35 Burst results for "Dr Sanjay"

Fauci says he was in surgery when task force discussed changing CDC testing guidelines

Atlanta's Morning News

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Fauci says he was in surgery when task force discussed changing CDC testing guidelines

"House Coronavirus task force and exchanges to CDC testing guidance, while infectious disease expert Dr Anthony found she's undergoing surgery. CNN's Dr Sanjay Gupta reveals that I was Sir. General anesthesia in the operating room last Thursday was not part of any discussion or deliberation. Regarding these new testing recommendation. Dr. Fauci also disagrees with them. The new guidance recommends no testing for people who are exposed, but do not show symptoms. Despite the risk of a symptomatic transmission. California, New York governor say they'll ignore the revised guidelines. President Trump frequently complains the US does too much testing and there would be fewer cases with fewer tests.

Dr Sanjay Gupta Dr Anthony New York CNN CDC Donald Trump President Trump United States Dr. Fauci California
Fauci recovering after surgery to remove vocal cord polyp

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:01 min | Last month

Fauci recovering after surgery to remove vocal cord polyp

"Found she loves to talk, and he's been an important voice in the battle against Corona virus, but we might not be hearing from him for a while. CNN medical reporter Dr Sanjay Gupta says found she has undergone surgery on a vocal cord. Dr. Fauci has been dealing with this polyp on his vocal court for some time. And that way we know this because he's been having some challenges with his voice. He wanted to have this polyp sort of taken care of for sometime he had AH flew. This is last year. It's sort of Costs and disruptions to his voice, But he's been waiting obviously is we're in the middle of co vitto have this procedure done. He just had it done. It was under general anesthesia. He texted me after you get out of the hospital, saying he's doing OK, but it was a a significant procedures by not going to be able to talk or talk much for a while. And, you know, hopefully get out of the hospital today or possibly tomorrow. Doctor found she will turn 80 on Christmas Eve. Fire

Dr Sanjay Gupta Dr. Fauci Corona CNN Medical Reporter
"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

02:47 min | 2 months ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"I should i. Didn't alleviated. That's really really funny. Psych. MIC drop. In terms of Emulating I think that there are there's there's so much. I mean I think. This answer won't do it justice but Long time ago, I read a book called feeling good. And the one of the psychology book by a guy named David Burns and one of the things that he wrote in the book is that. We need to treat the world as if we all have one unit of worth. Amount no matter who that person is no matter even if that person is your boss. That person is worth the same as you. You're worth the same as them. The person serving food the person you're serving food to we all have one unit of human worth. And I think Sunday has always got not at his at his deepest deepest level. No matter, no matter where he is what what he's doing Just this idea that we are all in this together you can say that but to believe it at your core to have that be what fuels you every single day I. Think is really special thing and he's always had that and always admired that and I want to. I want I want more of that genuinely. For me and for everybody I think I think the thing that I would alleviate. I think is is You don't Sunday night. Talk about this. Sometimes I think and I think that we've both evolved with this feeling of. Of Needing to leave a legacy. You Know I. think that there's always so much pressure of like what how the world remember you and I think You know if there's. If there's anything I, think we've kind of both realized together now, is that what we really have is our kids like those are the people who are going to be. Talking about us more than anything else as the stories that are going to be shared, those are the things that matter most us and and I in any pressure at all to leave a legacy. Is the thing that I feel like I would want to be eight. Whatever's left that? Love. That's awesome. Guys. Thank you so so. Sibling revelry is executive goose by Kate Hudson Oliver Hudson and Simpson supervising producers. Alison President Editor is Josh Windisch music by mark. Hudson Aka uncle..

David Burns Kate Hudson Hudson Oliver Hudson Editor Alison President executive mark Simpson
"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

08:25 min | 2 months ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"The body then is basically saying that's great getting serotonin elsewhere. I no longer need to make it. So when you stop taking the Serotonin or or Serotonin, reuptake inhibitor, which is what these medications are, then you crash, and you can have these horrible horrible sort of episodes and effects for whatever reason Silla Sivan seems to create a pattern and the brain where the body essentially is teaching itself to make the Serotonin to again the specific serotonin again. It's wild. Why would that happen? We don't know but I think this idea that we did. With these plants. No. I mean peop-, you know now I will say that the difference I guess a little bit between suicide and cannabis cannabis side, effect, profile, super, super low I mean nobody. Nobody's ever five really had significant problems. You know on cannabis and some people do with civil side, and you know, but and so I think you would need to be studied in terms of dosing it and whether microdosing makes sense, and all these various things that they're looking at but I think that this is another example of a plant of a naturally occurring thing being being ostracized for political reasons. You know it's for cultural reasons, not scientific. But it's shifting. At least it's shifting. We couldn't talk about these things at all I mean. When I I did the. We'd documentary and I wrote an OP. Ed, the I was worried, I? Think I've probably been called Sunil and said the I. Don't know what's going to happen tomorrow. When this thing gets published I you know I. Don't know how I still practice neurosurgery. Colleagues in the hospital are going to look at me or think about this. Are they going to think of me as some pothead? On My. Right exactly. But she favorite stories very stories from that time Sunday was at the. New York York CNN office and he was going out to lunch with like a few of the executives, getting suit types, and they're like on the street and York, walking down the street, and all of sudden like there's. A bunch of guys across the street. The like Yo Dr Sanjay Gupta you fucking rule. There were clearly high. Look at them and Kinda give you this look like this year. Your buds and I'm like. The documentaries a it's. Funny. It is, but it speaks volumes to expanding your demographic for real I mean that one better were the documentary boom. You have just expanded your demographic by at least twenty five million people. It's crazy right I. I know and you know one thing I'll say about that. Is that as you know as a lot of people who've been beating the drum on this issue? No, and they would rightfully say this is that so I've been saying this for twenty years. The other people would say that I've been saying. Saying this for twenty years, and then Sanjay Gupta gets on. Does this thing and all of a sudden? Well you know I. Would No way dismiss all the work that came ahead of time I I admitted it I wasn't listening to people. I dismiss them because I thought it was a just a ladder towards recreational. There wasn't any other motive in my mind. You know I I, so it did take a digging, but there are people who've been saying this for a long time. You know and and. We just got to amplify that message. Are you still practicing by the way I practice? Yeah, do you get people calling you like I want Gupta to do my surgery I just think he's a amazing. Found like this three. There's three types of patients. I realized that there is there. Is that type who they see you on television and they figure well. If he's on television, he must be good, which is ridiculous, no way to think about the world I think I'm good. Don't get me wrong but I. don't have any better because I'm on television. The second type I think is people who actually prefer that. You're not on television like hey, so just so we're clear you're thinking about nothing, but my brain during this time right, which is which is what I would do anyways, and then there was a significant population that just doesn't doesn't register doesn't clink. That somebody, tell them afterward or something like that. That'd be like. Wait what that guy so really, but yeah, you get patients who aren't aware that you're going to be doing their surgery and they're like Yeah, so Sanjiv Gupta will be doing your surgery and they're like what fucking little man! Well the the. We're doing like doing elective operations I'll go meet with the patient in the office and talk to them in the clinic and stuff like that, so we have that relationship already okay. Now we there will be trauma sometimes like I'll take care of trauma patients, and then after trauma, a car accident gunshot wound to the head or something like that I'll go talk to the family afterwards and the patient and. They'll be that that moment of sort of. Sight God. Like, doing great I mean that would be shocking. I would think that that family would that would be one of those shocking moments like Oh my God. Sanjay Gupta Save my life. You tell the story about about Jesus Hayes. Oh as Love this well. That's right so. I'll summarize because it's but when I was out in a rocky no covering a war as neurosurgeon Zeros a journalist, but the coverings neurosurgeon. There weren't neurosurgeons out there in the particular area. The battlefield I was and and I was embedded with a group of doctors called the devil docs and we were. Got Really tight you're in a war together, and you get really close and so there for weeks and one day. Somebody got shot in the head. a lieutenant was on patrol outside Baghdad, and they came to me, and I was again the only neurosurgeon. They're like, can you? Take off your journalist. Gavin put on your servants cap and take care of him. Which I? Which of course I wanted to to do and was honored to do, and and ended up operating on him and. decompressing his brain taken this bullet out of his brain in the desert. and which is a whole sort of you know? Life sort of moment but but. I didn't know how he was going to do. He he a significant injury of the sniper injury and months later I'm home and get a call from. From San Diego where he lived, and it was the the Rehab Center where they were taking care of him and I didn't even know that he had survived. There was no medical records in the desert. They call them. They think you know. Do you remember operating and Zeus? The Don over in Iraq and I'm like yeah operating on Jesus in the middle of the desert. How do you forget that right? and. I are. Has He? How's he doing in this? He's know he's got a little bit of left hand. Weakness ground that he's doing great. You should pay him a visit. Some time, which was so I was out in southern California. I I go to. Look them up goes housecall head of time. It wasn't a total surprise. He answered the door handsome marine. You know last I'd seen him. He was just beaten and battered on the desert floor, and you know, and he was great, and just kind of fall into it right Dr Talking. And we go inside his house. He's young guys with his parents and. His mom comes out a few minutes later, and she's so sweet, and she takes my hands, are you the guy that operated on my son said yes Ma'am I am, and she holds my hands. Thank you very much, you know, and then a couple minutes later. Dad comes out. DADS are different and he's like. The Guy that operated on my son. I, said yes, sir. I, am he goes and you're a journalist. The whole story. So. You know I tell you one other thing that reminded of this podcast. Is We we? We just sat down to talk zoos. His Mom and dad and I we just started talking. And I realized something, and this is months after the guy been shot in the head, almost died in the middle of a war zone outside of Baghdad went to Germany for Rehab, for I, went to Walter Reed ended up going back to southern California where he lived. And I realized after a few minutes of being there with them. They never really talked about it. I mean they SORTA talked about?.

Dr Sanjay Gupta cannabis Baghdad California Silla Sivan microdosing CNN Sunil Ed Iraq New York York San Diego Jesus Hayes Dr Talking Germany Rehab Center Gavin York Walter Reed
"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

06:12 min | 2 months ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"Cores brewing company, Golden Colorado. Okay Bill Clinton I I took a puff and didn't inhale. Can our next president be a pothead? Our next president just say I smoke weed, asking the man who studied it for five years, but this is why I'm asking him because you know. I know this is probably an exhaust. The topic we know a lot through you know your coverage of it, and you're transformation from being from fort from against to four. You know and I love I love my marijuana for lotteries, and but I'm wondering has changed to where our next President Kabila. Yeah, I take a puff now again. Yeah I think. I think absolutely and I mean even if you go back and read you know Fresno Obama's book, the audacity of hope. I mean he talks about. He talks about the fact that he was as he describes a quote living the life of an urban urban black male at that point, which meant he did a lot of drugs you know he did. He did things that were illegal, and and the consequence right for someone of his position. Saying that is then people will say well. How does that translate towards? Drug loss and drug reform, and all that and that's always going to be the dicey, thank. You did it. So why are you? Why are people getting penalized for it? You Know Fair Fair question they they'll have to do both they'll. They'll. They'll be able to admit it, and they'll have to be able to have a rationale in terms of how they're going to take their own experience then and apply it to policy you know, but yes I think that's. I. Think what you're saying in terms of all different for two reasons that you said you took that. You use marijuana. People do use as a as a medicine. You know I mean that was. That was the transformative for me? Is that you automatically thought of it? As this illicit sort of thing, you know sort of the the hangover from the reefer madness sort of thing to this idea that people who actually have legitimate medical problems. We're taking it for legitimate medical reasons, and and by the way the anti depressants and other medications that there'd be prescribed had all sorts of side effects. Like? Why was that legal? What? How did they justify that in? How do you justify that? This is a hundred billion dollar drug over here approved by the FDA prescribed by a doctor given to a pill form all that versus this over here, which is a plant that helps me and boss me very little money. Whatever it might be, so it's. A lot has changed I mean and they're. Going obviously. We're the. Research is ongoing, but I think what you can say is that it's a medicine, yeah? Right Do, and so as opioids opioids, and they have side effects, but it is a medicine so I think that's the first sort of decision. Thing you. It's not just this hocus. pocus I've got to tell you this real quick thing about about weeden Sunday because it's funny like our whole. I the first issue that we saw him like you know, be journalists, but also be an advocate. Right like actually say like this is what I this is what I believe by the way like. Here's all the research behind it, but also I believe you know it'd be an advocate for it, and it's funny, because that's the first visible issue. At least my dad calls me one day. He's like of all the issues that he could have chosen joses marijuana. I didn't know that a that was upset with me about the whole thing. Started me. MOMS, always proud. I'm so proud of you. MOMS always craft. What was the year with the first thing? With weed. Let's see. I think that was two thousand. Fifteen maybe five years ago. But I WANNA get to suicide and really quickly. Because this is something that had been studied earlier on, you know I think it was like in the forties and fifties and sixties, and then the drug culture sort of. The counterculture gets ruined it I, think. You know it's exactly what you said. There's a similar trajectory here. Silla. Sivan was used for the treatment of addiction in the forties as as. We came off of You know the the prohibition era. There were all these different substances that I think that's those those enforcers were setting their sights on including cannabis, including civil and. I got really I read Michael's first article that he wrote in The New Yorker about the nyu trial, which even predated the original Hopkins trial, and that was amazing. And I am lucky to know. Michael I talked to him a lot. Spend a lot of time. Just talking about the science I went and interviewed the scientists at Nyu. Who did that first trial and it was it was it was mind blowing? Really I mean you may know this, but just just briefly there was thirty patients initial trial. All of them have been given a terminal diagnosis. They're all going to die different ages different reasons. Different backgrounds belief systems, and they were incorrigible in terms of their their depression anxiety. They just could not nothing was working, so they had this terrible situation where they were terminal, and they were also becoming increasingly suicidal, totally isolated from their families, and they got enrolled in this trial, using suicide and a single dose of Silla Sivan. And I mean you know the reason? It became such a big deal was because that trial was was unbelievable. I mean you had twenty six people who had response, which is these are people who don't respond to anything. Anything they went through generations of medications. Nothing worked twenty. Six of them had a response. Many of them never had to take another medication again. You know so. It worked not only did it work, but it was durable lasted for several months, maybe even longer. So I think it's I think it's really interesting and I. Think you know the idea I mean I could go really deep into this, but we're trying to maintain a certain amount of Serotonin in the brain. Problems when you give Serotonin to repeal..

marijuana president Bill Clinton President Kabila Golden Colorado Michael Fresno Obama Nyu FDA Sivan depression cannabis nyu The New Yorker Hopkins
"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

01:42 min | 2 months ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"Actually. I am heading on a RV trip with the family. I'm heading up north and what a perfect time to fill my cooler with some coors light, which I actually will be doing. Coors light wants to make it easier few chill this summer and give you a break from the stress and the pressures of daily life okay. Plus the new cores light summer can does the work for you features sunglasses that literally turn blue when the beer is cold and ready to drink, so we have graduated from the mountains to the sunglasses. Because when you wear sunglasses, you're cool. You know what I mean. It's supposed to be freezing. Cold is made to be cold and you know. I like a cold beer I'm one of those like I'm not a big fan of the warm ails, cold, crisp freezing, cold Mike. That's my kind of only one hundred calories. That's very nice three point beer. If you if you WANNA low calorie beer cores, light is calling to you. Course light is brewed with a three step cold process. It's cold logger, cold, filtered and cold package, so it's actually made to chill both the mountains and the sunglasses on the new limited edition summer cans can turn blue windshield to perfection. That's why cores light is the one that I'd choose. That's that's real right. I'm reading, but I actually choose. It is the one that I Oliver Hudson. Choose when I need a moment of shells. So when you want to reset this summer, reach for the beer that has made to chill. You can have coors light delivered by going to get dot coors, light dot, com,.

coors Oliver Hudson Mike
"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

07:16 min | 2 months ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"Absolutely and we were the world leaders in that stuff I mean we, we are the. We originated smallpox. We're on the verge of radical polio. We came up with some of the most effective vaccines anywhere in the world. Yeah, we other other organizations in other countries. Call their organizations the CDC in deference to our CDC. We you know we. That was our. That was our bread and butter. Really in this country. You guys like Larry Brilliant. Who who is still alive and you know talks about things I'll say. He advocated smallpox eradication a disease. Know nobody gets to say that and and they knew how to do this even even before even anticipating that there wouldn't be a vaccine available for some time, so it's it's It's tough. I know people who've died of this disease and it's very tough to go out there and say you know. Their desks were preventable doesn't make the families feel any better. That's for sure makes them feel worse but you know there's going to be other ways to this and I'm sure. They talked about this as well so hopefully we'll learn. Some of these things going forward. We're going to have to apply these lessons right away. It's not like this. One Hundred Years from now. We need to apply these in the fall. Maybe in a couple of months. Because there's GonNa be a second wave. The virus out there. Is So so good at what he does, because he he he does this. I told them this flat out I. said You have this amazing ability to sort of slow roll the country into things we're GONNA. Do a fifteen day pause. We'll see how things go. Yeah, it was never going to be a fifteen day pause. He knew at that point. This was going to be months. Of having to slow the country down, but you can't say that. And then you know we'll have a vaccine. You know twelve eighteen months. We don't know. Maybe that's true, but he has this way of of of slow rolling things, so yes, if he told you. Maybe there'd be a second wave. There's going to be a second wave. Has Sanjay always been a person who was interested in like a little bit of everything you know to be to go? He goes to become a doctor, then he then he becomes journalist. And now you know you, you've a brother. That's like in Iraq and then he's in. Covering Bola, and then he's in Puerto, Rico, and all over the world putting themselves dangerous. Literally a front. You are a frontline journalist. All that making time for the air band which is. Going to be the headline, thank you very much. No but I mean have was. Was He always like that as a kid? Now you're right, I mean such as always the guy who's running as people running away from the Fire Sundays running into the fire, and that was true New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina earthquake. Haiti. Aska during the Bola life and I think that Y-. He's always been that way I. Mean He's always been. He's always been someone who is curious and. Interested in wants to wants to serve wants to wants to be useful in a one one of the pieces of advice Sunday gave me which is kind of related to this is like. Always want to be running towards something and not away from something. And you know I, think in the context that he came back. It was career. Advice know I was I was in a job at didn't like and I'm like I think I'm GonNa, go do something else, and he's a cool go. Do something else, but figure out what it is. You WanNa go do go do that run towards something rather than sort of saying I hate this job and I'm gonNA. Run away from it. And I think that that's Kinda you know how I how I've seen Sunday service. Lift his career as well. Life and career is is always kind of being willing to run towards something always always feeling like. Even if people are running away from it, I'll run towards it. Brel that's relevant. That's relevant advice right now in these last in this last nine days by the way. It's not easy to run towards the burning building, but you know it's it's a necessity at this point, even if it's uncomfortable and you know, you might get burned a little bit here and there, but it's important to run towards the problem and I'm learning that right now. You know what I mean. I'm going through these motions of men. What do I do? How do I? Do you know I? I need to move forward and not backwards. It's not time to treat, and I've never been someone honestly to run forward. I, kind of hang out in my spot. Watch things go by like that's my nature. Literally literally watched him do that I. Watched my career go by? No but you know. That's a relevant. Relevant? That's relevant information right now. It's a great great sort of I. Mean in, also you. I mean I'm just GonNa put myself in your shoes for a second where ten years older, which is a significant amount of time to be older and doing all of these really like amazing interesting selfless things in my mind I would wonder if that would affect how you would look your future. Like what am I gonNa, do am I going to become? You know and interestingly enough you become I mean what you're. You recalled like what the the great young innovator. That was what was the title like this? Always stay with you forever. The world's sexiest innovator. Innovation. Facing. If you ever want to ask yourself the question like what the Hell am I doing with my life? Right like have have Sunday your brother exactly. Like, you're always I'm always asking myself that question at the same time like he is, he is the guide. He prompts me to ask myself that question and that he guides me to the answer. So it's this, it's this sort of pushing poll, but it is funny like. Two Thousand Sixteen after the presidential election I moved back to Michigan to run for Congress, and and I I moved back here because I felt like our our community were did I grew up was one of the communities that decided to flip from blue to red that year and I really wanted to kind of run. Run, Fella, my brother's advice run run towards the problem. Figure out what I could do and ultimately that ended up. Being me running for office and it's funny because. It was the first time that you know in my own community in this congressional district, I walk around and people would would recognize me. When I wasn't walking with Sunday when I walk in with Sunday, they're coming up to us all the time. This is the first time people come up to me and you know like asking for like You know photo or something like that, so you know. I still remember the first time it happened. This guy comes up and he says hey, can I. Can I get a Selfie and I said? Yeah again. With, Jay not used to this alone, and the guy says yells to his buddy before he takes the shoddy else's basis. Brian, commended here getting this photo at Dr Sanjay Gupta's brother. Welcome to my world man, welcome to my world..

Dr Sanjay Gupta CDC Larry Brilliant New Orleans Haiti Bola Fella Hurricane Katrina Iraq Brel Rico Jay Brian Michigan Congress
"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

06:35 min | 2 months ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"Know. I'm I'm really thinking about you right now. Because I think that that kind of just transported him back to those as we're talking about right now and I and I it's. It's it's not you know it's I remember him so well during that time you know. The the age of he left the house when I was about seven years old, which means that? Really if I if I start to kind of really remember things like three four years old two seven. That's that's not much time. That's about three years, but it seems like forever. Like I have so many memories of the two of us at the House. which in a Lotta ways makes me think about my role for migro right now. My younger one, who's three years old, right like sometimes. I think it's easy to dismiss this age. Because you kind of feel like well, they may not remember as well but I think that. For me it was I mean it was it was? It was so much a part of my childhood so so Dr. Sanjay you're involved. You're very involved in your little brother's life right? Yeah, because that can go either way. I guess you could be like I'm too old for you. We don't have anything in common. latchkey kids I mean your parents were working so sanjay? I would assume that you had. Just a by nature took on a very paternal role for scenario. Yeah, I think so I mean. My parents did work and the even worked a lot of weekends so a lot of times. It was just Semioli and you know I mean it's funny now because you can't think of a ten year old, I don't think like I wouldn't have looked at my daughter's and said they're ten, and now they can take care of a baby you know. But and we had help from time to time there would be sitters and things like that. That would help. But I was a lot of times I was primary sort of caregiver and I mean one of the one of the stories I love. Is that I took Sahil to this little amusement park. When you were just like a year old or so, and it was Bob Lo island. It's this'll amusement park on this island in the Detroit River and it's it's cool. It's not there anymore, but it was a neat little place and we had to go by bus, and then we had to get on a boat, and take him and I was eleven. And he was one. And my h how we decided we did it just let. Like the idea of like Ryder, even at sixteen taking, Ronnie. Now, it's not happening. I know it was crazy. Sometimes, just out of necessity you know. Why don't you take him? We should take some NEIL TO BOB LA why. He was he was baby and I felt like it'd be a good thing You take him okay. Figure this out and. So. Were you guys like? Is Kids like what was your personality where you outgoing? Guy. I think well. I'm curious. This is a really good conversation. We you know it's funny doing this for the conversation. We don't typically have these conversations right and I mean just to I mean I think. I was the shy once and it was definitely I. Think a lot more outgoing I I didn't I didn't have friends really since. You seem to have a lot of friends. So you had some admire band. Yes, hit oriented yet is he had his fame fame? Even air air if that was not the. To be destroyed. Wait a minute. Widened you have friends like this seems to be part of it again is so even during the ten years a lot changed in in Michigan. There were no my parents. Their, their friends were mostly. Indians culturally you know foodwise music things they could share and Latins. They didn't have kids my age. You know so. We would go to their house. Whatever that would be our social thing, and and so I didn't have friends and I and I think just living in. A neighborhood where you're again. The only Indian family I just didn't have a lot of friends in the neighborhood is well. I had a couple, but not I didn't have a friend group by any means since you seem to have a lot of friends, you were definitely more going I. gotTa say one thing as well. It's really now being a dad because I. I see different personality traits in my own kids, and what's so funny to me again? I was having this conversation is that? How do you succeed as a kid? Right like would like. How do you think you're succeeding as a kid like I think a lot of times it's the measurable things and getting good grades. I'm involved in activities whatever it might be. I think the idea of being just a sweet engaging curious kid, because it's harder to measure You know you don't always know what to do with that. I think I was a bookish sort of kittens bookish kit as well although you know. I think he was. It was always just a really sweet engaging kid and I just saw people respond to him differently than they responded to me. I was I was I. I was shy. I was not very outgoing and I probably didn't smile as much even if I was smiling on the inside, so people thought you were surly. It wasn't that was surly. If I was interested in something, I would just sit there and stare at it and they would think I wasn't curious. I was, so it was. It was a lot of that it was it was I think I was misunderstood. Funny. Irony of the fact that now you are like America's chief medical correspondent, and like bring everybody, comfort. But I think you said something that is really really smart. Finally. You've said something. I! I deal with my kids as well. You know we we it's we live in this world of measurements right? How do you stack? Right, how are you in school? Do you have extracurriculars? Why unhappiness a measure of one six does such as? Disservice to all those kids you know just because we can't measure it and I think that school education needs to shift in a way to sort of take so much so much pressure and stresses on standardized testing, and all of these markers centered. I talked about this quite a bit community now I mean I I remember. Sunday having. Friends in college that we that I would hang out with, and we still hang out with now like I think one thing that him and I both done is we've the friends we really you know grew to like in like us like we hung onto people like we definitely formed our circle, and and made sure that those relationships stayed intact, and you know senator. We're talking about this because I. I was I just I. Just took a trip to Bhutan or I if you will be. Todd is the one country in the world that measures self based on Gross.

Dr. Sanjay Bob Lo island Bhutan Detroit River Sahil senator Semioli Ryder Michigan Todd Ronnie America NEIL BOB LA
"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

05:53 min | 2 months ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"You might have missed the best era of which was the nineties. I kind of float by Jane. Took that away from him so. He was in the nineties he was into nine eleven was funny as at Sunday so you guys may not know this. Sunday when he was in high school formed an air band. With an air band. Like. It's air all instruments. Guitar. Air Drums air everything. Lipson waste, let me this is. This. Is this exclusive this assange take. Tape. There was was just a silent concert so so that we do in the background were very. So. What sort of music Sunday was actually lead singer of this? and. There was. Right there was a family there were three brothers, and their last names were Gupta as well and so Sunday in this. This this family of three brothers formed a band and get this the secretive name of their band. They named themselves Gupta's. And so and so and so literally they would get together in the basement. And they put on eighty s which I still have playing than actually. If you see my shirt here, I don't know if you can. Pour some sugar on me just like changed my whole life and dance moves, but Also gets gets part of it to my kind of skits to almost frame the whole thing like rocket, I remember they rock of ages. There was a skit before that. Thing. Should have been Gupta to the third power or maybe G. Three G.. Four G., four four. There's always a reunion, so my mom. My mom would always make Sunday include me in these things so I was actually asked to be the cameraman. Recording. These is on video I s some of these recordings. Those. I do this is. The thing is that video camera was already on a tripod. So I didn't have to do anything. But that was my role. Until until one time Sunday brought me in, and I got to do Tom Sawyer by rush. And that was. Where are these videos and can we have them? and. And who is Neil pert in that song who playing the drums? There was some deep, wasn't it? Sundeep. He's. He was really got into that. He was convinced so mind body connection. That was that was. Do you. Remember Sanjay when Senio came into this world. Do you remember coming? Over very much so. That was ten. And and I guess I was nine I turn ten that year, and and it was. It was really I. Mean You know into the hope? My mom was pregnant that that whole thing and you know just. Taking care of her and and being excited, and then he came home. I remember I remember thinking that. I was the most excited that other people weren't as excited as me like I'm sure. My Mom and dad would thinking about the work they now had to do. They were excited as well so now I don't want to take the wrong way, but the the I was like so excited and I had a brother and I. Would you know every time in school? School people always ask you know an addition to your name? How many siblings do you have? And I was always, Sanjay, which nobody can pronounce zero siblings, and so that ought got to change and so it was. It was really exciting. I feel like it was an inflection point we move shortly after scenario was born as well to a new neighborhood and. Switch schools a couple of times during that time so. I felt like it was like cereals. For me was was a point of real transformation. I think and I still think of like you know. I guess it's just happens with younger siblings, but I still think of snow is very much a little kid, and so everyone is measured by. Are they older or younger than my brother? If they're if they're my brothers Asia younger, there are kit. If. They're older than there than there are full on adult right I. Don't know when that changes since. You're actually called me today and asked me. When does that change? I. Brush my teeth and I suddenly had this is something. Had this thought like I still think of us? This little kid with so is that always just how it is to? You know to my dying day or What what changes would when do we think of ourselves? As contemporaries peers as opposed to I, am the ten year older brother. and. To get answer I can't what you said I. I. Said I! Don't know if it's GonNa Change. I think kids probably have a lot to do with it. I've got two girls in my own now, so Sunday's got three. I've got to. My parents have five granddaughters, girl, and all my God. How lucky! Yeah. I feel like I feel like Sunday. was you know he was a was a third parent and he was more than that? No, he was, he was also a brother. He was a friend who was a mentor. Has All kinds of rolled up into one? So you know I think that that that that that hasn't really changed for me. Because of all you know, he's always sort of this guiding kind. Kind of figure for me, that was true when I was four years old. It's true it's true today, so that part I don't think is going to change it is it is strange. I remember when Sunday had his first daughter Sade, his oldest oldest daughter, and I remember him calling I was there, but he called me like the minute he was born. It seemed like.

Gupta Neil pert Air Drums Sanjay Senio Jane Lipson assange Tom Sawyer Sade Asia
"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

06:43 min | 2 months ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on Sibling Revelry with Kate Hudson and Oliver Hudson

"She drives to Detroit and she basically finds a way to get herself in front of a hiring manager, but there's one big problem because this is the nineteen sixties while Ford Motor, company is like in its heyday. This is Ford versus Ferrari had just happened. Out The auto industry is doing really well. Four does not have a single woman working as an engineer. The Guy looks at her. This hiring manager and he says we don't have any bill engineers working here. You know my mom is at this point in time deflated. She gets up. She's she's up a person getting ready to walk out of the room. And then all of a sudden, she turns around. She looks at the guy and she says if you don't hire me, you may never have the benefit of having a woman worker as at engineer. And, so this guy ends up getting so inspired with this meeting with my mom. The two of them advocate in an August nineteen, sixty seven. She becomes Ford Motor Company's first female engineer. Gives me the. Movie is a story. Restore you know what a beautiful! That's amazing. It was the hidden figures story before hidden figures. You know there's and then there's all the stuff that's baked into that right. I! mean she was the first woman who attended an all male engineering college in India in there was a lot of just sexism and stuff that you had to endure doing that and. It's funny. I had this conversation with her the other day. That's obviously like the the more subjective obstacles that you you have to overcome, and and how do you like as a woman you know? How did you navigate that stuff? Did you do? Did you always push back on everything? Did you did you? Take great pride in the moment. Did you realize how significant was in the moment? The two are the first woman engineer. Am I think about that all the time like even historically now all the things that we're going through? Do. In the moment that something is so significant like in one thousand nine hundred. They know that one hundred years from now they would be talking about what happened with that flu pandemic, or was it just something? I think about that with mom all the time. I'll just tell you know so now. We're just talking among the other day. She told me this quick story. I'll tell you which I think in some ways encapsulates mom. I don't know if you've even heard. My Nani. WHO's my mom's mom? You know they think when you're living the life of a refugee there's. There's a lot of safe that you need to have and things. You've just got to believe that things are GonNa? Get better because he had no proof that it will. And so they they believe in certain things like like palm reading, and that was a big thing with my ninety, which was surprising, because she was a very objectively minded woman but you believe in palm reading and she wanted to take my mom who was a little kid at the time. To get her palm read to determine whether or not she was going to actually. Amount to something and they should invest in her all that stuff. Can you imagine all based on your palm? So my mom did not believe in that at all thought it was hocus-pocus, and and but she read to find out what they would be looking for. And she took a piece of glass and cut the line in our own palm that she knew would would reflect what the palmist would look for. Now obviously, they would know that that was cut, but it was just like the okay I. Don't believe in this at all, but you. WanNa play the game. I will cut my hand as an eight or nine year old girl to make you believe that I. Am that person that that's kind of who she? That's kind of issue. That you heard that before so new I had not heard that story and then Cresco many so many parts of the story about when I had not heard I know. I spending a lotta time talking to mom lately, which is weird because in the middle of a pandemic. I feel like in some ways. We've become a little bit more connected strange, but we will do facetime calls and she loves to do it, and usually she wants to talk to the girls and the girls get quickly. You know they're. They're very distracting. And so, but then I just sit there and I talked to spend these kind of amazing conversations about nothing. Of Off. If you heard this, but. The story of how their parents met is pretty amazing. Do you want to share that with us? Today you. You give the the story I'll add in some of my little detail I've just. Even beforehand just typically though was. There was arranged marriage, but that wasn't the case for them. For what reason right that part of it, okay? I'll just preface one thing say that the arranged marriages still happen. Yeah I mean that is still part of the culture and we're now. We're talking sick nineteen sixties some Yes so it kind of picks up where we left off. Mom is now Ford Motor Company's first. Female Engineer. Oh, Kate. You'll appreciate this. Her name at this point is dementia karate, just kind of a long name the Dirani, and so one of the one of the manager said you know we might, we might want to short. Not find find a nickname of some sort, and so she comes up with Ronnie as her. Yes I, get! Eights. I love. Like Oh my God, it means Queen and she was like she was like I. Love the idea of these white guys. Call Me Queen every day. My Name. You will call queen rest of. Ronnie mom is You know she is living alone. She's living in Dearborn area and again nineteen sixties, not not a lot of Indians. People in our community around up, but she had heard that in Ann Arbor. There were more there were more Indians hanging out, you know. People went there for the University of Michigan, and so she every once in a while, get in her car and drive from Dearborn and Arbor which was maybe about a forty minute drive and one day she does that and her car breaks down right on the outskirts of campus and and so she walks to local phone booth. Phone booths back in the day, and it had one of those wires connecting an actual phone book row the big. Books I remember she goes, she goes. flips to the as an. She thinks that the most common India name in the as that you can think of which is Agarwal. And Chicago Chicago's up. The First Agarwal in the phone book. Guy Answers the phone and she's like. Hi. This Mr Augur Wall and the Guy Says No. He's out of this his roommate. The Guy. Who answered? The phone was my father. Wow Isn't that amazing, and then He. He helped her with the car. Damn. And how did how? How did their parents react to their coming together? Was it something that was looked down upon because it wasn't arranged, or were they okay with it?.

engineer Ford Motor Company Ronnie mom India Detroit Dearborn Ferrari Engineer University of Michigan Ann Arbor Mr Augur Wall First Agarwal Chicago Cresco Kate Agarwal
Coronavirus task force holds first briefing in months as cases hit record high

Erin Burnett OutFront

07:51 min | 3 months ago

Coronavirus task force holds first briefing in months as cases hit record high

"The United States about to hit forty thousand new corona virus cases today. The first time that we've had that many one day, the death toll in the United States closing in on one hundred twenty five thousand people, but if all you did was listened to the president and vice president today, you would be absolutely stunned here what I just said because this is what they said. Today? All fifty states and territories across this country are are opening up safely and responsibly. Well, that's incorrect. It's factually incorrect. They're not I mean eleven. States are currently on pause. Some of them are actually backtracking and closing some things down on plans to reopen Texas and Florida specifically. They are rolling back reopening plans governors of the other nine states. They are not moving forward with the next phase of reopening. So that was incorrect, and then the vice president went on to make this claim. The truth is we did slow the spread. We flattened the curve. So he says we flattened curve, so let me just show you America's curve. So you see, the surge right and then in in March and then you see the plateau. And then you see. The jump there at the end where we are now getting to fifty forty thousand cases today. That was a plateau, and it's on its way back up and I want you to compare the graph to these other graphs. These are countries around the world right? They have that surge at the beginning the UK Germany France Italy Japan South Korea European countries measured in thousands of cases Asian in hundreds, but look what happens at the bottom. They go all the way back down and stay that way. Ours never went down right, and now it's going back up currently with the same steepness of slope as it did at the beginning. And yet the vice president was taking a victory lap during today's briefing and he made sure to credit person number one. Under the leadership of President, trump is the president's made clear credit I believe to our president of the president made that decision. So, where was the president during this briefing while he was somewhere in the vicinity, but he was on twitter, talking about confederate statues, tweeting this image of people suspected of trying to vandalize statue of Andrew Jackson and what he was writing was that many people in custody with many others being sought for vandalisation of federal property in Lafayette Park Ten year prison sentences. It was hours later that the president did finally say something about the pandemic. That's amazing raging right now in the United States like nowhere else here he s. We have work to do that. We'll get it done. while. That's an understatement it. We are learning tonight that people traveling from the United States most likely will not be allowed to even enter the European Union. Banned, because the United States has gotten the virus under control Kaitlan Collins is out front. She's live outside. The White House Tonight Caitlyn. No briefings for eight weeks the White House. Felt like they had to do something here, but then they came out and said everything's opening you safely and responsibly opening fifty states. When that's just you know factually untrue. Yeah. It wasn't the message that some people were expecting the vice president to project from that briefing today after Wednesday's coronavirus task force briefing, and after you're seeing these numbers from this week including yesterday setting a record high of cases per day since the month of April, of course, which is the last time that they had these coronavirus briefings now you would that they would have. have taken more questions. The vice president instead of Aaron only took a handful of them, but before he started taking questions, you saw him arguing saying that he doesn't want the American people to think that because of these new surging infections that the United States where it was two months ago, even though the case numbers per day or mirroring that or beating it and. And of course, the vice president went on to talk about what precautions Americans should be taking. He ticked off a list of things that the CDC has recommended. But Aaron he notably left out wearing a mask when a reporter asked about the fact, that mask have become this political issue. He then only told people that they should be following local or state guidance ignoring the. The fact that the CDC a Federal Agency of course, has recommended that people wear masks when they are out in public, and within the vicinity of other people. He also defended those rallies that he and the president have been holding and encouraging their supporters to come to where thousands of people are put indoors with very little social distancing errand by saying that it was people's. People's right to the first amendment characterizing it more as a personal decision than something that they're organizing and urging people to come in to attend, but I do want to note to striking things that came out of that briefing today was the vice president offering a pretty rosy assessment of these numbers, and then Dr Falcon getting up there and having a very sobering warning. What's to? To come and personal responsibility and this, but also Aaron the vice president saying he believed it's an arguable that the reason that there are more cases in the united. States because there's more testing Dr. burks got up and she was going through these slides and one of the ones she pointed to was Texas where it showed in May as they were increasing testing their positive. Positive test rates were going down in the last two and a half weeks they continue to increase testing, but now those positive test rates Aaron are going up, and that completely refutes with the president and the vice president have been telling people and governors for the last several weeks. All right, thank you very much. CAITLIN absolutely makes the crucial point. Right the percent test rate. Rate is what they're looking at twenty percent of them. Positive that that's that's the relevant point. It's not the absolute number and Caitlyn I. Appreciate Your Time, so let me go now to Dr. Sanjay Gupta and Dr Jonathan Reiner. Who Advise the White House medical team under president? George W Bush currently in Cardiac Cath lab at Gw so so sanjay the vice president today. Came out and presented an alternate reality. he said all fifty states and territories. This country are opening up safely and responsibly. That is quote obviously the have double digit states halting stepping back. They're reopening all together big steps back. Yeah I mean. I. Don't even know where to begin with this particular briefing. You know you think two months. We haven't had a briefing. There's obviously some real trouble spots in the country and I'm. Saying that almost euphemistically I thought there was going to be an acknowledgement that look. We have some problems. Significant ones in here is our plan to address them. Here's what we're GonNa do we're convening the coronavirus task force to to address this? We didn't see that at all. I mean there's the last task force briefing. You can see what the numbers were at that point and obviously just see how the numbers have grown even over the last few weeks. Weeks, so it it it was it was a real concern, and there were a lot of things that were said that were just basically a whitewash of what's actually happening in the country, and that's what I think. Worries me. How are you GonNa fix the problem. If you don't even acknowledge it right well, that's the thing. If you're in complete denial about it, then you obviously don't have a plan to fix it because you don't believe it's their. Running when the president actually gave a nod to this this afternoon, his comment was making a lot of progress with the whole situation, but we have a lot of work to do but he did not attend the briefing instead he was treating about those confederate Mon. Monuments So, you know in the vice president. There was talking about all the encouraging news again. His words talking about Krona virus so. What do you make of this and I guess specifically the president's refusal to be there. Yeah the president. In a tweet about the monument seems to be more interested in protecting long dead confederate traitors. He is in protecting Americans right now. Yeah, I was really appalled. When the vice president today said well, we've all heard the encouraging news you encouraging news, really

Vice President President Trump United States Aaron Texas Caitlyn CDC White House Uk Germany France Italy Japan America Twitter Florida European Union Andrew Jackson George W Bush Dr. Sanjay Gupta Kaitlan Collins Caitlin
Social Distancing in Summer

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

06:49 min | 3 months ago

Social Distancing in Summer

"Has the summer heats up. People all over the country are considering now. How much risk they are willing to take as they venture outside. Some are thinking about reuniting with friends and family for the first time. Others are trying to decide whether or not to take a road trip. What about physically distanced backyard barbecue? Just. How risky is it to make this summer? Feel like well summer. It is important to understand what the likelihood of contracting the corona virus is and transmitting it. So that you can make the right decisions for yourself and for your family. I'm Dr Sanjay. Gupta CNN's chief medical correspondent. And this is corona, vice, fact versus fiction. So I have an eleven at neely eleven and thirteen year olds, and so the conversations were having now are about what else summa looks like. That's Aaron Judge, Professor, at UMASS DARTMOUTH and CNN contributor since his blog post about avoiding situations with a high risk of infection went viral. He's become a resource for many people. Some does look a little bit different, and there's been a lot of tears in this house over the last eight weeks, but We're trying to gain normalcy for our children as much as we can. The possibility of having a normal summer is not a lot of our minds. So I asked Erin about some of the questions. I've been hearing from you. Starting with pools is it safe to take a dip properly maintain to pull. Water will not be a source of spread of the virus. The chlorine that's in its will inactivate virus fairly quickly and the level of dilution that would happen in a pool or notional or lodge freshwater body would not lead to enough virus to establish an infection. But when you do this, you need to just make sure that we're maintaining an appropriate physical distance and create a little bit of extra space I. Don't know if you or your family members have been doing any hiking or going for long walks around your neighborhood. What precautions do do you think people should take if they just WANNA go for a walk or a hike? So, we have as a family, we each have three mosques We have a better quality one if we get into grocery stores or anywhere. We know there's going to be a lot of people. We have one win. We're just going to do a show. Than we have out general sort of mosque, which is a neck data that we use any time we go hiking or around the neighborhoods where we know that we are able to social distance the vast majority of time, but there are some times where the path my narrow and. while. The brief encounter is not as risky as the longer one. It's not no risk and you don't know the risk factors of the person that is walking past you and I tend to take mosques a little bit more altruistically. It is about me wearing them to protect us, and so when we get in that situation, we just literally pull up gate of mosques over our face. We do that about fifty feet out from the person or people. People so they can see what we're doing. And then we just run a little bit of a wider above as we possibly can. Games like soccer or basketball, would you? Would you be okay? People playing those? Yeah, I'm eat soccer coach and I really want to get my teams out on the fields, but not playing scrimmages yet were not sure enough especially with children about their role in infection and transmission, so no, I'm not yet there for. Those sports, but as long as it doesn't bring you in face to face contact. I think the the risk is low. A baseball of Frisbee is not right up there where I'm spending my anxiety. What about a road trip this summer for family? They want to go on a road trip and stay in either a hotel or an AIRBNB. Something like that. If it's your own family, I'm not to consent. Call head to the hotel. Will the YOU'RE GONNA? Stay at ask what they cleaning protocols are end what this Stafa wearing while they cleaning the room and if that comes into line with what your risk is for your. Your family then I would proceed a medium sized gathering like a birthday party or a wedding ceremony. Would you be okay with that? Weddings done outsides with appropriate spacing. Absolutely it can be done a birthday party again in a backyard outside can be done. I. Just encourage people to bring their own chairs while it's nice to stand up in chat, we find. People stopped to move closer and closer the more comfortable they feel, and if you've got a chair, you don't drift and that just maintains the safety while keeping the social aspect I. I really love your your practicality because you are thinking exactly how people probably behave. Disneyworld they're planning on opening up in July. What do you think about amusement parks? Yes, so amusement parks I mean if they they can institutionalize cleaning and. Keeping. Systems like lines organized better than almost anyone. We know they're in the business of doing that. But when we're bringing a lot of people together, we know the risks come up. My major concern comes with the rides that put people into slipstream. I don't know enough about aerodynamics and transmission on Roller coasters, but I can only imagine from being on them in the past that someone that screaming in front of you. Whatever's coming out of them as coming directly onto you in pretty intense. For a few minutes.

CNN Soccer Dr Sanjay Neely Airbnb Erin Aaron Judge Umass Professor Stafa Basketball
It Broke Me: A Conversation with Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

07:57 min | 3 months ago

It Broke Me: A Conversation with Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms

"It broke my heart. It was devastating. There are no words in the English language that will convey the despair that I felt watching that man life. Leave his body and him scream out for his mother. Here. Get Justice for my city. My city has been going through a lot of pain. This is not the first second or third time you see all this other than this is what we have to do to get hurt. All over the country, people are filling the streets to protest police brutality and the death of George Floyd a black man who died in Minneapolis while a police officer. Kneel down his neck. Disturbing video of this was seen all over the world. We are all seeing so much pain and anger and outrage. In this episode I spoke with the Mayor of Atlanta. Key Chalance bottoms about how she's dealing with the crisis as a leader. As a mother of four children. All unfolding against the backdrop of a global pandemic. Most of America caught sight of her recently, she gave an incredibly powerful press conference this past Friday. We are better than Nisus. We're better than this. As a city, we are better than this as a country. Go home. Go home. Born and raised in Atlanta Mayor Bottoms was a lawyer and a judge and has been in office since two thousand eighteen. She's only the second woman ever to hold the job. Heard. There were rumors about balanced protests in Atlanta. Idea with a mother would do I. Call My son and I said. Where are you? I said I cannot protect you in black. Boys shouldn't be out today. I spoke to her about this important moment in history as black and Brown America, disproportionately face to deadly threats. Police brutality, and they global pandemic. I'm Dr. Sanjay Gupta CNN's chief medical correspondent. And this is corona virus, fact versus fiction. Thank you again. Mayor Bottoms I very much been looking forward to this. Let me just ask. How are you? Are you doing over the last few days? You know I'm doing okay. I think I'm doing as well as all of America's doing right now. It's Um. It's very stressful in exhausting time for all of us but I'm doing okay. Thank you for asking. Have you been worried for your own safety for the safety of the people that you love it all over the last few days? In s Sunday. That's a good question, the one think. Carrying heaviest on my heart right now is my eighteen year old. Because he's, he's eighteen and he very much to be in the middle of everything. That's happening. Anna I know that they're so much. That can go wrong so much that we've been watching. Go wrong across I I want to ask you a couple of questions about protests in the midst of a pandemic I mean we are truly going through something that is unchartered here. We don't know the impact that these protests will have on the pandemic itself the spread of the virus. There were some powerful moments of solidarity. Though during the protests people came together. They sang a hugged. They were walking hand in hand. Those and the images. A lot of people will see. At a time when so many people are hurting like this? Are Those moments worth suspending the physical distancing mandates. Feel. This is just this convergence of where we are. Globally like I, don't we? Any of us will see again and our lifetime. Getting a covid nineteen tests today. Because everything that we've talked about over the past two months. just became secondary or has become secondary so. I just I just hope that people will get tested and will remember that we are really. We're still in the middle of Panton. Our communities are sick in their tired. In they're dying dying from covid nineteen, dying from poverty dime from police. Brutality! We're exploding. These forces seen unseen covid. Nineteen is the one that's that's unseen. Police brutality is the one that we can say. I I. DO Wonder How how did you navigate? the policies regarding the pandemic in Atlanta specifically, which at times seemed at odds with the governor, the data for example in the state of Georgia did not show a fourteen consecutive decline, which was one of the guiding criteria for reopening things. As a elected leader. How do you? How do you balance that on Friday governor? Kim Call in as asked me. What do we need in Atlanta in what he can do to help and he's provided the assistance from the state that we've needed. And I think you know when you're in leadership it. You can't take things personally. I didn't like the decisions made about covid. Nineteen and I'm sure the governor didn't like lab response. To the decisions he made. But it didn't stop him as a leader from coming to me asking me how we could help. How the state could help in I wouldn't too prideful to go to him and say we need your help. Your the mother of four children mayor, three sons and a daughter. You're having conversations with them. I'm sure as many parents are with their children across America right now. I heard you talking about conversations. You've had with your own mother back when you were a child. Historic Times back then, and it feels like these are historic times as well all. I feel like sometimes. You don't know how historic something is at the time you're going through it. Does the gravity does the importance of what's happening right now? Has it settled in with you and your family? In terms of the conversation you're having. I asked my husband the other day at What will this moment in time be call and I don't think any of us know the answer to that. I just know it something extraordinary that we're witnessing and I said. In my remarks a couple of days ago. What we say in happening across Atlanta. We didn't see when Dr King was assassinated. And so we know that this is this. Is something different? And not only is it happening across America will now see a having the globe. And the question will be what will be the difference on the other side of this moment. Will. We continue to see the disruption and all that we've been saying over the past few days or Or will truly be a revolutionary moment, and I think about the words of Audrey lowered quite a bit. Revolution is not a one time event. Do you remember the moment when you first

Atlanta America George Floyd Minneapolis Dr. Sanjay Gupta Cnn Brown America Dr King Officer Bottoms Panton Kim Call Anna Audrey Georgia
U.S. coronavirus deaths top 100,000 as country reopens

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

03:57 min | 4 months ago

U.S. coronavirus deaths top 100,000 as country reopens

"Joining us now. Our chief medical correspondent Dr Sanjay Gupta and our chief political correspondent Dana Bash Sanjay cases of this virus. There clearly rising across the south. And there's new model predicts hospitalizations will actually take up up by mid June. Could we actually soon see certain areas of the country? Go the other direction. Shut back down. Yeah I mean I think that's a real concern wolf if you look at four of the five states that have had greater than a fifty percent increase in overall infections They're all states that have reopened early at the end of April or the beginning of May and we may be seen now the impact of that or people out more people getting exposed and more people will get sick as a result. So that. But that's GonNa be the real concern wolf which you're raising. We know there's going to be more infections as you start to reopen will surge and start to go into exponential growth in these places which would then require a possibly having to shut things down again will it keep it a sort of higher baseline level. We don't know yet but it is concerning that we're starting to see the correlation between early reopening now and this increase in infections and we do know. Sanjay that that Model that the White House coronavirus task force relies on from the University of Washington. Medical School is projecting. Yes one hundred and one thousand deaths so far over these past three months in the United States. But they're still projecting by early August and that's not very far down the road it could be more than one hundred forty thousand deaths in the United States. That's their assumption right now. That's their assumption and it constantly changes. I mean these models are tough. You know if you look at at one point that same model said there might be sixty thousand people who have died by the middle of August and obviously the number greatly surpassed. You gotta take these models with a little bit of grain of salt. I think the big question here wolf is that this isn't a bifurcated either. You're open or your shut in terms of these states Is almost like a policy issue versus a people issue. The policy is these states are reopening but if people are still being careful maintaining physical distance not having long interactions with people which is defined as around fifteen minutes Not Being in close spaces together not gathering emerged groups all those things that can make a significant difference. We now have evidence of that here in this country. There's evidence of it around the the world. So if opening doesn't mean pre March sixteenth could hopefully be a beneficial thing in terms of not letting these infections start to go into exponential growth. And these these new concerns come as the death toll clearly has now surpassed one hundred thousand one hundred one thousand right now but it took the president quite a while to make any comment at all on this very very grim and sad milestone. What does that tell you he? It's not who he is. He did eventually put out a tweet and say exactly what a president should say but it did take longer than perhaps it should have and he didn't come out and make a statement and that is kind of in keeping with the way that he and his administration but particularly he with his towards reelection or he hopes. Reelection is Doing this now. At a distance at an arm's length the time of him being on about this hour on a daily basis for sometimes ninety minutes to two hours. That seems like ancient. History now because backfired. He wanted to be a wartime president And for while he tried to do it. It didn't work Because it backfire because of this statement that he made and he never did it again but there is a middle ground and that is to be a leader let Americans here from the scientists and to not stoke cultural differences when it comes to masks and other things. But he's not dealing

United States Dr Sanjay Gupta President Trump Dana Bash Medical School University Of Washington White House
Together, We Grieve

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

03:57 min | 4 months ago

Together, We Grieve

"Yesterday. The number of people who died from covid nineteen in the United States surpassed. One hundred thousand doesn't even feel like I can say that number out loud without getting a pit in my stomach. I know you've probably heard this number by now. The please let that settle in for a minute too. Often we see numbers on the screen and we forget the real stories of people who are not here today because of this virus we have known at least for the last few weeks that this tragic milestone would come but it makes it no less painful. Everyone's going to try and contextualising comparing the tragic number of deaths to pass wars terrorist. Attacks Plane Crashes Natural Disasters But one way should not be described as is inevitable. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. Six months ago most of the world had never even heard of this novel Coronavirus Cove Nineteen. It was a virus that would change their whole lives. Some people would develop a cough a fever and then have a sudden decline. Some would require a breathing machine. Some never even made it to the hospital most dying alone because of the brutal contagious -ness of this virus family members of the sick and dying could not even be there so here we are left with memories and sadness and sinking feeling that we could have done better. And that's perhaps the most painful part of this whole thing so many of these deaths could have been prevented. We saw countries around the world afflicted with the same disease around the same time and yet heavy miniscule fraction of the infections in debts of the United States. Yes South Korea. It is one seventh the size of the United States but they have had fewer than three hundred people die total not three thousand not thirty thousand but fewer than three hundred. They didn't have a new magical therapy or a vaccine. They had nothing we didn't have. It was that they acted early. And we now know it made an exponential difference in lives saved about one in seven Americans. Now know someone who has died. I'm the corona virus. I am one of them. My friend Doctor. James T goodrich a truly gifted neurosurgeon. We first met when I was just a resident it would be a couple of decades before I got a chance to operate side by side with him during a groundbreaking operation separating the McDonnell twins little baby boy's conjoined at the head. Doctor Goodrich was considered the most experienced neurosurgeon in the world when it came to doing that operation when he died due to Covid we lost. Someone truly irreplaceable. The memory. I'll always hold onto about. Him is his smiling eyes peeking out from his surgical mask doing the thing that he loved more than anything else. So let's honor the memory of the more than one hundred thousand lives lost by committing ourselves to taking this virus. Seriously I will go ahead and just say it. It sucks what is happening. Right now is awful. Our country in the world had become infected and now we are dealing with an illness so different than any illness ever experienced by someone living today. It is a once in a century illness. And it sucks. We don't know exactly why we were stricken with this illness at this time in our collective human history but that doesn't mean we can't act. We must act. There are lessons to be learned not only from the past but from countries who battled against the same virus with greater success.

"dr sanjay" Discussed on Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

11:18 min | 4 months ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

"Our medical correspondent Dr Sanjay Gupta's at a hospital east of Baghdad. Sanjay tell us what's going on where you are. We're invite an operating room that's unusual in. That's from two thousand three when I was embedded with a group of medics during the Iraq war and still relatively new to CNN the anchor introducing me is probably a familiar voice. Many of my friend and colleague Wolf Blitzer. How are you holding up Sanjay? It's been difficult yet. These convoy rides will be you know much about Bacon. Be a very challenging bank wolf and I have both been at CNN for decades which is kind of surreal to say. We've been at the front lines of some of history's most life changing moments nine eleven. Hurricane Katrina the Bala crisis but this pandemic has had no precedent in our lifetime as host of CNN's. The Situation Room Wolf says this has been one of the most intense experiences of his career. He joins me today to talk about the challenges of covering tragedies the political is ation of facts and how he keeps going during this never ending new cycle. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. Doing Hi Sandra. My got my clorox disinfecting wipes cleaned off his microphone. This little table here. and you would be very proud wolf. Thank you I've really been looking forward to this. Let me start off by asking. How long have we have? We known each other well. I've been with CNN for thirty years. And and I think you've been with CNN West for about twenty years. Is that right? Such young two thousand and one I started so nineteen years coming up on twenty years. That's amazing I I remember. Of course the first major story you and I covered Was in February march of two thousand three just before the war with Iraq and we were both in Kuwait You and me we're recovering. Anchoring my show from Kuwait City from a hotel balcony and all of a sudden the war started and the first Scuds came in and a few of them landed about a mile or so behind where I was reporting from And we see this huge plume of smoke. Go Up And the wind was blowing towards us and I said well let. Let's wait and see where the smoke goes And the next thing I knew is Dr Sanjay Gupta our chief. Medical correspondent was in a vehicle. You were heading to that high end mall where the Scuds landed and you were wearing your gas mask and you were getting ready to report the news right. Yeah that's exactly right. I I wanted to go over there and And see at the time it made total sense. Yes I will go exactly where that big plume of. Smoke is where that missile landed in the middle of a war where there's concerns about bio weapons. It made perfect sense. In retrospect I was thinking what am I doing? Let let me let me ask you wolf about this this particular time now covering this pandemic You've covered so many stories again These wars Oklahoma City nine eleven hurricane Katrina other outbreaks. How how is this? Been different than those well. This has been At least from my personal perspective. The most deadly You know as we speak more than ninety thousand Americans have been have died and hundreds of thousands have been you know had to suffer through corona virus and and so many more around the world and these are people. These are wonderful people. These are mothers and fathers sons and daughters brothers and sisters They're younger. They're middle aged. They're older they're wonderful people. Many of them were looking For the prime of their lives spending time with their families enjoying life The economy was good and all of a sudden. It's a disaster. We've got millions and millions of people who are unemployed applying for unemployment benefits Many of them can't even apply. What's so heartbreaking to see these long food lines people waiting to just get food to put on the table to feed their kids And themselves and who would have thought this was going to happen and even something as simple as wearing a face mask you go out and you see all. These people wearing face bests You see people all over the place. Who would have thought that was going to be happening here. So this has been so so intense so riveting so scary so crazy in many respects. It's just an awful awful situation and I and I would say it's it's certainly you know the the most intense period two months that we've been doing this in all the years of my journalism that this is the most intense while. I mean that's saying something given your career and yet you do a story like this and it's it's difficult nowadays seemingly wolf to disentangle anything from from politics and the more subjective nature of the story. The opinion part of story people weighing in From a Political Lens. Do you sense that as well is is? Is it truly impossible to disentangle just about any new story from politics nowadays? Well look. There's the political story. There's a political angle to what's going on and the country is deeply divided as you know I I will say this. Sanjay the article you wrote for CNN DOT COM On Your personal thoughts and I have it right here in front of me You know that it for the for the for a moment. Think of the United States as a human body at that and people haven't read that article they should go back and look it up And the last words you wrote and I have it right here in front of me. It's they were so powerful because I truly agree and I truly believe what you said is true. You said the country and the world are facing a serious illness but it is treatable. It is fixable. Let's do this together. You're absolutely right. We're we're going through HAL right now. This is an awful awful situation and it's going to get worse as these numbers get worse and and hopefully there won't be a second wave that comes in the fall or anything like that but I totally agree it is treatable. It is fixable. Let's do this together when you think about your your your tone. I mean do you think about your your tone? When you're delivering news stories Wolf. A lot of it nowadays has been you know frightening news to give. How do you balance being hopeful for an audience and being honest I do think about my tone And I try to. You know to be as objective as I possibly can be but sometimes you know the the story is so painful you you're gonna see that you know on my face you'll hear it in my tone you'll hear my words And you know I've been trying over these days To end the situation room with some images and pictures of a real people who unfortunately passed away from the corona virus and we tell those stories who these people are because it's one thing to say ninety thousand people have died. It's another thing to say. Look at this individual. Look at this woman. Look at this man. Look at this teacher this nurse look at this This a first responder And you put the face on these people. And it's sad. It's it's heartbreaking because you think of their families and so often their families they can't even say goodbye in a hospital or they see they can't even sometimes go to a funeral To say goodbye to their father mother or whatever and You know you gotTa have some emotion when you just feel that it's it's so powerful so so awful Science reporting in some ways I feel wolf is a luxury in that we can always rely on data and science and evidence facts to bolster up our reporting There's not a lot of opinion science reporting although sometimes you do have to offer up some thoughts on things but for you. In an era where alternative facts have become a term that people become familiar with. How do you think that that is affected the reporting on this pandemic the idea that the truth and the science? That's just another avenue of information. Here's here's another avenue. You could pay attention to the most important thing we can do. And you're part of our fact checking team Sanjay's went when we hear government. People including the president makes statements do a news conference and say all sorts of things I want to come out and say well. Let's let's check what we just heard? And we'll have you We'll have John King have Daniel. Dale our chief fact. Checker will have Gloria Borger Dana Bash But we'll have doctors And in addition to you who come on and say well what he said just not true. What he said is true And I think that's a real service that CNN does provide that. We're not just listening and reporting but Ross fact checking and making sure that the viewers get an honest understanding of what's going on not just propaganda from time to time. I think it's so important. Everything gets sort of polarized and and sometimes it gets minimized inappropriately. So I really do appreciate the sort of work that you do wolf. How about you? I mean even your site in the pandemic Wolf. I think you are known to the iron man at At CNN and in the media business. In general I mean you work hard weekend. Shows Weekday shows What what was the work life balance like for you well right now. I I love working and I've been working during this during this current pandemic seven days a week. I woke up this morning. You know I got a little routine. I got on a treadmill for an hour and I watched the news on television as I'm getting a good little sweat Excited because I know that you know in the situation room gets on the air. Five o'clock I'm going to be ready to report the news as fairly and as responsibly as accurately I as I possibly can and the viewers will be grateful. And I'll be grateful that it's not as if if I took a day or offer You know or a weekend off. I could go to. A restaurant can't do that. It's not as if I could go watch my Washington nationals. Play baseball game. I can't do that. It's not as if I can you know. Go see my family down in Miami. 'cause I'm not going to get on a plane right now and I'm not going to be able to do that and whenever I used to complain to my dad about how hard I was working he would always say listens on. There are harder ways to make a living what you do so. Just go ahead and enjoy your job. That's my attitude you know. It's my attitude to despite the long days and frantic research. I've always tried to follow wolves lead. I WanNa think wolf again. Not only for his hard work but also for being a constant source of inspiration for me and everyone else at the network. If you have questions please record voice memo and email them to ask. Sanjay at CNN dot com might include them in our next podcast. We'll be back tomorrow. Thanks for listening..

Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN Wolf Blitzer Iraq Hurricane Katrina Baghdad Kuwait City clorox Oklahoma Kuwait United States Washington nationals Sandra Political Lens baseball Gloria Borger Miami John King president
When Staying Home Isn't Safe: Domestic Abuse On The Rise Due To Coronavirus

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

08:25 min | 4 months ago

When Staying Home Isn't Safe: Domestic Abuse On The Rise Due To Coronavirus

"Corona virus versus fiction is sponsored by express. Vpn We've heard stories. Where survivors are saying. My relationship with emotionally abusive became physically abusive last night. We've heard stories from women whose partners were coming home and coughing on them and telling them that they were acting them with the coronavirus. That was Katie. Ray Jones the head of the national domestic violence hotline for most of us. Staying at home has been the safest way to protect ourselves from the krona virus but for others home can be a dangerous place worrying experts about what is happening behind closed doors. So what do we really know? And what can we do to help those? Who may be isolated and afraid? I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction in the past we've seen increases in domestic violence during times of crisis and stress. We've seen spikes in two thousand and eight during the Economic Crisis James Goggle. Yano is a former. Fbi agent and CNN's law enforcement analyst. He says this pandemic is putting victims in particularly vulnerable situation. We've seen spikes during national disasters like say Hurricane Katrina Hurricane. Sandy and we've also seen it during times of the Super Bowl major sporting events and look correlation doesn't always equal causation here. But there's a lot of factors at play in one of is. These victims are trapped in a cohabitation situation with the abuser. As stay at home orders went into effect in March. Several cities across the United States reported a steep increase in domestic violence calls as compared to last year. Cities like Seattle Portland and Boston have all reported increases in calls to hotlines or reports or arrests related to domestic violence in April Chicago. City officials told CNN the Illinois domestic violence hotline saw the highest daily call volume in. Its twenty year history. Meanwhile in other parts of the country calls to domestic abuse hotlines and reports to law enforcement have stayed flat or even declined experts. Worry that victim stuck at home with their abusers may not know how to get help one group that is working to assist victims of domestic. Violence is safe horizon based in New York City. They're one of the largest victim service organizations in the country. We work with victims of all crimes and abuse and that includes family. Violence Domestic Violence Child Abuse Sexual assault human trafficking elder abuse and we help people to heal and rebuild their lives areas weighing is the CEO of safe horizon. I started by asking her what she had been hearing for. People who need help during this pandemic when nobody's supposed to be out and about the choice to leave a situation or leave home is definitely complicated by concerns about getting. The virus others can include. Let's say the victim is someone? That had not been economically dependent on the Abuser. But now they've lost their job Maybe that's an economic dependence. That has now begun. Are there particular signs of an abusive situation? If that person doesn't seem to have the freedom to go where and when they want seems to have to account for every dollar or every place they go seems to be separated from loving relationships that used to be important to them in the relationship. You may experience all of those things and also threats and then of course every form of physical violence that people experience. But if someone is hurting you physically choking US spitting on you. You absolutely have a right to seek help into not expect that that behavior is normal. I imagine that the problem has worsened during this pandemic of both intimate partner. Violence Child Abuse. But I wonder do we know for sure I mean the because the reporting of this I imagine is is part of the challenge as well right. The story reporting is complicated in the first month of the stay at home orders. Here New York calls to our hotline. Were DOWN. That's for a couple of reasons. One people just prioritizing their Their health but another is an assumption. That help wasn't available and that is tragic because help is available. Are Hotline is functioning. The national domestic violence hotline is functioning. Police are responding to calls were able to provide a tremendous range of services. Virtually and as the word has gotten out about that our calls have increased child abuses a different because those reports come from teachers who are mandated reporters and doctors. Those reports are down by seventy five percent over. The prior period is heartbreaking and tragic because the abuse cannot be down by seventy five percent. It means that teachers that would normally see something and be concerned about. It are not able to see that over revolt learning. Let me ask you though. Short of opening up. Are there other things that can be done to to address this issue specifically with child abuse? We've done research over. The years about Bystanders to child abuse people who may suspect that there's something abusive happening in a family and overwhelmingly members of the public. Say I wouldn't want to report that because I might be wrong. What if I'm wrong and it's really none of my business and my response to that is what if you're not wrong. What if you're right and so I would say if anyone listening to this? Podcast has a nagging suspicion. That child is not being treated right in their home. Find out where in your state you can call it in it. Just strikes me from a pragmatic sense that it might be challenging. If you're in an apartment you know with people and you're you're trying to see cal. But you're worried about stigma even within your own living situation or privacy concerns. What do you recommend for someone who who says I want to get help but you know frankly? I got someone listening in the next room. Try and get on the call or seek help. I recommend chat can be much more private and there are many mental health services available over chat. A large part of what we do with victims of domestic. Violence is safety planning. What can that particular person? Due TO BE SAFER WITH. Sheltering at home that's become much more complicated because safety plans often would include something like I can spend the night at my mother's if I see certain signs of behavior that are worrisome. That sort of thing may not be option now but options. That can still work for this time. Might be a code word that your child does that. If I say a certain word the child should call nine one one. It might be something lake a neighbor when I put the shade in the bathroom Or put a plant in the window. The neighbor knows that you're in distress and to keep an ear out and to call the police as you pointed out it's about giving people help. Yes first and foremost if you imagine or think about what it might be like or what. It must be like to be a child or to be an adult trapped in a situation where you feel. Fear every minute of the day and you could help that person. Think of what that would mean victims of domestic abuse faced significant challenges leaving before the pandemic but wants people to know that organizations like safe horizon.

CNN Dr Sanjay Gupta Katie Hurricane Katrina Ray Jones Elder Abuse FBI United States New York City Yano Illinois Sandy Seattle Chicago Partner
The Future of Restaurants During COVID-19

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

07:57 min | 4 months ago

The Future of Restaurants During COVID-19

"But of all the places we like to gather now shutdown by this pandemic restaurants are also some of the hardest hit so today. We're going to talk to people in the industry. The chefs the restaurant tours to find out what they're trying to do to survive for them for us for everyone. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction restaurants. Sort OF BOTTLE. The zeitgeist their community. And it's where people celebrate as not just about eating. That's David Chang. He's a chef and the founder of the momofuku group which has restaurants around the world. He's also the host of the Netflix show ugly delicious if food establishments were important. People wouldn't want it so badly. There's just somethin'. That is a connection to just being human besides tasting delicious foods. Chang calls restaurants quote cultural banks and worries about the erosion. This pandemic has had on all aspects of the dining experience. We literally take ninety percent of cash flowing. Give it back to everybody else. On top of trying to make delicious food and build organizations however small they might be no one gets in this business at least that. Iron Meyer so they can make a ton of money they do it because of the life and the positive impact you can have both on yourself and others around you and you that away that that. That's that's going to be pretty brutal closing. His restaurants in March was extremely difficult. He had to furlough around. Eight hundred workers in this week decided to close to of his restaurants reopening others. Maybe even harder. You have to reconfigure literally every decision of how you operate in a restaurant. It was hard enough to begin with. How do you taste food? How you order food. How do you sanitize now? How do you do contact with delivery? You even allowed transaction via credit cards anymore. So now you there's like all of these things now that are going to be expensive. Chang doesn't have the answers yet. But he thinks he knows what it's GonNa take. Define I just think that we're going to need some ingenuity and creativity to sort of align some mutual problems that we have in this country particularly in the food space and sort of reconfigure. How this whole works on his twitter feed. Chang has also been asking people to send him photos of reopened restaurants in cities like Taipei and Hong Kong. It's fascinating to look at them. Some of the photos show. Police Systems delivering coffee. Temperature checks at the door and customers. Even receiving full body disinfectant sprays. Don't worry with their clothes on too many. These measures may seem a little over the top. The common thread is we have to actually make impossible hap and that gives me optimism really genuinely does because these kinds of impossible tasks that sort of her. My brain are what I most attracted to. And we can't have anyone working off a different playbook everyone needs to be working the same playbook every restaurant every business in the absence of a so called restaurant playbook the National Restaurant Association which is a lobbying group is doing what it can to try and offer some guidelines for reopening obviously frequent hand washing some element of distancing some element of face covering certainly reduced interaction between the host. And the guest. That's Larry Lynch Senior Vice. President of Science and Industry at the National Restaurant Association Lynch said it's already begun. Restaurants are already testing out new methods. Everyone's looking visit different ways just this weekend. We saw one of the towns here in Florida. Closed down one of their street to the restaurant. Tours could pull the chairs out into the street. If you're used to going out as being a curated. Dining Experience Lynch describes the post pandemic world as sort of a safety focused obstacle. Course I would say what you're probably GonNa find is before you get there. You're going to look online and look what the instructions are in that particular restaurant what their expectations or. It may tell you to wait outside. May Ask you to place your order online. It may tell you that once you get outside. Send them attacks and let them know. You're outside wait once you're inside. You may wait a bit before the waiter or waitress actually comes up and greets you greeting maybe something as simple as confirming your order rather than taking your order. Once you die. You may find that your table is included as fasces. Wasn't it passed. It's going to be cleared all at once rather than sporadically during the dining experience. When you're dining probably won't see the manager come over to ask how your view was and whether or not you enjoyed yourself. Restaurants are going to have to tailor safety measures to suit their capabilities and it is possible. Not everyone can physically accommodate these recommendations for example Irene. Lee doesn't see her Boston. Restaurant may may hosting sin diners anytime soon. We're a small restaurant so we have about thirty six seats. Which means the possibility of socially distancing inside the building is basically none but Lee. Who was a finalist for this years? James Beard Rising Star Chef Award has still managed to find a silver lining. We are pretty much going to have to change our whole model which sounds scary but is also a really exciting opportunity. So how do we re imagine what a restaurant can be? Water restaurant can do what restaurant staff are capable of Lee in her employees are already starting to answer those questions. For example her restaurant may may is open for delivery and is also hosting virtual dumpling classes. The restaurant is delivering groceries to healthcare workers and selling pantry staples to the community like milk and eggs. The goal to help customers avoid the grocery store because I think supermarkets are going to feel unsafe for a lot of people for a long time and I just think like we have the ability to get almost any of those products probably at a better price at Mamie and so it would be kind of unconscionable to not try to use that to help keep people safer and to make their lives more. Convenient Lee is taking this time to rethink how a restaurant should operate. And she's hoping the industry is a whole does the same especially in the areas where it was struggling even before the pandemic. I think that this is a huge opportunity for us to keep talking about the biggest issue that our industry house which is Labor on the issue of jobs and low wages and like terrible workplace environments. That is always been the bane of this industry. I am hoping that the compensation model could be altered and cross training could become more prevalent. But that's the long term in the short term lease preoccupied with just keeping may may afloat even though she says. The survival of the restaurant isn't her biggest concern. If mamie doesn't exist in in five or ten years that's totally fine with me. I'm going to be really pissed off if there are no cool. Independently owned quirky restaurants to eat at like I cannot eat every day I refuse and so I think that for me. The question about Future is almost a little bit less important but for a lot of people in this industry is all we have one thing I've learned. Is that the restaurant. Industry is full of dedicated creative leaders and is someone who enjoys dining out. I'm optimistic. They're going to find ways to meet the challenges ahead and keep this important part of our culture alive. It's definitely GONNA be an uphill battle but I'm GonNa do what I can to support my favorite places with takeout orders and contributions to out of work employees. They could really use the help

National Restaurant Associatio David Chang LEE Mamie Dr Sanjay Gupta Netflix CNN Lynch Larry Lynch Senior Vice Founder Twitter Momofuku Group Iron Meyer James Beard Florida Police Systems Taipei Irene President Trump
Students and teachers struggle with remote education

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:57 min | 4 months ago

Students and teachers struggle with remote education

"That's Jimmy Fallon on the tonight show earlier this week. I think voicing the thoughts of so many families. The song was a nod to national teacher appreciation. Week which ends today. But you'd probably go on all year long like schools across the country. The week looked very different compared to years past instead of apples on their desks or gift cards from parents teachers might have received an Apple Emoji or some on then mo. You know why. It's because forty seven states and the district of Columbia have ordered or recommended school closures for the rest of the school year. Teachers across the country have taken their lessons online to try and weather this pandemic so today will some of these teachers struggles and successes in navigating remote learning. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. We had really try to make everything work in the virtual world and that's challenging to do because most teachers like myself we don't sign up for that. We sign up for the interaction. We sign up for the collaboration and we sign up for those human moments that you can't really replicate online. That's Chris deer. Two Thousand Twenty Louisiana teacher of the year and a finalist for the two thousand twenty national teacher of the year. I teach at Shawmut High School in Louisiana right outside of New Orleans. Dear teaches world history to seniors and AP human geography to Freshman. I didn't know what that was. He said it's sort of like anthropology inspired to teach partly because of a formative personal experience. I was in high school when Hurricane Katrina hit. I was a senior. It was our second week. It disrupted the entire region down here. I was forced to Texas. I stayed in hotels in shelters in bounced around different schools. And I missed out on a lot of big events that a lot of people look forward to their senior year sound. Familiar deer has a pretty good idea of what is current students. Probably feel. It's a time when you're supposed to be celebrating all of your hard work your dedication. Your accomplishments When your family supposed to watch you walk across that stage cheer? So it's it's a time that you'll never get to Redo and you'll never get back and it's not just a loss for dear students. Some of them will be the first in their families to graduate from high school and the ceremony would have been meaningful to the relatives as well. Dear has students who are also dreamers undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children Andy has students. They're working essential jobs while they also balance online classes. Learning Online. Might seem easy enough if you're a student with the computer or the Internet but deer also has students who didn't have the luxury of these tools so a lot of students that originally didn't have Internet when this happened. We were Distributed work in packets in just literally papers out when we were distributing food but my district personally has been a given chromebooks out to students who need them and trying to collaborate with local organizations to get hot spots to get kids connected so I think teachers all across the country are doing everything they can to get kids online and to keep that that learning going as Peron's a community school in Phoenix Arizona has also handed out chromebooks in Wi fi to some of its students. But that's not all the school is providing. I think a lot of US forget how schools are to our communities. Even if you're not a student there Hannah Wysong teaches science and English at Esperanza mostly to low income students. She has helped distribute food boxes and gift. Cards to grocery stores. But as this pandemic drags on why song in her colleagues are looking ahead. To long-term challenges families might face food is available and a lot of schools in food. Banks is. This has gone on for a couple of months and parents are not working or working less The next set that working right now is to build a fund for rental assistance. And that's just the creative problem solving. Why Song has been a part of outside the classroom after students have been set up with food and Wi fi is when her real job and the real connection begins and these teachers have come up with all kinds of new ways to do that as well something that we normally at our school? This House monthly family nights with movies are dinner or games or whatever it may be and we were really mourning the loss of family nights and we decided to do it. Virtual dance parties so we got a local Dj from a radio station. And then we invited all of the families to get on zoom there. Were I think between forty five and fifty people on between families and staff and pretty cute to see a bunch of little squares of third graders? Dancing Chris Wyckoff who teaches American history to eleventh graders? North Carolina has taken advantage of our reliance on the Internet to send his students. Some encouragement been sending out digital cards. To let them know that I still see you. I still see your work. I still see you're working hard. Wyckoff has been proud of how well his students at the Johnston County career and technical leadership academy have taken online classes after all they could easily just turned the video off and go do something else online learning you know it has its it has its good and its bad. Even depending on the type of learner you are in a lot of our students are capable of making the adjustment at home all of those the social and emotional atmosphere of home versus the social emotional atmosphere at school all of those things combined to either create atmosphere for success or failure for for the students. Chris dineen this is another. Chris said there were hiccups using video-conferencing at first we had zoom bomb the first or second date but his middle school students at Albuquerque Academy in New Mexico. Have come around. The students themselves had to adapt to a totally different style of teaching and they've actually had to become somewhat more accountable for their own behavior. Because of course we can't see them and monitor them in the ways that we normally do. Laurie Abrahams finds this challenging to. She's a special education teacher on Long Island and works with three to five year olds. Who have special needs during normal times? Work incredibly physical and requires personalized interactions with each student. These days she struggles to get her students to sit still in front of the camera. All kids do well with schedule. Especially the kids with special needs listening issues and attending issues. They really need that. They need that routine. And the you know it's very hard. It's very hard for them but like everyone else. Abrahams has come up with ways to make it work. In fact she borrowed one method of calming her students. Down from children's Yoga certification course. What I'm doing with my fingers touching my thumb to forefinger middle finger rain finger and pinkie and so you have them do that. So it's four touches and then you just say peace begins with me and they understand that peace means quiet and then we keep doing it at any time. You feel anxious or that. You need to calm down you can just you can. Just move your fingers like that. It's thoughtful it's innovative. It's what's necessary the teachers we spoke to said they've mostly worked out the kinks of remote learning and they feel optimistic about finishing the year apart from their students but in the long run. They're still not so sure. I think these kids are young enough. That if it's just four months in the scheme of along is this is not gonNa make the biggest difference because they didn't have four months of preschool. I think that in the fall if kids can't go back to school if they have to learn online. I think that's going to you know really impact this whole generation. This won't surprise you but Chris Dear Louisiana teacher whose own senior year was interrupted by Hurricane Katrina this pandemic once again highlights the need for more investment in education. I know a lot of times when the economy starts to Tank a bit. The first thing that gets cut is education and people might say well. Why do we need as much you know money for education budgets when they do things virtually and whatnot but at this time? I feel like we need more because we need more counselors. We need more. Social workers we need more therapists need smaller classes. And that's how we're going to get through this. These five teachers said the feedback. They've gotten from students and parents has mostly been positive but during the strange difficult national teacher appreciation. Week it's nice for them to hear that their efforts haven't gone unnoticed so since they can't hug their teachers in person this year we got some amazing shouts from students all over. Who want their teachers to know that their students are grateful? My Name is Dalton Davis. I am seven years old from flawless. Oregon. I want to say hi to my first grade teacher. Mrs and Mr Hello. My name is MIRA sing and I am in seventh grade. I would like to thank all of my amazing teachers. Hi My name is Leah. And I'm a fourth grader. I want to give a shot at to my awesome teacher Mr Festival. He is there every day with a smile. Hi My name is Cassie from Whittier California. And thank you to all the teachers especially my Fourth Grade Teacher Mrs Cutler and I'm Kassy's MOM Krista I also WanNa say on behalf of my fourteen year old David who has autism. We appreciate the Special Ed teachers like Mrs Gain. Thanks hi I'M AMELIA. Ham seven years old. I'm in second grade. I have the best teachers and I can't wait the virus to beautiful so I could go back to school.

Laurie Abrahams Hurricane Katrina Louisiana WI Chris Wyckoff Dr Sanjay Gupta Jimmy Fallon CNN Columbia Shawmut High School First Grade Teacher Chris Deer Thousand Twenty Louisiana Apple United States Long Island Texas Leah
The Latest on Testing

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:12 min | 4 months ago

The Latest on Testing

"When you were a kid. Did you ever make one of those pinhole cameras? Were you cut a little hole into a piece of cardboard and then look through it on some ways. That's kind of how we're looking at the corona virus nowadays through a tiny little window part of the reason. We haven't been able to get a bigger picture because this is a new corona virus and we're learning as we go along. We have also had inadequate testing across the nation so the inability to know the true extent of this outbreak becomes a major barrier in terms of getting the country back to work. We need clear vision and so far we haven't had that. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. There are currently only two types of corona virus tests available in the United States. Because I'm a healthcare worker. Who still takes care of patients in the hospital? I've had both of them. I'm GonNa give you a little poke over Uruguay. Don't okay. We're all done it. Okay early on there. Were some significant delays in testing and there was also the release of a flawed test. Which really put us far behind since then there have been a lot of unauthorized on validated tests. Which have flooded the market the most common and most accurate test we have is called a PR test. A polymerase chain reaction tests. Now that's the one that detects whether or not someone is currently infected with Kovic nineteen. It involves a saliva test in some cases or more commonly a nasal swab. Cnn's Brooke Baldwin referred to it as a brain Taylor so that gets sent off to a lab where the genetic material is extracted. And because there's such a small amount of genetic material it is then amplified. That's the polymerase chain reaction. If all goes well results usually come back within a few hours but it can take a few days if you have to send it to a lab somewhere then. There are the antibody tests. Those are the ones that can determine whether or not someone has had cove in nineteen in the past and might have some immunity to it now. Those involved collecting a small blood sample either through a needle in the vein or three blood spot sample. But here's the problem. Antibody tests have not been consistently accurate. There are a lot of bad tests out there and it's still unclear how much those antibodies might protect you from the virus in the future. When you're testing for the virus the biggest problem would be having a false negative. Why because you would think that you don't have the virus and then you might go back out into the community into a nursing home into a hospital and potentially infect people with the antibody test which you really hoping to avoid is a false positive. Then someone might feel that they have the antibodies thus feel that they are protected. Go out into the community to a hospital to a nursing home and spread the virus so with the diagnostic virus test. You really have to reduce false negatives with the antibody test you really have to reduce false positives. The promise of the immunology test to find out we have. The antibodies is huge. That's Kevin Delay on senior fellow at the University of Southern California's Schwarzenegger Institute for State in Global Policy. The institute supports test sites across Los Angeles. This can influence policymakers at the local state and federal level. That can actually inform us. When it comes to social distancing if I'm immune in scientifically I've been proven to be immune then I can re enter the workforce and I could play a bigger role and make sure we're safe for a company called Roche announced that it received emergency use authorization. Eu A for an antibody test it claims is more accurate than most Roe says. It has already started shipping. Its new test to leading labs around the world. Here's Rosillo Severin Schwan. It's really special. Because it is so accurate. It's it's almost perfect. Accuracy and allows us is to really reliably test whether a person has been infected by the corner virus or opt irrespective of whether you had symptoms or not now. There's another kind of tasks they could be useful here. It's called an antigen test again. The test for the virus is the PR or diagnostic tests. The test for the antibody is called a serology test. And now the antigen tests look for a protein on the surface of the virus. You may have already had one of these if you've ever had a test for strep throat or the flu. Here's the problem. A reliable antigen test for the corona virus isn't yet available in the United States. But the hope is that will soon have something that works kind of like an ad home pregnancy test. Were a test strip. Would change color detail if you might have the virus. Frederick Nolte is a pathology professor and the head of Corona virus testing at the Medical University of South Carolina. Antigen detection has been part of the diagnostic landscape for a number of years and it has a number of appeals. It can be done relatively quickly. it's inexpensive. It can be deployed in a number of clinical settings outside of the laboratory near the patients but the chief concern with it has been the sensitivity and they low sensitivity means a high false negative and with high false negatives people feel that they don't have the virus and they go back out in the community and potentially continue the spread so how available. Rpcr antibody tests to the general public is probably the question. I get more than any other as of Monday. Johns Hopkins University's Kovic Tracking Project was reporting over seven. Million people in the United States have been tested and they mean the diagnostic or PCR tests in this case but again the initial rollout of those tests was fraught with problems and that caused major delays in the country's early response to the pandemic. Those problems are being addressed now but there are still supply chain shortages the PR requires certain transport mediums reagents and yes nasal swabs and those things have been in short supply but just last week. The mayor of Los Angeles announced free diagnostic testing for all of the county's residents because we know the ten million residents county need that it's critical for US opening up in the future. That's Mayor Eric. Garcetti on CNN and we wanted to be the first big city in America to take the advice of doctors around the country saying you have to find the silence spreaders. This is a silent killer that people without symptoms who can spread. This are critical piece of knowledge in order to open up in the future and in New York City mayor. Bill de Blasio says the city will produce its own cove in nineteen tests kits in partnership with Three D. Printing Company. We realize we had to find another source. Global Market wasn't working. There weren't sources around this country that were reliable enough so we decided we would make our own and this has had been put together very quickly. So we're really an uncharted territory. Creating these tests kids in New York City again. It's these nasal swabs that have been in such short supply in so many places around the country. Now there are also plenty of antibody tests floating around that have not been reviewed or validated by the FDA. The agency said Monday that it was tightening. Its policy to keep unproven and even fraudulent tests from entering the market. It's been a big problem in one. Study of twelve antibody tests. Four were shown to deliver false positive results more than ten percent of the time. Remember if you're testing for. Antibodies and you get a false positive people may incorrectly. Assume they now have the antibodies and are protected and then go out into public and keep spreading. You really want to get that false positive rate under two percent as low as possible. Really the future could lie in at home. Testing Antigen tests would be the easiest to mass produce for home use but again like I said we don't yet have a reliable antigen test for Kovic Nineteen White House Corona Virus Task Force member. Dr Deborah Burke said this last month on. Nbc's Meet the press we have to have a breakthrough innovation and testing. We have to be able to detect antigen than constantly tried to detect the actual live virus or the viral particles itself and to really move into Antigen testing. If an antigen test is approved and mass produced it may serve as a valuable screening tool. But it's probably not going to replace the P. C. R. Saliva or swab tests when it comes to diagnosing Kovic nineteen the Antigen test in this case would be used to screen the PR test would still be the most accurate according to the Guardian scientists working for the US military have designed a PC test. That has the potential to detect the virus as early as twenty four hours after its contracted that could help stop infected people from spreading the virus before they even show symptoms and keep in mind. A lot of people never show symptoms but can still spread the virus. It's another promising maybe and remember this. Testing does need to go hand in hand with contact. Tracing once you find out who's infected that person needs to be isolated and then everyone who has had close contact with that person needs to be traced and sometimes those people need to be quarantined as well test trace and hopefully treat

United States Corona Virus Task Force Los Angeles CNN New York City Dr Sanjay Gupta Rosillo Severin Schwan Roche NBC Johns Hopkins University Brooke Baldwin Uruguay Bill De Blasio Dr Deborah Burke Medical University Of South Ca Guardian EU Kevin Delay
Doctors reject Trump's dangerous suggestion to use disinfectant

Mac and Gaydos

03:06 min | 5 months ago

Doctors reject Trump's dangerous suggestion to use disinfectant

"When I see the disinfectant Fort Knox in a minute four minutes and is there a way we can do something like that five injection instead of how much the cleaning because you see this in the lungs and it does a tremendous number will also be interesting to check here well that was yesterday it's called the trump teeny one part bleach one part disinfectant one tide pod can you take it with your morning coffee and it's guaranteed to cure coronavirus here's lots of things so puts hair on your head after died so the president saying that yesterday it was said to me not reckless like a lot of people say it was to me hilarious and it was stupid and silly and he showed up Saturday and it's not the end of the world but my goodness was it funny and you've got people taking it either not my way they're taking it one way or the other so you have the far left saying what well the far left is saying this is serious he really believes this the he's gonna get people killed and they're attacking you know that the far right are doing everything they can to say he didn't say that you guys he was just joking but everybody's so pending in the wind wind to fit the narrative that makes it work for them so what really happened so I mean I guess everybody's got you know their take on this and it's it's such an outlandish thing to say I'm but you know I just think it it was amusing because as soon as I heard it yesterday you know you and I looked at each other did he know it yeah he didn't really say and what some people are saying is you know what's gonna happen he was gonna happen people are actually going to do this people are gonna like people are gonna like they're gonna want some kind of pure L. drip you know going into their veins and I'll just say this if there's somebody out there that actually wants to take out trump up on this and go do it that's your problem it's not trump's problem that's your problem if you really want to listen to every single thing that he says and you want to do everything he says then you know what you're going to die you're going to die from putting some type of disinfectant inside of your body that's your problem so I'm sorry but I'm just taking this as I am amused by it and I don't need to put like a doctor on every five seconds like CNN and they're saying do you think this doctor do you think that this is is something that could end up harming people do you think that do you think maybe that could could happen do you think so let's ask Anderson Cooper and Dr Sanjay Gupta bleach and other disinfectants used to kill viruses on surfaces in your kitchen doing anything with that internally it's just doctors what we make and they also said it you know it needs to be studied actually it doesn't we know the answer to this one and there's a lot of things out there that we don't know the answers to we need to investigate but the idea that we would do a trial of some sort and inject some people with disinfectant and some people not then see what happens I think everybody would know that that would be

Fort Knox
Chris Cuomo on Covid-19 Recovery

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

05:44 min | 5 months ago

Chris Cuomo on Covid-19 Recovery

"I tested positive scare. Yes as you might imagine. So let's focus. Let's use this example of me having as proof that you can get it to God forbid we do everything we can to avoid being sick. We have to do it for ourselves. Families are for those on the front lines. Were saving lives of people like me and many of you if you couldn't tell by now that CNN anchor. Chris Cuomo Kristen. I have been friends for a long time and last month. He was diagnosed with cove in nineteen and ever since then. He has been broadcasting as nightly show from his basement. It took weeks but he was eventually cleared to emerge from self isolation. It's been a journey for Chris. No doubt and we've been discussing that journey a lot on his show and on our own like a lot of people. I was worried about him even giving him some advice as a doctor and a friend. Dr Sanjay Gupta. Our chief is back. My brother North Star for many of us are during this time. You were right when you told me that. I would see a different side of this once. The virus took root Chris a warrior. But you're allowed to take a day off. You know we love you. We think about you and it's okay to take a day off totally right. You gotTa Take Care of yourself. I you can't take care of anybody else. Since his initial diagnosis Chris's wife Christina. And his son. Mario have also been diagnosed with Kovic nineteen. Now that he's through the worst of it I wanted to catch up and ask him about his experience with the virus and also find out how he and his family are now doing. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. Let me ask you about you. What what are your days like nowadays you know. Tell me everything. When when are you waking up? What are you doing? How do you spend your time? Well it's changing. This has been a transformative event for me. I've never been knocked at my ass like this before headline disease. I was diagnosed with. Ptsd they put me on the pediatric doses select. So you don't have to work through a wire was having these dreams and all that stuff but nothing like this. You know a shivering mess for days where I was forced to be isolated and take stock in a way that I never had in my adult life so I went from doing nothing all day except preparing to do that. One Hour of television after which I be sweaty mess and fall down on the couch and basically lay there for like six hours and then get into some weird sleep cycle now. I am in the recovery phase which I didn't know existed and I am trying to be highly structured so I wake up early. I write and I read. Then I'm trying to start upping my activity curve. I can do very little exercise if I do too much. I heat up and I start to get a wave of almost like kind of a mild nausea and now that I don't have to be isolated. I'm waking the kids up in the morning for school Doing Breakfast Christina is needs to sleep it hits her hard at night her symptoms. She gets really bad. Sinus pressure at night and there are no great answers and I am still warm and they say I may be four weeks but I have a little bit more energy. Feel about forty eight percent myself. I can see you. Obviously the people who are listening to this. Podcast cannot but you you look a lot better. I mean we talk a Lot. I see you a lot You know obviously just via screen like this but You better one thing I do want to say. Is that when we first talked about this about you? Having a positive result on that on that test I gotTa tell you I was. I was worried in in in these. Aren't things that I told you while you were still dealing with this because I was modulating myself even so the conversation I'm having with you now is a different conversation? Because I've been reading stories about young people who had really no pre existing illness or anything and them getting really sick. Chris and even dying now. Am I going to share that with you on television? You know as you're dealing with this no I'm not now. I don't think that that's not being honest. I think it's it's it's modulating how I present things a little bit but I gotTa tell you I was. I was worried about you and there were times when you had these declines in your in your nights were terrible and your pulse symmetry your oxygenation was a little lower than I would have liked and I knew that you couldn't necessarily get to the hospital right away so I was worried and I guess the question is were you. Did you ever think that this was going to go sideways you I? There's so much of an unknown right and what You keep. Relying on is perspective that it's not supposed to be. It's not supposed to be me. I was having those funky dreams. A Lotta people have and I take a lot of comfort in new coverted community the I got patched into through this of people. It's so comforting Sanjay. When somebody's had the same that you had the commiseration things real you know. You got those crazy shakes. You Bruges leg yet. You know banging your legs into each other. Yeah I got that Bruce.

Chris Cuomo Kristen Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN Christina Nausea Mario Bruges Coverted Bruce
Testing "critical" amid concern of virus second wave

Dana Loesch

00:18 sec | 5 months ago

Testing "critical" amid concern of virus second wave

"Forward health experts warned that there may be a second wave of the virus headed our way Dr Sanjay Gupta says that there's a concern that it might show up during the next flu season are they gonna be enough hospital beds are they gonna be enough ventilators is going to be enough P. P. no more than forty five thousand people in the U. S. have died from the virus that's according to the Johns Hopkins

Dr Sanjay Gupta P. P. Johns Hopkins FLU
More deaths, no benefit from malaria drug in VA virus study

Mitch Albom

00:28 sec | 5 months ago

More deaths, no benefit from malaria drug in VA virus study

"The malaria drug widely touted by president trump for treating the new corona virus show no benefit in a large analysis of its use in U. S. veterans hospitals medical correspondent Dr Sanjay Gupta says other nature's nations that have studied hydroxyl clerk when haven't given the drug positive reviews seems similar data now out of Brazil are France and out of Sweden where in Sweden they actually reckon they gave guidance to the entire country's hospitals to stop using this

Donald Trump Dr Sanjay Gupta Brazil France Sweden Malaria President Trump U. S.
Malaria Drug Helps Coronavirus Patients Improve, in Small Study

Ben Shapiro

03:00 min | 6 months ago

Malaria Drug Helps Coronavirus Patients Improve, in Small Study

"We're starting to see some promise shown in various drugs that are being used to treat corona virus in your times reported that the malaria drug the president trump had been promoting hydroxy chloroquine not detecting cleaner you idiots hydroxy chloroquine and that that is actually been effective according to The New York Times no Larry address address the floor clean up to speed the recovery of a small number of patients mildly ill from the coronavirus according to doctors in China William Shatner infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt that is going to spend it send a ripple of excitement out through the trading community that's what it was small and limited to patients were mildly or moderately ill not severe cases but we're starting to see some evidence emerge Dr oz actually talk about this and he said yeah that we're seeing some we're seeing some news that the hydroxy floor cleaners is actually effective all the patients had the mall near when they started over the course of the five day treatment with the hydrochloric when a fifty five percent of the control population where they just got to normal therapy there's that wasn't resolved the resolution of the pneumonia eighty one percent of the patients on that record when there was improvement in the logs images in addition and that was small those by the way I everything I've said is that physically significant even at sixty two patients despite being small they still got the measures that we like to see that is very good news Dr Sanjay Gupta of course comments over at CNN is their chief medical correspondent he just would rather still unproven treatments for cover nineteen a number of trials are in the works we don't know if any of them will show effectiveness against the novel coronavirus here if you might have heard of these I dropped the floor clean and clear clean these related drugs are used to treat conditions like malaria and autoimmune diseases there's limited evidence partially from studies on human cells it could have anti viral effects when I process is being that they could make it harder for coronavirus enter human cells thank you said the evidence isn't there history should make us cautious in the past chloroquine showed promise in vitro against influenza but ultimately can prevent infection in humans he says the danger isn't just false hope we see shortages of these drugs which people need for unrelated conditions now as you read this severe which is one of a number of anti viral treatments doctors are looking into now they work by blocking the virus ability to replicate says this was developed by Gilead sciences previously Gilead sciences previously tested against people and mirrors it is not been approved as a treatment yes other anti retroviral drugs are also being tested like a combination of HIV drugs a randomized trial published this month found they did not improve seriously ill patients compared to standard care alone and then there's convalescent plasma which is taking a component of blood from people very recovered and hoping that their antibodies could mitigate the effects and people were exposed or infected he said we tested this with the ball up to get this up and running we need to ramp up antibody testing a blood test different from the nasal swab we've been hearing about he says the list isn't exhaustive nothing has been proven to work so far he says right now again don't rely on all this but we're we're seeing some promising treatments but we just don't have enough evidence to say that this is definitely the the be all end all at this

Before the coronavirus, Bill Gates sounded alarm on pandemic preparedness

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:21 min | 6 months ago

Before the coronavirus, Bill Gates sounded alarm on pandemic preparedness

"If anything kills over ten million people in the next few decades it's most likely to be a highly infectious virus rather than a war not missiles but microbes Microsoft founder Bill Gates five years ago. In two thousand fifteen. He gave a popular Ted talk where he warned that. The greatest risk of a global catastrophe wouldn't come from nuclear war it would come from a highly infectious virus. I spoke to Bill Gates on Thursday night during CNN. Townhall on the corona virus together with my friend and colleague Anderson Cooper Bill Gates and his wife. Melinda have already given hundred million dollars toward global efforts to control Kovic nineteen through their bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Today I wanNA share with you some of the highlights from our conversation. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent this is corona virus fact versus fiction. Bill Gates has called for more investment in epidemic preparedness around the world and he started on Thursday night by telling us that the United States has not done nearly enough to prepare for the situation. We're in now when you don't know the problem will come around. Sometimes people prepare like we prepare for war with war games and putting lots of money into that but sadly we'd gone long enough without a disease here in the United States that even though we had a bowl and Zeka SARS not much happened the countries that really were affected by SARS actually are the ones that have done the best in this epidemic because they acted when the number of cases were still very very small. So so bill when you when you give a talk like he didn't two thousand fifteen. You see what's happening now I mean. Could you have foreseen the rest of this sort of response? The lack of infrastructure the lack of resources no apparent strategy really out of the gate has that part of it. Surprise you given that. I mean you were sounding the alarm five years ago. One one of the things I call for. Isn't that the same way we do? War Games on a regular basis. And we say okay. We're not ready to deal with Surprises I called for us to do germ games and look at okay. Who would talk to the private sector? Who would make sure that testing capacity was raised? Who would make sure that the right people are being rested in or not somebody without symptoms getting tested daily rather medical personnel. Who have symptoms? Who really need to know. And so I wouldn't have predicted exactly how slow and how somewhat chaotic. The response has been. But if we'd done those simulations we would have seen some of these laws in the system and you know behaved a little bit like the countries that have have done the best on this one. What stage do you think? The pandemic is in right now in the United States and globally and I guess what people are Home WanNa know. How close are we to a peak here in the US? Well the good news. Is that China? Did there Shut down and they did it in a very serious way and after a six week period of a shutdown that it's more extreme than even the best states in the United States are likely to do they were able to start opening up again and the total number of cases there is very very small. So that's very good news. We're entering a tough period. That if we do it right will only have to do it once per six to ten weeks but we have to do it has to be the whole country we have to raise the level of testing the prioritization of that testing quite dramatically in order to make sure we go through one shutdown so that we take the medical problem and really stop it before. There's a large number of deaths. We do then get an economic problem. Which is why you want to minimize the amount of time and having states go at different things or thinking you can do it county by County. That will not work. The cases will be exponentially growing anywhere. You don't have a serious shutdown in many states there. There's less than than two hundred cases right now. You're saying even in those states the same kind of shutdown needs to occur. Well let's say you have one hundred cases and let's say you don't do a shutdown. Then it grows thirty three percent per day. If you take one hundred thousand and get ten thousand it's exponential growth. If you're not stopping the sooner you in engage in the shutdown the easier it is to get to that peak we have. We have not peaked. The parts of the country. That aren't shut down by the in late April. We should start to see the numbers peak. There they'll still be to hide. Open UP SEAL. Probably have to go another month to really get those numbers down but any part of the country that has cases and truthfully because of our problems with testing because we're not prioritizing testing the right way that a lot of those places actually do have cases but even if they have one hundred that will grow and people do. Cross county boundaries and so basically the whole country needs to do what was done in the part of China where they had these infections. I don't WANNA be political in any way but just in terms of for folks who are out there you know and looking forward. I always think it's better to know. Just factually what's coming down the Pike Than You know then. It's good to have hopes and aspirations. But it's good to know what's actually coming down the pike for people who are believing or imagining that in middle of April or early April people are able to gather together and churches for celebrate for Easter celebrations. Or go back to work in a regular way. It sounds like you're saying you don't believe that's realistic. No it's not realistic. The numbers are still going up. That only happens after the numbers have Pekan are going down a lot and getting down when absolute level. You know there are some good things happening. The work on a vaccine although that probably will take eighteen months out it's going full speed ahead. Our Foundation is funding. That we're looking at getting back scenes to everyone in the world so in the in the long run that is the key thing. We had a really positive result. That people were wondering. Did you have to have a medical person swab you in this way that they stuck it deep in your nose? We were able to prove which on on Monday the FDA made official that if you do a self test where you don't have to have the medical work with personal protection equipment. That self test is accurate as the one where the medical worker gift set. So that means that by self swabbing. We'll be able to get a lot more test on and only limited by the back end capacity. So there's you know there's good news coming one of the therapeutics although none of them are proven out. But they're quite a few. We have a things that foundation created called therapeutics accelerator to really look at thousands of compounds and make sure we focused the human trials on the ones that have the most promise so you know innovation which some of which we could have done in advance but innovation really is happening. But you know when you look at those numbers the US now. With the most cases there is state that has gotten to the point where their numbers are flat and are going down and the testing capacity is means. We're quite blind to a lot of these cases right now so it it. It can be done but we're not. The light is not at the end of the tunnel. In terms of a mid April reopening with this you know Dr Fouled. Things have been very clear that this is a year eighteen months. Whatever that it will take before people could actually get this vaccine are there are there and I and I and I I know that he's he's right about that. But I'm just wondering from a technological standpoint. Are there ways to speed this up using genetically modified virus or anything to to expedite the process? Well for the next pandemic we should be able to make diagnostics very quickly like hundreds of millions within two months we should be able to scale up antiviral drugs from a much bigger library within like six months and by beam ready with. This aren't a platform we should be able to make vaccines and more like a year than a year and a half and so we can and I think governments this time probably will pay attention. to Making those investments or the next one you know. The one of the biggest open questions is therapeutics. Can we very quickly Find antiviral drug. That really means number people. Go on the respirator is much lower and cuts that death rate. Quite a bit. It's tough enough in the US with the put a lot of money into our health system. If you think about this is you get to India. Nigeria and the the even poor countries in Africa. Just imagine what the overloads can look like. They're and yet they won't be able to do the that isolation and so you know we we is. We've gotten the disease down with a low infection rate. We'll have to be not letting people go to those countries or come from those countries hardly at all. It'll be very strict in terms of how that testing is done. So the sooner we solve this on a global basis the sooner we can go back to the world economy. That actually was very

United States Bill Gates China CNN Dr Sanjay Gupta Melinda Gates Foundation Microsoft Anderson Cooper Melinda TED Kovic Founder Nigeria India Africa FDA Dr Fouled Pekan
Emotional Turbulence and Resilience:  Coping and Staying Sober During the Pandemic.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

09:47 min | 6 months ago

Emotional Turbulence and Resilience: Coping and Staying Sober During the Pandemic.

"It is Wednesday march sixteenth. And as most of you out there will know by the time. This podcast comes out on Monday. Which will be the goodness twenty-third that we are in the midst of a really big world crisis. I'm talking to you from the US. But the corona virus is now everywhere in the world and most of us are reckoning still. It's Wednesday for me Monday for you but still very much reckoning with the emotions of all of this. Last Friday I left my gym. It was Friday the thirteenth and people were still talking about how they were going to deal with the kids coming home from school our gym owner was talking about how he was going to put together a summer camp for these kids by Saturday. I have a dear friend by the way bless her soul she is moving tomorrow in the midst of this so hopefully she'll be safe and hunkered down in her new home by the time she listens to this so I went over to her house on Saturday and I had already decided that I needed to stay. Four to six feet away from her and her children and it was so hard and that was last. Saturday I'm talking to you today on Wednesday and by the way I'm probably getting emotional throughout this podcast because this morning I woke up and I was scared I was overwhelmed and I just had to put my biggest girl pants on and get things ready for this podcast so I went over to her house and we sat around chatting for probably only about an hour. Maybe an hour and a half with her and her two kids and it just struck me while. I was sitting there with the thought in mind that I was still trying to protect my clients. I am open on Sundays so I see a couple of clients in person on Sunday and only one was gonna stay home and we were going to do it via video and the other one still on Saturday I was GonNa meet them in person as I was sitting there trying to be upbeat while I was still feeling pretty upbeat and we were talking about. What the pandemic means for all of us. The kids were really engaged. And it dawned on me that this may be it for a while that this kind of engagement might be our new normal for a while unfortunately again. That was Saturday the fourteenth by later that afternoon after watching more news reports I had decided to switch all of my in person sessions with clients to online and I scheduled to additional calls with clients who just called in said. I needed to talk. Okay so then we get to Monday and Tuesday in our group text from the gym is like. Oh everybody's going. Why shouldn't you go one person's flying off to Michigan from Georgia to see their mother in law with their teenage child and I came to my knees on Tuesday. I'm trying to figure out with all of us online and the groups that we have on facebook for my profession counseling. What we're going to do. Many people don't have an online practices I do. We're sharing back and forth and people were thinking that they could work out the week. Seen people in person and I know many of them are still doing that Wednesday. Today as I record you know there was a lot of clear information but a side effect of the time that I spent in the northern Virginia area and DC area is that. I'm a news junkie and I listened. I listened to Dr Sanjay Gupta and Dr Anthony Fauci and many many others and then I listened to our president on Tuesday. Who's tone shifted nearly a hundred and eighty degrees? And I realized this is going to be big in our lifetimes in our children's lifetimes and who that was just yesterday so after talking with friends last night and you know doing what everybody else is doing watching on news and do my own research and then falling into bed as early as I could around midnight last night. I got up at four. Am this morning with Falana anxiety. I decided I was going to get in the shower. I was going to shave my fifty five year old woman who lives alone legs and put on a really good show for you in. Come and give you the best information I could about how to stay sober in how to stay mentally well and then I dropped to my knees and cried. I just bawled which I'm prone to do every now and then now that I'm sober. I used to do a lot more of it when I wasn't but I realized that I needed to come on. Be With you today to share my emotions to share. How scared I am. And yet how hopeful I am and to share with you as I always do at least a few tips and ways that not only I but other people are prioritizing getting through this really whack a doodle time I want to say that to the best of my ability I am working with every person who is calling into me and my established clients financially to keep support it during this time. This is going to be different than anything that we've ever done and I am seeing to you. If you need help reach out I am waving my rates. I'm reducing my rates. I'm letting people pay full price if they can. I am doing what I can to assist people with knocking too overwhelmed myself. So if you need help. Mental wellness support recovery support reach out. Lots of people are offering free programs. Do REACH OUT. Ask people go on facebook even if you haven't yet at all get out there and fill your buffer zone with stuff. Put more tools in your toolbox just so you have things to rely on. Because we don't know how long this is GonNa last. I've come up with an acronym. Give you right off the bat. Because of course the world needs especially at this time other acronym but here goes. I don't like him either but they're really useful. It's called calm. Sea STANDS FOR CLARITY. A stands for acceptance Alston's for learn and M stands for movement at this time. Everything is really Eerie Weird. Like nobody's moving in my apartment complex. There's this eerie silence around us. At least I feel a heaviness in the air so what I want and by the way. This is my damn word for two thousand twenty. I want clarity. I WanNa know what is expected of me. I WanNa be clear on what my goals are. Here what my needs are and I want to understand my most basic way. Forward clarity around information that you're getting stop with the junk. Goto SOURCES LIKE CORONA VIRUS DOT. Gov Seek Out. Cable stations in news outlets. That are really reputable. Turn to the channel that you don't normally listen to to get the flip side. I'm begging you to do this. And after you spend a limited time doing this very important to acknowledge that we must limit our intake of this information. But I want you to get some really good information for you in your family members so that you can make some decisions the next step after that is acceptance it will go a lot smoother if we you me. Remember that we're GONNA have to wake up daily and we're GONNA have to move through our days hourly accepting that this is what is happening right now. The many people even today who are out there not believing that this is going to affect them that they don't have a social responsibility to you and me that I don't have a social responsibility to you are going to get a really stiff uppercut to the jaw. If they haven't by the time this podcast comes out. It's not going to take on

Facebook United States Dr Sanjay Gupta Virginia Dr Anthony Fauci Alston President Trump Michigan Georgia
"dr sanjay" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

04:15 min | 9 months ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"With Dr Sanjay Gupta I've been reporting on the concussion crisis in high school sports for years I think most people have really come to understand that this is serious stuff I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN's chief medical correspondent not too long ago people used to refer to concussions as getting your bell rung but today we're calling concussions what they really are dramatic brain injuries a new study out of you and see Chapel Hill find the boys football no surprise is the high school sport with the highest concussion followed by girls soccer and then boys ice hockey that's the best news out of this report though is that record concussions are down now one of the study's author said that he thinks that speaks to the fact that we now have legislation every state that says you've got to pull a kid out of a sport when a concussion is suspected and that child cannot return to play until being cleared by a physician I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta helping you live a better life okay I just got another glaring.

Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN Chapel Hill football soccer
"dr sanjay" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on KGO 810

"Hundred thirty. Dr Sanjay Gupta. vitamins or supplements Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN's chief medical correspondent here in the United States more than half of the don't say they take some sort of vitamin or dietary supplement but according to a recent study at a West Virginia University it might not always be getting what you pay for the researchers did find it'll make it three fatty acids could reduce your risk of heart attack in coronary artery disease folic acid also reduce the risk of stroke but taking folic acid and vitamin D. together made strokes more likely beyond that supplements really had no significant effect on mortality or cardiovascular disease outcomes except to prevent or correct specific deficiencies or in specific circumstances such as pregnancy one expert told us there is generally good agreement that dietary supplements should not be recommended to the general population so save you money I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta helping you live a better life. super big problems on part we're gonna check in with heather now take a look at what the issues are and how one that might be in place. four PM as come and gone in the bar situation lingers on from the Tilton auto body traffic does double in Pleasanton and Pittsburgh bay point trains are single tracking through the station other trains are turning around it is problematic for folks trying to get to SFO if you can get to a Civic Center station you can ride bart to the airport that way unity and AC transit is eggs are accepting bart tickets at this time there's a three and all the lanes with an injury accident for Santa Rosa north one one of highway twelve the right lane is blocked by one of the cars over to the East Bay to accidents for north six eighty one is near stone valley road it's on the shoulder and in the slow lane there's one in Concord at north six eighty before willow pass north bound seventeen near Bascom Avenue an S. U. V. driver was reported to be texting and hit the wall is not causing northbound slowdowns but southbound is heavy south to a before more park there is an accident in the two left lanes and out of San Francisco north one one stamp from just north of two eighty to the bay bridge traffic sponsored by cache creek so let the good times spent every Saturday and Sunday from five till nine PM you can win a brand new Lexus are up to twenty five thousand dollars cash let the good times spent only a cache creek casino resort through October twenty seventh visit crash creek dot com for details and if your arm gets tired and starts to ache spin and all those wheels turned blue emu blooming Alaina came cream and blooming maximum arthritis cream both.

Dr Sanjay Gupta Dr Sanjay Gupta. bay bridge Pittsburgh bay point East Bay United States CNN West Virginia University Lexus Concord San Francisco Tilton Santa Rosa Pleasanton Civic Center Alaina twenty five thousand dollars
"dr sanjay" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"With Dr Sanjay Gupta. they say what's good for the heart is good for the brain. so the opposite must be true as well right I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN's chief medical correspondent people who are diagnosed with coronary heart disease are more likely to have trouble with cognitive decline later in life according to a new study published in the journal of the American college of cardiology wonder all just we asked about the research said we are now seeing more issues related to cognitive function from heart disease as more people are living longer and also undergoing more hurt procedures and placed on medications so how exactly does cardio vascular disease affect the brain well it could impact small vessels there for disrupting the flow of oxygen to parts of the brain and the link between the two could stem from common risk factors that start earlier in life such as obesity diabetes and high blood pressure I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta helping you live a better life. Tambaram as who is the DNC chairman says and I quote socialism makes a capitalism work. socialism.

Dr Sanjay Gupta Dr Sanjay Gupta. journal of the American colleg CNN Tambaram DNC chairman
"dr sanjay" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on KGO 810

"With Dr Sanjay Gupta. they say what's good for the heart is good for the brain. so the opposite must be true as well right I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN's chief medical correspondent people who are diagnosed with coronary heart disease are more likely to have trouble with cognitive decline later in life according to a new study published in the journal of the American college of cardiology wonder all just we asked about the research said we are now seeing more issues related to cognitive function from heart disease as more people are living longer and also undergoing more hurt procedures and placed on medications so how exactly does cardio vascular disease affect the brain well it could impact small vessels there for disrupting the flow of oxygen to parts of the brain and the link between the two could stem from common risk factors that start earlier in life such as obesity diabetes and high blood pressure I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta helping you live a better life. call now. John this is the John Batchelor show Shanghai August two thousand in a short time ago the last presidential election but in this case what's important is to watch a color Erreway life land in Peshawar Pakistan the gateway to the. tribal so. order like that is that much in this. the last ten eleven years of war against the al Qaeda and Taliban monsters that plague Afghanistan.

Dr Sanjay Gupta Dr Sanjay Gupta. John Batchelor journal of the American colleg CNN Taliban Afghanistan Shanghai John Erreway ten eleven years
"dr sanjay" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"With Dr Sanjay Gupta are you a morning person or more of a night out Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN's chief medical correspondent new research out of the U. K. finds women who like to rise with the sun have a lower incidence of breast cancer in women who prefer to stay up late the study also found sleeping more than the recommended seventy eight hours a night was linked to an increased risk of breast cancer as well now one of the researchers said it's important to note that these data do not necessarily suggest that modifying sleep habits could actually lead to a decrease in the risk of breast cancer what they suggest is it appears at the risk of breast cancer is associated with the genetic trait that in and of itself is associate the morning or night preference so what are the most important risk factors that you can control your weight how much you exercise and not drinking too much alcohol and don't forget your mammograms I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta helping you live a better life on Westwood One podcast network I had an incredibly naive view of what his addiction was like I thought oh well he's going to re and he's getting out like that means he's fine he's checked in everything's fine this is the last day a new podcast from women on a media about the things that are killing us and I'm your host stuff anyone else wax first top listen and subscribe to lasting wherever you get your podcasts visit.

Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN seventy eight hours
"dr sanjay" Discussed on Deepak Chopra’s Infinite Potential

Deepak Chopra’s Infinite Potential

13:24 min | 1 year ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on Deepak Chopra’s Infinite Potential

"Amazing. Three pounds of meat with no identity of its own. And yet it conjures up everything including yourself. Hold that thought and tried to picture a green actually holding it while we take a moment. This sort of infinite potential is brought to you by parachute sleep is one of the biggest secrets to a long and healthy life. So having the right sheets that make you feel happy and comfortable can go a long way. That's why parachute uses only the highest quality materials like hundred percent long staple Egyptian cotton and pure European flax to make their sheets. Plus, they never use harmful chemicals are toxic synthetics. So you can feel good about using the natural linens in your home. Parachute makes very comfortable. Home essentials like sheets pillows robes towels and all things soft and wonderful. I have enjoyed my own parachute. Cheats, very much visit parachute home dot com slash infinite for free shipping. And returns on parachutes premium quality, comfortable home, essentials that Spanish shoot home dot com slash infinite for free shipping and returns on Berisha's premium quality, comfortable home essentials. They offer a ninety day trial. So if you don't love your new stuff just ended back. Good health starts with a great night's sleep. I'm talking with Dr Sanjay Gupta about the brain. And the mind maybe it's long experience as a TV journalist, but that kind of get the feeling that he's interviewing me. Is their free will pre will as dominated philosophical discourse thousands of years, and nobody still agrees on that. And I've struggled with it or not so soon as you're born your parents told you you're of Indian origin, but you're American your mail. Okay. This is your background. This is your identity, and then for the rest of your life, you reinforce that conditioned mind based on cultural history based on all kinds of history. You know, you're you're basically a product of culture religion of economics of race of migratory habits through eons of time. But if you become self aware, and you can observe your mind and realized. That I'm the observer of the mind. Now, you can choose consciously. And that's where the Indian traditions biz DM are very valuable because they have a word for this. They call it freedom, Malaysia in sunscreen, which means freedom and the freedom of is from the prison of your own conditioning, which is also loosely coiled Kerma. So karma, the condition mine that is very predictable. Very predictable. You meet somebody on the street. You say, you're you're idiot. Your asshole you see the blood pressure rise. You said no, you're the best person in the world. But you see a different response. So you're at the mercy of every stranger on the street. So that is how malleable consciousnesses, but it has to still work to the human Bain. So right now, I can imagine my brain having this experience with you right now and our frontal cortex being activated. But I also imagine the frontal cortex people were listening to us wherever they are. So we right now are influencing the frontal cortex of not only each other. But everybody else across the world who's listening? If we are all such individuals with all of our own background and history and all the things that make us your lated unique. What would explain? Mm them based on the theory. You know, this this curtain may not be it's not blue. It's these photons are activating certain parts of what would make it that we have such shared experiences. What is the likelihood that you, and I would both look at this and describe it in the same way. If it's all basically, just a individualized perception. Of of what's happening in our case. It's the hypnosis of social conditioning using human nervous system. This is not a shared experience for pirates of birds or honeybees honeybee goes to grow comes back to the Kaif. And does a few seconds of what is called a wagon dance and all the other anyways. No executive go to get their Honey for that flavor. What is that language the Wagle dance? It's beyond my comprehension. Okay. What is the world that honeybees experiencing is beyond my knowing our shared experience is a result of the hypnosis of recycled conditioning. And now, it's a reality as humans, not what is the advantage of knowing this once I get rid of all constructs and undescended magical lies then. I have the freedom now to create new constructs. Do you think that the hard question about consciousness can never be answered? How can you answer something where where the basis upon interpreting it this potentially faulty we never know what realities wound ino- what perceptions of reality? And these are human perceptions is is their reality only as potential that's including this series. I set you up. There is a reality. There is a reality. That reality is the consciousness with conjures up every possible experience. We've now come up with the idea that there are two trillion galaxies. That us seven hundred sixty million stars uncountable trillions of planets that are little planet is a speck of dust in an infinite reality that if you looked at planet earth as a grain of sand and all the beaches of the would be an exaggeration. Then you look at human beings on top of that. Then you're not even visible of there. And yet, you can conjure up all these contracts. I always feel I mean, this honest feel so good when I talk to, you know, despite the fact that you tell me that I'm smaller than a grain of sand, and that my entire life has been one of conditioned responses. Totally predictable devoid of free will. What am I doing here? What is my life mean? This is the big question who am I? What am I doing? What is the purpose of if what do I want? When you start to ask these questions. It opens the window to a different reality. If the premises that, I'm I'm very small and as hard as I may try to step outside of my own mind to observe it to make myself, not someone just full of conditioned responses. What is the mean, though, what difference? Does it make a huge difference? Because all the things that we're doing right now to a wood. In a war terrorism EKO destruction extinction of species climate change internet hacking. This is all coming from the condition. So if I could step back and say, if this is all the condition main that is no risking human extinction and life on this earth. Can I step back and create collectively and identity that is based on relationship and inseparability of all existence? What people feel when they feel love is an actual experience. Right. And that's inseparability. So what is love? It's just seeing yourself in another person. What is beauty seeing yourself in object. This coffee Cup is beautiful when you realized it's a perceptual creativity in the same way as your body the body and this coffee Cup and the brain they go together, but they are actually me. Hi, I'm experiencing brain body mind and Cup all as a unified activity within myself, and this me is not physical. So don't have to worry. Whether it's going to be born or dying. I don't feel like I think about it very much. And I've thought about not thinking about it death. That is at some point everybody thinks about when you grow when news facing debt or somebody dies in your family or somebody gets terminal illness. You will think about it. You know, I was six years old living in Bombay now called Mumbai with my grandfather. My father was a cardiologists training in England and one day. We gotta telegram from England that my father had boss all his exams. He was a member of Royal College of another big deal. Those. Issur cardiologists. My grandfather was so excited. He was an oil massage and took us to the rooftop. Fired some rounds from his rifle into the sky, and he took us to movie anew baba and the forty and any to to carnival and then in the middle of the night. You must have been so excited. He died. So the next thing I know is he's being taken to the commission grants. And what I knew my grandfather who took us to the movies the day before is knowing the bottle and a bunch of ashes which could be up my fist and an uncle of mine said so what is life yesterday was taking the kids to this carnival? And today's a bunch of ashes that triggered in six years old, my quest for what Israel since we sort of understand this at a fairly young age that as much as we'd like to believe no matter what we are going to die one day. That is a certainty. Right. Yes. I mean, no one thinks I'm not going to die. I mean when you get older and age, or if you're dealing with some sort of illness, you're thinking about probably nonstop. But it it struck me. I thought maybe I was unusual that I didn't. Think about it. Really? I you know, it wasn't and it's a protective respond. So I'm protect protecting myself. And if you were thinking about it all the time, you would be living in exile. So is it different for you every night at practice conscious debt? And this is what I do. I sit in my bed. I start with what is existence, and I'm not being metaphysical about it existence is anything that exists right now. Okay. This hind exists. This body exists this furniture exist. This color exists like. Then what I do is that close mice. No Sunday, one aspect of existence has gone. What am I experiencing with my eyes closed? If I pay attention to it. I'm experiencing sensations. Sounds and thoughts. That's it. And then if I should my attention from sound only into sensation, that's all expenses sensation. If my ex shift my tension from what is having this experience of sensation. I come to the conclusion I am. So right now, my experience of existence is only sound and Titian talk. As I slip into the dream state. And then into the deep state all of that discipline. But I am still without having an experience. In deep sleep is the mystery of existence.

England Berisha Dr Sanjay Gupta Malaysia Titian executive Bain Kaif Israel Kerma Royal College baba Bombay Mumbai six years
"dr sanjay" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on 790 KABC

"In moderation. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta, helping you live a better life. So Wayne you wanted to ask him, and it was about Pretty Woman. Yeah. We've heard so much about Seinfeld. And Pretty Woman was such a big moment in terms of your career. And how that another accident? I had done a show on Broadway that I wanna Tony for Jerome Robins. Broadway and rob Reiner. Rob Reiner came to see it. He knew Gary he was still married to penny at the time. He knew Gary was looking to cast this thing. And he said I saw a guy that might be right for you. So I went and auditioned for Gary and Gary said after that show, you're right for anything. I said, and Gary said, you could do it be good. And and then he was not going to cast me. He didn't want me thought. I was too young to small to babyfaced. And he he had his eye on another actor, and they couldn't make a deal on it got down to. I mean, they were shooting the movie, and they didn't have this actor yet and the script was much rougher around the edges than the actual movie that Gary made. And there was a concern that I was so much smaller than Richard Gere that when it came to the fight scene, which is supposed to be a really brutal seeing that it would look he was beating up a dwarf. It was it was a Disney made film. They're very sensitive about dwarves and how they're treated. Little people. So somehow, the casting director got me the Richards got me in a room with Richard. And they put telephone books on the floor that I stood on. And I did a scene with Richard that they? And then Richard became he went to Gary, and what this is the guy. KABC dependable traffic.

Gary rob Reiner Richard Gere Dr Sanjay Gupta Wayne Seinfeld Broadway Disney Jerome Robins Tony director
"dr sanjay" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"dr sanjay" Discussed on KGO 810

"Better life with Dr Sanjay Gupta. What if I told you body fat in one particular area of your body was linked to smaller brain size. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. CNN's chief medical correspondent. It's true. Green to a new British study carrying more fat around your middle is associated with less gray matter in your brain, gray, matter depth, that place where you're thinking processing and memory takes place. And there's even another reason why this is also important the author of this new report says it's because he's shown associations between green matter atrophy and the risk of developing dementia causing effect is not entirely clear does dementia caused green matter to wither away or vice versa. Nevertheless, the researchers takeaway is that if there are any traditional factors directly causing obesity, these same nutritional factors could be impacting brain volume staying in shape. Good for your body and your mind. I'm back to Sanjay Gupta, helping you Live Aid better life. This is the story of a very special woman. In a matter of seconds. She turned herself into a great mathematician or an entrepreneur her knowledge was limitless instill is she could also make monsters disappear. Especially those that lurked in the shadows. Under the bed. This woman put back together a teenage girls broken heart, which had been shattered in a thousand pieces just by giving her a bear hug. She masqueraded as a regular person at work. But as a superhero at home. Everyone knows her as Gabriella, I still call her mom. Your hero needs.

Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN obesity Gabriella