embrace it as chaotic, but exciting is also available to us. Ran So, we're really excited, and also part of it is that we've been in Hawaii for a decade and have just psych such a solid family and friend network here that we feel like we can leave and explore because we have such deep roots, so it's so good. It's all good I'm ready for winter I'm ready over road trips. I'm.

Hawaii Dr Sarah Boston Albany
Anxiety Bytes: Am I Doomed by My Genes to Be Anxious?

Not Another Anxiety Show

08:18 min | 7 months ago

Anxiety Bytes: Am I Doomed by My Genes to Be Anxious?

"Hey guys autumn to not another anxiety. Show I'm your host Kelley Walker and joining me. Today is my co host Eric. Lay them head low. This these days I now and we get to do a little Anxiety by segment today. I know and I'm still angry about the it yes B. I t I s you. Don't all the grudge It's been a year more than a year it's been I think you have some exciting news. I'M GONNA share it for you okay. There are guests who knows how to sign into the show's instagram page. I do I know signing instagram. I even made a fun. Little time lapse video that I'm figuring out how to upload so stay tuned. It'll probably be like a week or two. I'm toying with doing once. We can like put it together. It makes us look like we're professionals. Yeah I'm not there yet. I'm just learning. I don't honestly we could talk about this after. I don't even see where you like. Start a new post or something so overwhelmed by. I like we're just GONNA TAKE BITES ICE says around coaching advice. Which is gonNA take fees Where you start a new post where you start a new post. Yeah we'll talk right after that will take that off. Line okay so anxiety by its. I'm kind of pumped about this one. Because I have had this question many times we we had a really great up that I can't remember the which one but it was sort of towards the beginning of things where we talked about We talked about this and it's one of it was when I was going through panic attacks. That was one of my biggest fears in the things. I got stuck on the most common questions I get asked. Okay really. It's like it's got to be like top five most common questions just in like my personal kind of one on one coaching experience. And I know it was a big question for me when things were really when things really felt like a big struggle. And we're really sticking well challen. Let's do it okay. So wait are need to set a timer. Is it going to be? Siri renew us all right. I'm GonNa see if I can do it with my voice. He Siri set a five U. Two's flower girl. God Oh my God all right. Forget I'm going to be hearings. A man you know what? Don't judge not that's okay. I've never heard man. Siri is my Syria. Identifies AS A British man? That's better than regular Siri. But you can tell me how to do that after two regular series. Okay ready so the question is am. I doomed by my jeans to be anxious. Ready go answer is now and that's the end of this segment. Thank you so much for tuning in today if you want to. Why do we do no no? None of us are doomed by our genes to be anxious In fact according to an article published in the advances in experimental medicine in Biology Peer Reviewed Journal Genome five times fast fast. You know when when you cited. It's nice abbreviated. But saying it. Out Loud so mouthful But you know. According to this study Genome Wide Association studies have failed to identify any genes significantly associated with anxiety diagnosis so You know this was published by the National Health Institute. I think it's like on the APA website too but They're very clear that we really just haven't been able to find any genes associated with an increased risk for developing anxiety But some recent research suggests that like epigenetics may be playing a role here so if you remember from old episode epigenetics can be thought of as genes that are more flexible so they can be turned on and off throughout our lifetime and they're also influenced by Environmental factors and environmental factors or like a very broad-based charm for like influenced by all sorts of things And this is really quite a bit different from how we used to think of jeans. And if you kind of want a quick review about genetics EPI This is a quick little anxieties segments bite. But you can listen to episode one seventy two With Dr Sarah Circus where we go into a bit more detail about Epigenetics and now apostasy by her so much much longer so much. Allah for so much But Anyway so preliminary research animal studies. Only there's no human studies yet but in animal studies suggests that some epigenetics may play a role in regulating our HP access which we talked about in episode fourteen so basically may influence. How sensitive are flight or fight response is under stress? So what happens is when we're feeling resilient on top of things good our fight or flight response may work absolutely beautifully but if our system is under stress which can be caused by external factors like financial strain Or internal factors like worrying. You know like certain behaviors or habits. We may innocently have But when our system is under stress epigenetics may kick our fight or flight system into higher gear a little faster than it would in someone else with the different genome but the great thing is there are genetic factors that positively influence the sensitivity of our HP Access Aka fight or flight response. So just some other factors that really like you can think of like enhance or late or you know. Increase resiliency with our fight or flight response. One factor is exercise. You know impacts this system. Positively nutritionally dense whole foods impacts this system positively human connection impacts the system positively A regular mindfulness practice can impact the system. Positively one of my favorite studies found you know just to go off. That is one of my favorites that he's in the world found that mindfulness practices. You know different. Mindfulness practices reduced on. Ibs symptoms in in study patients and and more importantly which shows sort of like the nature like a micro like a microcosm of the nature of epigenetics It also reduced these mindfulness. Various mindfulness practices also reduced expression of a gene associated with. Ibs Flare Up. So people were experiencing reduce symptoms and we were able to also see this in their genome so in short recent preliminary research suggests like there may be an EPI genetic factor here and also you know what we do know Have Known for little while there are so many EPI genetic factors that influence hauer fight or flight system behaves right like stress is one that can kind of tilted towards the unfavorable Paul. And there's so many other behaviors or habits that we can cultivate or have control over which is nice to know that. Can SORTA on nudge it back towards a more favorable place. Some right right right. I love that you keep learning things. Yano I'm like I told you Erica. Scientists forever yes mate just made it

Anxiety Siri HP Kelley Walker Biology Peer Reviewed Journal Eric EPI Genome Wide Association Yano Dr Sarah Circus Syria APA Hauer Erica Paul National Health Institute
Create Video Your Way with Dr. Sara Langworthy

GradBlogger

08:22 min | 7 months ago

Create Video Your Way with Dr. Sara Langworthy

"Sarah thanks for coming back on the ground blogger podcast today. Thank you Chris. I'm so happy to be here. Thanks for asking me back so we had Dr Langworthy on if you can believe it backing up. Sold seven of the podcast Tara. How recording video drives her business suitable? What is her business at develop? Lael see how she got started as an academic entrepreneur. What our journey was there. What role video plays in her business and also video setup? The you know the technical aspects. Get a lot of that in this episode as well. I'm how to make incumbent videos. So we cover a lot of ground back almost forty six weeks ago or almost a year ago now days absent talking about creating video your way. And the Genesis of this is that I am on Sarah's newsletter so I get the newsletter said Shinzo. I encourage you to be there as well caceres great video and in that I saw. She released this week. Program called video your way and was actually at a time where. I was recording video myself for Lincoln. Promotions of our conference at Safety Science Salsa shooting video sale pages and different things. So I said Hey I wanNA learnable video so I joined the program but I also emailed Sarah and said Hey we get you on the PODCAST. Talk about what's Watch people should learn here says really justice whereas Cam boats so Sarah Langworthy Dr. Sarah Language has paid child development. I met her through. You sell flipped group. I can't even remember say four years ago we've seen each other's businesses kinda girl from then so maybe a good place to jump in here is we haven't talked in almost a year now. what's what's new in your business. What have been the big things have happened over? Lost twelve months. Yeah well so it's been an interesting It's been interesting year for me about six to eight months ago. I actually came to the realization that I really needed to pivot my business. So For those of you who have do not listen to that first episode For a long time after my career in academia I was doing a lot of work focused in early childhood development primarily doing speaking and trainings in those sorts of things I was also dabbling in some consulting especially around video and communications and I kind of have my feet in multiple worlds right and I think a lot of us. Independent business owners and entrepreneurs can relate to the idea of having to kind of shift your businesses from time to time and go into different directions and really focus in on what it is that you want to be doing more long-term and and really focusing your message of Your Business and so about six to eight months ago or so. I made the decision that I didn't want to continue doing work in the field of early childhood specifically as the experts as the child development person. Who's coming to a conference in presenting on particular topics? That sort of thing. I really felt like I needed to step away from that For a number of reasons both personal and professional and so I was also feeling really lead in this direction and driven by this idea of helping other people tell their story through video. I've had a lot of conversations with people who are like. How do you do that or you know? I WANNA start video series or I wanNA do a video link dinner on social media to help drive my business or conversations with nonprofits who are like. We know. We need to reach your people's video but we don't know how and that's kind of where the idea of video your rate came from. I actually sat down in an afternoon and I like thought about okay. What is it that I would share with people about my own video journey and what it is that you need to do if you're going to start from scratch and video at the end of the end of the day At the end of the a few weeks realistically but I kind of sat down in an afternoon outlined all of that out and you know it took several months to get the program up and running but now we have video your ray and it's It's real it's exists in the world and the focus of it is really to help people who were kind of new to video one dabble and kind of understand. How do I make an effective video to get you from the concept of your video? All the way to completion. Where at the end of the eight weeks I watched through the whole process so that you have a video you shared it with the world and hopefully it is helping to bring you all the fame and glory in business you want. Ideally if nothing else you've learned about the process and you've learned a little bit about how you can use video in your business and can make the decision about whether you want to continue using video in Your Business. So yeah it's been an interesting especially six months or so kind of getting all this up and running but it's been fun while I love it. I mean we just got done. Fifty three and fifty four. The podcast were with Cheryl allow. She's talking about a big pivot in her business. A big pivot in her life in a research direction that seems to be a common theme with some of the guests were having on is getting to a certain point in Your Business. And saying hey. Is this going where I want my life to go? This is going to be unable able to enable and support me in two years and five years. Are we going in the right direction and making those adjustments as needed? Maybe good place I I really want dive into video your way and all the elements of it. I'm just so people have that understanding of develop play in general. How are you helping people there? What is the business of developing a play at a broader scale? And I think I mentioned this but it is at develop play. Llc DOT COM which is D. E. L. O. P. L. A. Y. LLC dot com as what a spoleto? It's kind of fun to say it's kind of a mash up of words. I was when I originally created the business. I was thinking like okay. I want kind of like a fun name. I want something that conveys a little bit of my personality and I want something that also hearkens back to my roots in developmental psychology and so I ended up smashing together and develop develop and play so it works pretty well but it is a little bit hard to spell so biologists for Chris you know in terms of developing as a whole. It really is My business as a consultant so I formed this. Llc as a way to kind of have my you know my shingle out there as a as a consultant in primarily communications and video Also doing some organizational consulting in that sort of thing as well There are a lot of things and anybody who's been in academia kind of knows you you learn how to learn stuff and so there are a lot of things that I've picked up over the last five to ten years. That are beneficial skills. That helped me help organizations. Do their work better right. So my focus with video your way and and and as I'm thinking about developing long term. It is really kind of honing in on that helping people communicate and reach their audiences. Bardsley through video and obviously video is only part of a larger communications. You know approach for a lot of people in a lot of organizations but it is going to be a thing that's GonNa be around for a while. I think we're going to have video via primary focus for a lot of places and so especially for smaller nonprofits and smaller businesses people who were kind of running their own shop. I'm finding that there is that gap of how do I take what I want to share with the world and get it out there using video? If I've never done video before where do I start? How do I do this? And so that's really where video way came from and I'm not a trained videographer by backgrounds. Like that's not that's not been my You know series my area of study but it is something I've picked up along the way and I learned a ton by just kind of jumping in and doing it and so throughout the series. I'm pretty candid about like I know some stuff but I don't know everything so you know. This is just my way of doing things. And if it's helpful for you great take it and run with it and I I also encourage people to go down your rabbit hole about video in the Internet. Is your friends when it comes to learning new. Things and video is no exception there so Courage anyone to check out Sarah on Youtube at develop play or searching Sarah langworthy because their videos are really really good. If you WANNA learn how to do really well edited really nice scripted videos like that or even if you WANNA learn a quick and dirty videos like I create This might be a really good program for you so I encourage people to check it out

Dr. Sarah Language Sarah Langworthy Chris Dr Langworthy Consultant Lincoln Dot Com Spoleto Shinzo Cheryl CAM D. E. L. O. P. L. A. Y.
Bay Area extends stay-at-home order to May 3, adds new business restrictions

Mark Thompson

00:41 sec | 8 months ago

Bay Area extends stay-at-home order to May 3, adds new business restrictions

"Bay area health officers are extending the stay at home auto through may third they say more stricter social distancing is needed to slow the spread of the corona virus Santa Clara county health officer Dr Sarah Cody says social distancing is the most effective weapon against covert nineteen goal is to decrease to the greatest extent possible the average number of contacts that each of us has with each other every day the new order add some clarifying language around essential businesses and activities for instance the use of playgrounds dog parks public picnic areas and similar recreational areas is prohibited it also puts a stop to most residential and construction activities

Dr Sarah Cody Santa Clara County Officer
COVID-19 Q & A

In The Thick

06:42 min | 8 months ago

COVID-19 Q & A

"You guys. This is such a treat his. You'll know our all star. Washer hot a leak you know. He's like with us from the beginning. Right you guys know that. He's like contributing op ED writer. He's a CNN commentator. It's a big deal to have him calling us from his car. So welcome wash minivan respect and the Dad Boston okay. Here's the amazing thing dear listener. We are joined by his wife. She's a brilliant physician. Her name is Dr Sarah. She's a physician at Georgetown Family Medicine. And Hey you're married to watch you've done this for a while you're the euro. Welcome to the doctor. I thank you so much for having me and I'm calling from the cars. Yes so watches in the fan in our driveway. And I'm in the car in the driveway and they're watching the children from six feet away. This is about as social distancing as you can get this is the most socially responsible podcast in the world amazing amazing and I just love. What was just told me that he wants to do which is to wrap me up in bubble wrap so that. I stay healthy. Thank God I am healthy. In fact I just tweeted out today. I was just like how I'm going to be grateful for having a roof over my head husband. Who LOVES ME? My kids at home. home job. So we're GONNA start podcast on a note of gratitude and I'm just so thankful that was and Sarah are joining. Hulu me because this is a big deal. It's our first time to have a married couple. It's also our first time living through a pandemic so here we are. We're surviving there are now over three hundred thousand cases worldwide with over thirty five thousand Kovic in nineteen cases in the United States making this the country with the third most cases after China and Italy. We're actually just eleven days behind Italy in terms of trajectory. So keep that in. Mind as you guys know. It's putting such a strain on our healthcare system The CDC is telling healthcare workers to improvise when they have a shortage of masks. What we have several states multiple states that have you know basically placed some form of shelter in place or lockdown protocol. I have to say I'm surprised that not all fifty have done it so Sunday night. The president of the United States his name is president trump. You know he said this and it was really it was really It was a moment because he said that the National Guard is going to be deployed to New York California and Washington State. That made a lot of people of color really uncomfortable. Yeah and then also on Tuesday the Prime Minister of Japan. Avi Shinzo he said. The International Olympic Committee will postpone the Summer Olympics. They were supposed to be held in Tokyo this summer. Now they'll take place no later than summer of twenty twenty one so I just want to back up for a moment to understand. And we're we're laughing through this because we're we're releasing and because we're with people care about right now on this past but Every single day it's just like Oh my God. No joke like no joke. How serious diseases and why? We should have taken these measures back in February but Sarah Update us. What what we've learned so far about cove in nineteen you know. I just have to agree with you. I've just say we are already weeks late and doing everything. Normally when you're late to do things it's like. Oh the toll measured in something. That might not be that relevant right now. The the tragedies toes measured in lives loss. So every day that there's a misstep or delay it's going to be measured and more lives lost absolutely horrifying so where we're at right now. I mean at least in the US like you said we actually don't even know the two cases. Those are reported cases when you don't know the real official number because we've been under testing and we haven't been testing and we haven't been tracing and just like the World Health Organization said it took a think about sixty seventy s from the first reported case to reach the first one hundred thousand cases and then after that it took just eleven to reach the second one hundred thousand cases and then just four days to reach a third one hundred thousand cases so this is a horrible buyers exponentially affecting people all over. So this is scary and we are not overreacting or under reacting and as public health professionals. We always say if we do our job right then. People will say that we overreacted. And that's okay because then that means we're all okay but unfortunately that's not the case right now so sir one of the things that we did for this show because we have a real community of people who listen to us right so we're familiar even though we're not touching each other the ask our our listeners to send questions and one of our listeners on twitter reverberate wire asked if it is spreading through for example gas pumps and how long it lasts on surfaces. I mean sometimes when you're seeing this information it's its terrifying how long the virus can last on different surfaces. What do we know is is fact about this question? So we're always finding out new information. This is a new virus. Things are always changing but what we know as of now is it's highly effective so are not is the rate of infectivity of any virus and if it's greater than one then that means the virus is going to keep spreading and if it's less than one that means you're gonNA see decrease in number infections And when it's greater than one what that means is so far the SARS coronavirus two are not is. It's around three so for every one person infected you're likely in fact three other people And this is without without social distancing and all those measures so one of the reasons it's so infectious again. The flu is like one one point five so this is almost doubled infectivity rate of the flu. 'em Is because it does last on surfaces right now. What we're finding is akin lost on cardboard boxes or paper for anywhere up to twenty four hours and it can last on plastic or steel for two three days. Whoa WHOA Yikes. Yeah I want to say based on what I've been reading. The literature shows that that's not the highest rate of transmission can get transmitted that way but the highest rate is droplets through a person to person contact. And there's a small number fecal oral also ooh K. All right good to

United States Dr Sarah FLU CNN President Trump Italy Hulu Writer Boston Georgetown Family Medicine International Olympic Committe Avi Shinzo Twitter Prime Minister Of Japan Tokyo World Health Organization Olympics National Guard
6 Bay Area counties in California order shelter-in-place

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:38 sec | 9 months ago

6 Bay Area counties in California order shelter-in-place

"Country Americans are being advised not to do things like gather in groups of ten or more in order to slow the spread of covert nineteen half dozen counties in California though are taking things a step further you order is the most strict yet in the U. S. in seven bay area counties all residents are told by legal order they cannot leave their homes except for essential errands like needing food gas money or medication Santa Clara county health officer Dr Sarah Cody these new orders direct all individuals to shelter at their place of residence and maintain social distancing of at least six feet from any other person went outside their resident

California Dr Sarah Cody Santa Clara County Officer
Holed up in the US: Coronavirus shutdown threatens jobs

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 9 months ago

Holed up in the US: Coronavirus shutdown threatens jobs

"Coronavirus shutdowns cover every part of the country all bars and restaurants in at least eight states are required to close at least part of the day Santa Clara county in California has been the epicenter of cases of the corona virus in the San Francisco Bay Area Dr Sarah Cody is the local health officer these new orders direct all individuals to shelter at their place of residence and maintain social distancing of at least six feet from any other person went outside the residence in Ohio governor Mike DeWine points out Tuesday its presidential primary election day it is clear that tomorrow's in person voting does not conform then cannot conform with fees CDC guidelines to wind wants to push the Ohio primary back to June I bet Donahue

Santa Clara County California Dr Sarah Cody Officer Donahue San Francisco Ohio Mike Dewine CDC
Holed up in the US: Coronavirus shutdown threatens jobs

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 9 months ago

Holed up in the US: Coronavirus shutdown threatens jobs

"Coronavirus shutdowns cover every part of the country all bars and restaurants in at least eight states are required to close at least part of the day Santa Clara county in California has been the epicenter of cases of the corona virus in the San Francisco Bay Area Dr Sarah Cody is the local health officer these new orders direct all individuals to shelter at their place of residence and maintain social distancing of at least six feet from any other person went outside the residence in Ohio governor Mike DeWine points out Tuesday its presidential primary election day it is clear that tomorrow's in person voting does not conform then cannot conform with fees CDC guidelines to wind wants to push the Ohio primary back to June I bet Donahue

Santa Clara County California Dr Sarah Cody Officer Donahue San Francisco Ohio Mike Dewine CDC
Holed up in the US: Coronavirus shutdown threatens jobs

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 9 months ago

Holed up in the US: Coronavirus shutdown threatens jobs

"Coronavirus shutdowns cover every part of the country all bars and restaurants in at least eight states are required to close at least part of the day Santa Clara county in California has been the epicenter of cases of the corona virus in the San Francisco Bay Area Dr Sarah Cody is the local health officer these new orders direct all individuals to shelter at their place of residence and maintain social distancing of at least six feet from any other person went outside the residence in Ohio governor Mike DeWine points out Tuesday its presidential primary election day it is clear that tomorrow's in person voting does not conform then cannot conform with fees CDC guidelines to wind wants to push the Ohio primary back to June I bet Donahue

Santa Clara County California Dr Sarah Cody Officer Donahue San Francisco Ohio Mike Dewine CDC
"dr sarah" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

10:12 min | 9 months ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"This is Bernadette with Adriana. Bobby Antos Nev. Mendoza we have read Aldo on the controls and Tina Burnett in studio with us today. And we've got Dr Sarah Ballantyne coming up too so lots of good information. What are we talking about Tina here? It is how much of aging is in our control. SLAM LOT WE CAN. Do you have void a lot of things a lot of things aging corona virus. You know what just popped in my mind. I told you I think if something like this so that south by South West might be might be cancelled by many people out of the expose festivals. Coachella 's happening soon have lost their minds and I have to say. I think the media is totally stirring this up into making it bigger than it is absolutely everyone except for one life radio that is and there's viruses. There's Ben viruses since the beginning of time and they're never gonNa go away and there's going to be new ones every year every couple years. We just need to keep ourselves. Strong's a strong in our immune system's strong and so you can fight off almost anything you know that I would I would. I would bet money on it. The people that have actually died from it. Were not already not in good health. Well I mean not necessarily sick but your immune system is key and if you don't have a strong immune system from eating healthy it's that kind of talk about today. Eating healthy tinker solve exercising. Not Smoking not drinking too much living in filth you know seriously. I mean yeah think about from what I've heard. What like. Yeah I know exactly. That's exactly that's what I thank you for. We were about that yesterday. Yeah working out. I mean when you have a virus growing and you can't get to a clean place or place that is germ free or at least clean. You know No places germ-free. There's germs everywhere. But yeah it's like it's gotta be a case by case study and people are absolutely losing their minds. The Expo West was cancelled It's one of the biggest events in the health A natural food industry And it was cancelled in everybody's like what was cancelled the week of which is even more crazy already there to set up. We're already millions of dollars are being because well and I think it's to create hysteria in my opinion to push the mandates that they wanna push for more vaccines. Oh Yeah because the vessel working on it. Oh my God what did I read last night. I totally forgot about. It was right as I was falling asleep. I think I don't know it's about how. Oh I'll find it. I'll find it. I can't even believe I forgot about it. I didn't want to get back up out of bed. No the Chinese have have have the stock market. There's a IT'S A. Let me think you've sent us yesterday. No it's about the the Oh my God. Chinese pharmaceutical pharmaceutical companies. Calm Down Bernard that. Because I'm so excited when I read them because when you start putting two together like like a scientists in a laboratory like seriously but it was a I'll where's my phone you guys talk and I'm going to try to find it because it was that good. It was that good go ahead. The death rates are dropping. And we'll Wuhan so and the thing is too if you look at the total number of cases and how many of those cases that people actually died pretty small percent income housing flu. Thank him and kids. Were dying this flu. I mean it's I don't know why they're making more because it's never been here in the states or the strain at least. Yeah maybe I it talks about entrepreneurs in China specializing in vaccinations that performed solid including the Kong With I guess that's a stock K. A. N. G. of Huan Bio- Biological Engineering. Their stock was up by twenty three percent or because of the corona virus. Yeah because they sell and what was. It says their stocks down over the last two. Yeah Corona Beers down so sorry for the people that I think. I don't know what show it was. But they said that Thirty five percent of Americans believe that you can contract corona virus from drinking water. Okay so the guy who was talking about that was Bowen. Jim is listen to them. Yeah you're talking about how that that's thirty. Five percents actually think that if they drink they'll get the virus that they drink. Are you serious? Is there people really that dumb out there? Yup and Jim was like. Yep Yep Wow. That can't be real. No it's definitely true from three different show. Oh my God yeah. They will kill. That doesn't necessarily mean it's true. I don't know I find that hard to believe how could thirty five percent of the population be that ignorant educated people around here. I know but still have common sense. Well here's what it was. It was it was basically a piece on billionaires The richest people in the world new. The new numbers just came out and who got richer who lost money but it was about. The Corona and mentioned the Corona Virus. And that the corona virus have has resulted in many booms for China Pharmaceuticals Doing Vaccines Online education and online games whilst causing share prices of hospitality and travel to drop within schools with schools. Shut since Chinese New Year. Online education providers are up and Blah Blah Blah. But the but the producers of vaccines are up this one company by twenty three percent. And you know it's always about the money it's always about the money at the root of anything evil. The root of it is money and greed. And I and I just there's a you know I could go. I wasn't planning on talking about vaccines and I don't really want to. Because it's it's I get so upset when I when I talk about it because I have read so much about it starting back twenty five years ago with Dr Robert Mendelsohn about how we are in over VACs and that was that was before you know after That was before nineteen eighty six. I think what actually carry his book with me and I wasn't prepared to talk about this but you know this is what you need to know where there's smoke. There's fire where this corruption and greed. There's going to be lies. That will be told to cover them up and we only to open our minds and just and just talk about this subject and talk about it without people being censored the fact that we are being censored in this country about any subject let alone something that affects the children and the future of this country or the world because we're a world society. Now we really are Is it needs to be examined. It's wrong and if there's somebody doing something wrong. It needs the the curtain needs to be pulled down on them for sure right. Yup that's skies keeps getting me started right out of the hidden. Let him know I was watching. There's been there's so much corruption. Oh my God it's everywhere. It's the root is money. We were watching. What what we're going to say. Well it's kind of on this topic but when we were talking about just how things are censored and things are covered up. You know there was A. There's a show on Netflix. About this little boy that was that was eight years old. And I. It's it's a what's his name the last name Hernandez and They did a Netflix series. On this little boy's parents had beaten and abused him for six months that his mother had him. He had been living with his grandmother before that. I don't know what the logistics were about him being but they were trying to basically it was. It was like how did this it come to this point. Where they they? Finally the mother finally called police because she says he slipped in the toilet. Well they did. You did you hear. Gabriel Fernandez Gabriel Fernandez Fernando. It's the saddest documentary watching on Netflix. Stop 'cause I can handle it. But they they actually ended up and I didn't. I haven't seen what happened. But the they brought in the social workers there was four social workers that the parents had the the sister and brother lie to the social workers and say that everything was fine when they knew that parents were locking him in a box gagging him beating him shooting him with. Bb guns dragging him and he would go to school with bite marks and watches the new earning him with cigarettes and he has said everyone knew in the system failed. Him He yeah. This system failed him and I was just thinking how I mean. How does something like that slip through the cracks? They had social workers on them and they're they're actually charging the social workers at felonies. Unfortunately it happens a lot so much red tape. I used to work for family court in New York State. I was the assistant court clerk. I talked about this the other day and I mean there were some of the most horrendous just like that stories and pictures and everything that we were exposed to and It was just awful. I think this one little girl. She had long red hair and when she died at six years old she waste. She weighed twenty six pounds. I believe something like that an enemy. She wished they kept her in a closet. I mean you hear about these things you think. Oh My Gosh. Why are people? How can people be so so messed up and so mentally ill and just so cruel and I don't I don't have the answers about them being on drugs or anything and I was thinking. Are they just really that evil that they and the man was the girls? The woman's boyfriend and he was like this. Six two giant man's muscle behind the big. Little boy was only like four foot one sentenced to death. He this guy. He's on death row. I I did see that. She got sentenced to live. Thank God that you know. I didn't finish it. Wow I couldn't I had to turn it off. What are you guys doing? Watch and stuff like that. I I was like I want to see what that's about all over my I couldn't watch. I can watch it. That's the thing that's where I saw social media Sal. I'm all this all this happy. Talk like this okay. Jeez health and wellness. I promise you we're going to have a happier show over so don't do that. Dr Sarah Ballantyne is going to be and she's a PhD and she's going to be talking about. Busting the myths of intermittent fasting and Tina Burnett. How much of aging is in our control? Stay tuned everyone. You're listening to one life radio.

Tina Burnett Netflix Dr Sarah Ballantyne Jim China Bobby Antos Nev South West Strong Gabriel Fernandez Gabriel Fern Bernadette Mendoza Wuhan Dr Robert Mendelsohn Adriana
Number of U.S. coronavirus cases of unknown origin climbs to four

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:36 sec | 9 months ago

Number of U.S. coronavirus cases of unknown origin climbs to four

"Health officials announcing a second coronavirus case in California in which they do not know how the person was infected Dr Sarah Cody is director of the Santa Clara county California public health department and says it's time for a shift in how everyone approaches the virus so now what we would like businesses and schools to do is to start preparing and thinking about what would it be like if children if there is a large number of children that needed to be home or teachers that needed to be home there are also new presumptive cases in nearby Oregon and Washington state once confirmed by the CDC would bring the number of cases in the U. S. to nearly

California Dr Sarah Cody Director CDC Santa Clara County Oregon Washington
Los Angeles: Santa Clara announced second case of 'community spread' of coronavirus in the US. Here's everything we know.

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:49 sec | 9 months ago

Los Angeles: Santa Clara announced second case of 'community spread' of coronavirus in the US. Here's everything we know.

"Meanwhile a woman who has come down with corona virus in Santa Clara county is the second reported case of community transfer the virus in the state this week health officials say the woman had not traveled overseas and she was hospitalized after having difficulty breathing Santa Clara county public health officer Dr Sarah Cody says they have to reassess the way they try to handle the disease this case does signal to us that it's now time to shift how we respond to the novel coronavirus the public health measures that we've taken so far isolation quarantine contact tracing and travel restrictions have helped to slow the spread of disease and we will continue to implement them we will continue to trace close contacts of our cases to try to limit the spread of the virus but now we need to add other public health tools to the mix

Santa Clara County Dr Sarah Cody Officer
Coronavirus Outbreak Deepens Its Toll on Global Business

Squawk Pod

03:32 min | 10 months ago

Coronavirus Outbreak Deepens Its Toll on Global Business

"Hundred plus new cases of Corona virus reported by state newspapers in China overnight traced back to prisons including two and who obey the center of the outbreak global air travel demand set to decline for the first time since two thousand nine because the virus will cost airlines globally more than twenty nine billion dollars mostly in the Asia Pacific region car sales in China have plummeted. Ninety two percent in two thousand twenty just under five thousand cars have been sold down from nearly sixty thousand a year ago and South Korea's currency has had its worst weekly loss in years. That country has become one of the worst affected places. Mainland China reporting one hundred new cases overnight bringing the total. They're above two hundred and here in the US. Coca-cola said that negative impact from the corona virus will shave one to two cents a first quarter per share earnings. There are more than seventy six thousand cases of the virus. Worldwide if uncertainty is what stops a the momentum in the stock market. Is there anything more uncertain the possibility of a global pandemic and I think about it a lot and it's just horrid to even buy any stock that wouldn't be impacted by right out from this point the reason that you continue to see these highs is that people assume it's going to be a v-shaped recovery and it's going to happen sooner rather than later that you will see a return to the economic after it with correct return to the Economic? We don't know goes away and we still don't know what what kind of numbers were getting. It appears that it's slowing them with then. We hear that they changed the way that they're they're counting in South Korea where it's spreading pretty rapidly. There was a major increase overnight. Just hard I if if you rank uncertainties for me you know nine thousand nine hundred eighteen. Global pandemic imminent. You know millions of deaths. That's a really scary. That's one of the scariest things you were scared. Back then I didn't get the flu shot. There's a story in the business section of the New York Times today. Talking about how Amazon is really looking at some long term issues and already showing some concern about what it will mean for Prime Day in July when it usually takes place because they're worried about being able to ramp up. They rely so heavily on getting things from China And with factory shutdowns and slowdowns. What's that going to mean and when you start thinking out okay? Months and months from now what the impact will be in it. When we have Dr Scott Gottlieb on he has consistently said No. There will be pockets here. We had sear Dr Sarah. What was her name Madonna? There's there will be pockets here when if this becomes with her more cases that finally come to the United States then it will really I think a lot of stock trading our Wall Street guys around. Here it's a way over there still at the absolute another company. I forget the other company. Maybe Sony said that they are not sending people to a conference in San Francisco. That's coming right. There are also not sending people to Conference Boston. So there are concerns. I it just shows you. At the corporate level there are concerns about travel even here in the united if it does become if there are outbreaks. Possible pockets here in the United States. What do you think that the stock market would do? In that case. I think that that might and then golden state golden say five to ten or so right but I don't know I'm just saying that if you rank my fierce global is up there so until we get a really good handle on. I just can't see how you belong. How you'd want to really be anything.

China United States South Korea Dr Scott Gottlieb Coca-Cola FLU Asia Pacific Amazon New York Times Dr Sarah Boston Madonna San Francisco Sony
"dr sarah" Discussed on Huddle Up with Gus

Huddle Up with Gus

13:40 min | 11 months ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on Huddle Up with Gus

"We have a special edition of huddled with gus today. Joining me in the huddle is my great and wonderful wife and she is sitting in for my co host. David Hager we are doing an incredible interview together with Someone amazing that she worked with. Dr Sarah Kaminsky doctor. Mickey ski is a graduate of Michigan State University College of Human Medicine in East Lansing Her purse postgraduate training consists of trip aboard residency at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pittsburgh. PA where she served as chief resident. Sarah now runs the Alexis Joy de Achilles Center for perinatal Mental Health Health at West Penn Hospital where she worked with my lovely wife and and together they are trying to help women with perinatal. Postpartum issues Sarah era we're going to dig into your past and maybe a little bit of your psychiatry about how sports shaped your life and I'm pretty excited to have you because the huddle with me thanks. We're happy to be here happy to be here to do a sweaty balls Dell's references to early. There's no anyway associated I've told you before what our shows all about and It's really about how sports can shaped your life and how it kind of gave you some passion and really helped you understand how this crazy world war and I think that sports puts a lot of that into perspective Just like anti was a cheerleader gymnast. Tennis player necessary really is whip. You'll double champion tennis nice putting that out there about that so I'm going to start with you sir with everyone. What was that spark that influence when you're a kid that really put a passion? The sports I think I was obsessed from like womb like literally I was a tomboy through and through right from the beginning. It was like I remember when I was eight. Probably younger than that. Now just get off the bus and the first thing. I would do like bolt to my friend's house and we would just play outside until we were forced to come inside and it was like everything for you know tag football to Homerun Derby you know and you just I didn't care you were just outside. Yeah all the time so we asked us of everyone guests in probably fifty percent say they played this game and they love love. It is willful Paul. Did you play heck ask great with a ball homerun Derby all these timers that I can remember playing with a ball in la in going on the streets and we just have pick up games and you just take a bat and we'll football and it never breaks. You just have a blast. It's so true and so did you have siblings. You grew up with two brothers two sisters so it was like the big competitor Older brother Yeah for sure he was the other athlete. I don't think my older sister would care if I said this but she is not and neither is my younger brother. My younger sister stor did but she was a lot younger than us. So she played volleyball at Brandeis and You know I think that that was a big part of her identity as well But my younger brother probably put me took me under his wing more than he probably wanted to. Yeah well yeah I think he appreciated the fact that I could kind of keep up with them a little bit. You know from basketball racist and you beat them. I know you guys have to start at once. Bonding ask which is one of those like Handmade Derby Y- they were it was like four wheels and there was a wooden plank in the front in a court and you I would just like turn it to steer down a hill and we would race each other all the time I don't. I don't recall ever winning but I recall a lot of injuries. Can you know if you're outside playing all the time and you're in sports you're GONNA have those types of injuries. I had them. I had tons of them. I still have scars. I can point out from that stuff. Yeah for sure jumping off Portuguese though. Sometimes that did happen all joking. Aside this low you're talking about earlier though. That is a huge lesson learned in sports loss injury and picking yourself back up missing today every one of our guests always talk about how so we didn't have games we didn't have TV. We went outside twenty four seven and get knocked down you get back up and you learn how to push through it correct. Yes those times like that absolutely and that's an incredibly important lesson for women. Yes for sure. A lot of life lessons adopt there on the court in the field. Especially when you're big brother's trying to put you down right that's right you know choice. So what were your parents. Were very supportive. You when you've grown up and sports. Yeah absolutely. My Dad was one of the you know. Like he was a minister and still isn't minister And he every Sunday afternoon. It was like our time you know he would get home from church and we would go out and play catch like on the street or we play football on the street And sports was a huge part of his life. He played baseball for decades So I think he had an appreciation for it and You know he was like Dad. That would always brag about me. You know like the girl playing on the boys baseball team and I sucked right. I mean I don't think I ever I've right field a lot. Yes it was always like the last batter never liked right yeah rate and Ah you know my dad would still be like. Oh but she's playing with the boys you know like a big deal. Yeah no but I mean I was and then I played softball and that was Those are probably the best years I mean. Just had this close group of friends that were so loyal. Yeah and you did everything everything together. Just did everything move I. What was the first organized sport that you place? Yeah it was. It's probably baseball. Yeah Yeah baseball like I learned do. Do you know what I learned. I learned a very important life lesson. which was everyone on? The team has different strengths and different reasons for being there and those goes on the bench can provide a lot of positive influence on the team which is very true. That is an accurate a lot of encouragement. So you're learning all these things you're going into high school. What was a big part of you know that I experienced high school there? There's so many sports you get to choose from to be on different teams. Did you really like. What was your sports you wanted to be part of? I had a really hard time choosing what to do. Because there is a lot of overlap. You know I ended up playing tennis and and because it was a fall sport for girls and then moved into basketball in the winter and then in the spring I ran track and I I stopped I think that transition to softball fast pitch I just. It just didn't invest. I think I had other sports. I wanted to play and I didn't want to invest solely in one so I oh and I've that is so true for me today I don't I like to kind of dabble in different things and I. I didn't want to give up anything any particular sport so I just Kinda did what I could through every season Kinda funny. That's how I am too because I played every sport and want to give up. I should have just stayed in football. Play basketball my senior year and end up blowing both ankles and just like why did I even come up for the team but then you gotTA finish taught from A. They won't ankle. Twist your when you hear about very often you had to work hard to us both ankles at the same time. I would honestly that picture painted doing both at the same time. It's something that's GonNa stick up there for a little while very unathletic to do both at the same time you said that. Not me a Monsanto word judgment okay. uh-huh appreciate judgment on but you know but it's really good point that Sarah makes there's so many things that you to make a decision about an your parents pushing for academics all the time house grades. So what were you student. Were you in high school. I think like most women athletes I was I I did pretty well. I think I I don't really. I think I was eleventh in my class out of about four eighty. Choose so so I like Seneca and that was like big. Now it's like even I mean twice the size of that probably. I don't know what the class sizes but I definitely. He was pretty motivated. When it came to studies I saw that as a a way out but a as a an opportunity to to get somewhere different and it worked for me because then I got into A Great College in Massachusetts. And I I got to see another other whole experience that just wasn't possible in western Pennsylvania and I grew tremendously in college and I got to play sports because it was. You know division three. Yeah so I play basketball there and you went to Smith. Yeah so great. It's clear in high school and you're you're obviously into sports. You're doing unbelievably well and academics. Then all of a sudden all these college choices come up. How do you make that choice? What were what was that decision like for you because so many people have a really hard time with that? I I was one of those people. I think that I set foot on Smith's campus and I knew that was where I was supposed to be visible. You probably like twenty a lot. Yeah you know and my older siblings went through it before so I think I kind of knew you know some of the schools that were available and I knew I wanted to do liberal arts. I wasn't I wanted to smaller size school. I value that intimacy that like. Yeah you know and I think I wanted to play sports so I didn't. I didn't look at major large universities And there was something about the town of Northampton that just was it felt right for me. I knew I was going to get a great education It was the transition was tough from here. Yeah yeah leaving high school. Those were my golden years. Like you have a lot of friends that I I dated joy high school. I don't know that I was I mean part of the reason I like Smith was because of the distance like you know I was ready to see he something other than Western. PA As a kid With my dad's job we moved every three years to like different city in Western. PA and I didn't and I had close friends where we were. But then we would move and so it was like my family was my unit and I think I just was kind of looking for like some stability and I and a chance to really build some continuity in terms of friendship so your siblings go to today. I'll go to college. They did. Yes or the local schools Ohio in in state and then my sister went to Massachusetts said. Swear yeah so like our daughter. Abby you know When she went to have heard Sports helped her. You get into that school. Because it's a very high academic school. Even though she was very smart in in high school sports. You know it's it's all super competitive right. Yeah so I'm sure all that immune that was a big part for you to get. It was sports absolutely. It was yeah and it. It isn't even just like excelling sports. It's just seeing that. You participated in a team activity that you were a captain that you were you have leadership potential that your peers value valued you or valued your character you know. I think those are things that if I think from an emission standpoint for college are important you know because that's what you have to do the rest of your life and be part of team and that consistency and perseverance. That comes with those years to in multiple sports plays onto it so if we go back into your high school if you could take maybe one or two memories that you say. I'll never forget this this moment at this time. You know some people graduation some people. It's winning you know a big game. It's winning a state championship. What was that moment?.

basketball football Sarah era baseball Sports PA tennis Smith Massachusetts David Hager Dr Sarah Kaminsky Michigan State University Coll Dell West Penn Hospital Pittsburgh Alexis Joy de Achilles Center East Lansing Mickey ski
"dr sarah" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"Just as sort of a caveat you know there can be sort of other psychological issues that arise as the result of inflammatory activity there is like sponges there is using a cycle tracking APP in using condoms just during the fertile days or even using sponges during burgled as and you know an condoms of course are like the red headed stepchild of of contraception homing likes them but you know they really are. They're not as bad as it I used to be and they have the added benefit of protecting women and their partners from sexually transmitted infection so I mean we've got some options right. There's diaphragms. That's also a a possibility but I think that some combination you know there's lots of different things that we can try out whether it's a non-hormonal d. or trying out cycle tracking plus USC Don't recommend for people who it's like absolutely critical that they don't get pregnant just because it's a little bit less fail-safe take other options but especially when we think about teenage pregnancy when you're seventeen year old girl like I don't know about you but I was about as irresponsible as it come and you know there was absolutely no way I could have been trusted to account my cycle days and so for me as sort of think about my daughter getting older she's he's about turned thirteen and we're going to be having to have these issues soon. If she is sexually active she's in her teens. That probably the first thing that we would try as a cover I just because it's just as as the pill doesn't have hormones and so I know that it wouldn't be influencing her brain development. If that didn't work than we would consider whether it makes sense wants to have using things like condoms and sponges and diaphragms or whether it might make sense in this specific context try out when the different hormonal contraceptives up to the sort of takeaway is the answer is going to differ for every individual woman in having all the information is like I like the best step in terms of moving forward word Dr Sarah Armed with the knowledge that you have today also knowing you have a daughter hypothetically speaking. She's thirteen years old and just has horrible acne. We know the. FDA has approved some birth control pills as a way to treat acne like it's an acne medication of which the side effect is no babies right so your daughter comes to you and she's like mom. We've tried everything. We've changed my diet. I just can't go to school looking like this anymore. Can I a please try what the doctors suggesting birth control medication and I know I'm asking you like for your situation like this daughter. You're not in it so so please before you answer just know that we're taking that into consideration. This is for you and you got it. Thank you thank you for allowing me. I would try something else. I there are so many different things that we can try to improve the way that adolescent girls are sort of not only like the way that their skin appears but but also the way that they feel about it. I would really kind of try to exhaust those options for his. I Yeah I mean I'm a strong advocate of clean eating eating and stress management and getting a good night's sleep and sunshine and exercise and you know some of these more sort of integrative medicine medicine types of approaches to issues as you would probably go down that pathway I and I would probably work with somebody work with our family doctor who takes the same approach in trying to find alternative means of doing it before going to just during this time in her brain is still developing given that this isn't something as important as has opportunity regulation. I love it. Where can we pick up your book. It is available on Amazon and you can also find it on inbound or at any of your local bookstores well Dr Sarah..

Dr Sarah Armed FDA Dr Sarah Amazon seventeen year thirteen years
"dr sarah" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"It's like post pill pardom here yet. You know where your hormones are like not. I don't think they have quite figured everything out and I hear that. This seems to be more common. Among women who are on the Pill for a really long time sort of uninterrupted in so I would recommend that book and also I can say that there is not a ton of research in this general area again for all all of these reasons that we've been talking about that we should all be very upset about as women but yeah I would definitely recommend that book to readers who are considering during transition off the pill and how to manage that transition in ways that they can troubleshoot what's going on in their bodies. Well let me do the conversation back to our brain new share there with our listeners because I know this has a lot to do with the inspiration behind your research and dedication to this topic. What did you experience when you came off of birth control in terms of like brain power and your thoughts and feelings yeah so you know I was on it for more than a decade of my life. In almost consistently I went off at right before I have both my kids when I was breastfeeding them at all of that but that was on it pretty straight through a long time and when I went off at and it was about three months after the fact I just noticed one day that recently I had been feeling or alive like I felt like I sort of emerged out of this like two dimensional black and white drawing and like coming Lau light and I felt like I had more energy. I was finding myself thinking about sex noticing men thinking husband. Thankfully I uh-huh yeah while including him because I've been noticing either. I was listening to music again. I was exercising. I I was going to sound like a terrible stereotype of women as I was interested in my appearance again. I mean it was just like I felt like I woke sexual bean gene yeah. I felt like a sexual being I felt alive in a way ahead energy and I just felt more vibrant than it had in a really long time. It really surprised me. I was really taken aback by it. which given my background is psychologist? Who Studies Women and studied four hormones? I really should have known that might pill is influencing what membrane was doing and the way I was experiencing the world but I mean it just I had a blind spot when it came to my pels and that was what led me into the research is that I became really interested in why am I feeling so different and what is research have to say about this is they are actually any research out there about what the pill does to the brain and when I went to the research literature I was absolutely shocked like we. We need more research. There's there's a lot of things that we still don't know but we actually know quite a bit and it's just that women haven't been told about it and so I actually as soon it is. I was reading all of this research. That was out there. You know when looked Is this information available. They just like not get the memo in so I went in Doug around like in the popular press in looking at books in information's nowhere in so I saw like you know somebody's got to get this information out of these hard to read research journals and get into the hands of women so that way they can be active participants in decisions about birth control. You know work with their doctors..

Lau Doug three months one day
"dr sarah" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"It helps us remember things it sort of gets our immune system ready in case of injury it also helps to shut down the immune response to keep it from sort of over taking the body and putting the body in a pro inflammatory state it does all kinds of things that are helpful for us in the context of stress and women who are on the pell. Don't get this cortisol increase in response to I'm stressed so other researchers have begun to look into why this is and this is a really important question because normally we don't see this sort of thing go on unless somebody has a really chronically active stress response so normally like you don't see somebody shut their stress response response down unless they've been a victim trauma they have like we see this sort of a pattern and people who have PTSD people who've been abused in Childhood L. Head and women who are on the birth control pill share this common in having this like lack of cortisol response to stress and so other researchers. I looked at you know. Is it possible that women who are on the pill might actually be shutting their own stress responses down like might their body be shutting off the stress response because the pill is doing something that basically puts them in a state of chronic panic essentially in terms terms of their hormones and there's been research now that followed up on this that suggests that this is exactly what's going on and that women have a number of different biological markers is going on in their body that are consistent with their bodies being overwhelmed by Cortisol and that their bodies actually shutting their own stress responses down and this is really important because it is not good for mental health so lacking this dynamic change in cortisol all just like we see in people who have PTSD for example. You know it's linked with mental health problems because when you don't have stress hormones in response to stress stress you're less able to cope and yeah and and not being able to cope with stress of course is it causes anxiety and when anxiety Eddie becomes unmanageable. We become depressed as we feel like we have no ability to actually cope and so that's one piece but there's more it also is linked with shrinkage to your hippocampus Ono and yeah and your hip campus is a part of your brain that plays an important enroll in learning and memory in its you know having a stroke in hippocampus as something that we tend to see and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's Disease Ample Yeah and this is just brand new research. That's been done now in these two large samples of women were they did brain scans and looked out whether or not these women were experiencing experiencing hippocampal shrinkage which they began to explore because that's what you tend to see in people with PTSD and people who've been through trauma because the reason that you get shrinkage in the hippocampus is that this is an area of the brain that is very sensitive cortisol signaling and and it can actually kill the brain cells there if it gets let's too much going on there and so these researchers given what others had been finding with the Cortisol response in pill-takers they looked at taking women's sprains and then compared them to samples of non pill-takers and they found evidence of hippocampal shrinkage in the pill taking group and this is something something that could potentially be associated with some of those feelings of brain fog that you hear women talking about or even dimension Alzheimer's. I'm sure you've found this to be as frustrating winning as I did. When I was doing the research for my book I could find so few studies that were specifically looking at women and not that my book was written just for women men but it's hard to give a woman an indication of how this is going to impact your health..

Cortisol PTSD pell Alzheimer's Disease Eddie Alzheimer
"dr sarah" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"The body that has receptors for hormones picks them up and so they all work the same way no matter where they're located in the body. Are there bio identical hormones that provide a form of contraception or is it just synthetic. You know that's a really interesting question is not one that I like in a really wonderful position to answer because I don't have a good toward have a good answer but I will tell you this and and that is that you know we know that the pill works by sort of tricking women's bodies into thinking that they're in the second half of their menstrual cycle and this is a point in the cycle where progesterone is dominant relative to estrogen and that sends a signal to the brain that it doesn't need to do the things that it does in order to kick start an egg to begin into mature and doing all these things that can lead to pregnancy. It would seem reasonable to me that if you're able to create a sort of progesterone dominant state eight US bio identical 's that given the way that whole egg release goes on that it would have the same effect but I mean but I I mean sort of theoretically speaking it seems you know given how the pill works and how the body works and how hormones work that that you might be able to create such a thing but basing that just speculation. It's speculation can get you pregnant and yes again. I'm so glad we're having this conversation as I always say okay. When you know better you do better. Let's see from my birth of my daughter which was nineteen years ago from her birth until she was seventeen. I believe Steve I was on a continuous bout of birth control meaning. I was doing exercise videos at the time I had an Obgyn who complained about the fact that I couldn't predict how it was going to feel and how it really would impact the way I was doing videos et. CETERA and it was just an inconvenience. I've seen convenient which is a horrible thing to think about your own reproductive health but that's what I was thinking and he'd suggested that I just take it continuous without ever taking that break right like the week off of your placebos or eventually I did the new ring and so I went that many years without oh having a period maybe once a year I would you know give myself a break just to see like okay my getting my period and then sometimes I just didn't because I was on it for so long and I shudder to think about what happens to your body when you're working against it in that way I mean that's just such an unnatural state to be in to be in this constant state of low estrogen and Progestin dominance or progesterone dominance. I can't imagine what that was doing but let's talk about what happens happens in women's brain in terms of her stress response and perhaps even anxiety and depression. Can you tell us right yeah so these are the two big take things that are primarily going to be involved in health related outcomes the end the first you know is this stress response peace and what the research fines is fat women who are on the birth control pill. They don't have this big increase in stress Hormone Cortisol in response to the stress the same way that other normal healthy functioning adults do so normally when people are feeling stressed out so we've all been there you know you're stuck in traffic or giving presentation or doing a.

progesterone tricking US Cortisol Steve I nineteen years
"dr sarah" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"We need to be in a position where we are active active informed participants in discussions with our doctor about are we going to be on the birth control pill or not and if so which one are we going to be on sort of educating ourselves ourselves about what we know about the different types of pills out there what the pill does to the brain many known also like some of the questions that we don't know in allowing women to. I sort of take all the information have it and then make the best decision for themselves. They need experts like yourself to basically lead the way and let let us know what we perhaps haven't been told so. Let's start there Dr Sarah if we can what are some of the perhaps more surprising things that women need to know birth control can do to their brain their body their stress response their mood their personality right. There's is a lot of our hormones and especially our sex hormones. They play a really important role in the sort of signaling machinery that our brain uses to create the experiences France is being who we are and we know from decades of research that women sex hormones influence everything from their appetite to who they they are tracked into his a romantic partner to the nature of their stress response to the nature of their immune response and I could go on and on and on it really shouldn't have been surprising to for all of us as it is that when you take the birth control pill which of course changes what a woman's profile of sex hormones looks like that it's going to change in her brain is doing and so it's GonNa like change the way that she thinks Enfield's inexperienced the world and some of the really surprising ways that you know I've learned that the Pilkin influence women's behavior is for example with me choice you know when the leader to meeting attracted to maybe even even late who you choose as a partner so there's been research now for decades showing that women sex hormones influence their ability to do discriminate between men and just meaning that at times in the menstrual cycle when estrogen hormone estrogen is relatively high that women are like they're better able to discriminate between sort of like higher quality kinda sexy men and then my sexy man the creator of of that study who defined what a more attractive sexier man is 'cause. I think most of us would have a different definition right. No there's absolutely idiosyncrasies. Oh Sing Christie's when it comes to partner choice no doubt about it. Thank goodness right or else..

partner Sing Christie Dr Sarah France Pilkin Enfield
"dr sarah" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"The evolutionary sciences but recently she has turned her expertise ts to learning more about what it is we don't know about the impacts of birth control and the impact specifically has on our brain now. This is really the interesting because Dr Sarah's own journey lead her to dig deeper into this research finding that she herself became more alive like more like herself off after she got off birth control and because she is a psychologist by training she wanted to understand what do we know about the effects it has on our brains and and sadly what she discovered is that we don't have a lot of research in today's episode. You will learn what you need to know. What doctors are perhaps not telling you and how you can make an informed decision to be clear. This is not a discussion. That's anti birth control. This is not a political statement this topic I bring to you because I want you to be able to make informed decisions and while you're at it pickup Dr Sarah's new book. This is your brain on birth control Sara. Thank you so much joining me today on the selene show. Thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited to be here. That's awesome. I am really curious about what type of response you've been getting specifically because this topic can be something that is often politically charged you know we're talking about women's reproductive reductive rights really and making informed decisions about her body and making informed decisions so I'm just curious before we get into some of your research which is phenomenal phenomenal. I'm curious if you've had pushback from one side or the other because this is often politically charged right this is a very much politically way charged issue and we are still living in a day and age where there are people who are very powerful leadership positions in our country great who aren't very respectful of women's rights and women's rights to choose what to do with their bodies choose when they're going to be having children in regulate their fertility and thus far. I have to say that I have been really overwhelmingly. I'm supported by women and you know. I think that both sides both sides because my book isn't Anti Birth Control. No it's absolutely not you know a M- alignment. I don't align the pell or and I don't tell them not to take it. I explained that in my own in life the birth control pill has been an absolutely amazing force and it you know if I had to make the decision again knowing all the information that I know now all for certain periods of my life I would still probably make the decision to be honest because it is very effective in it's easy to use in its save. Save is just that I would be making the decision knowing what trade offs I was making and really that's what this yeah and that's what this is about. It's about giving women the information remains that they need to make informed decisions in also to better strategize their birth control strategy in a way that's going to allow them to sort of maximize their life and like who they want to be and so it's really just about starting conversations about something that women have really been talking about for a very long time when it comes to their birth control pills and that is how it makes them feel your position on birth control very similar to my position on food and Diet which is I'm not here to tell you what to do but I do want to advocate for the woman who needs to understand. She should be making those decisions as opposed to blindly asking some expert. Am I allowed to eat this or not. Is this healthy or not. You know some people refer to it as intuitive eating. I like to call it informed eating and I think what we're talking about. Today is a process by which women need to again like take control. Take ownership and become informed yet if you don't I know what the pill is doing to the brain right than you are at the mercy of your doctor to be telling you what to do with your body..

Dr Sarah Sara
"dr sarah" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

Point of Inquiry

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

"They'll feel good about fighting for the homeland and they'll be healthy and that was a big part of our time strategy so all these people who are growing them the supply changes evaporates right and this was when the united states got really really adamant about victory gardens because all of a sudden we don't have enough food to supply both the homefront were effort and that's why victory gardens were such a huge part of the u._s. War strategy was because we locked up all the farmers and the best way to document that is if if he can find receipts during that time watch the go down and watch the names change on the on the deeds <hes> in who they're buying from so that's that's kind of one of my goals heading out to california and a couple of weeks. I'm going to be asking around as to where there might be. China stashes of old world war two vintage invoices selby following your twitter twitter closely for updates yeah i don't. I don't tweet a lot when i'm traveling just because it's like you're like actually found out something thing bega then you do a threat or article seed asked a little bit about the collaborative approach earlier and this is a great time to circle back to that something kinda tell people is is we kind of have this agribusiness family farms dynamic whereas in reality what really happened is agribusiness is what allowed family farming as we know it to exist because before that it was this you're crossing the reason we have families running their own land by themselves. At this point is because of agribusiness. It's not in spite of it and because of agribusiness that's why they have the tools allow a lot of them. Stay competitive in market rates a lot of what we're seeing as far as being often described as peons of say poultry <hes> conglomerates and things that ah ha so shockingly enough poultry farmers he grew broilers are actually the best off farmers group in the united states the way it's point you have a bottom ten twenty or thirty percent of farmers who are doing very very badly but that's usually not one of income. They've got some other stuff their farming as well <hes> the people who specialize are doing very well for themselves. It's really interesting like at a got. Statistics can send you but especially considering how many of those guys are in the middle of nowhere with no jobs and they have a high school education and they're making bank think it's really interesting how kind of the discourse his like there are at ten twenty or thirty percent poultry farmers who are not doing well with it right right and that's because because the tournament pricing system and i think that's very logical grounds to critique determined pricing system but when we just kind of go like poultry farmers are bankrupt all the time. That's that's also a false narrative. Along like are doing great. There richard and farmers on average making more money per year and farmers in general are making more money than average americans so so this presentation of poultry farmers are suffering is really really inaccurate and are you saying that these are family owned operation on their family owned okay so it's yeah we talk about family. Versus corporate farming and the thing is like i don't think people understand corporations do not want to farm it doesn't make sense from a balance silence books perspective <hes> what a lot of these integrators so companies like archer-daniels-midland <hes> you know tyson purdue things like them. They're kind of like the umbrella company and they have basically farms kind of behaving. It's franchises so like your family farm. I wanna do thing let me become. Let me get a franchise farm with purdue. Do you know where they have contracts. It's not exactly like a mcdonald's franchise but that's probably kind of the best way to understand it is yes kind of businessman but you also have kind of this this umbrella woah roof shelter organization <hes> and just like franchising their relationship doesn't always work out so i don't wanna present like oh no no actually it's good for everyone. It's not obviously <hes> but at the same time portraying like it's bad for everybody is also very false on average again. Farmers are making more money and the agribusiness system..

united states twitter california purdue China mcdonald tyson richard thirty percent
"dr sarah" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

Point of Inquiry

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

"Make lots of equipment that works for smaller scales debt never happened in the u._s. us because we had big landowners owning big plots and all those cry what small note it. They didn't get to make management decisions. They were not in charge of deciding. How automation was going to happen opened. They just got replaced <hes> so we're talking right so those kind of it's not the kind of equipment doesn't exist for saul farms is just that it's steph that how it works yeah. That's how it works over here. The import tariffs might be very terrible. We just don't have that much availability of it over here. It's not like there's a ton of it in the netherlands in japan either but it does exist exist rate <hes> so that's again if you think u._s. Agriculture story is one of small family farms consolidating dating. You're not going to understand why our equipment situation is like that. <hes> so as to kinda back a little bit the story that we kind of have conventionally of agriculture autonation is it started in the mid eighteen hundreds with wheat reapers and mccormack binders and all that kind of stuff <hes> those did exist. Those were mostly used on a big corporate farms that existed at that time in minnesota north dakota. There is like a wheat bonanza. There is a big period of high wheat prices again <hes> after the civil war and before the nineteen hundreds he called the wheat bonanza and so there's a big speculative period and these people who are running them wanted to use equipment to harvest instead if people <hes> they did sometimes he's big migrant labor crews like sometimes they'd have people come up and harvest wheat by hand so they're having giant crews from mexico move up to basically exclude canadian border in the eighteen hundreds so migrant farm labor is nothing new but really tried to minimize that because it was cheaper to use binders reapers if he could so those we're kind of the first early adopters <hes> but most agricultural is still happening by hand including wheat infield agriculture and if you're looking at the numbers i you know you still see a lot of sharecroppers in the midwest and great plains by the nineteen twenties which kind of tells me we'd agriculture was still not one hundred percent automated that tells me they're still out of hand labour happening <hes> if you look at california today there are a lot of crops that are sort of automated like wine grapes. <hes> bad example actually raisins is the better example you can either <unk> yeah you can prune raisin grapes by hand or you can just sending basically hedging machine <hes> those are both completely communist fifty fifty in california today <hes> because if you own a lot of acreage it makes sense to invest in the equipment but if you own a smaller acreage it makes sense to just have it doesn't pay off right so i think u._s. <hes> big crop agriculture was in the same situation for a long time so this narrative that we have of you know field automation starting in the eighteen hundreds and b basically finished by the twentieth is not accurately. There's still lots of hanley. Were happening in the twenty s <hes> so you still had a lot of landlords who were in the market for automation by that very leap period so that was automation mostly happening to replace sharecroppers and tenant farmers. It was not happening to replace landowners. It was not family farms eating each other family farms eating each other finally really started happening with ernest in the eighties when all this consolidation and replacement of people really started started to hit white landowners and that's when we had a national panic about it ray that's when he hit the news. The farms are bigger now which means they also have more people on them so if you look at the number of farms you can go. Oh oh my god. We're we're losing them but stop pullback recognized that the vast majority of farmers in nineteen twenty were actually sharecroppers. Let's look at the landowners <hes>. There's a fewer number of farms. The farms have more people working on them. Fulltime is concentrated to the big performs. That's like we have three family members on this pharmacist of one so if you look at the number of people working on the farms it's still three million like white landowning farmers. It's still three million..

saul farms california ernest Fulltime minnesota midwest netherlands north dakota mexico japan one hundred percent
"dr sarah" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

Point of Inquiry

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

"The mid west there were small family farming but if you look at the data it doesn't support that at all there is a whole lot of share cropping going on <hes> so it's it's kind of funny to me that we talk about like going back to the way it was one hundred years ago and white cool. Tell me more about your plan to bring back share cropping lawyer yeah. I'm gonna i'm gonna now. Go back through twitter and see where i'm sure you talked about this probably times. I've done a little bit here and there just just i don't know it. It doesn't really seem to get a hold of response because it's so far off the beaten path of what we know about. Agricultural is just kinda like hey just heard to click the. I'm still doing what's what's the problem here. Why are why isn't this considered <hes> something that we should all know no about and become a knowledge glad u._s. So here's what i think happened <hes> so again i we have to go back and understand how sheer cropping works and what it means things right so there's a couple different formats of it so there there's tenant farming their share cropping. They're kind of interchangeable terms. <hes> share cropping is when you well. Let's let's start with tenant farming ten farming's when you rent somebody's land. It's like you rent a house instead of owning it and you formed land and you just pay rent. You know a fixed amount you know he x. Many dollars per acre per year right so let's tenant farming <hes> tenants would provide sometimes they provide the mule in the equipment and all that stuff sometimes the landlord provider that so if the landlords providing it and you pay more in rant if you're providing you pay less and hopefully the idea was if you did a long enough you could kind of accumulate capital by a a couple of mules be more productive and eventually buy land <hes> that was the ideal. I don't know how often that actually happened but that was the hope. That was your one conrado for mobility. Share cropping is when instead of paying cash rent. You give a certain amount of the crop. That's grown to your landlord so <hes> in french they called it taj because you gave a landlord half divided in half yeah in some places the proportion that you give to the landlord would change but but that was basically the idea and it was kind of interesting because both tenant crop <hes> cash tennessee and ensure cropping were very very common formats throughout human history. If you wanna talk.

twitter tennessee one hundred years
"dr sarah" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

Serious Inquiries Only

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"dr sarah" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

"Joined by Dr. Sarah Taber, how you doing so good. How are you? I'm doing great. I'm really excited to talk to you. I, I love the name of your podcast farm to Taber. It's. Thank you. It was someone else's idea, but it's good to recognize when it happens. Right? Yeah. Okay. You're, you're very fair. You gotta give credit where it's due, but I thought it was hilarious, and also I'm, I'm, I'm excited to talk about sustainable agriculture and all that. But I, I'm wondering if you could give the listeners bit of your background a bit of introduction to who you are. Sure. So I'm Dr Sarah Taber. I am a crop scientist and I originally got into crop science on on account of I love plants. They're, they're nice. They're quiet their chill. You know, they want to do what they're gonna do, except Venus, Flytrap. That's the only one that's really, you know, they do what they want to do. What they're about and they just do it. So that was that was kind of what I got into it for was just really just a really late plants and and then come to find out you get a little further into it professionally, you realize that in order to take care of the plants, you have to take care of the people who take care of the plants. So you get into something because you like plants in the null winds up being people. So that's that's life, right? Yes. So a lot of what I do now, you know, I started out in crop science and then I started doing a lot of food safety and food safety is really interesting because a lot of folks really think it's about, you know, like techniques and practices, it's about washing your hands. It's about, you know, SOAP's and all that stuff. And that's in there. But what food safety is really bad is about human systems. It's about making sure that socially people are aware what they're supposed to be doing that there's accountability and that the folks at the top of the organization are doing what they're supposed to be doing. The folks at the bottom, you know, like a, you know, at the bottom, the organization organizations are already pretty good at telling them what they need to be doing, but it's coding the. Folks at the top account. That's challenging. So that's kind of what food safety is all about. It's actually about people, it's about human systems. So that's kind of where I've been tilting a little bit in my work is, you know, we need to understand human systems. They're real. They're important in, they're actually behind a lot have of what is agriculture, so not sustainable in the past. And in order to really make it more positive or sustainable, we have to pay attention not just to our techniques composting and cover crops and all that, but we have to pay attention to human systems. So that's really fascinating. So it's it's one of those things where you think like, I'm gonna I'm gonna find the scientific solution to this problem or it's going to be based on, you know something like that. But then it sounds as though when you get into it, it's it's like, oh eight. People just aren't doing the things that. Scientific solutions are just kind of a pipe drain without people who can can do them..

Dr. Sarah Taber scientist