32 Burst results for "Dr Sam"

Dr. Sam Pappas Explains His Integrative Holistic Approach With People

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:50 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Sam Pappas Explains His Integrative Holistic Approach With People

"Different kind of medicine. And the first time I met you, we sat down, we spoke for hours, about all kinds of things, but it was a holistic approach that didn't say, okay, what's the one thing you're suffering from now oh here's a pill go off and see if it works. Can you explain what form of mets in that is? And why you think it's what we all should be practicing? Well, I like to say I kind of take the best of traditional academic allopathic medicine with health and wellness and an interest in the why. Allopathic means what? It means a traditional medicine where you're looking at diseases and asylum. You have a heart problem. You're attacking a problem one by one. Yeah, exactly. Kind of like a disease. But then also looking at this terminology called integrative, wellness, holistic, we're kind of asks, you know, what's the why of the problem? And I try to bring in my unique interest in biographies and people and I believe that each person is worthy of a personalized unique relationship. I think the doctor patient relationship is therapeutic in and of itself. Which is why I want to know how many books you've read on Odysseus as you told me. And of course in history and your goals and your interests. And also, your lifestyle, because you could have a proclivity to diabetes, or you could have issues with insulin and maybe it's a function of how much sleep you get. Which aren't usually questions. I think this medicine and your suppress that phenomena, but what if it's a lifestyle issue? So you actually, in a nice way, you interrogate your patients to see, okay, what are the many factors that could impinge upon this one thing we're seeing in, for example, you do extensive

Mets Diabetes
Dr. Sam Pappas: We've Learned Natural Immunity & New Treatments Work

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:48 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Sam Pappas: We've Learned Natural Immunity & New Treatments Work

"So now we have multiple vaccines. Now we have France's Collins and others saying, yes, there are issues of heart inflammation, myocarditis. We have gone much further than what you helped me with originally, which is hydroxychloroquine, the Z pack, then Ivermectin came along now. We have the new nova, the new vaccine that's still under testing. Novavax. So tell us about what we have learned in just the last few months about COVID and the way to treat it. Well, we've learned that natural immunity is fantastic. We kind of knew that already, but it's been proven now multiple multiple times, but still not acknowledged, so we know natural immunity is a great place to be in a safety net. We know that many, many more treatments are out there and as the variants have gotten weaker and the new variant omicron and I want to listeners to know that's how you pronounce it. It's omicron. Yeah, not Omni cron. So you know, I had a trachea. I actually found that the British, I went and I checked with the 83 year old Professor of anatomy at Stanford from the UK and it is tricky and not in America. But in the original, real English, it's tricky. That's an intro from the last excellent. You do your homework. So we've learned that with the new variants that the treatments are much more effective that less people are getting hospitalized and having serious complications. It's a milder version. And attacking mostly the upper, which is less dangerous. Once it goes into the lower into the alveoli, that's really dangerous, especially for the elderly. Exactly. But I'm a little different than a lot of my peers who are for early treatment. Many of them say, well, only if you're 50 or above, and my take is, this can have a chronic component to it,

Heart Inflammation Novavax Myocarditis Omni Cron Collins France Stanford UK America
Dr. Sam Pappas: The Science Community Has Shown to Be Inhumane

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:11 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Sam Pappas: The Science Community Has Shown to Be Inhumane

"You came in here to discuss your COVID action plan, we're going to talk about the update that I've just received from your lovely colleague Tamara. Let's begin it right there. As a medical professional as a scientist, how dangerous is it for one individual to say, I represent science and I mustn't be questioned. It just reminds me of what the Greeks said about hubris, right? And it's been 90 seconds and he's already brought up the Greeks. That you beat your record. That's impressive. That's good. But you're right. This is the definition of hubris. And you know, you and I talk about the humanities and education and I believe in the noble critique from within, but the science community has really shown to be anti humane. Right. And to think that one person or one organization has all the answers, I mean, many, many of my colleagues are really scratching their heads now. And people in my small circle of healthcare providers and super moms, we saw this ahead of the curve, but now the group has been enlarging and many people are seeing these

Tamara
"dr sam" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

05:09 min | 3 months ago

"dr sam" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"It's literally led to more than 30 iterations of at least two of my products. Yeah, it's a good thing my manufacturers are very patient. I think many would not be so patient. Yeah, it doesn't want to stay in an emulsion. So that's a tricky one, but when you get it to work, it just people become quite evangelical about it. It just transforms skin. And it's transformed my skin. I'm a tendency to redness and am very breakout prone. And I wouldn't be without it in my morning routine. So yeah, that's another good thing I guess to say is when can you use it morning and evening? I have it in a formula that I use in the evening trek and niacinamide. Yes. So you can use azelaic acid twice a day quite comfortably and as I say, that's how the range is built so that it's in both my morning products and my evening products. So there's no photosensitivity with it. It tends to play quite well with other ingredients as well. So yeah, you can happily use it twice a day or once a day whatever suits. Now I was going to watch about vitamin C, but let's do antioxidants as a general rule. Do you have any favorites? I use vitamin C every day. I know that majority of people I know who are in the skin care and the beauty industry use an antioxidant or vitamin C and swear by it as being one of the I mean really, the three ingredients that people are evangelical about. I know it has extended a bit more recently, but it's retinol vitamin C and hyaluronic acid in terms of things that actually work is that in line with that thinking. I mean, if I was to create a hierarchy, I would probably put retinoids above vitamin C, especially in context of the breakout prone lady who wants to minimize sun damage. Just because retinoids, I mean, they really are the gold standard. We should compare everything else too. Because they go inside skin cells and change the way they function. There's really no facet of your skin, I think that retinoids don't influence. They turn on more than a hundred genes. They are super impactful. So they normalize keratinization, which is why they help keep pores on cloth. They are literally the first thing you should be putting in place if you have acne unless you're pregnant. They improve cell turnover so you get lovely improvement in texture and general luminosity. And they switch on the little powerhouse cells, the fibroblasts in the dermis. That means they increase output of collagen elastin and hyaluronic acid. So all that kind of youthful stuff that sits in the domus and gives our skin its structure and thickness. So for me, retinoids are if you don't have a retinoid in your routine one, don't you? Is kind of the way I view it. There is one for everyone pretty much. So yeah, whenever you think of that and all the properties it has. I mean, as a way of acid comes a close second for me, vitamin C is a little bit lower down in the list just because, you know, it's helping with assembly of collagen, so that's good for firmness. It's an antioxidant, which means it's great at preventing sun damage of the future. It's reasonably effective in hyperpigmentation, but it's not got the wow factor. And I can literally tell somebody walking in the door or three months after they've been using a retinoid. They look like a different person. It is the word transformative really applies with retinoids. Vitamin C is like a nice thing to have. It's a nice thing. So is it okay, so it's a great antioxidant, but do you have others that are favorites? Because I mean, you know what it's like, we get press releases every day for things and there's some sort of seed that's an antioxidant that people say is more potent than vitamin C or something here about how a pomegranate has more vitamin C than 50 oranges. And that's where I think it gets very, very confusing. Do you have a preferred antioxidant or is it always a vitamin C? So it's important to realize that vitamins a B and C all have antioxidant properties in addition to these other kind of cellular effects. So I definitely think vitamin C if we're looking purely for an antioxidant to add into the mix above and beyond azelaic acid and retinoids, then that would be where I would go to in somebody who's more focused perhaps on the premature aging side of things. And it's great because practically it's quite gentle. It has some anti inflammatory properties too. So you can use it around the eyes and on the neck, which are areas that you often want to really focus in on because they're thinner skin and they're prone to wrinkling first. And then of course it's about choosing your formula. So if you're very sensitive, sometimes you'll struggle with the most effective form of vitamin C, which is L ascorbic acid to sometimes when you'll have to think about using one of the vitamin C esters. You know, there's a whole price sensitivity thing around vitamin C some of them are quite expensive. So it really is about finding the right ingredient with the right functionality for your budget to some extent. But as I say, I think it's less important than some of the other ingredients. Certainly in terms of trying to solve a problem listeners need to know that tabby has just tried no, not a tabby, a Ginger Tom was just trying to.

Ginger Tom
"dr sam" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

06:06 min | 3 months ago

"dr sam" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"So I think we're probably not seeing much more disease outside of the kind of mask maskne type flare ups, which we definitely are seeing to some extent, but not as much as we're going to say, 12 months ago. But I think it's the interpretation because we're all seeing it ourselves on the screen for more than I think anybody should, frankly, I've just turned off myself you. I was wondering why I was like, you know what I'm getting too much feedback here. And oh yes, it's me. I don't need to see that. But yeah, so I think that's it. We're doing a lot of reassuring that things aren't as bad as people think they are. You know, that whole thing is scrolling and literally doing a comparative judgment every single thing you scroll through on social media has definitely fed into people's tendency to pick themselves apart and focus on negatives. But yeah, break out some of the masks because they say, I think that's just going to be an ongoing thing, but people are getting better at managing it. Certainly. Our toolkit has changed a little bit. I think in context of a mask and having inflammatory skin issues, the importance of barriers support has really kind of come out for me in the last 12 months. You really do have to make skin isn't getting dry and flaky underneath the mask. I think that single thing, which is a bit counterintuitive when your breakout prone people are often a bit moisturizer phobic, you know, they've had experiences in the past of using heavier creams and breaking out as a consequence. So really doing that piece around re-education actually barrier support is your friend isn't going to make matters worse. And something like niacinamide is a really fantastic ingredient because it's anti inflammatory, but it also boosts barrier function. So yeah, I remember quite passionate about that as an ingredient hence it's in a lot of our products, but yeah, it really does help calm things down and give people that sense of control because there's nothing worse than peeling your mask off at the end of the day. Particularly if you're somebody who's working in the frontline in the hospitals and just feeling really crap about your skin, you know? What is going on when you get mask me? Because I guess if you just thinking about it without being a cosmetic dermatologist, you might think, oh, it's just the greenhouse effect. It's just getting very warm and there's no air to it. So everything's getting congested. Is that the deal? Yeah, I mean, if it's a combination of humidity, so it's like tropical acne. And there's a friction element as well. So there is a degree of chafing. And I mean, we see that a lot. We see people who do cycling for a living. They get acne and the strap of their helmet. So if you irritate the skin enough, eventually that promotes clogging of the pores and then the whole acne process ensues. So it's humidity, plus friction under the mask was the tea kind of main differences. And if you're already acne prone, that can just it's a bit like going on holidays, just tropical environment. Anybody's acne prone knows that could just be such a red flag for your skin. So it's about getting the right material in the mask. Sort of softer silks are definitely kinder than cottons. Having brakes where you can. And as I say, generously supporting the barriers so that you can then use active products alongside that to actually manage the problems. So retinoids and anti inflammatory ingredients like salicylic acid are still super important as laic acid these kind of things. But you need to support the barrier so you can actually use them and not get irritated by them. What about? And this is just a very personal question, but say you love wearing a beanie. And yet when you take it on your winter walks on the weekend, you like wearing a beanie, but around your hairline, you're getting these little bubbles of what feel like little spots. Can you do anything about those? Can you put BHA on afterwards or yeah, absolutely. I mean, that's the same thing. A little bit of occlusion is just triggering clogged pores and mild breakouts. And if you're doing it persistently, you can see how that builds up over time. So yeah, I think preemptive action, something like neutralizing gel is really great because it's quite kind the base is consciously moisturizing. We use 5% square lean in there. So I think it can be soothing as the same time as being anti inflammatory and calming down the bumps. Nice. Okay, so let's go through your favorite ingredients. And what it is exactly about them that works and why you use some time and time again. So I guess let's start with azelaic acid. Let's start with the eggs. So I think I was one of the first people to start talking about azoic acid like 8, 9 years ago. I always knew that when I finally did my range, I wanted it to be a really central ingredient. I think even as a sort of a doctor in the hospital scenario, I don't think we really learn how effective it could be. So it's just such a versatile ingredient. We use it in melasma for hyperpigmentation. We use it in acne, both in terms of treatment and prevention because it's anti inflammatory, antibacterial, and it helps keep pores on clubs, so it's my go to if you're pregnant with acne. It's really safe. Safe for use in both pregnancy and if you're nursing and it tackles most of those kind of key points in the acne pathway. And it's great for redness too. So it literally does just about everything. So we use it on prescription for rosacea sufferers. But even if you're just somebody with a tendency to redness in the skin and maybe you're fair and maybe you have some little patches of pigmentation. And maybe you've got a few pimples in your chin. That's kind of like the perfect person because it's going to tackle pretty much all those kind of problems in one easy step. It's a challenge to formulate though. I'm not going to lie. It's literally led to more than 30 iterations of at least two of my products. Yeah, it's a good thing my manufacturers are very patient. I think many would not be so patient. Yeah, it doesn't want to stay in an emulsion. So that's a tricky one,.

acne rosacea
"dr sam" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

05:20 min | 3 months ago

"dr sam" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"They really rely on you for quotes that you are seen as a really top tier expert in terms of if they're writing an article about skin and skin care and skin issues. You are top of the list for people to go to. Oh, that's so nice to hear. I mean, I've had a long-standing relationship with Sarah. I think I helped her with her skin some years ago now and, you know, I think that's it. At the time I was setting up my practice, I really welcomed those kind of relationships. I was working with quite a lot of other brands at the time and I did some TV for a while. And that just created a kind of feeling about the practice that maybe were a little bit different in the way we approach things. So I like to think that a lot of journalists are now friends and they know that I'll give them the kind of copy that just translates these understand to bob it kind of, I guess, doesn't use too much jargon and makes everything quite clear. But yeah, I love working with the beauty press. I mean, there's so many ways that my job has kind of gone. I just feel so fortunate that I get to do all the things that I wanted to and my job as is so varied now influencers, social media, making products and the clinic. And it all kind of feeds together nicely to create this kind of I don't know or relatability, I suppose. And you have a very good-looking brand. It has to be said. It's a very nice looking, but you have very good taste. You do have very good style, I think. Back at you. I mean, it's not so really important to me. You know, my first word was literally shoe. And I've been fashion obsessed. I think skin was this beauty as I could make medicine and there was some hard years at the beginning getting my medical physicians training certificate and all the rest of it. But you know, it's quite funny how the path took a long time, but it finally ends up exactly I think where I was supposed to be. So yeah, but yeah, things looking sleek, minimal elegant. And also the fact that the brand is quite unisex as well. It's not pink and gold. I just think that in the end of the day, we have quite a lot of customers here at guys as well. So it's nice that we've done a nice packaging, but it hasn't boxed us in. Yes. Okay, so I know that one of the things that you get asked about a lot and I know that it's something that I think a lot of listeners deal with, is the fact that they are beginning to tackle the signs of aging or they are noticing signs of aging on their skin and they want to be using skin care that will minimize those telltale signs. Oh, I've lost you, but I'm going to carry on. You're there. But also, they may be experiencing this other thing at the same time, which is about acne. And I guess the one would think that the treatment for one might not work for the other, the two in unison just are not a great bedfellows, but you actually have this approach for dealing with both at the same time, don't you? So I think what's interesting is that when you look at the ingredients that actually have a proper evidence base behind them. There's only a handful really that make a big difference in skin. And I guess my toolkit for solving both the kind of premature aging scenario in context of being acne prone has been honed over ten years plus in private practice. So when I created the range, essentially what I was doing was producing a more accessible lower potency version of what I do in the clinic every single day and structuring it in the same way so every patient that comes to see me gets a little plan where they literally have it all spelled out. So there's no guesswork. The cleanser, the moisturizer, how much do you use when to use it? Don't do that. It's definitely don't do that. So there's a lot of red pen involved with, I guess, my approach. But it really is the way to capture behavior and get people to be consistent and diligent and bearing in mind that when you're solving problems like breakouts, there is at least a 6 week lag before things really start to work. So you really have to build that trust and belief, which is very easy, of course, and I go to patients sitting in front of me by giving them a really kind of structured plan, a bit like a really good physio or a personal trainer will do for you. So it's like, how can I build that belief system into an over the counter offering? You know, when I haven't got somebody sitting in front of me and they might be attracted to something sparkly and new that they see on Instagram. So that's the real reason why I kept the brands direct to consumer because that way they have to go to the website to buy it. And then they kind of can't avoid the video content around each of the products so they kind of get that feeling that I'm kind of walking them through it. And if you complete our routine finder tool, you actually get a little routine again, it tells you exactly what to use and how much and how often. In a way that becomes really easy to follow. And I think that's what makes the difference. The right ingredients in the right products but use the right way. And lots of education around what your true milestones should be. Like anything that promises to solve breakouts and hours or days or even weeks. If probably not telling you the truth, given that icy clinic patients and I'm using prescription grade stuff and it takes three to 6 months..

Sarah bob acne Instagram
"dr sam" Discussed on Health Babes Podcast

Health Babes Podcast

05:05 min | 3 months ago

"dr sam" Discussed on Health Babes Podcast

"Welcome, Sam, we're so happy to have you. Thanks, crystal. I'm so excited to be here. Yes, yes. So why don't we get started with you kind of introducing us to how you got involved with working in psychology? Like what inspired me to become a psychologist? I think that's a fun story, actually. So this was many, many months ago, maybe almost 20 years ago. I started my own therapy for the first time in my early 20s. And it was with a man, and pretty soon into our work one day, he said, so what's the plan? And I was like, I don't know, what you're talking about. What do you mean? And he said, you know, your life, the plan? And I was like, no one's ever asked me that, right? And I had no idea, but it's like as soon as he asked this knowing opened up in me and I was like, I think I want to do what you do. And it was a complete shock to me. And he said, okay, great. So you're going to need to start applying to grad schools right away. Start the process. It was this very beautiful paternal energy that just sort of oriented me to this frame of like, what are you going to do with your life? You're 22 years old. You've got to sort of get on it. So that was my journey. That's how it began. And then I went to school and got my PhD and here I am leaving that world behind. Yes, yes. So can you talk a little bit about you talk a lot and I love your Instagram page, by the way. It's great. You share a lot of awesome information, but you talk so much about how the first 5 years of our life makes such an impact. Can you dive into that a little bit? Yeah, and this is where I'm really grateful for my background in psychology is we learn a lot about the stages of childhood psychological development..

Sam
The Most Egregious Politicization of Health Policy in US History

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:30 min | 8 months ago

The Most Egregious Politicization of Health Policy in US History

"Let's talk about the therapeutics that made my covert experience the mildest case of the flu. I've ever had thanks to my doctor. Dr sam pappas on hydroxy December last i had three days of the sniffles felt a little bit tired and that was my experience. Not only that. I don't know why you left it out of your by but it says euros an officer in the. Us army reserve medical costs. God bless you doctor barky for everything you do and are doing to get the truth out there. Let me just start right at the beginning to the mirror. In twenty five years of practice serving your fellow man have you ever ever seen such an egregious politicization of health policy in our nation. Doctor never dr gorka at and it really makes me sad to say this. But some of our healthcare agencies like the fda the cdc unfortunately were realizing now have been captured by industry. And what i mean by that is the funding from the fda in the cdc about fifty percent come from the organizations that their charter to oversee. So the fda used to be entirely funded by taxpayer dollars as it should be and the fda is supposed to work for the american people to keep them safe to oversee pharmaceutical companies including vaccine companies. But now they're funded by the industry in the end the groups they are supposed to be overseeing and

Dr Sam Pappas Dr Gorka FDA FLU Us Army CDC
Dr. Sam Pappas on Health Censorship During COVID-19

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:36 min | 10 months ago

Dr. Sam Pappas on Health Censorship During COVID-19

"Censorship about our health. It's my first time my twenty plus years that a pharmacist would say. I don't agree with that treatment. All refuse as i've been told right. I refuse to fill out a legal prescription some politician. A governor doesn't like the incumbent in the white house for some other reason shortly that's against everything your profession stands for exactly and it's you know we are as we said the fog of war and i think one of the points. That gentleman mentioned that because important is the flu. We thought we had conquered it. But the reality is we were labeling flu patients as kovic. Yes and it's important now in this future fall and winter flu season because shimin for flu is differentiated for kobe. So for example like the steroids would not help. Fluid help cohen. Yeah so patients who weren't doing well in the hospital. So are we going to be taught by adversity. As the greek side had it again or are we gonna learn slick or we gonna laugh at that and he looks to me right now. We're learning the wrong lessons. I with with the audience. God bless you and what you your whole team tomorrow and everybody else is doing. It's time to be honest about these things we're talking to. Sam pappas follow him. Check out his amazing covert. Newsletter pappas health dot com the action. Plan pappas health dot com and we updated. Bet you did for the For your listeners do that. We had good fabulous

FLU White House Cohen Sam Pappas Plan Pappas Pappas
Dr. Sam Pappas on Post COVID-19 Exposure Prophylaxis

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:26 min | 10 months ago

Dr. Sam Pappas on Post COVID-19 Exposure Prophylaxis

"Well. Quick example. a patient of mine. Who's in her forties. I'd her husband. Why don't know is in his forties have teenage son. He came in with a cold. Attorney was covert. The husband got vaccinated. It seemed like because work had said he should get yup. She did not. She didn't think she needed it which was fine. She says what. Can i do out. I read about post exposure prophylaxis My son is doing great. It's like a cold. And i said you can take some therapeutic ivermectin you after exposed from coming down with it as them mexican after the fact exactly zik right her husband. Ironically the vaccine dacoven now. Fortunately he did well and you know you have done worse if he didn't right but that's an example of she says you know i've read this and she's the supermom and i'm gonna take ivermectin As i was mentioning before the monoclonal antibody regular ron has a research paper. They just did that. Said you know supposedly giving an iv shot of this monocle body. We now have an under the arm shot. We can give in the house if someone's been exposed so we have multiple options. What i did originally on your advice. Hydroxy chloroquine worked for me. After i caught the corona virus. I'd three three days of a little bit tired. Little bit of sniffles. That's it now. We have ivermectin. We have z pack. We have

ZIK RON
Addison George, From Naperville Central High School, on Mask Mandates

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:55 min | 10 months ago

Addison George, From Naperville Central High School, on Mask Mandates

"Central in april. I got the co vaccine. As soon as i was eligible even though i already had kobe last year and i knew i wasn't at high risk of getting it again. I did this. I could be free from all restrictions placed on me over the past year. I did it because all the adults. My life told me it would help those more vulnerable. They told me. I could finally live my life again without masks without quarantines and without remote school. I've done everything the adults have asked me to do. And now you want me to wear a mask again for eight hours every day at school. Who am i really protecting by wearing a piece of cloth. Every single student and teacher in naperville central is eligible for the vaccine. Every single person can make their own decision and about what risks. They're willing to take an. I should be allowed to do the same for myself. You might think it's no big deal. Where mask all day but for me. It is a big deal so this young girl. Who did everything she was told to do. And now they've moved the goalposts they want her as vaccinated young girl to wear masks eight hours day in school and so number one their health consequences for these kinds of policies not just psychological ones and you call it the figures to me from dr maccari. Who's johns hopkins darkens. Yes so. I've used his figures that a stunning the mortality rate for children in america who catch cove. It isn't one percent isn't half a percent. it is zero point. Zero five zero point zero five and these young kids are being told moscow up. Then you've talked about this myocarditis the inflammation of the heart which can be caused by some of the vaccines. You're seeing in children. The average rate normal rate for this inflammation

Kobe Naperville Dr Maccari America Moscow
Sebastian Gorka and Dr. Sam Pappas Discuss the COVID-19 Delta Variant

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:24 min | 10 months ago

Sebastian Gorka and Dr. Sam Pappas Discuss the COVID-19 Delta Variant

"So we know it's treatable but probably spreads more. So what i have heard. And tell me if i'm wrong because you are here to correct me. It's not some new super scary deadlier variant. But for some reason it's easier to transmit and sometimes you may not even know if you're carrying it. Is that sound right. So generally viruses historically have always try to get into the host so they often are less lethal but more transmittable. And i like to say that you know infectivity equally valid and we know from uk for example that the mortality rates delta very inter- much less than the alpha variant the original virus So that goods shoe so we shouldn't be more scared of it right on the other hand productively as you know. My feeling is covert worthy of treatment. We don't know why but some people have chronic symptoms My concern is our people who are vaccinated. Gonna get this And have chronic symptoms and think. They're you know foolproof and don't have to worry about it so can i stop you there for a second. 'cause this is one of the most disturbing things that i experience of. Somebody's hand covert. Now thank the good lord. I knew you you'd prep to me. Intimately on hydroxy chloroquine on z pack

UK
Famed Criminal Attorney F. Lee Bailey, Dead at 87

Joe Pags

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Famed Criminal Attorney F. Lee Bailey, Dead at 87

"The U. S. Famed defense attorney F. Lee Bailey has died. The 87 year old rose to national fame defending some notorious names, including O. J. Simpson, Dr Sam Sheppard, Patty Hearst and the Boston Strangler. He died at his home in Georgia. Bailey was disbarred in the early two thousands over its handling of shares

F. Lee Bailey Dr Sam Sheppard U. O. J. Simpson Patty Hearst Boston Strangler Bailey Georgia
Celebrity Attorney F. Lee Bailey Dead at 87

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Celebrity Attorney F. Lee Bailey Dead at 87

"Celebrity attorney F. Lee Bailey has died at the age of eighty seven according to one of his law associates I marquees are loaded with the latest Ashley Bailey made his name winning an acquittal for the second murder trial of Dr Sam Sheppard Bailey's other high profile clients included heiress Patricia Hearst the alleged Boston strangler and former NFL star OJ Simpson one of the memorable moments of Simpson's nineteen ninety five trial was Bailey cross examining Los Angeles police detective mark Fuhrman about racism anyone who comes to this court and quotes you as using that word in dealing with African Americans would be a liar would they not detective yes they would all of them correct all of them Billy was disbarred in two states for his handling of stock owned by a convicted drug smuggler really won the right to practice law in Maine in twenty thirteen

F. Lee Bailey Ashley Bailey Dr Sam Sheppard Bailey Patricia Hearst Bailey Cross Mark Fuhrman Oj Simpson Simpson NFL Boston Los Angeles Billy Maine
"dr sam" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"dr sam" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"And De paul Coordination with that. And i wish we had time to get into their relationship. Because what are you doing with this professional. Who's developing programs in hospitals and With the crazy actor like de paul. But that's gonna have to another time. Remember it takes one to know one I agree i agree. You know there's so much we get into. But you know. I'm dr sam and also i should mention if you listen to this on the radio if you just go to church hurts and bought or you can see where you can get this on podcast. And and if podcast if you would just click on that subscribe button. A great way is just hit the forward and send it to a friend Text or email We would love to have more of you involved and hopefully the show touched some people in your lives. But dr sam i want to get a little personal because You know i haven't gone through. You know everything you've done in that and that's tempting that's your resume but Your resume doesn't list one of the things that's most important to you and it's fresh Would you mind telling me a little bit about your last year's with your wonderful wife Certainly i was married. Eight sixty two years was a great marriage and the last eight years was a steady decline from parkinson's syndrome down to lewy body dementia and Obviously losing the faculty of memory progressively until she passed away in december of two thousand and nineteen had tremendous family of caregivers assisted an and i prayed fervently and often for miracle. I don't know how many times this and and it didn't happen and something happened to me. I didn't naveh word for it. Until recently i read lee strobel book on on miracle and the word relinquishment that came to me I was able to enjoy her singing. Almost to the end Things courses like. Did anybody tell you. I love you today. Do you do know that. Paul and her often sang together. Blessed assurance deeply. You want to pick it up. All i just was wondering if john remembers that little ditty that anybody tell you i love you today. Did anybody tell you. I love you today. God loves you. I love you and that's how it should be. God loves you. And i love you and that solid should be god loves you and i love you and that song i it should be. Put me on your list. Let me be the first. I love you today and arlene. Love that song. She sang it right to the end even when she had tremendous cognitive disobey. We're still praying for you. Because i know it is fresh and You know let me. Just wrap up this If you've listened to this show for very long you know. I like to drag in here. People i've run across in life. Who have stories worth listening to. We've had a lot of old friends and family and clergy and academics. Dr sam and bi-polar new friends and unlikely duo navigating life from very different professions psychologists and an actor..

Paul de paul De paul today sam first Eight sixty two years john arlene last year one nineteen last eight years december of two thousand dr sam lee strobel dementia God parkinson
"dr sam" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"dr sam" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Funny ad doc. I wanted to introduce dr sam. And just tell you dr sam if you keep your volume down a little bit That might be a little the feedback. We're getting but would you de paul. Explain who dr. Sam mayhew is well succinctly. That's difficult but i'll say just a couple of quick things. One first of all knocked. Sam may you and we like to call him. Dr sam Is indeed a dear friend. A dear friend. Dr sam is a world class therapist psychologist. He founded integrated behavioral health. And that just been extraordinary. The impact of healing really around the nation in the world. and because. That's what sam is. Sam sam comes into areas of people's lives who are broken and is a healer and restore I think thirdly the most important thing is salmon forgive me just speaking so transparently. But sam's a lover of jesus christ is great man of faith and That's meant more to me than anything. Well got to admit You know i am new to meeting you guys and i'm already you know. I suspect we're gonna be friends for a long time. But dr sam. You really your resume. We can't get into it but it's really a professional lifetime in the world of psychology in creating things in hospitals and companies and just really impressive stuff but after a lifetime of success in many ways in your field. Why did you find it worth your time. Actually write a book about a king who lives some twenty eight hundred years ago in the middle east. Well over my practice. I'd seeing the best in the worst of human conditions And as i finished my practice and wrote a book With deep calls assistance about an individual. That i met in manhattan where i put a clinic. Inches the lambs ministries out there. And i got to know this person who had been through almost all of the traumas and sins and catastrophes a psychotic psychotic reactions that he'd had very paranoid. I and i saw him recover from a life of of that. And as deep palmira looking at writing the next book we wondered. Could we take a look at a dialogue. With.

jesus christ twenty eight hundred years ago manhattan de paul Sam One dr sam Dr Sam sam first thirdly dr. dr palmira quick sam
The astrophysicist and immunologist who've dropped everything for COVID19 - Science Interrupted Part 2

Science Friction

09:22 min | 2 years ago

The astrophysicist and immunologist who've dropped everything for COVID19 - Science Interrupted Part 2

"So most of what I did was a combination of data software and statistics. This is astrophysicist. Dr Sam Hinton from the University of Queensland in January Hey submitted his PhD so I worked on Supernova cosmology and that's essentially taking exploding stars somewhere in the universe and using that to figure out how far away they and once you figure out how far away something is and how bright it is you can try and map out the history of the universe. Obviously things that are further away are further back in time because it takes time to get to us so the idea was if we can map out the last fourteen billion years of the universe ended expansion that hopefully we can try and characterize the nature of dark energy and dark Meta. That's my main eight right and obviously that's a problem. That's all about modeling and Statistics. So I created Asian hierarchical models and other sorts of models try and encapsulate all the nitty gritty details. That happened in the universe. In some statistically robust way so just a little way project just a tiny one that managed to consume years of my life. And whether that's because I just wasn't smart enough or whether it turns out that the Hamid actually really is complicated. Well I have opinions on both if only I was smarter. And if only the universe was simpler okay so taking on the entire history of the entire universe right there. So how is this? Astrophysicist and software engineer now suddenly found himself working on another big but totally different problem. The cove nineteen pandemic today on the show too young scientists who have had to rapidly retrofit and translate talents in an unprecedented moment in history. Sam Foreign doesn't shy away from a challenge. If he's name sounds familiar to you. That means you might be a fan of this stamp. Tonight's GonNa play out that I wanted to crunch the numbers for this other man to do it. There's computer I don't know if he's going to go hunt. I didn't even know. Cross was going to play his idol. New Sam was a popular contestant in the twenty eighth season of survivor Australia but bravado aside what use is an astrophysicist in fighting a global pandemic after all as far as we know now corona virus has made it into space yet and that's a relief as poor people on the International Space Station. There's no ICU. Up there what essentially happened was once I started getting serious. Everyone just put out feeling the same. We need help looking at a whole bunch of these tasks and this happened at Uku. Enriches where I work and through the grapevine. People said. We're looking for someone with all these skills and then Sam supervisor happens to be the acclaimed dark energy astrophysicist and TV presenter Professor Tamra Davis She's also passionate about astrophysics people using their research knowledge and skills in non astrophysics domains. So Tamra put Sam's name Ford The first thing was surely there are people that are better suited than me and salmon just accepted a job offer in the US at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. That's a big deal. But when Sam was told more he went back to Tamra and said. Are you all right if I just take months off from my actual normal astrophysics project to work on? This and her response was absolutely fine. Don't worry about it. We'll figure something out. Get on the project and do what you can. It was there was no chance that I was telling this down. It was a way to make a real contribution and astrophysics You know we don't make significant contributions every day to society we may every now and then invent something like the digital camera and was like yes. This is amazing but covet is a right here right now. One hundred percent immediate problem so there was absolutely no hesitation jumping into it so just like that. In a matter of moments Sam's life has suddenly turned upside down. Oh yeah if I thought I had long hours before. There's nothing like the current hours that we have to deal with. Sam is now the lead daughter analyst on a really crucial international project rolling out in real time in intensive care units across the world during this pandemic. And if you've seen the footage coming out of those units you'll know that this is a hellish frontier and what we need damage. Dice seeing young patients patients people of all age ranges. Who are just incredibly sick. And you can even hear now as. I'm walking through patient rooms in the hallway. It just your oxygen the sound of the pulse ox this ventilator later. Dan has joined. What's called ECO car? The global project headed up by trail-blazing intensive care specialist professor John Fraser from Prince. Charles Hospital in Brisbane AIKMAN COD is a mighty Akron Rod. It stands for Extra Corp. membrane oxygenation for twenty nine thousand nine novel Corona Virus Acute Respiratory Disease a card so when your heart and lungs can't do the job of oxygenating your blood and it. Komo machine allows that to happen outside. If you body. We want to know essentially. How can we best help as many people as possible? So we have very finite resources with this outbreak. We don't have an infinite amount of nurses doctors and ventilation equipment that we can just put everyone on so we need to know. Hey if if patient x comes through the door and they look like this but is the best sort of ventilation can give them if we just give them a mosque. Are they going to be fine or is this a patient that needs something more severe because a nurse can generally do around ten c-pap mosques so the very easy ventilation but if they have to actually mechanically ventilate someone help out the longest mechanically and it's essentially one nurse per patient and we don't have that many nurses when we have so many patients coming in so we really want to be able to say when someone walks in the door that they're probably going to need this outcome will be x? Y. Depend however retreat them. So when someone comes in we take the age we take their weight and then we need to know what other things do have do. They have high blood pressure Do they have diabetes? Are they smoke I? What is the condition of their lungs? There's so many things so many different data points that you can gather in the medical world ten thousand different questions that you could ask but what we have in our data time series so for two weeks after people. Get to the ICU. How are they red blood cells evolving? How of their platelet counts doing what we want to do is compare their outcomes and Dan data with other people other healthy people or people that have different afflictions so that we can say this is the thing that's unique about Karina buyers. This is one of the predict is here. That's different from anything else. And it's very hard to get that sort of time. Series data doctors and nurses are working around the clock to keep people alive. They're exhausted so around the world. Medical students are stepping up and being recruited to help collect the data every day. You need to be updating the data. And that's why we need for example medical students to come in because it is such a large burden if anyone is trying to also treat patients on top of that. We have around five hundred different variables from the different patients. And about a hundred of those we have information hopefully essentially every day that they're in ICU. So that we can see how they evolve over time. I can't say too much mall because whilst I have a huge list of variables in front of me things like pro calcitonin. I don't know how they used in a medical context all that I can do generate the reports and then worked with the clinicians in real time to say. What do you want to see? What would you expect to see? And how can I best present these models and this information to you so that you can draw conclusions from it? The urgency of the situation means. This is being taken very seriously. Clinicians are working in the dark right now with this new virus so they'll benefit from a Biegel clearer picture of what's happening for patients around the world. Oh Yeah it's absolutely unbelievable. I've never been involved in a project this lodge and especially in the current predicament. All the usual blockades and the bureaucratic slowdowns that you encounter have just been removed. So we have fifty countries now from Estonia to Kuwait to the United States is coming online the UK Italy Spain strategies coming online now two tons of countries and then each country also has all the hospitals in it. So we've got around two hundred fifty hospitals and that number grows every day.

Dr Sam Hinton ICU Professor Tamra Davis Sam Foreign DAN University Of Queensland United States Hamid UKU Software Engineer Cross Biegel Extra Corp. Diabetes Brisbane
Solid-state batteries could be game-changing for EVs

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 2 years ago

Solid-state batteries could be game-changing for EVs

"More and more people are buying electric vehicles but some still hesitate because they worry. The car will run on a power in the middle of Dr Sam. Jaffe is with Karen era. A research firm that specializes in energy storage. Bridge he says. Ev batteries are improving every year. When the Nissan Leaf first came out it was one hundred miles range. The new S plus model can go roughly twice as far DR and higher end. Cars can travel even farther. The recent Tesla model three is over three hundred miles range. Buddy says fully reducing people's range anxiety. He may require a new type of battery technology. I think the leapfrog technology is solid state batteries battery with no liquid material inside so everything. Everything is a solid material which means that it's safer but also it can be more energy dense so in battery could store more electricity and travel more miles on a single charge. Several companies are developing solid state batteries. But Jaffe says it will be years before solid. State batteries are affordable and durable enough to be widely used. Did it's going to take another ten years. But they are definitely coming. And when they do he says ranging Zayed's could become a worry at the

Jaffe Dr Sam Buddy Tesla Leaf Karen Era Zayed
British government loses key vote on Brexit timetable

Bloomberg Businessweek

07:00 min | 2 years ago

British government loses key vote on Brexit timetable

"But this is a little bit of a bass that we find ourselves in we've been listening to a lot of back and forth there in the U. K. parliament Boris Johnson the prime minister winning one and losing one but losing a big one in the sense of we don't know exactly what happens next yeah that's exactly so two votes happen the first one rather quickly and that was basically the U. K. parliament voting to accept his brexit Boris Johnson brexit bill that was followed by another one and that's where Boris Johnson lost and that was basically to fast track the brexit law we did hear from Boris Johnson is still committed to it but he also did say we now face further uncertainty the European Union must now make up their mind so that's basically where we want Jeremy Corbyn a leader of the labor party we did hear from him he says he wants a reasonable timetable so that's kind of where we are at this moment Dr Sam now to pop off has been kind enough to sit through listening to the U. K. parliament stay with us president of empire global ventures on the phone from Washington DC you've worked around the world with different organizations based on these two votes and based on what you've been hearing Sam now what we've just heard that Boris Johnson first victory as prime minister spells the end of the year of the United Kingdom you just heard Scotland say now that there's brexit we will seek independence again as we did a few years ago with the referendum and this time they're likely to be successful Johnson is also created an institutional structure that puts a red line between Britain and Northern Ireland and so there is a possible future Northern Ireland is no longer part of United Kingdom so just understand what's happened in the last ten minutes Johnson got his first victory which may have cost him the European king of the the United Kingdom and so what do you imagine happens next what is Europe's play in all of this the E. U. has been more or less letting this play out you know they've largely yeah they wait in it at various times Boris Johnson saying premise support center thing he will go back to the E. U. and then report back to the parliament what do you imagine the E. U. stances here do you sense at all has been very consistent from the beginning they want a clear signal from Britain about how brexit is to be prosecuted and then once Britain has sent a clear message you will decide at this point hi it would not surprise me you will give Britain a few more a few more minutes to manage it to manage its internal issues now that the parliament has asked for a period of time go through this but that raises another key issue it's not just this is going to take longer it's that the parliament is going to scrutinize the agreement and propose amendments this is exactly the same thing is happening in the United States right now where the executive branch with president trump is saying that the legislative branch oversight of him is functioning as a lynching what we're having is the executive Boris Johnson fighting it out with the parliament and Boris Johnson is going to go to Brussels and tell the European Union really you should give us more time but I don't mean it well it's interesting to and I you know get going back to a Bloomberg live blog you know there was no mention of pulling the bill there's no mention of an election which I believe Boris Johnson had said he would maybe do if he lost this vote so no mention of that yeah I think it's dark I think what you said and I kind of had a positive to set at that you know the undoing I think it's the final undoing of the British kingdom in terms of how we know it or have known it for so long does the United Kingdom the British monarchy and empire was an analog construction what we're seeing now is a did you build a digital extrication of of smaller units that can efficiently or less efficiently function within a wider market old traditions are being set aside one of them one of them has just been unraveled to our ears that's an extraordinary thing we heard from Scotland and that will go the history books about Boris Johnson and David Cameron who started this right and so let's recap sort of where we are we've had two votes in the U. K. parliament today one essentially the parliament really for the first time supporting ideal put forth by the prime minister in this case Boris Johnson it to leave the E. U. subsequently a vote against the timeline that prime minister Boris Johnson had recommended and put forth where that leaves us interestingly is not necessarily where we expected to be Carol because force Johnson had made noises about either crashing out on October thirty first which by the way that's next week it's sort of interesting to think at least for me I thought oh wow I cover thirty first really is coming up very soon but also this idea that he would call for a general election he is done none of those things yet he is essentially said we're gonna look for an extension a short extension to get this deal that parliament has approved done now that is contingent on a number of things including as Dr Sam that a puff laid out the E. U. getting on board with this notion of agreeing to a deal and agreeing to some length of extension and we don't know exactly what that is gonna look like Sam I am curious of what does this mean what is the New World order going forward with the UK potentially a resume out of the European block maybe northern our our Ireland going off on its own as well how does that change that global landscapes particularly over Europe well Scotland and Northern Ireland but I would develop their own national identities and and proclaim them but the the loss of Britain from the European Union and the loss of London as the European financial capital that has already sent shockwaves around the world so as a result of this New York City has emerged as the undisputed financial capital which has benefited the US economy tremendously there's been tremendous capital flight and human capital flight from Britain to the United States in the financial sector but the what it is this voluntary decision by the people of Great Britain to leave the European Union the headset all of this in motion seventeen point four million Britons said they wanted to leave and today for the first time the house of Commons passed a bill that will allow them to do just that

Boris Johnson Ten Minutes
"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

The LEAD Podcast

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

"Proclamation is very important our community services in everything that we do for the community is to live out the gospel so we can help them understand the bible but our goal is to proclaim and the moment we stopped proclaiming. And we just wanna be another christian nation. We lost our prophetic voice. And it's tragic to when that happens that's powerful. Thank you for that. That is I hadn't even thought about branding that way. And it's a it's a topic. I interact with a lot so i thank you for that. That that brooks miss in my mind too so last question for us. We like to leave our listeners. With something practical that they can follow up with so if they want to learn more about branding digital marketing. What are some resources. What are some books. They can dive into anything like that. Okay so I'll give you our official website for the identity of the adventist church and the website is identity dot adventist dot org k. If you're interested in copywriting if you're interested in marketing the best marketing framework. That we found is story brand by a guy called donald miller. There is a good book on amazon. That you can. You can download and and and see and read and a lot of online resources to so for framework for marketing. donald miller it will help with sermons. it will help with framing the conversation so that people will listen it. Donald miller really helps to clarify your message. It's incredible Those are two resources would point people to awesome. Well thank you so much stanford coming on. This has been an awesome conversation. Thank can i'm looking forward to seeing how the adventist church really dives into the digital world in the coming years and thank you for your work as well. Thank you very much pleasure guys. Thanks so much for listening to the lead. Podcast my name is ryan becker. I'm one of the co host and producer of this podcast. And we really appreciate your support if you want to subscribe. Then you can find us on itunes stitcher any of your favorite pod catching apps and if you do subscribe on itunes than we just ask you. Please leave a review. That really helps us out to know what we can do. Better and the things that you are already enjoying the things that we can continue doing. Make sure you do subscribe and leave a review because we're always doing giveaways and that really. That's the way that we do. Is we do it for those. Who have left a review if you have any comments questions or feedback for the show. You can us lead. Su podcast at gmail.com. Or you can find us on twitter roger hernandez at lead. Scu and myself at ryan. One eight zero becker. Thank you guys so much for listening in supporting without you. This is not possible. We'll see next time.

"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

The LEAD Podcast

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

"Means. That's the the the trust frost that the world has in those organizations so branding is directly related to your promise if you promise love as a church all we're gonna promise love. Do you have the courage to promise love that. Every adventist church will love you when you arrive that every adventist member will love you just is look at our online conversations. We struggle to love yeah k. so natural church development okay. It's it's a tool to measure and cd. Do you know what the lowest lowest score is. In every adventure church measured. I don't low the lowest one is loving relationships. I could've guessed that so so if you promise love and clearly we're not delivering on love. What do you think's gonna happen to the people that go to church. They'll leave caso so hope. We've been promising hope for twenty years do you can you really promise and expect that every adventist church that you go to the sermon will will as you walk out the door. You'll be more hopeful. I i don't have the courage to promise some of our churches. Honestly the service will suck the life out of you yeah but but you will know more about the bible when you leave when you arrived. If you pay attention okay so our calling to the world remember number jesus called us to be. I'm to proclaim in a loud voice to everyone so if you take the parable of the ten virgins i think many adventists believe leave that we are the five virgins who who who slept had the oil that that's our belief well my understanding understanding of prophecy. Is that no we're not. We're the boy that runs in front of the groom screaming. He's coming. He's coming. We wait cop. The virgins essentially ashley okay so that's a different perspective and if we hit a proclaiming a loud voice to wake up the world to the fact that jesus coming well then our role is different rent then proclamation is very important our community services in everything that we do for the community is to live out the gospel so we can help them understand the bible but our goal is to proclaim and the moment we stop proclaiming and we just wanna be be another christian denomination. We lost our prophetic voice and it's tragic to win that happens. That's powerful. Thank you for that. That is <hes>. I hadn't even thought about branding that way and it's a it's a topic. I interact with a lot so i thank you for that that that brooks amiss in my mind too <hes> so last question for us. We like to leave our our our listeners with something practical that they can follow up with so if they want to learn more about branding digital marketing. What are some resources what are some books they can dive into anything like that. Okay so so <hes> i'll give you our official website for the identity of the adventist church and the website is identity dot adventist dot org if you're interested in copywriting if you're interested in marketing the best marketing framework that we found is story brand by a guy called donald miller or is a good book on amazon that you can you can download and and and see and read and a a lot of online resources to so for framework for marketing donald miller it will help with sermons it will help with framing the conversation so that people will listen uh-huh. Donald miller really helps you to clarify your message. It's incredible <hes> those two resources that would point people to awesome awesome well. Thank you so much stanford coming on. This has been awesome conversation thank you i'm looking forward to seeing how the adventist church really dives into the digital world in the coming years and thank you for your here work as well. Thank you very much pleasure. Hey guys thanks so much for listening to the lead podcast. My name is ryan becker on one of the co host and producer of this podcast and we really appreciate your support. If you want to subscribe then you can find us on itunes stitcher

donald miller ryan becker ashley host and producer stanford amazon official twenty years
"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

The LEAD Podcast

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

"We are known for this and when they see the symbol of the church. Oh adventist bible. We used to be known as the people of the book and yeah right And and research shows that a lot of people associated with that not with hope we've been focusing on hope for awhile and and when we asked people on the streets adventist church which words come to mind. hope didn't feature You know everybody. Bible bible with known for this or that promise. It took a long while hundreds of hours of conversations to define that. So that's a tool powerful tool that. I think local church pastors could use. Wow that's great. Thank you for that So just two more questions for you as we kind of wind down here The the first of which is talked about a logo is and i think there's a there's a misunderstanding or or or Kind of a misconception. Around the idea of branding everyone thinks branding is just visual is just logo. So can you break that myth for us and and and help us understand. What is the. you've already explained. What a logo is. So that's that's good. But what is branding an entire idea. How do we how do we interact with. that idea. branding is how much trust. Is there any given organization. How much trust is given to an organization. So how do people feel when they see when they encounter any touch point of that brand so it could be seen. The logo could be visiting shop. It could be in our case. Visiting church could be meeting and adventist in a public space. All of those touch points. How much trust do people have with that brand so and you can value this. you know. there's a tangible value to this. So amazon is valued at one hundred fifty billion the most valuable brand in two thousand eighteen. Well okay. that's a lot of money okay. And this doesn't include any factories. It doesn't include any distribution centers. That's just the name. Wow one hundred..

amazon
"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

The LEAD Podcast

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

"Community service or whatever community activity there is an even on a sabbath morning you start with <hes> this project is brought to you by the seventh day adventist church and if you don't know much about the adventist let me tell you this. We're here to help you understand the bible to find freedom healing and hope in jesus so if you ever go through a difficult time in your life and you're willing to explore the bible and understand what god may be saying to you then talk to us because we have helped millions of people understand the bible and we can help you too now. Let's play basketball and you do this week and next week and the following week and the following week because at some point somebody who's coming. There may be a year from now. They're going gonna be a difficult situation and they're willing to wonder what is it that possibly people seen this christian in the bible and so on and when they do they need you to remember that no one explains the bible better than adventists and so they come back to us so it's a drip drip drip drip drip drip until you own that authority not yet and we have a couple of things to say about the bible so this is what we do so that tool that sentence that that positioning statement. I'm understand dan the bible. That's what we're about then over time. It creates a sense of of biblical awareness in the community we are known for for this and when they see the symbol of the church oh adventist bible we used to be known as the people of the book and yeah right <hes> and and research shows that a lot of people still associated with that not with hope we've been focusing on hope for awhile and and when we asked people on the streets adventist church which words come to your mind hope didn't feature <hes> you know everybody ge- bible bible we're known for this or that promise. It took a long while hundreds of hours of conversations to define that so that's a tool powerful tool that i think local church pastors could use wow that's great. Thank you for that <hes> so just two more questions for you as we kind of wind down here <hes> the the first of which is talked about what a logo is and i think there's a there's there's a misunderstanding or or or <hes> kind of a misconception around the idea of branding. Everyone thinks branding is just visual is just logo so can you break that myth for us and and and help us understand what is the. You've already explained what a logo is so that's that's good but what is branding as an entire idea. How do we how do we interact with that idea. Doc branding is how much trust is there in a given organization. How much trust is given to an organization so how do people feel when they see when they encounter any touch point of that brand so it could be seen the logo could be visiting a shop. It could be in our case visiting church. It could be meeting an adventist in a public space all of those touch points how much trust do people have with that brand and so and you value this. You know there's a tangible value to this or amazon is valued at one hundred fifty billion most valuable brand in twenty the eighteen wow that's a lot of money okay and this doesn't include any factories. It does include any distribution centers. That's just the name well one hundred and fifty going apple comes right behind with one hundred and forty nine billion in google after that honor and forty eight billion so this is what does that mean it means..

basketball dan apple amazon google
"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

The LEAD Podcast

05:53 min | 2 years ago

"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

"No that's that's encouraging for me to hear as a millennial as someone who Most of my friends no longer really tie themselves to the organization. Side the institution of advent ism. So faith has become this. This much more nebulous idea and you know less. Concrete lasts less something. I can visibly see and it's much more personal interactions with through online interaction through online engagement. And so for me. I feel very. I did not know before today. Before before i had had seen. You hear dc three that that we even had someone really paying attention to that at the dc level. I didn't know part of that my fault for not really engaging too but it is very very hopeful for me to to see us. Starting that conversation how can we. How can we leverage this space for the good for the gospel for the good work and and for spreading. Jesus name so you know. Thank you for what you're doing..

"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

The LEAD Podcast

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

"God has given so much pasta to to to present to people in a way that would enrich their lives. Just put a camera in front of you in gopher it today. I'm speaking to two young mothers whose young single moms who are struggling with parenting. Okay then say something. Breathe life into the into their lives. You know read a passage of scripture that brings hope to them or have practical advice that so any issue that you are passionate about imposters are passionate about different things. Just bring that out and then mentioning on a sabbath morning this week on youtube i noticed that and every week you mentioned your channel every single week you mentioned your channel and then suddenly people will see that. That's where the conversation is happening. That's that's important and then it was slowly grow. Yeah but no committees no committees. Thank you for that. Thank you for that. I can't stand so many committees. So you're in tune with the digital marketing. You've you've you've looked at some stats regarding adverse and and can aware we are so for those who are looking for inspiration for those who are looking at. How can i engage with the the adventist conversation online to on youtube or others What are some current who are some current content creators that you might point people to what are some current youtube channels or or any social media really any any creators that that are out there. Okay so we've got Justin justin cole. He is his youtube channel. Is called that christian vlogger And he he doesn't have A very overt. I'm a seventh day. Adventist therefore no. He is a christian. Who's answering questions from the bible but of course all the time people ask you what your and he's very open very clear i'm a seventh adventist. Sabbath is important to me. Tell you and he goes through the bible so over the last year or two he had two and a half thousand people who said i want bible studies. That's an incredible amount of people that are that are. Yeah you know willing to study the bible based on a youtube channel. So that's one that i that i admire a lot You also have. What's up groups in namibia for example who are battling and planting churches through. What's up because the person receives the messages they love it. They start listening with groups of people in their homes. But then there's no adventist church near them. What did they do. So the whatsapp group tells them well invite more friends. And let's start a church in your house my house. Yes so they're what's church is being formed. Wow and it's really cool because they let's say sabbath school somebody that is remotely because the whole thing is remotely happens remotely you press the audio record in. What's up and say welcome to savage school today. We're going to discuss this that and the other and then they let gold. That audio goes when people receive that audio. The person who's doing the cyber school noses their turn and so they have this ace synchronous way of everybody taking part in this digital sabah's school lesson over what's up and here's the beautiful part if people have slow internet connection..

youtube Justin justin cole whatsapp group namibia sabah
"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

The LEAD Podcast

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

"Just put a camera in front of you in gopher it today. I'm speaking to two young mothers whose young single moms who are struggling with parenting okay then say say something breathe life into the into their lives. You know read a passage of scripture that brings hope to them or have practical advice that so any issue that you are passionate about imposters are passionate about different things just bring that out and then mention it on a sabbath morning this week on youtube. I noticed that and every week you mentioned your channel channel every single week you mentioned your channel and then suddenly people will see that that's where the conversation is happening. That's that's important and then it will slowly grow yeah <hes> but no committees no committees. Thank you for that. Thank you for that. I can't stand so many candidates so you're in tune with the digital marketing you've you've you've looked at some stats regarding adverse and and kind of where we are so for those who are looking for inspiration for those who are looking at how can i engage engage with the adventist conversation online to on youtube or others <hes> what are some current who are some current content creators that you might point people to what are some current youtube youtube channels or or any social media really any any creators that that are out there okay so we've got <hes> justin justin cole he his his youtube channel is called that christian vlogger <hes> and he he doesn't have <hes> a very overt. I'm a seventh day adventist therefore no he is a christian who's answering questions from the bible but of course all the time people ask you know so. What's your and his very open very clear. I'm sevens adventist will the sabbath is important to me tell you why and he goes through the bible so over the last year or two he had two and a half thousand people who said i wanna bible studies. That's an incredible amount of people that are that are yeah you know willing to study the bible based on a youtube channel so that's one that i that i admire a lot. <hes> you also have what's up groups in namibia for example who are baptizing and planting churches churches through what's up because the person receives the messages they love it. They start listening with groups of people in their homes but then there's no adventist church near them. What did they do so the whatsapp group tells them well invite more friends and let's start a church in your house my house yes so there what's our church is being formed while <hes> and and it's really cool because they let say sabbath school somebody that is remotely because the whole thing is remotely happens. Remotely you press. It's the audio record in what's up and say welcome to savage school today. We're going to discuss this that and the other and then they let go that audio goes when people receive that audio the person who's doing the same school noses their turn and so they have this ace synchronous way of everybody taking part in this digital sabbath abbas school lesson over what's up and here's the beautiful part if people have slow internet connection. They're going to go through the whole thing when they receive it when they're in giant receives it so it's a it's a fantastic creative way of of spreading the message essentially wow that's awesome so <hes> i i love that i love that we're getting on youtube and i watched that. Christian vlogger watched justin. He's become a friend of mine and he's someone that's really cool and when i would also encourage checking out and interacting with his content so what are some adventist entities in addition into the church playing that you just talked about what are some advocates entities doing digital work well or that are a good example of digital marketing. This can be anything it doesn't necessarily but just anything in the digital sphere well. We are beginning that conversation so it's not something that adventist list are particularly fantastic about because marketing is very different from just putting content out and hoping for the best absolutely no you need. You need that funnel you. You need to first of all be found by people then you need the people that find you to engage with you and and that's why we call it a funnel because there's always less people in the next step not everybody that goes to your website connect with you..

youtube justin justin cole sabbath abbas school namibia Christian vlogger
"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

The LEAD Podcast

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

"I don't advise church postures to become digital specialists. It's that's not their job. yeah. I don't try. Don't try to read everything that is there about digital don't delve into that world And so in that. That's a mistake. I believe i think posters should have their own youtube channel because that's what conversations are having. The conversation is not happening in the marketplace any longer that is the new marketplace. Yeah and if it was good enough for paul to go to the marketplace. I think it should be good enough for all of our postures each and every one of them To to have a youtube channel that discusses various issues. You know that that are relevant to the posture that given point and it could be. I'm i just last week. I preached a sermon about this. Because of three things that i've seen one two three and i think that matters so if they write a title in very compelling way of that video youtube we'll keep sending people their way all the time and they will start having followers and subscribers and then they but it is it is a community so have somebody that will answer questions and and keep that you know alive and well if pasta is spending more than a few hours on digital every week if it's not direct ministry than i think it's it may not be what they want. They want to be in the real world physical present with people in his based on that they will have power to you know. Go out to a cameron will. And i think that that actually opens up another door for people getting The younger crowd involved in things at churches is..

youtube paul cameron
"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

The LEAD Podcast

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

"Welcome to the lead. Podcast helping you to get it. Grow it and give it. We'll come back to the podcast here at ease c. Three in collegeville tennessee bulk recording season. Three and today. I have a really cool with me. He just presented this morning. And we're gonna talk a bit about the presentation. He had on digital evangelism branding and being online and this is Sam nevis is. Do i have the okay great. This is fantastic. I forgot to confirm that before we started. But i'm thank you so much for joining us. That's all right my pleasure and so tell us a bit about who you are and where you are currently what you're doing For the church. Currently so i am the associate director of communication for the seventh day. Adventist church globally. Recall that the general conference as yeah everyone. Listen this podcast. Understands what that means. And i my main responsibilities are branding and digital marketing for the adventist church. Awesome that's fantastic. I'm really glad that we have someone fully dedicated to that. That's the millennial in me So let's let's break this down especially for passengers who may not really have done a whole lot in the digital sphere and digital space. But but what would you. How would you define digital evangelism digital evangelism. That a great question. So a few years ago i was asked in fact when when i was called at a general conference in an interview similar to this i was asked about digital evangelism and i said there is no such thing as digital evangelism. Because you need people you know you need a hug. In order to trust and and without that there is no such thing as digital discipleship. That's just a myth. And then i went to brazil and a guy. Listen to this interview and said can have your whatsapp number. They use that a lot and for the next year. He started sending me constant screen shots of people that are that were sharing from the depth of their heart on facebook right so he answered the questions on the official church page for for brazil and there were within weeks were sharing. I've got this issue. I don't know how to tell my my father things that took four years for people to start sharing with me in a local churches their pasta. Yeah it suddenly. All of that came out in in digital. So this guy has single handily changed my mind about this process but he did something different instead of just responding to people's questions he contacted them every week he led the relationship he never let go and the following week. They'll be attacked the following week. We've prayed for you the following weeks or anything we so this constance just like a normal relationship that you would have was paramount to people being led online and now the the baptized last year. An average of three per day just from facebook alone so this this matters and and the digital is real digital is not virtual so virtual. You're talking to a computer. Digital is just a tool that connects real people with real people they're not constrained to space. And that is what matters great. So that's actually a really powerful answer. I love it i And i i love that someone took it upon themselves to really kind of just change your mind on it. What are some misconceptions..

adventist church Sam nevis collegeville tennessee brazil facebook
"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

The LEAD Podcast

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

"Following. We've prayed for you the following weeks or anything that we so this constance just like a normal relationship that you would have was paramount to people being led online and now the the bob ties last year and average of three per day just from facebook alone so this this matters and the digital is is real digital is not virtual so virtual talking to a computer digital is just a tool that connects real people with real. You'll people <hes> <hes> they're not constrained to space and that is what matters great so. That's actually a really powerful answer. I love it. I <hes> <hes> and i i love that someone took it upon themselves to really kind of. Just change your mind on it. <hes> what are what are some misconceptions that people have about digital evangelism well that if there are many misconceptions in fact we live in misconception so people do you have on one end of the spectrum like i was. There's no such search thing is digital. Let's not full ourselves <hes> and then you have those who think that digital is dangerous and we shouldn't touch it but most most people just ignore it. They just don't don't feel they don't sense the power and the possibility within digital and and that's the group that most imposters find themselves in they kind of know it's important but they just can't be bothered and they don't do it. Yeah that makes sense so what then and bare minimum right if we were gonna say like everyone should be doing this <hes> everyone should be doing the ideal but what bare minimum should every church be doing online online digital marketing evangelism all of it. What what what should they be doing bare minimum..

real digital facebook bob
"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

The LEAD Podcast

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"dr sam" Discussed on The LEAD Podcast

"He just presented this morning and we're going to talk a bit about out the presentation he had on digital evangelism branding and being online and this is <hes> sam nevis is do. I have the okay great. This is fantastic. I forgot to confirm that before we started but i'm thank you so much for joining us all right my pleasure and so tell us a bit about who you are and where you you are currently what you're doing <hes> for the church currently so i am the associate director of communication for the seventh day adventist church globally recall that the general conference as yeah everyone listen to this podcast understands what that means and i my main responsibilities are branding and digital marketing for the adventist church awesome awesome. That's fantastic. I'm really glad that we have someone fully dedicated to that. That's the millennial in me so let's let's break this down especially for pastors who may not really have done a whole lot in the digital sphere and digital space but but what would you how would you define digital evangelism digital evangelism that is a great question so a few years ago i was asked in fact when when i was called to the general conference in an interview similar similar to this i was asked about digital evangelism and i said there is no such thing as digital evangelism because you need people you know you need a hug in order to trust and and without that there is no such thing as digital discipleship that's just a myth and then i went to brazil and a guy i listen to this interview and said. Can i have your whatsapp number. They use that a lot and for the next year he started sending me constant screen shots of people that are that were sharing from the depth of their heart on facebook right so he answered the questions on the official church page for for brazil and and there were within weeks there were sharing. I've got this issue. I don't know how to tell my my father things that took four years for people to start sharing with a local churches there pasta yeah it suddenly all of that came out in in digital so this guy has single handily changed my mind about this process but he did something different instead of just responding to people's questions. He contacted them every week. He led the relationship he never let go and the following week. They'll be taxed the following..

brazil sam nevis associate director facebook official four years
Dr. Sam Mallette, III PhD, THE Dr Sam SHOW How To Build Your Own Brand

The Money Coach Ronda Cobb

05:34 min | 4 years ago

Dr. Sam Mallette, III PhD, THE Dr Sam SHOW How To Build Your Own Brand

"Hi, everybody. This is Rhonda them any coats, and it is so great to be here. Welcome to the show. I know you're gonna love today show because we have two great, great guests factors. Sam is just passionate about enriching people's lives. One solution time and currently he hosts his own had we rated gravy go show called the doctor Sam show with by the way in the end, you know, full disclosure and the money coach on there once every three weeks. But this show gives prescriptions for your heart where they should ship money mind. And so he's also starting numerous to vision commercials, and he hosts the national talk show any is going in the right direction to build his brand and create a wonderful speaking that form called Sam dish. Which is his platform for the amount of principle. So I thought it would be nice for you guys to get to hear from doctors AM because if you've got an interpersonal relationship question, where you're gonna go, ask him if he wanted to know how to build a brand will who you're gonna. Him. He's doing it. It's going great. So welcome to the show that you're seeing so great to be here. Are you right? A free. She ate him void ended ducks and almost like who is he talking about. Don't tell anybody has heavy. Okay. We say if I too, so I really do really do Asam. But you know, when we're when we're are situations or reverse the news, a host and the guest speaker, we have so much fun on the show 'cause it's live, Chow our listeners, what it's like to be doing all of these things you're doing to build your brand and you're doing them all simultaneously. Yeah. That's a good question. Well, like you said, I'm doing a radio show every week television show. We just started seizing two amount television show, and I hope the national television show out of it was formerly out of Detroit, Michigan, but the network close f- Asian. So now is in Akron and also on right there vice column every week and the Toledo journal, and I write for pathway newspaper every now and then and then I have my Sam dishes in all of that is. But as your question, it all comes down to me for me is just communication. And a lot of people always say, ask me that question. What you just said is, how are you doing that all at the same time. All love is just a form of communication, and I'm just expressing to radio television, print and all the other ways of expressing it. So it's really just just me. It's just like talking talking in English talking in Spanish, talking, rushing, and I'm still communicating. So that's how I look at it. That's them. But you are doing it by plan, right? You started out to build your brand and you have. And you're working on it, you didn't just go, okay. I think I'll get up this morning and start to turn myself into this media marvel. Did you mope? No, yes. I was a media Morrow, but I had I got a working plan in place and for the most part where starts out anytime you want to build a brand that you have to know what your brand is that normally centers around who you are. And I'm very familiar with me because since I was a child, I've been in the self development on myself. So I'm very aware of what my strengths weaknesses are, what my kiss are, what my lane is. So what I've done with it, like I said, put it in those communication form and just build every day just building and how it should go. One of the one of the things I do after you know, after, you know who you are branding is a find out how you how you need to brand and get a plan together. Am I? One of my one? I think the best plans I've had is like this. I've. I've I've had it made a lot of bad moves at all because I

Dr. Sam Jeff Rhonda Dilma Miami R. S. A. M. M. A. L. Fifty Years Ten Years
Arnold Schwarzenegger is recovering from heart surgery, according to his rep (updated)

Dr. Drew Midday Live with Mike Catherwood

01:23 min | 4 years ago

Arnold Schwarzenegger is recovering from heart surgery, according to his rep (updated)

"Kabc news is live and local at two thirty i'm jeff whittle former california governor arnold schwarzenegger's hospitalized in stable condition after undergoing open heart surgery yesterday at cedars sinai medical center the seventy year old schwarzenegger went in for a previously planned procedure to replace a pull monica vowed that was originally replaced in nineteen ninetyseven dr sam kelly g a cardiologists tells nbc four news replacement valve wasn't meant to be permanent those vows last anywhere from fifteen twenty thirty years it was likely at this time that he needed a valve replacement because the life of that bioprosthetic or pig valve had passed california may have another fight on its hands is the environmental protection agency looks to possibly rollback obama era fuel efficiency standards even if the epa loosens fuel economy standards this weekend california could still pursue the goal set by the obama administration because of the clean air act rebecca lynn land with kelley blue book expects california to stale push back but that may not be best for other states i think what's best for california is become closer to what the rest of the country and what consumers want to buy the obama era standards call for.

Monica NBC California Obama Administration Jeff Whittle Arnold Schwarzenegger Cedars Sinai Medical Center Dr Sam Kelly Barack Obama Rebecca Lynn Kelley Fifteen Twenty Thirty Years Seventy Year