24 Burst results for "Dr Ryan"

"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

04:36 min | Last month

"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"Tell me the page lengths. Tell me the is. Tell me all that stuff. So that i can do exactly what you want. And they don't like hearing. I want you to tell me what you want to give you know. They don't want to hear that in. So that's the first problem. It's not their phone. I don't blame them for for approaching you. Just just it's a harder thing to undo I think the other thing. I wanna say this you know when people say that students don't have the intellectual curiosity curiosity it's both traits like any emotion or like any phenomenon need is both a trait into state. Yes some people are more curious than others but all students are curious. All students are curious. And you know that because if you walked up to them and said hey did you hear what ariana grande did they would. They would say white one and they'd start googling the answer before you finish the sentence right and so you just have to figure out how to draw curiosity out. It's not. They're all curious. I i realized by the way. I probably use a terrible example. I'm much younger. I should but you know there's behave. They've been taught not to care about the stuff. We're trying to teach them. It's not sullivan half. I should say it's not that they're not Curious they are. It's just we have to find a way to to to bring that curiosity out in the good news is curiosity actually much easier emotion to induce that a lot of other. It's when you identify gaps in and this is why joke about about our akron days because when you when you identify gaps in people's knowledge in you make it obvious to them they want to fill it man. That's the that's the way it works. It's just helping them. Recognize what those gaps are at is that is so important and You know and that's that's the best thing about young kids by the way is how because they know they have all those gaps in. They desperately want to fill it. That's why they asked the question. While it's it's it's everywhere they look is the sense of wonder some of that just goes away because they're learning more that we just beat out of the with a yes. That doesn't help. Yeah and and i think you know when when that lament was coming up it was in the context of.

ariana grande sullivan
"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

05:22 min | Last month

"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"To explore and to learn more about your surroundings offered a very real survival benefit. It meant that you might find food that you didn't know is there are better shelter or place a place to escape per safer space that you know that that ultimately back to a philosophy i about life and about education and that is that jimmy beings never know what we need to know until we need to know it and that just knowing things is inherently better than not knowing them and it means that you can use them in in some way or at some time when you don't expect to need it and make up saving your life And so the for me why. I'm interested in both interested in anger as a as a therapist. I'm interested in. Curiosity is a teacher. Because when i think about mike classes and learning experiences i sat up. I'd set the set them all up at this point with the idea that we need to. We need to use curiosity as the motivator is to think about how we can motivate students that way using that innate desire to know stuff when you say that it sounds to me as a coach and a former teacher like that seems like it should be so obvious and yet it's not right. We set it up as you need to learn this. Not how can i make you curious enough to want to figure it out which is so much more powerful than you need to learn this right. You know i one day had a terrible sort of epiphany one. That was a little bit of an existential crisis. That i went to actually went to talk to my my dean about it almost immediately and said here's the thing if a group of people came to me and said hey ryan we want you to teach us something. I probably would not set up that experience. The way i set up but my class is essentially just a group of people coming to me and saying hey ryan we want teach us something and i probably wouldn't sit down with them and say okay. Well let's hammer out a syllabus and come up with learning outcomes and use a bunch of wrecks. And that's not what i would do and so really the universe is gonna make me do some of those things because for various reasons accreditation and such. But i've decided that within the class the parts that i can control i wanna frame more around that first day i went. I would've build my class around okay. Group of people has come to talk to me. They wanna told me they want to learn something. Let's let's frame experience around that to the best that we can. And i'm sure that that's meant a totally different way of approaching everything..

jimmy ryan mike
"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

02:38 min | Last month

"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"But that is actually it can be really hard to muster up in heat fat anger going all the way through the project that is that is just not in so many ways. That's not really doable. Especially because she said also a lot of her work requires a level of focused. That is hard to win. You're really angry. Chelsom pointed out in innocence. Interesting because i naively had really thought about this in as art that she talked a lot about protests Art shocked about sculptures and protest signs and the pink hats at the women's march hinton's at that in all of these things as as works of art that people spend considerable time and effort on and how many of those things were motivated by anger and i thought that was really fascinating. It really interesting to think about these. So many of these really really beautiful works Murals and things like that. That are that are motivated by anger were anger was the spark that initiated it and. Yeah it might not have been energy. You used to finish the saying or to build the fact but it definitely Definitely motivated the creation of it in the first place as the curiosity piece. I i think it's not so much that those two emotions are linked other than that. I think that they the thing that they have in common. I'm really treat buys anytime. I think about emotion i think about what. What is it. Rinse in our evolutionary history at for it to exist it it gave us it either is just ran. A random byproduct of our existence or a gave us some sort of evolutionary advantage and for things like in anger that. It's obvious for things for something like sadness. it's a little less obvious. but it's definitely there The for curiosity. I got curious to know why. And in how what adaptive value it held so i really started reading a lot abou- emotion and what it why it was a value and you know became pretty a pretty obvious..

Chelsom hinton
"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

04:23 min | Last month

"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"Need for suffer through a little bit to get veteran tolerating frustration. So i'm wondering since you mentioned that there is an upside to quitting. Is there a formula rule of thumb. A way that you draw that line between i need to put up with a little bit more frustration and it's time to just pack it in it. Yeah it's interesting so this is this is actually come out with some of the. The grit work knows people were talking at really focusing on great in how important it was the concept. Other people came along indian. Actually grit can be bad sometimes because there are projects that it. It's actually smartest to quit. You know in so the example that. I'm sure you're familiar with as well as like know working on a dissertation or something that you know there comes a point where you hate your topic so much within. You've chosen so much that it might actually be smart. Even though you've sunk some things into it might actually be smarter for you to switch to something else and into to throwing the towel on that. Start out. were because you've got so much left that you've got us. Do you really want to suffer through that A think the the the trying to figure out what that point is to me you it ends up being really contextual depends on how much you have left of the project. Do you think you can finish or do you think it's impossible. How miserable argue as you're as you're working on it. I think those are things that some people some people just sort of know in the moment formula is for knowing that is i do and i hope you on us if i if i error i err on the side of completing a project action so i think i've barely ever even sat down a book that i i've i've finished a whole bunch of really long books that i hated simply because i was like i feel like i gotta finish this thing right so i wanted to suffer through through projects. I'm always a little bit amazed when i see reviews on amazon of a book like i didn't even finish this. Wow really i think the first time. I saw one of those you do that..

amazon
"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

04:23 min | Last month

"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"Yeah so A lot of people will say if you've got goals just keep them to yourself for a little while and you know don't don't share them Doesn't really. I wish i knew it. And the holy name. But there's a good ted talk actually You check out. I think if you just search for what. I just said you'd probably find it. Okay i'll find out what the notes. Yeah so but. I could see how that could be true with anger. Two right now. This is the power. I'm really extrapolating that if you if you're frustrated and you complain it feels like you've solved the problem and instead of an and you let some basketball go essentially you've you've spent some about fuel instead of directing towards solving whatever the problem is you know in that in using the fuel that way. So what would i say to people who have were stock and you know this is going to be really really is gonna feel really obvious in something. A lot of people have done. But i would say sit down set a timer and just start writing and don't feel like it needs to be perfect. Don't even feel like it needs to be something you're gonna include. Just sit down and start. And i think that that i do think that a lot of people just get stuck because they feel like what they put down is sort of set in stone when it's not. It's going to be changed a jillion times between when you i.

basketball
"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

05:22 min | Last month

"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"I'm on board with that interpretation. The idea that sometimes anger can allow you to see things really clearly. it can also I think it can a can allow you to be honest in ways that you are normally. Can you say some more about that. Yeah well. I think it's what others just saying about the filter coming off. That's you know when you're angry. You use sometimes willing to tell people things you wouldn't normally willing to say. Look i'm really mad. And so i- unloaded on my boss. And i told all the things that have been stewing inside for so long. And that the truth didn't you know came out In my anger that got me there. So i do think there's a side of it that could be a could lead to just a new level of honesty people and now i'm wondering how much anger comes from feeling like. You can't normally tell the truth in a situation like that. I think that's fair. I mean. I think you know. This is where that that steam metaphor works nicely for. People is the idea that sort of injustice after injustice after justice little ones build up inside to the point that you just feel like you can't take it anymore and you know i I think that that is a real. That's a real people. Feel just the burden of stuff surfer lifestyle for not being able to say things or being in a situation where they feel devalued and not being able to talk about it or sherrod or deal with it and then they just someday this sometimes. I think it can lead to exploding. Sometimes i think they just sort of suffer in silence in ways. That her yeah. Yeah and and as you're talking now thinking about the line between frustration and anger. Do you draw a big distinction between those two or are they pretty much. The same thing dune i. Don't you know so when i think about anger. There's kind of two big overlapping reasons why people get angry. Maybe three sometimes. But there's there's a unfairness and injustice these there's.

sherrod
"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

04:33 min | Last month

"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"So let me ask you start. I whenever i hear quotes. It always takes me moment to sort of cross asks what it means. So and i don't have any context for that or anything quote on quote page so i yeah for you from falsity. I think that's the part. I'm struggling with as i think about it. I think so a lot of people like to use. I'm going to think out loud here. So a lot of people like to use Steam as a metaphor for anger riley liked to talk about anger as as steam. Hence the whole catharsis metaphor. I've were pressure cookers when we got to release it or else we explode and i get that Give that comes from I do think it begs the question. Sometimes we'll what are we releasing like. What is this thing. that's actually leaving us I prefer a metaphor of fuel In the sense that. I like to think of bangor being a fuel that energizes us to do things and to respond to to an unfair world. I think that like any fuel though it's law and we can explode Can we can do bad things with it and can hurt ourselves or hurt others for not careful so when i think back to that quo. It's the words farc that. I'm i'm intrigued by this idea. That anger serves as this spark. This this fuel that allows us to To respond to response to injustice to respond to argos goals. being blocked. i think the part. I'm not sure what needs is the freezers from falsity. Are you able to elaborate on that part. What that means to you at all. Well as you've been talking. I've just been kind of wondering kind of thinking of whether or not this is accurate. I don't know but you're the expert so you can tell me either those moments of like really really righteous anger when you realize that something is really wrong that you've been wronged that there's some grave injustice that something that is just burning you up and i'm wondering how much potential there is for.

riley bangor farc
"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

05:29 min | Last month

"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"I kind of lost sight of how bad it was For the kids going in there and so the kids left for the day because we were giving tours to people who are interested in want to know more about the facility. And i brought my mom. My mom walked through and she stopped. Turn me and she had kind of a tear in her eyes and she said so. This is it and i said yeah. And she's like this is awful. And i think that was sort of a wake up. Call that because my mom is not someone who is by any shelter. She is not somebody who isn't aware of how bad things can be inside the recognition. It was just a reminder of odier got what would it be like to be a fourteen year old and have to leave your home Or or or whatever place you've been living and come here and how scary that must be in how hard that must be. It served as this moment of. Yeah probably should have known that but And i did. But i sort of forgotten men since i was every day. Yeah we adapt to things and don't notice stuff like that so easily right. how wow. It's only worse. Now that i have kids that are about the age that could that i it. It's a different city. But once you start to think like mrs the age of some of those kids that this is just you start to think about what that must have been like for kids. How scare. they must've been. I hate it. Yeah no that's that's rough. So i have this sort of multi part question in my head. Now and i'm gonna throw it at you and hope that it makes some kind of sensitive not will break down but i'm thinking about that and i'm thinking about how most of us think of anger as a negative thing and i'm also looking at the title of your book..

"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

04:41 min | Last month

"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"So i am. I am curious to know how it is that you came to specialize anger. Yeah so i can only point two two reasons one is. There is a certain running joke in my house when i was growing up about the martin. Tamper that especially the i have three siblings. Two parents and And you know the idea that two brothers specifically who people used to joke all the time about the martin boys having temper my dad and my brothers. And i and i honestly don't know how true that actually is in some ways. Now that i've sort of paid more attention to it. But i just kinda i grew up in what what people might consider angry household and it and it's funny because it's a very loving household we got along really well. We still get along really well I see a few weeks but you know there was there. A were angry outbursts every now and then not usually like directed at each other but honestly directed outwardly. It was just oftentimes my data particularly at a temper in so i just was interested in even from the time offers a kid. I think in thinking about anger the other more specific thing. Though was that in college. I worked to add in adolescent shelter. The criminal justice. I studied criminal. Justice and psychology. I worked in the juvenile justice system for a few years in college at this shelter. that was for quote unquote at risk adolescence. And that's not a termite necessarily like feel like it puts out a responsibility on them. It's not their fault. They were at risk. They were in horrible situations and there are victims of poverty in a poor parenting racism and sexism and other things there was. What a salient experience. For almost all them was this inability to control their anger. There were just outburst all the time and And i got really interested in. I actually went to graduate school because of the time is thinking. I'm going to be a therapist. And i wanna work with kids and this is in particular. I wanna work with kids. Who really desperately need help in. These seemed like the wanted to work. With and i thought i wanna help them learn to manage their anger. And it's funny. Because retrospect i realized you know the kids were the problem. I mean yes. They could have benefited from better managing their anger but but then allowed to be angry about and they were in the some of the worst circumstances imaginable But i also. I went to graduate school thinking. This is what i wanna do. This is what i want to study. And i started working with a guy named eric. Dahlin the university of southern mississippi who has a new role to the faculty member. When i got there was also studying anger And it was. I just became totally enthralled with it at the time And and did my thesis on my dissertation bumped other papers..

martin Dahlin university of southern mississ eric
"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

05:03 min | Last month

"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"Its being consumed by people in meaningful ways. I don't know why why wouldn't count that. Yeah i would agree with that. It seems ridiculous to me not be you know not to take it at all seriously. You know like you say. It doesn't necessarily land in the same category as i've done this study. And here's all of the evidence of what i've found but it you don't mean you do have a really fascinating level and type of engagement on your top posts that you know. I'm thinking in particular a month or so ago when you were doing the series about catharsis and how catharsis really actually not good for you and the number of people who kept saying. But i do this all the time and you know it kind of like fascinating to watch the the interplay between. Here's all the data in this series of videos. And here's all the people you know. Some people going. Wow i never thought about that. I'm going to do something different next time. And other people just hanging onto the thing that they know which is probably a whole other discussion for a whole other podcasts. But we can delve in there a little bit if you want. I mean. that's the thing that's it's really interesting. Because what many of my colleagues would say. They're partially right with about this. They would say right. But but social media blogs regardless they don't have pure review and i would say shore they don't go to ted talks. Tell me my peers aren't reviewing me. Right go go read the comments. And tell me i'm not hearing other perspectives. I'm not any they. They understand that. Say why because aren't necessarily experts in there now but they're still my periods. There's still a meaningful group of people sharing their perspectives. On what i have to say in a way. That's actually i think. Been more valuable to me as a scholar than a lot of the the review. I've gotten from other scholars That a conversations. I've had over. Ticks can do really enlightening. They asked questions peers. Quote.

ted
"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

04:04 min | Last month

"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"Then i got in that same methods class. I started thinking and learning about some Famous studies started paying attention to some really interesting and clever methods. That were used to answer big questions. And i i all of a sudden found myself thinking. Oh this is where the creativity is. This is where the fun is in psychology. Where you get to do new things trying to things in come up with innovative ways to answer questions and i always got excited about that. Whereas i hadn't necessarily been before i think that's to me when it comes to psychology. That is where i really you. Sort of found A lot of a lot of the the creative elements that i that i really felt like i needed and then when i started teaching i think that opened up a whole new avenue for me sinking about all of the different ways that i can reach students and and bring creativity into the classroom to try and reach students in new ways and it was it was really really freeing. I think at a moment when i sort of started to realize it takes. It took me time in in some ways. I sort of feel. Like maybe too much time to kind of hit a point where i felt like i could. I didn't have to do things the way everyone else did. And didn't have to teach the way. I was taught and i didn't even have to. You know going back to those research papers. I don't have to publish the way other people publish i can. I can disseminate research in different ways hence dock and hence you do in twitter in all sorts of things i can. I can find other ways to get the word out in. Because i actually in so many ways. I've always been drawn to creative things as a consumer. I love movies. I love tv. I love reading though. I think it took me longer to be really interested in reading sections than it did. Other people but I've always been drawn to the arts. Do creative activities that way but never is like someone did those things. And and i think at a certain point i started becoming more drawn. Be doing them but finding ways to do them in my own field. Yeah i mean. I'm kind of wondering somewhat unserious. Louis you know like does tick-tock count as a publication credit for a university professor. Well here's a piece of because i would argue that. I don't know that needs to count the same way or that. It should count the same way. But i would. I would leave people with this piece of information The mode for the number of people who read a research paper once it's published is less than ten and so when it comes to now do i think tick talks should be should count as much as a research paper now But when you acknowledge that you are reaching way way way. More people and disseminating the work in much much more meaningful way. I'm not sure why. We don't factor that in a little better into people's what i would call scholar scholarly productivity that. There's a lot of good work being done.

twitter Louis
"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

Follow Your Curiosity

02:42 min | Last month

"dr ryan" Discussed on Follow Your Curiosity

"Welcome to follow your curiosity where we explore the inner workings of the creative process. I'm your host dancing orban. None of us get through the day. Without encountering anger somewhere be at work at home on the road or even inside ourselves ryan. Martin is a professor of psychology at the university of wisconsin at green bay and he specializes in anger. He's written the book. Why we get mad. How to use your anger for positive. Change and given a ted ex talk. But a lot of people have encountered him through his anger professor account on tick-tock where he shares interesting new research and offers advice on how to handle anger. And how not to. In our conversation ryan and i discussed how his fascination with anger began the positive sides of anger. How anger can fuel creativity and how we can unintentionally sap that fuel ryan also tells me how he came to be curious about curiosity which inspired him to revamp the way he teaches. I think you'll really enjoy my conversation with ryan martin. Welcome to the podcast ryan. I'm excited to talk to you today. I am excited to be here. Thank you very much for having me your welcome so i am curious because you are not an obvious creative person. You're not you know a painter musician or whatever. I'm curious to know what creativity looks like for you and how it came out before you started studying psych and and after so i'll let you decide where the best places to start with that. Yeah so i love that. Prompt and i'm actually asked that the way you did. Because i've been thinking about a lot since we we were talking about doing this since you. You told me know that you wanted me on the show. I've been thinking about kind of creativity in my history with it As conscious because i will admit that. When i when i first started studying psychology you know one of the first classes you take is research methods in one of the first things you have to do. In a research methods classes learned to write a research paper. And i don't know how many of those you have read but they are pretty formulaic. And not very fun right and so it's it's very much a they have four parts are intro methods results discussion. And you just you just follow that format and really good for science really into read not really good to to write As far from my perspective Because i remember thinking well this is. This isn't fun. Where's this isn't the kind of writing i like and so i.

ryan orban ryan martin university of wisconsin green bay Martin
"dr ryan" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

The Steve Deace Show

04:27 min | 3 months ago

"dr ryan" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

"You will do this. You will do this. You will do this. The government says this. So that's all i'm going to do. I did my part. You can't sue me. i wasn't right. I wasn't wrong but i did. What they said. And so we help this guy. Line driven mindset that has really been the demise of the critical thinking physician. And it's sad because it's to the detriment of the patient every individual on this planet is a unique organism. Were not all the same. We apply population statistics to individuals. And that's not how brex medicine. So i the simple explanation. The innocent explanation is burned out. Doctors that are ignorant of the broad facts about the virus in the immune system and don't have time to think about it and so they they feel absolve by saying i'm doing what the authorities above me telling me to do. I've got about a minute and a half year in your opinion as an md and pathologist. Who should we be given these vaccines to and then is there anything. I didn't ask you about that. You think our audience needs to know in in line with this conversation. I think those who are elderly or at risk who choose to get your body your choice. Those are the only people who should be getting this shot knowing going into it. That their risks and we have documented those so. That's who should get it. I think we need to open up the conversation. Continue dr mccullough's conversation about early treatments. I've created a lot of patients early with huge amounts of success. I think we need to emphasize natural immunity natural immunity natural immunity. We need to over the conversation again. We're silencing very smart people so stupid people won't be offended in this past year and we need to open up the conversation you know. Truth needs to be. broadly accepted. Truth doesn't does not mind being questioned. Why doesn't like to be challenged and over this past year. Those of us who have the science half the data are getting silenced. So i think the conversation needs to continue the conversation to anyone and everyone who knows about this and quit. Silencing us don't go to the government for help because their guidelines are very financially driven by big pharmaceutical interests and the best interest of the patient. Isn't there there are those of us that are here. The patient always comes first in our mind and heart in what we do on a daily basis. We wanna go forward catching covid early for those who are still going to get it. We want to treat early. Save lives and avoiding this vaccine age. Fifty is probably the best thing you can do to stay alive dr ryan cole. It's a pleasure ryan quickly as our website. Our audience can go to if they want to get more information on what you do call diagnostics dot com. That's a laboratory and Yeah i'm. I'm so busy with patients. I don't have time to be on the social as much lately. We appreciate the work you're doing by the thanks again for joining us. A lot of vitally important information that you shared with audience. We thank you for it ryan. Take care god bless us. Well all right. Dr ryan call here with us any quick thoughts as we close that out. Well dr calls yet another example of why when you call me an anti vaccine doomsday. Just keep getting stronger and stronger and stronger angrier and it's not just the side of things it's the cultist side of the smart people again. Who you mentioned obamacare and the system just overtaking these people with phd's md's and they're just like a only following orders ma'am that that's exactly why i am the way i am on this topic. Because there is no critical thinking. And that's not a covert thing. It's been this way for a long time. And much of our notions of western medicine should go the way of leaching. Quite frankly i just. I wanted to say. Listen to the experts guys Dr kohl pop culture tuesday we will discuss the most cringe program. I've ever watched the most cringe documentary ever produced but why we chose to talk about. It is important next. Just heard about heard.

tuesday ryan ryan cole Fifty kohl obamacare mccullough first a minute and a half year half the data past year dr Dr pop culture
"dr ryan" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

The Steve Deace Show

04:58 min | 3 months ago

"dr ryan" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

"Our friend emerald robinson at newsmax. Thought had an interesting tweet this morning. She said last month. Everybody needs to take the vaccines this month. Don't give the children the vaccines anymore next month. Don't give anybody these vaccines anymore. That song i thought that was a powerful tweet. Just just fyi as well on tangential but related note. We're going to have to cut this segment out of youtube because they'll probably knock us for medical misinformation. Even though even though in their own terms they signed the world health organization as one of their governing body. I'm glad you brought that up so this morning on facebook. I took her buddy an dr andrew boston. He was just on our show recently. brown university epidemiologist ace researcher He put out his own analysis on his own. Think sub stack. He put out his own analysis of what he is seeing with myo pericarditis issues with youth. Vaccinations around the country and and an it. He is asking them as vaccine advocate. Hey looking at this data we at least need to pause and reflect and do more research on this before we resume vaccinating more anymore. Children and i posted a his the his report on his sub stack on my facebook. Page five seconds. After i posted this facebook puts up. Its disclaimer kobe. Vaccines go through many test for safety and effectiveness and are then monitored closely source ready for this world health organization. Ironically facebook put a disclaimer on my post citing the who which is the very often currently urging countries around the world to cease and desist pudding. Cova vaccine's into children. I again gallos. Nooses not the fake ones. Not the fake ones that we founded a nascar garage with fourteen. Fbi agents dispatched last year. No the real ones. Which is what we were put in where we filled them with the necks of those who were the last tala -tarian civilization that thought they could use public health to to demarcate civilization declare. Who is the superior and the lesser lied to us with fake junk science from the bowels and pit of hell that's what we did to the last manifestation of that here on planet earth correct correct. We put all those. We didn't kill on the battlefield. We put all of their next in the news. Kick the dan chairs out from underneath them and we watched them breathed their last right. Yes that's what needs to also happen here. In my opinion these are crimes against humanity. What's going on here. And the side by side of these storylines going on with the two olympic trainy stories if we survive as a nation and people are looking back on this. They're going to just be laughing at. How did you rubes believe all this. Did you tolerate all this. And they're going to have to have that opinion for us to survive that long because we can't survive that long unless we come to format opinion. Why do you keep buying this garbage as reality. let's end this on a gone. Good news there is some there is some. I think i have discovered my new cambodian. Smoking toddler all is just not going well on a given day right. Aaron you've got that like one of your hot keys or in your safe folder. Fire that up on. When i need to go then add. That's right there with the the jihadist gets blown up in real time during his spiel. You know how much. I love that video right. Okay pence getting heckled at the faith and freedom coalition. Yes yes yes. More and more cowbell that video. Yes if trump does it run again and we do have an open primary caucus my first prime directive is going to be. I'm going to make an example out of mike pets because he's he's a very kind of christian republican that has darn near lost our way of life to the spirit of the age and we can't afford anymore so we got a new partner on the show. It's an interesting product man. It's called fast growing trees. maybe you've upgraded a few things while you were stuck inside but we all want to get back outside.

emerald robinson youtube last month next month last year Aaron trump facebook newsmax andrew boston this morning this month first prime directive fourteen two olympic trainy stories republican Fbi Page five seconds mike myo pericarditis
"dr ryan" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

The Steve Deace Show

06:38 min | 3 months ago

"dr ryan" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

"The western conservative summit. Florida governor ron santa's edged out former president trump in a straw poll. Seventy four point one percent to seventy one point four percent. The aforementioned pence came in tenth place at twenty one point six percent voters in the straw poll were allowed to pick multiple candidates in the unscientific poll. And that's what happened while we were away. Yeah the way they did. That was fascinating. It's an approval rating. Do you want this person. Basically run for president. Would you like them to. And you could click on everybody that you wanted that you wanted to run for president so Hey errands montage brought to you by friends over at rough grains you know we've been talking about them for quite a while now it is that supplement powder that you mix in with your pet. Your puppies appre is food that they already like because chances are it's been stripped of all the stuff that they need just like that happens to our foods for the same reasons mass consumption distribution Same thing he goes on with the pets. We take a lot of supplements nowadays to put the good stuff back into our diets. Your pet could use that too. But maybe you're wondering hey. Will this ruin my dogs for. They won't need it anymore. They won't like the taste of it. Our dog cabin loves the stuff that maybe yours won't. Here's one way to find out we gave you that first. Fourteen day. Jumpstart bag for free. You just pay a couple of bucks for the shipping. But the bag is on us just to see if you don't see number one a difference in your pet in the two weeks just in terms of their overall outlook energy level et cetera. But do they even like it number to give it a shot at rough. Greens dot com. That's are you f- f. That's how they spell it over there. Ref greens dot com or. Give them a call at eight three three rough dog. All right Eric clapton is one of the most gifted talented accomplished musicians of this era. And he's also one of the best connected basically anybody who's anybody in british pop music in the last sixty years either has been in a band with performed with or is friends with. it's funny. How and a lot of them are still alive. You know one of his best friends was george harrison from the beatles. He's been dead for a while but a lot of these people are still alive. Yeah been fast it. It's been good to see them. Come forth and support their legendary friend during this traumatic ordeal. Hasn't been good to see. It's been good to see pete. Townsend come out and support his old friend. Keith richards come out her. Well forget keith richards. And he's you know three sheets to the wind On the toilet in the morning he he. He has less cognitive ability than joe biden. At this point so that's a bad example but It's it's good to see you. Know his old buddy pete townsend you know jimmy page is still alive. Glycine jimmy page's old bandmate coming out and you know having his back during this really difficult time. You've noticed that hand. I hear you have no hands. How's it going. Yeah okay yeah. It's good to have friends. Indeed that boston herald story. I've told you guys that i'm already having conversations with people i know including a certain senator from texas. Recently we need at this point. We skip right past nine eleven and that we're at nuremberg now. Nuremburg style tribunals. Were the these this thing ends with these bastards in a noose on a gallo. That did this my wife finishing up her final degree. She needs for her therapist. Accreditation here in iowa via liberty university and she starts full-time at her job. After graduation in august she's interning there now and i mean we were discussing this very study. I sent it to her. We were discussing it y- the other day and she's like i could and i'm not alone. We got like nine therapist or something. She said in office people who see patients we. We could all just load up with children with minors. That market has just absolutely exploded. He said in the last year plus market by the way that all the data has shown from the very beginning. They are either not as a group as a group not vulnerable to or vectors four. Meaning they're not receivers or givers by enlarge at a dangerous level of this virus goes beyond that we would have gotten to hurt him any a lot faster yes because it had the healthiest immune systems out there. Pushing back on the virus right. You're exactly right about that. It's almost as if whether it is taking all the healthiest immune systems off the board. What was done with ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine not providing any treatment guidelines for eight months treatment. Guideline until october of last year was if you was a if if a patient tests positive isolate them unless their symptoms are too serious than they go to the er maybe a ventilator or one of the few new treatments created at works regeneron the mon- that's the monoclonal antibody treatment. That's what trump received These people are bastards and it's almost as if they did all the system. Did all of this. The spirit of the age did all this specifically so it could create the market disobey to these vaccines that are showing and proving to be increasingly dangerous when the world health organization that is essentially an arm of the chinese propaganda machine. I wouldn't go so far as to call them. An arm of the chinese government. But i would say they are at the very least sympathetic to the chinese propaganda machine at the very least they. They believe that they have to balance the messaging of the chinese propaganda machine with some semblance of their mission. Is that fair. Yeah okay When they're now saying no one under eighteen anywhere on this.

Eric clapton Keith richards keith richards george harrison iowa joe biden six percent texas jimmy tenth place august last year trump two weeks eight months four percent october of last year one percent Fourteen day ron santa
"dr ryan" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

The Steve Deace Show

01:46 min | 3 months ago

"dr ryan" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

"President believes that a fifteen august unborn. Baby is a human being. Are you asking me if the president supports a woman's right to choose. He does in completely unrelated news last week the. Us conference of catholic. Bishops voted to proceed with drafting a formal statement on the meaning of communion which will include whether pro-abortion politicians like president biden should be denied it in new york city. Supporters of hamas rallied for the annihilation of the jeers want the washington post created a video explaining how white people should feel shame and create accountability groups for their whiteness. Living embodied anti-racist culture does not exist among white people. White people gotta start getting together specifically around race. Accountability groups are really helpful in terms of having a place to process. Having a group of people whose responsibility it is to call me on things or to challenge me. We're unpacking wrong. Things that we've been taught in history class. I realized that i needed to go back and unpack and reorganized everything that i had learned because it was completely threw a white lens. Most of us in doing this work have experienced this where there's a period of deep shame for being white and for acknowledging the harm that our ancestors have cost and that's a very legitimate piece of this work completely unrelated news democrat. Senator sheldon whitehouse of rhode island came under fire this weekend. After it was revealed he and his wife have been members of an all white private beach club in the state for decades.

new york last week president fifteen august rhode island Bishops democrat this weekend biden Senator sheldon decades Us conference washington
"dr ryan" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

05:56 min | 8 months ago

"dr ryan" Discussed on Good Life Project

"We have this conversation. I'm hanging out in boulder colorado. You are in vancouver <hes> and <hes>. You grew up in british columbia. It sounds like in a small town. Did which is known it. Tell me if. I have this right as the second largest stampede. In canada behind calgary is that right. We're gonna go that right. Yes yes. I've lived my entire life telling people that factoid and for non canadian listeners. The stampede is certainly it biggest rodeo on the planet candidate you've <unk>. I grew up by <hes>. Surrounded by cowboys and gold. Rush prospectors bright williams. Like the. it's the town. It's pretty small town though isn't it yet. Is sub between fifteen and twenty five thousand depending on over the course of years. So it's it's pretty small it's largely in the interior of b. c. so it's a lot of mountains nearby and a lot of outdoors and that sort of thing. The caribous right. That's right. yeah it's in the cariboo. Yeah so were you. Were you ever participant in the rhodesia side of things. Actually my father was the the head of the rodeo. When year. But i was really small. I was never a participant. We had sort of friends that had ranches in for a while. We had cattle and horses forces scared me in the sense that they they had their own minds. I wasn't entirely sure when i was on a dirt bike. I knew how to control that but horses had to actually be a lot smarter than i was to know how to get on with horses so my sister wrote a lot got. That's kind of really interesting foreshadowing in a weird way though right because you sort of like as a as a kid you see these animals and realize that they have their own mind than their own will. And you're not entirely sure how it works. How to relate to them or had a surly interact way where you develop a mutual understanding and then you look pretty far far forward actually like a couple of years down. The road and your life has been devoted to similar process but with human beings absolutely. Yeah it's it's really interesting too because you see come full circle and not for me personally. But now acquaint therapy you have these people that are really being able to understand. The phenomenon of the brain is the brain is the brain right. So it's it's fascinating to see it across not just humans but across all animals. Yeah a much. A curious is so you do all this work on <hes>. Measuring what happens in the brain and detecting what happens in the brain then translating that. Because i i've also seen sort of this really fascinating emergence of therapy and known people who both <hes>. Lead therapy and have been through it. You have been inclined slash patients and shared how they feel like a horse's or these deeply wise animals who are fiercely intuitive and consents. Everything about you so that there there is this sort of connection really unusual connection that tends to happen with human beings as a neuroscientist. Does that land trudy. Yes it does. It's actually where. I'm i'm right now. I'm really interested in tobacco up a bit when ibm i built watson and challenged <hes>. Jeopardy champions i got called in the neuroscientist to compete <hes>. Sort of debate with computer scientists about the brain and a and all that stuff. And i got fixated on this interesting thing. I stumbled across my research where somebody proposed that there could be more functional connections in the human brain than there were atoms in the observable universe and over the years. I've really found that interesting. Because i've i've tried to work the numbers and that sort of thing and what i realized it. You know if you reduce that down to a simple circuit of neurons it is possible that that circuit can have more connections than it actually has atoms that compose it and when i really realized it was kind of cool is when if you think we'll wait a minute that's the neurons are not just within our own. Skulls are neurons. Interact with each other all the time right so minor runs right now. Are changing your functional connections in yours are changing mind so so i thought wow. Isn't that cool. Because that's like a really heavy kinda insight into ways. We could tap brain potential brain power to do good things in life. And so yeah. I'm always thinking about those things. Yeah and it's and it's really interesting to right because the fundamental assumption there. Is that the things that go on in our brain can in a very real way affect what's happening in the brain of being whether human or animal <hes>. in proximity to us in some way shape or form. Yeah yeah we just had one of our <hes>. Cyber narrow factoid and one of the facts that was really interesting as when musicians are playing music their brainwaves synchronized and doing all these things now. I don't personally do it but through in the field. There's all these meta scanning where they can show the neuro relationship between mom and baby and different people far away as just fascinating. Yeah that's amazing because then if you can show that the brainwave sink. Then if that sentence than has almost like this trickle down effect on the physiology and the rest of the nervous system then maybe that also part of the basis for people who were new you have these phenomenon where it seems like physiological cycles. start to sink <unk>. Yeah yeah. And i think it's interesting because the more that we become mindful of that the more we can actually use it for positive impacts right and i think in the world today you can maybe start to ask the question if some of that is there and has just out of control and so how could we actually harness that. I think that's just such interesting ways to think about how you know we never really think about our brains right. It's just what moves our body and our personality and all that but if you could actually think about it in different ways i've i've always loved creativity in that. Yeah

Ryan darcy simon fraser university more than two hundred today first Sixty academic works first brain colombia
Unlocking Your Brain's Potential With Dr. Ryan D'Arcy

Good Life Project

05:56 min | 8 months ago

Unlocking Your Brain's Potential With Dr. Ryan D'Arcy

"We have this conversation. I'm hanging out in boulder colorado. You are in vancouver and You grew up in british columbia. It sounds like in a small town. Did which is known it. Tell me if. I have this right as the second largest stampede. In canada behind calgary is that right. We're gonna go that right. Yes yes. I've lived my entire life telling people that factoid and for non canadian listeners. The stampede is certainly it biggest rodeo on the planet candidate you've I grew up by Surrounded by cowboys and gold. Rush prospectors bright williams. Like the. it's the town. It's pretty small town though isn't it yet. Is sub between fifteen and twenty five thousand depending on over the course of years. So it's it's pretty small it's largely in the interior of b. c. so it's a lot of mountains nearby and a lot of outdoors and that sort of thing. The caribous right. That's right. yeah it's in the cariboo. Yeah so were you. Were you ever participant in the rhodesia side of things. Actually my father was the the head of the rodeo. When year. But i was really small. I was never a participant. We had sort of friends that had ranches in for a while. We had cattle and horses forces scared me in the sense that they they had their own minds. I wasn't entirely sure when i was on a dirt bike. I knew how to control that but horses had to actually be a lot smarter than i was to know how to get on with horses so my sister wrote a lot got. That's kind of really interesting foreshadowing in a weird way though right because you sort of like as a as a kid you see these animals and realize that they have their own mind than their own will. And you're not entirely sure how it works. How to relate to them or had a surly interact way where you develop a mutual understanding and then you look pretty far far forward actually like a couple of years down. The road and your life has been devoted to similar process but with human beings absolutely. Yeah it's it's really interesting too because you see come full circle and not for me personally. But now acquaint therapy you have these people that are really being able to understand. The phenomenon of the brain is the brain is the brain right. So it's it's fascinating to see it across not just humans but across all animals. Yeah a much. A curious is so you do all this work on Measuring what happens in the brain and detecting what happens in the brain then translating that. Because i i've also seen sort of this really fascinating emergence of therapy and known people who both Lead therapy and have been through it. You have been inclined slash patients and shared how they feel like a horse's or these deeply wise animals who are fiercely intuitive and consents. Everything about you so that there there is this sort of connection really unusual connection that tends to happen with human beings as a neuroscientist. Does that land trudy. Yes it does. It's actually where. I'm i'm right now. I'm really interested in tobacco up a bit when ibm i built watson and challenged Jeopardy champions i got called in the neuroscientist to compete Sort of debate with computer scientists about the brain and a and all that stuff. And i got fixated on this interesting thing. I stumbled across my research where somebody proposed that there could be more functional connections in the human brain than there were atoms in the observable universe and over the years. I've really found that interesting. Because i've i've tried to work the numbers and that sort of thing and what i realized it. You know if you reduce that down to a simple circuit of neurons it is possible that that circuit can have more connections than it actually has atoms that compose it and when i really realized it was kind of cool is when if you think we'll wait a minute that's the neurons are not just within our own. Skulls are neurons. Interact with each other all the time right so minor runs right now. Are changing your functional connections in yours are changing mind so so i thought wow. Isn't that cool. Because that's like a really heavy kinda insight into ways. We could tap brain potential brain power to do good things in life. And so yeah. I'm always thinking about those things. Yeah and it's and it's really interesting to right because the fundamental assumption there. Is that the things that go on in our brain can in a very real way affect what's happening in the brain of being whether human or animal in proximity to us in some way shape or form. Yeah yeah we just had one of our Cyber narrow factoid and one of the facts that was really interesting as when musicians are playing music their brainwaves synchronized and doing all these things now. I don't personally do it but through in the field. There's all these meta scanning where they can show the neuro relationship between mom and baby and different people far away as just fascinating. Yeah that's amazing because then if you can show that the brainwave sink. Then if that sentence than has almost like this trickle down effect on the physiology and the rest of the nervous system then maybe that also part of the basis for people who were new you have these phenomenon where it seems like physiological cycles. start to sink Yeah yeah. And i think it's interesting because the more that we become mindful of that the more we can actually use it for positive impacts right and i think in the world today you can maybe start to ask the question if some of that is there and has just out of control and so how could we actually harness that. I think that's just such interesting ways to think about how you know we never really think about our brains right. It's just what moves our body and our personality and all that but if you could actually think about it in different ways i've i've always loved creativity in that. Yeah

Bright Williams Cariboo Rhodesia Boulder British Columbia Cowboys Calgary Vancouver Colorado Canada Trudy Watson IBM
Wisconsin sees massive spike in deaths, new COVID-19 cases

Steve Scaffidi

00:33 sec | 11 months ago

Wisconsin sees massive spike in deaths, new COVID-19 cases

"Virus cases across the state of Wisconsin could be a sign of things to come. The nightmare scenario of frankly, Wisconsin's chief medical officer, Dr Ryan Westergaard, says that nightmare could get worse than the fact that it's already highest levels. Widespread. And we think most people haven't been exposed yet is really a concerning scenario. Acting Health Secretary Andrea Palm said. Tuesday's numbers are a prime example of why they opened up the alternate care facility at State Fair Park. Despite it being sparsely used right now that exponential growth that we have talked about a number of times throughout this pandemic is coming home to roost like Spaulding

Wisconsin State Fair Park Dr Ryan Westergaard Andrea Palm Medical Officer Secretary
Virus pushes twin cities El Paso and Juarez to the brink

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 11 months ago

Virus pushes twin cities El Paso and Juarez to the brink

"A key battleground state Wisconsin broke records Tuesday for the number of coronavirus cases and deaths Wisconsin's chief medical examiner Dr Ryan Westergaard says the previous records were set just about a week ago it's a nightmare scenario frankly that this could get quite a bit worse in the next several weeks or months before it gets better health secretary designate Andrea palm says significant action needs to be taken we all need to stay home do not interact with people that you do not live with several months ago the Wisconsin Supreme Court struck down governor Tony Evers formal stay at home order if people stay at home we can call it whatever I call it saving life Iverson is pleading with people in Wisconsin to voluntarily shelter in place I'm at Donahue

Wisconsin Dr Ryan Westergaard Andrea Palm Wisconsin Supreme Court Iverson Donahue Secretary Tony Evers
Raise Your Frequency & Tune-up Your Energy With Crystal Singing Bowls With Colin Hillstrom

My Seven Chakras

06:04 min | 1 year ago

Raise Your Frequency & Tune-up Your Energy With Crystal Singing Bowls With Colin Hillstrom

"Once up action tribe here host and founder of mice, Chaka's my seven Corales dot com, the show where we help you expedients, effortless healing awakening, and Barnes today's episode we go deep into conversations and discussions about sound healing, one of our most favorite topics, raising levels of consciousness, letting off stock emotions, and the power of immersing yourself in healing sound, but before diving in. I'd like to remind you that. I have recently released a twenty page document that outlines some of my favorite Whiz, my tried and tested with to raise my wife rations and feel better a worst immediately, so if you'd like to check that out for that free download, my seven juxtapose dot com forward slash feel better now. Mice showed US dot com slash. Feel better now and get your pdf download all right, so let's bring on our special guest for today's. Golden Hills from is an innovator and practitioner specializing in alchemy. Sound Healing For archetype consciousness coaching advanced light meditation and transmission homeopathy. Believes that continually growing once awareness, understanding and knowledge of the chucker system is a most practical way for living a more balanced alliance, successful and Fulfilling Life Colin created his first full time wellness center in nine, hundred, ninety four, and has studied and certified on various. Mazda practitioners, including Dr, Ryan, or banners, and would renowned sound healer and Inuit Sherry, Edward, so as you can imagine topics for today are going to be in and around sound and vibration, frequency and healing in consciousness, and you're gonNA. Really enjoy today's conversation so Golan welcome to our show, and are you ready to inspire? Yes I am thank you. Thank you very much for having me on the show and Yes, ready to inspire is all about that right? I mean a lot of people talk about. On spirituality and social growth, and all sort of things and And those conversations can become quite hetty often approach from a left brain kind of side. The question at the end of the day's would actually we inspired you today, and that's what he wants about being letting Spiridon, and and really living by inspiration, though yes ready to inspire today, you Betcha. Absolutely and also listeners for some context as you probably know most of the guests that I've interviewed in the past activity, ninety percent of our business in the US. and. Especially since I am in a very conscious and you know spinach centered place. Vancouver was to reach out to some of the experts and visionaries and healers in the vicinity, and perhaps having person conversations with them, and so calling is actually bist into Victoria, not far from Vancouver, and this is me going in the direction of connecting with amazing people locally, and then, if possible, now that's a hint having in percent of us with folks in my community about healing about sound about frequency. Right so super excited about this session collapse. We can start with your childhood. What was it like growing up in your husband? And where did you grow up? I grew up near Hamburg Germany Two years old when I immigrated to Canada. and. So, what was it like growing up? I grew up in a very small city of about forty thousand people between Hambleton over. A city that has no post. Post secondary education, though virtually everybody after great thirteen, the Germans middle different from the Canadian like after great for you begin to specialize the either day in the General School, the Middle School until grade, ten or you early on Tuesday academic route Nicole was called high school, which is basically great, five hundred, thirteen, leading towards post secondary education. So virtually all my friends including myself degrade thirteen. We went somewhere else because there was no other place to study and I studied. At the university, of Munich for a year while it's actually not really quite true I enrolled in. In our school of law at the University of Munich, I went to one lecture and I thought that everybody else was like. Advanced compared to me and I decided to drive truck for year instead of going to university so I did that. And then I decided to study business administration and I enrolled at the University of Hamburg. I went to a few lectures. Derek got few credits and just couldn't wait for my ticket to leave. Germany, I was Prior to that thirteen years old spent a Lotta Time in France on exchange program. That's. That was A. That was very. Informative for me that Germany's a place that's really know for tunnel vision, and that's just very dramatic. Way is just like you basically almost like you just have blinders around yourself dislike like a horse. Pulling a cart in a way and that's in a way. That's the dramatic way of seeing you'd think of the way geographic on Germany's a wedge between East, and West Germany. That's just like the mind. Develop Sideway, though when I was thirteen years old I got the opportunity to do a debate in an exchange program. The French student and that was kind of my first. And my mind that there was also. A different wages. And absolutely loved it, and I remember like being We as a family are my host family I would go out with a with a fisherman on the little fisher boat are hardly tours and I thought to myself at the two year old. When I'm old. Enough I'M GONNA leave this place Germany, and I'm going to move to France on. We're GONNA become a fisherman. and they went over seventeen or eighteen years old. I thought I can't wait to get away from here

Germany France United States Chaka Golden Hills Vancouver Founder University Of Munich University Of Hamburg Mazda West Germany Munich Barnes Spiridon Golan Colin Hamburg US.
NEPA changes looming

Native America Calling

09:02 min | 1 year ago

NEPA changes looming

"This is native America Calling Monica Brain sitting in for tear gatewood. It started in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine with a massive oil spill about three million gallons of crude oil spilled into the Pacific Ocean by Santa Barbara California the environmental damage outrage the public and elected officials and it was the impetus for the federal legislation named the National Environmental Policy. Act OR NIBA. The act formalized the practice of environmental impact assessments. That explore how big projects might harm the environment or wildlife as dry as that might sound. Such a review was at the heart of the decision to locate the Dakota access pipeline near standing rock so now the trump administration says Nipah needs to be modernized. They would like to expedite environmental reviews. The proposed changes could also limit the public's ability to weigh in the proposal calls for tribal consultation but many tribal environmental watchers say that the trade offs are severe. That's our show today. Are you interested in streamlining environmental assessments? Will your try benefit from the proposed changes? Maybe they'll get projects done faster. Phone lines are open. Everyone's welcome give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's eight hundred nine. Nine native joining us. Now is Dr Ryan Emmanuel. He's an associate professor and university faculty scholar in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources at North Carolina State University and Ryan is an enrolled member of the Lombi tribe. Welcome back to native America Calling Ryan. Thanks for having me Monica. Yeah it's great to have you also on the line. We have Lisa developed. She is the vice chair of the Fort Birth hold protectors of water and earthrights and she is an enrolled enrolled in the man. Dan Haddatha recrimination. Welcome Lisa thanks for joining us Ryan let's start with you okay. So what purpose does Nipah serve? So one of the the key purposes of Nita's to ensure that we accurately document The environmental and tax Of a proposed project that is either going to be carried out by the government Carried out on federal lands or carried out with Some kind of federal funding Or or or permitting approval in order to make informed decisions about The types of actions or projects. that that we undertake in the US Nita says that You you must go into that with your eyes. Wide Open regarding environmental impact so at a very basic level it's a it's a documentation of the The environmental trade-offs and effects of undertaking a certain activity or development or project. Okay so let me simplify this a little bit to see if I understand this There's a project and it's either on federal land or it has federal funding and let's say that The environmental reviews is required. It's done and then it says something like this fish farm could end up Killing thirty percent of the sea turtles in the area. The that's all that happens with that. There's public comment but the company ultimately or whoever's doing the project ultimately decides whether or not to move forward is that right well the the agency that's responsible for conducting the review under Nipah is the one We'll make a decision based on whatever those numbers particulars are whether it's endangered species Or hunting or fishing areas or any other kind of resource areas. The Federal Agency has to take responsibility for the impacts. And say say yes you know despite those impacts. We're we're going to permit this activity anyway or no those impacts are too severe and we're GonNa make a judgment call and say we won't issue you this particular permit okay and so Let's talk about some of the proposed changes that are recommended To start off at one of the big things that I read was the creating deadlines for projects and so when president trump announced this he. He made a mention that you know. Sometimes projects take decades to finish and it's really slowing down progress and things like that and so this the the proposed changes would require that projects need to be finished from start to end The the permitting process anyway in two years is that right. That's right and it's important. I think to define what that window of time is that is from. The announcement of the agency is going to undertake An environmental review Through the the research in preparation of the document the public comment process finalization of the report. And then the agency's decision are supposed to take place within that proposed two year window. I mean do you think that's unreasonable? To try and get stuff done in two years. Well if you look at the the underlying data that the proposal sites you know it looks like it would be difficult. So the council environmental quality studied a length of time that it takes reviews to work their way to the systems and it really varies from one agency to another but a lot of these reviews take much longer than two years and so you know there are a couple of explanations for that one could be inefficiencies in the system but the other explanation could be that environmental issues are just so complex and we now have such a richer understanding of these issues and we did Fifty years ago that it warrants More time and more effort To to study documents impacts underneath a are Is THE AGENCY REQUIRED TO CONSULT WITH TRIBES? If it's on their tribal land or near in ancestral land. They so there's a federal executive order that Nipah is is Well the agencies are required to abide by Federal Executive Order Requires them to consult with drives whether it's on tribally controlled territory or or traditional lands Of that particular tribe so that that would still be in effect under the proposed rule changes as far as I understand. There's some language in the proposed rule about actually strengthening Provision for tribal consultation But at the same time there's concern about shortening the time window that you have to engage with tribes. Yeah that's another proposed. Change is well of course if it's two years than that automatically shortens the time window but also you know there's a public comment period Which we're in right now for these proposed changes to NAPA. But you know for these projects and there's a some efforts or the proposed changes are to shorten those public comment periods as well. What do you think about that? Well so I'll give you an example from the tribes that I work with here in North Carolina I I actually work with predominantly non federally recognized rides and there. There are a couple of important things about that but For this conversation you know. It's important to note that these trials are resourced when it comes to Staff who can deal with these kinds of requests for public comments or preparing the kinds of rich responses that are needed to articulate tribal concerns. You may have one person in tribal government. Who's responsible for environment Energy on and maybe a few other roles as well so when they're already Under under pressure to respond to these kinds of deadlines it will probably reduce their ability to participate in decision-making if you shorten the window even further

Dr Ryan Emmanuel Nipah Monica Brain America Lisa National Environmental Policy Department Of Forestry And Env Dakota Pacific Ocean Gatewood North Carolina United States Nita Santa Barbara California Executive
News in Brief 23 August 2019

UN News

03:22 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 23 August 2019

"This is the news in brief from the united nations. A surge in deliberate attacks against students teachers and schools in western central africa has led a to a tripling in school closures in the last year the u._n. Children's fund unicef said on friday in a new report. The agency warned that a generation of youngsters had been robbed given education in eight countries in the sahel region sounding the alarm in geneva was unicef goodwill ambassador mizzou now melon a former syrian refugee. Nearly two million children are out of school at iota conflict so it is not an easy number. It is important to highlight those challenges linda's to highlight the struggling those people because they need us. They need our attention. I had to flee my homeland in syria and two thousand thirteen here team and they also had to lift if you can't it wasn't easy for me and also i can feel like those children who cannot go to school because education. Is something really really really important to me myself together. By unicef to june indicates that nine thousand two hundred and seventy two schools have been closed in makino fasso cameroon maroon chad central african republic democratic republic of the congo mali nesia anti-g area as a result of insecurity three times the number at the end of two thousand seventeen fifty four people have died in sudan because of flash flooding since last month and nearly one hundred ninety four thousand people have been affected across the country tree humanitarian have said citing an alert from the sudanese authorities the u._n.'s humanitarian coordinating archer reported that fifteen out of eighteen states dates have been hit and more than thirty seven thousand homes destroyed or damaged. Here's a spokesperson jens locker. The fake people are in need of emergency shelter food health services and clean water and sanitation. There's also an urgent need for victor control to limit the spread of waterborne diseases by insects and drainage of stagnant water with rainy season expected to last until october and more rainfall forecast humanitarian are concerned by the high likelihood of more flash floods of the one point one billion dollars required to respond to all aid needs in sudan this year only thirty percent has been provided by donors and finally hey to the democratic republic of the congo d._r._c. where the ebola virus outbreak continues to prove hard to pin down but you in health experts remain positive they can't arrogated it speaking in geneva dr michael ryan from the world health organization or w._h._o. Explained that two of the biggest challenges daily security risks in the northeast along with the massive movement of people all potential carriers of the virus at the peak of this outbreak. We were tracking twenty two thousand context everyday tracking twenty two thousand the different people every day in an area where people hundreds of thousands of people move in the province every day. It's been a huge challenge while they disease has spread in the last last two weeks to mwenga in south kivu. Dr ryan insisted that one of the biggest steps forward was the development of vaccines and therapeutic medicine's latest data shows at the outbreak has led to a total of two thousand nine hundred twenty seven cases of infection and one thousand nine hundred and sixty one deaths daniel johnson u._n. News.

Unicef Sudan Geneva United Nations Dr Ryan Africa Waterborne Diseases Jens Locker Congo Syria Linda Dr Michael Ryan Daniel Johnson Archer U._N. One Billion Dollars Thirty Percent Two Weeks
A 28-year-old man had a stroke popping his neck

Sterling

09:40 min | 2 years ago

A 28-year-old man had a stroke popping his neck

"Pop by pop my neck, but I did not have a stroke. What the hell happened here because I may neck Popper. I like the pop my neck where were you know, wake up in the morning. It's like I'm working or something go, oh, my next or you give that little pop, and it feels good for a minute. What would you guys do all the time? So what happened with this guy? Well, by by trade, I'm a neck Popper to you know, but we we obviously take x rays, and we take we take things into consideration. When we're examining the patient, and one of the things that we have to look at it as a risk. And even though you can't mitigate risk all the time. They don't know that somebody's at risk. The reason this type of thing happens isn't because they're popping their neck, but because they have very unhealthy blood vessels to begin with. So somebody has blood vessels that have become very rigid over time. And there's some simple things. Most people can do to make sure that they're keeping their cardiovascular system pretty healthy. Fish oil is one of the. Things that the anti inflammatory effects of oil magnesium keeps blood vessels, really healthy. So taking magnesium really staying hydrated and avoiding too many diuretics like copy alcohol. Gotcha smoking overtime, those things really destroy your blood vessels. So the reality was whether he was popping his neck playing golf or flipping on a light switch. None of those actually would cause the stroke. They just would have been the last, you know, predisposing force that century that happened the the week blood vessel was really the issue. So what you're saying? Is that the the blood vessel it self deteriorates? It gets not as flexible it should be. Let's put away. It's like like an old rubber hose left out the sun. It's going to start cracking you'd brittle and that's what happened, but he's only twenty eight years old how much how much damage could he do your blood vessels Twenty-eight, man? This is the sad part is due to trans fats and fried foods and sugar in soft drinks and things like that chill. Children. Now over fifty percent of children under ten years old actually show signs of at-risk Leroux says already at that age. That's that's right. You know, what no one a little bit about physio because you know, I had about a half a semester of pre med dock. And I thought it might be like an osteo fight. So and osteo fight is something that kind of grows on your bone in your heart. And I thought okay, maybe this osteo fights there when you turn kind of act like a I don't know because it's it's you know, it's hard body that somehow cut the cut the artery possible to there's a there's a possibility of that. So I'll give you a couple of stats about seven thousand seven hundred thousand people have strokes every year. And the type of strokes that he had the T. Rowe artery, dissection or Bazeley artery. Dissection there's two two arteries. They're only about two point six percent of all strokes are because of those vessels. So you know, when people talk about chiropractic, and there being some risk you'd have to go into a chiropractor, roughly, eight point zero six million office visits to even have the risk of one incident of a stroke happening in a chiropractic office. And so the likelihood is that most of the time. These people were already having symptoms of stroke. For instance, this guy was popping his neck. He was probably having some neck pain, and maybe even a headache and trying to get some relief, but the neck pain and headache were probably related to the fact that he was already having vascular issues, and then the cracking of that whether there was an fuel fight or whether the the vessel is just that brittle. It was going to get injured. My my dad actually suffered a stroke when he was fifty and he did it. Golf. We've it or not you know, how we're supposed to keep our head down. Well, they never told you at one of the dangers of not keeping your head down that you hit your ball and slice it. But you could have a stroke. Oh my God. Turned his head really quick. And suffered a stroke on a golf course. And I remember the neurologist that was tending to him because I was in chiropractic college at the time. I said, you know, we're chiropractic where Jesse people all the time. How could he turn his head and stroking? He said, you know, my wife did it. He grabbed her tail and try to crack her neck when she was in the hot tub, and he said, she had a stroke. And he said the reality was we found out that she was already pretty much predisposed to her blood vessels or pretty unhealthy fathers. He was the person that told me if your dad had a stroke while flipping on the light switch that doesn't mean flipping switches, come true. Well, that makes sense. I it. So it's how brittle your arteries are because we're not taking care of ourselves at fifty I expect that because I recently went to the Christ hospital out six months ago, and I had one of those screenings that they do for twenty nine bucks and twenty minutes, and I'd recommend anyone get that simply because they they get a baseline of what's going on inside the walls of your arteries in your cardiovascular system, and everything great there. No Widowmaker, nothing predisposed should worry about everything was normal for someone of my age. So which is a good thing. But you know, four Warner's forearmed if you get one of those things and they find out. Hey, wait. You got some problems here lifestyle changes and possibly medicine if you let that go and don't know you're facing this twenty eight year old guy did it just simply golfing turning on a light. Switch in his case pop in his neck caused him to have a brain bleed have a stroke, and he almost died. Mentioned before, you know, essential fatty acids, hydration water minerals, like magnesium can all help you as a chiropractor. This is one of the reasons is critical chiropractors should always take xrays. If you have a problem going on because there are certain things that we could have seen. You might be able to see you know, calcification of an artery. You can see the crowded artery in the vertebral artery calcification of it's there. And if it is then you would change your strategy and how to adjust the patient with a less invasive type of an adjustment. I use a instrument sometimes called an Arthur stem. That's very noninvasive. We can still make great corrective changes, but the reality is a situation like this our country when you when you look at it five out of six people five hundred six end up developing, heart disease, or cancer. And so the way to make sure that you don't ever get one of these things is just assume that you're going to be the one of the five hundred six and stop assuming you're going to be one of the one of the six and start taking care of yourself in a way that is going to get you for their for their away. From that statistic. So we do a lot of classes a lot of things. I teach a lot of education on nutrition and stuff, and I will tell you that everyone really needs to start looking at their lifestyle medicine is they're kind of like the fire department to save your life in case of emergency. But two hundred thousand people a year die from taking their medication as prescribed definitely not medicine itself. Doesn't create health it can save a life here and there, but what does create health is making sure that your exercising eating well drinking enough water taking supplements. And I honestly chiropractic care the one thing in this situation that you know, some people might hear this and think it's scary. But there's no better way to take care of your nervous system. How your body heals then taking care of your spine? Dr Ryan Berlin, acute hearing centers dot com hotline seven hundred w w chiropractor lying, your health west in Westchester, and we're talking about this twenty year old guy and Oklahoma had a stroke because he popped his neck. He's an excellent stiff went to pop in it'd caused as vertebral artery to sever and he's gonna. I guess be. Okay. But the short term to meet him term prognosis is good for this guy. People die all the time. I wasn't the poppy the neck rather it was as the internal parts of his body. Cardiovascular system was at risk here too. So all told you know, as I said, I may neck Popper myself. I've had I've got like a head of bad back that fixed up chiropractic care and everything and my neck and mid back and all that. But I find myself at times like man next stiff specimen wake up, and I gave it a little pop is that inherently bad or like you heard popping your knuckles. What what does that doing cracking your knuckles? You hear that it can create arthritis. And that's usually people are jamming them or, hyper extending them. If you're gonna crack your knuckles the best way to do it simply just to pull them a little bit and get that release. So the popping noise is an inherently bad. But when you're doing it to your spine. You gotta remember that you have not only blood vessels that are very critical going to your brain. But you also have a spinal cord in there. And if we all remember the story of Christopher Reeves falling off his horse five organs shut down by injuring his spine. So. Even though you might be able to pop your neck and get a little bit of relief. You know, I always say a blind squirrel finds a nut. Every now, and then the reality is your best leaving it up to the experts. I went to school for eight years to learn how to Justice bind properly, and when people are using chiropractic care more proactively and not reactively. It's amazing even your people who are addicted popping their own neck. They don't feel the need to as much because we're actually getting to correcting the actual problem versus just grossly mobilizing all the vertebra above and below the one that's really stuck. I don't know. But in the last five, six minutes, you've been on DACA. I think I've tried to pop next seven times because I keep talking about pop in your neck. We gotta get you say popular. It's kind of like, hey, you know, what we did. We did a ten minute everyone. Blinking everyone. Be blinking right now. How many people are sitting there pop in my neck? I don't even pop like I'm trying to pump. And sometimes things just pop, you know, when you're moving around in the course of working out or. Just just life too though. Right. Okay. That means you're getting a little out normal motion there, and the body is eventually what happens you get a little releasing it eventually moves, but that is an indication that there's probably a little bit of dysfunction in your spine. You know, one thing that always amazes me as a chiropractor is everyone brushes their teeth every day because they want to keep their teeth healthy, you know, think about nobody really understands how to keep their spine healthy and chiropractic is one of the very few things you can do to proactively keep your spine, healthy and more importantly, keep your nervous system. Healthy info care practice, say great tool for keeping people healing and healthy.

Neck Popper Golf Neck Pain T. Rowe Artery Warner Bazeley Artery Leroux Christ Hospital Jesse Widowmaker Oklahoma Headache Dr Ryan Berlin Christopher Reeves Westchester