12 Burst results for "Dr Ron Epstein"

"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

07:48 min | Last month

"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

"Speed news commercial supplier conference and i am giddy with joy because i am literally staring at richard appalachia from the teal group. Kevin michael's from aerodynamic advisory and dr ron epstein from bank of america and gentlemen. I'm just glad we could all get together. It's nice to see you as agreed to be here. Thanks this is the best. It's so good to see you again in. Everyone is fantastic. It is so let's dive into it. We're Most of the way through the conference this week. We've heard a lot. It's been a couple of days. A lot of presentations. Lots of people talking. I wanna start with a general feeling as to what the state of the commercial aviation industry is from what you're hearing if you choose one or two words. What would you say is the zeitgeist here. Ron yeah i. I'd say optimistic You know the one statistic that kind of jumps out to me is. There's took broad consensus that the industry could be back to twenty nine hundred air traffic levels by late. Twenty two mid twenty three something like that's where you know. The consensus here seems to be too depending on the platform depending on the market that kind of thing but a general optimism richer. What do you think yeah. you know. Strong agreement cautious optimism. We've never seen such a profound bifurcation between unprecedented traffic drops by the economy holding up. But usually they kind of travel he economic disaster coupled with traffic disaster. Here we only had one Bizarrely enough so i think is a feeling that is things returned to life so we'll degrade machine that is the industry can. What do you think about what the crowd here is thinking. I think bifurcation the word richard use and stole was going to use that word but but it is clear that there's a bifurcation between domestic international travel so when we talk about our peak as coming back. That's the mix. But i think i think the theme is that domestic travel is going to recover much faster. Us and china domestic travels fifty five percent of all domestic arba gays and In our in domestic travel is going to be back probably twenty twenty two and that probably underpinned some of the announced since we've seen from airbus about rate increases. Well let's get right into it. Let's talk about those rate increases. Because i think that's a gorilla in the room that Everybody's got an opinion about one way or another. I believe we have heard some skepticism from this supplier. Audience about rate increases. Gentlemen would you agree. Disagree. yeah. I think that's that's right and they should be skeptical right. I mean it's their job if they just take the always at face value. Then they're they're taking risks that maybe they don't want to However i would say you know the talking about the airbus rates that got thrown out there particularly the target and twenty twenty-five And you think about that. Success airbus had with the three twenty one plus two eight hundred twenty There's numbers might not be all that optimistic. If you think ten to fifteen those per month could be a three twenty one then talking fifty five sixty eight hundred twenties and out in twenty twenty-five doesn't seem all that aggressive honestly you know. Give kevin becca custody of life occasion. I'll go with case shaped here. You're seeing these k- patterns everywhere and it's true the rates I feel generally for reasons. Roger say said about You know better. About the airbus rates. Than i do about the boeing ones in very large part because of the three twenty one. We're doesn't seem to be competing very effectively. But you're seeing this case shape pattern everywhere. Kevin said domestic international scheduled versus busy. I mean keizer just showing up everywhere on the landscape. I think what i would add to that is So whilst we're more optimism about her travel and rates at the same time the supply chain is completely unprepared completely unprepared and when you talk to suppliers and i know you're gonna ask us about this but when you talk to suppliers and especially smaller suppliers the long lead items required even for what airbus is talking about next year. They don't have the working capital a lot of them to order. So then they don't have firm purchase orders from airbus so as airbus going to walk the talk in come through with purchase orders because the supply chain his weakened as we all know and these and i know you'll ask us but the constraints of working capital and human capital are gonna really really boil. Boil up absolutely so. Let's go there. We hear a lot of talk about liquidity concern in the supply chain particularly at the lower levels tier three tier four below. There is a belief that the tier ones can get capitalized. They are capitalized And can go get more if they want. They can sell stock if they had to. You know if they ran out of all other options but the lower levels they need money. They're not getting it and or at least it's going to be harder for them to get it at the same time human capital Issues there were a lot of layoffs. A quarter third. Maybe half of particular workforce's hiring than back as more difficult ron. I'm looking at you. And i'm thinking Chokepoints you know. Do the top tiers. Do they get just how fragile supply chain is feeling right now. I hope they do. I mean by my single biggest worry about the industry now. Is the supply chain for all the reasons you mentioned. It's it's kind of like a huge ramp in the capital base of the bricks and mortar there. But the people aren't so you re ramping up in an industry that just got decimated and you know how you gonna get the people back. So i i worry about it. huge Raw materials place in the whole thing. So kevin i want to go to you on raw materials. Yeah you had alluded to that before. We're hearing about rising prices of the raw materials There's the fear of inflation. Inflation shock could be coming back. Maybe some say. It's a short term thing but if you look at all the money in the marketplace a lot of people frayed could be a long term that's really disruptive to the buying airline business model and and partying for an aircraft. You know just. How much consideration should the whole industrial base have for rising material costs and inflation and those concerned. Yeah you know. It's it's interesting when the the the oem's here said well we're not concerned about raw material prices because we are hedge. We have long term agreements prices out but the smaller suppliers Don't necessarily have those agreements you know. Boeing has an arrangement in the in in its supply chain with aluminum titanium through tm. Extra space where there's longer-term pricing seemed at their preferential. But for everything outside of that. Or if you're in europe where you don't have that you're very very post so it's definitely something to worry about an and again as yet another headwind for potentially smaller suppliers being asked to order in advance when they don't have working capital in buying at the wrong time winters inflation in the the products that are vying so several other issues. I wanna go through but I gotta i gotta pick on one that i think looms in the background richard. You know we're coming to this conference and there's been a big change or a big announcement at boeing. mr calhoun. tenure has been extended for quite a while and so. I do think that there are suppliers kind of wondering. What direction is boeing going in We talked a little bit here at the conference about a new aircraft whether they should whether they shouldn't a lot of people think they should To question of timing though maybe is more importantly wind. Do they do that. What did you learn anything from this conference. That surprised you.

Kevin michael Kevin Boeing fifty five percent ten Roger kevin Ron one two europe richard this week next year china dr ron epstein two words bank of america fifteen twenty nine hundred air
"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

04:41 min | 8 months ago

"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

"Would be more energizing neighboring without be and so actually taking on this issue of suffering as issue approaching suffering itself as an opera church burnings and you talk about why some people don't burn out and there are several resilience factors that you point to. I guess let's talk about doctors. Do you think doctors can learn to be more resilient. Did they become more. Resilient as time goes on and they face more and more these really difficult situations or what is that capacity. That allows us to be more resilient here. I think that medicine is really bad job but yes it's true. Some people do become more resilient. Some people burn out. And i don't think there's any workers not enough concerted effort in terms of building the capacity for resilience individual had collected way as in other professions for example. I know in the aviation industry after had a near miss if you're pilot not allowed to fly again until you have a chance to talk with someone about her experience and how you manage that emotionally as well as heartedly and fair procedures in place that help people deal with traumatic events. Even the military they in training for special forces for example. They know they're going to be sending these people into very very dangerous circumstances and they don't just throw them in at the deep end they do some progressive conditionings so that they are able to navigate a mildly difficult situation moderately difficult situation a severely difficult situation and so it's just this progressive training. I think you dishes do that. Also you don't good musicians. Don't wake up one day or playing in all. They play for a small class from them. They play for larger group. But i think in medicine students spend two years essentially in the classroom has some pretty early clinical experiences but essentially classroom learning. And then they're just thrust into these environments rich. Ross human suffering is unfiltered and often without. Ah nuff opportunity to debrief. And to build their capacity for resilience. In those circumstances and the culture of medicine has before doesn't acknowledge and reinforce that says that he the shirt. I really feel that. There's a lot to be learned a lot that needs to be changed about the culture of medicine to make it perfect. Is that maui patients but healers has and it would certainly help the high levels of burnout among physicians. Yeah what is your meditation practice with. Do you do every day now. Either do meditation. I reducing exercise. I and then to meditation. I would say some days. It's twenty five minutes sundays. Fifteen minutes in the morning. I was trained. Initially insemination tation had. There are two forms on his focused attention. Meditation the second is was called she got thousands which means just sitting and it's kind of a more open awareness addictions. That's what i do on where the breath of accounting breasts about trying to control. It is somewhat similar to some the pasta meditation techniques. So you and in the app can usually something much briefer line. Jonathan humphreys a transition between work and home and for the. I've done both both since i started. Yeah are you able to teach any of the doctors or residents that you work with now or do you pretty much. Keep your practice as your practice. Well into the context of workshops mindful practice for health professional. But it's not just meditation. We also do a lot of narrative and deep listening exercises and other things. Meditation does for important container for interactions. I am so grateful that you're doing this work. It will have such an impact in already has had such an impact on so many people. I loved this book. And i highly recommend it to patients. Potential patients healthcare professionals. Thank you so much for writing and thank you for being on untangled today and so happy you could be with us.

Jonathan humphreys Ross burnout
"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

01:32 min | 8 months ago

"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

"And there's this real temptation of wishing that she we go away or who didn't have to walk into the room. And i know i would never say that in a professional context but the feeling is there. It's undeniable on the other side a contrasting healing. A saying that you can make some difference just by helping the patient feel other. Non lower men accompanied listened and that in the broader scheme of things. Even if the pain doesn't get better the suffering might but she needed to function better despite the pain that she may feel that she's that much less alone and that her life has a greater sense of meaning and purpose just by virtue of having been listened to in a deep way and human to human contact. That's the part that tells me okay. I'm going to go in the room. Because even if i can't do anything technically to change her medical condition. There's something that i can do just by being present now. How do we deal with our own distress around those kinds of circumstances. I think that's we're community comes in knowing that your theology physician or healthcare professional taking care someone who presents problems that are intractable and being able to talk about it and also be able to turn towards that and saying well one way that i can see the situation differently that.

"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

01:52 min | 8 months ago

"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

"In the middle. You need your mind and be prepared for a few ways and obstacles and you need to be able to do pretty about maneuvering around them but also you don't wanna drought abandoning your patients. You wanna a kayak. That's just not. And i used as a metaphor for the mental states that you might want to be in your clinical work. Yeah i really liked that because you also talk about stress can be really good thing and it's finding this balance of things that may seem like they're opposite but finding a place of stability for yourself the other thing i wanna talk about before we close is we talked a little bit about suffering this idea of suffering and compassion proposed doctors and patients. How can we make sense of certain things that have been. I think you use these words. The brutality and unpredictability of a disease. I personally. I have a friend who has a genetic degenerative disease and she's very young and she will likely die within maybe a few years. And it's this idea that doctors have to face. this patient. patients have to face the brutal condition and living with chronic pain. This question is really about. How do we suffer together. Dr impatient what helps us to deal with these things. And how does it. Dr wake up every day over and over again to face these kinds of things in the world. I think we all navigate that conundrum differently. What is just for me at my rules. Dr knowledge that even human understanding often release suffering. Last time i was on thursday the hospital a few weeks ago.

chronic pain
"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

04:13 min | 8 months ago

"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

"One thing thinking to do which was to be this observer not only of others but also with himself so you talk a lot about curiosity and i feel like this is interesting for doctors and for all of us. This idea of transforming discomfort into curiosity. This curiosity discomforted curiosity transition is massachusetts is just a former practice in service of being who you are. He sort of in the book by doctors to embrace or even tolerate ambiguity sometimes in cuties so uncomfortable this idea that to be a good diagnostician you may need to see things from different perspectives and this is true but this is also true to hold something lightly enough to be able to see it from different perspectives. As soon as you become too wedded to an idea and you're thinking begins to shut down but if you're not wedded enough to an idea and you can't four because unita someone's they are shorter brass. There's this ambiguity. Maybe it's heart failure obvious pneumonia. Maybe it's the collapsed ladies. You've got to do something to act right one way to approach. That is with absolute certainty. Oh yes this looks just like that which were a certain percentage of time but then if that's certainty remains too rigid and you won't be able to navigate if your first supposition didn't work out so i think it's having enough certainty to act or not confidence to act and enough ambiguity terming curious it's remarkable the degree to which humans can actually learn this on the positive side. This is a pretty nuanced skill to be able to see the world in different ways and young children can do that. 'cause they got great imaginations that sense of focus and disciplined yet yielded carothers curiosity through to some kind of meaningful action. You have a quote from william james in your book defining practical wisdom you say all human thinking is essentially a two kinds reasoning on the one hand and narrative. Descriptive contempt thinking on the other. Are you teaching other students now. Are you mentoring young medical professionals. How are you sharing all of this amazing wisdom that you've amassed throughout your career. How are you planning to seeds for the next generation uses collecting collective inquiry and hard. What i love about. Teaching is learning and watching others. Learn learning myself and watching other. I so i see this as just a choice of what kinds of questions you want to ask. I could ask a medical student. Please explain to me. Biochemical basis diabetes. Or something like that. okay. That's a question i know the answer to not. I think students should know. But other questions that i'm asked dr mowing methods patient. Would you think was going on. And how did your thinking change as you got to know this patient better and as you did the exam with my tests and what did did you find your region. And how did he get out of those lines. You feel most certain. What do you feel uncertain about if there's something that you might have missed. What was that being. And those kinds of reflective questions to jiggle people's thinking and say okay and then i try to be transparent about my own processes at if i end up in a blind elliott Tell us student that and so you. This direct authors This did not and he's big surprised. Now while i liked your kayaking when you learn how to kayak and there was the sense of being off balance but stable and safe at the same time knowing that you're never completely imbalance and that that's okay another car enjoy kayak.

unita heart failure pneumonia massachusetts carothers william james dr mowing diabetes elliott
"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

04:09 min | 8 months ago

"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

"Really both ad that the mindfulness piece is doing. The difference is knowing that your auto pilot and knowing that you need to slow down or stop and by knowing often that comes before you can actually articulated so again. The examples the surgeons that i gave this comes for work of colleague of mine in toronto caroline walton. She talks about slowing down. When you should have equality of surgeons but a surge is insane themselves. i'm encountering difficulty slowdown down. Just kind of do it. Is this tacit knowledge that they have the do recognize. It does register and they do slow down but they don't even go through the mental processes of deciding that in itself at capacity to slow down to take a pause to take a moment is also a learned capacity. So i would say. Stepping out of autopilot itself may involve some kind of autopilot alert system saying jay. What i normally do is stop us. Something different but it's not even that verbal at. You're talking about intuition. Right is constructing this big thing. That people call intuition. 'cause intuitions can be right on. Can also just confirm stereotypes and biases. That looks like a dishonest person. Well about it is the color of their skin. Their genders their age. Is it the fact that this deeper certain accident. I don't know me deconstruct it. Then you can use your intuition intelligent. How do you think. Mindfulness your meditation. Practice helps you get to that place because it seems like such a unique place right. This intersection of expertise and heartful ness and some vague. Knowing the way. I put it together and this is not an original idea. Psychologist named eugene gimblett nine Experiencing as a primary turning modality the difference between having experience and engaging in experiencing. It's a red getting around having to explain whether you're doing this experiencing thing is a source of learning as a source of learning and a process. Not a checklist kind of learning. It's a familiarity with a process that allows you to understand its landscape about roy service describe waves but he's all these words to but still i can't imagine that as rate actually feels that the words somehow our common language but there's also this feeling of what a wave is how your intersecting and interacting with it. I think of mindfulness more in that process sense. And i don't into the orleans serious really good clinicians inside. There's something not right about the situation on their lab test look could but they just don't look healthy and so sad capacity for dissonance discarding. I love the way you just said that. Yes seeing dissonant provokes curiosity as to ignoring nervous carving. This reminded me. Just watch the new oliver sacks documentary this idea you talk about in your book that he perfected the art joy of observation and he had this curiosity this realization. That there's always more and he had this is like a deep seeking to know which was so wasn't he criticized so much in the early days. Scientists didn't want to accept his way of seeing the world but he was always really so unique and so curious and had such keen observational skills also so persistent fire from there at a crazy life. Doing the one thing thinking to do which was to be this observer not only of others but also with himself so you talk a lot.

caroline walton eugene gimblett toronto jay roy oliver sacks
"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

07:45 min | 8 months ago

"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

"To diagnosis it. Based on cognitive information just in the emotional rallying and the technical route. I started out the book describing different surgeons that i work with as a thirty two and one was clearly responsive reflective and the other hand if you look at them on the outside the one who was responsible reflector was very extroverted loud fast. Funny he didn't strike you as being monka sure. He wasn't stopping calling for a moment of meditation into the operation. But he certainly has a capacity of being a moment of being attentive and being curious and recognizing errors before they really got snoopy garrison. What mind from this actually looks like is not about still pawns and motor slaughterers bind from this happen in this chaotic fast. Moving world of technologically driven medicines. Well you have this model for mindful practice. Do you remember the one that i'm talking about where there are three bubbles. One is quality of care. One is quality of caring and the other is clinical resilience. Let's talk about how you do define mindful presence and where you see that in the ecosystem of healthcare right now trust different questions. What is trying to make the point of being mindful. Wish helping yourself feel better or stronger. In fact ripples of that. Mindfulness touch the lives of patients both in a bio technical sense that i think you're paying mindfully. You're more likely to make the right diagnosis drive. The ranked treatment not make surgical errors. Not stick yourself with a needle. Things go bad and so i think it's safer more effective. More patient centered care. The second is relational that is if you're able to be more self very more likely to make strong relationships with patients and colleagues third bubble. I've really changed nomenclature a few times because 'cause it's not just about resilience and it's not true. It's not now. I put that bubble is flourishing that. It's a sense that you're doing the job that you're meant to do. You're doing well and you have a sense of wholeness about it doesn't mean you're happy all the time doesn't mean you're contempt with a certain wholeness so put enough. I don't know how you feel about this now but medicine being in crisis. Do you feel that way now. Is it healthcare. That's in crisis is at the whole spectrum from patient to doctor to payers. Do i don't wanna be overdramatic. Confluence of factors that are concerning or at least fifty years or actually more than that. I- rita's as early part of the twentieth century hundred years bemoaning the excessive attention to the technical aspects of medicine insufficient attention to the human aspects of medicine. That's one area of tension had part of it is the technical aspects are more concrete. You're easy to grasp it's easier to master them easier to if you're doing well or not and the human aspects are by nature interest objective and something's gotta slip through your fingers. He's easy knocked nervous. The nefarious aspects. I think are few one is on call. The hegemony of curbing which is the international classification of diseases now second one thousand different diagnostic categories. But not one of them is called suffering. Here's a category for breyer. Tumors the left next anger. But there's this imperative to categorize and he was seventy one thousand categorizes account for the uniqueness individual so thinking digitally as opposed to unlock thinking and that curbing driven by economics to some degree depending upon the code you you can charge. Different amounts of money for caring for people and the second is the corporatization healthcare so despite people's aspirations to provide high quality care and i think even the chief financial officer most healthcare enterprises are committed to high quality. Care is just that the process of increasing productivity through put prophets hijacks discussions about quality. And i just think at faculty meetings in my department in many other departments and the amount of time spent on quality of care as opposed to quantity accuser. Keener is just out of balance is very much our the areas of concern. I think are professional isolation clinicians. This is untrue. Word effect of electronic health records for people are now sitting in front of computer screens rather than talks louder. I think a collective sense of alien nation health care the camaraderie that could be. There isn't and we. I don't mean to Any good news because they had their problems too but one thing that was present for a very long time was a sense of community among dealers and this is very very hard work that we do. It's taxing Taxing and it just becomes so much more hostile when you feel your part of the community and in fact in the work that even though i didn't talk much optionality optionality and the article in nineteen ninety nine that's really come to the forefront has loan and poorer quality off practicing. Mindfully is a support for that is having. You're not doing this on your heart of the larger effort. As i was reading your book i felt so much compassion for doctors who are often made out to be the bad guys are women and this idea that what you talk about is the lack of community but also cognitive loads drive them to be on autopilot and this expertise is so important and the need to redefine to create an opening for other ways of being that may be more possible or other ways of healing. That may be more possible and you talk about the emotional distress that many doctors go through and this idea you were used an example of patient saying to the doctor. What would you do if this were you. And how difficult these questions really are a human being to answer and how much of your emotional life you may have to cut off sometimes to be able to be with the kind of suffering that you're with your touching on a number of things are not respond to the last one. I think part of the task. You have iago pilots some of the time. You couldn't get through the day without that again back tonight. Musical training if had to think about how to play a c major scale. Every time i played one. I would never be able to learn. Music is something that just has to be just through repetition and experience that becomes lubricated points that it becomes afros and that's really important to get through the day. Equally important is recognize that effortless automatic were has its limitations and you need to step into a more deliberate and reflective so. It's really both ad that the mindfulness piece is doing. The difference is knowing that your auto pilot and knowing that you need.

breyer rita Tumors Keener
"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

04:18 min | 8 months ago

"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

"She was somewhat of a controlling. the huron had. Everyone's life the-the out for them. They're going to be this internet. And so i was going to the doctor and so i embraced it for a little while. But as soon as i hadn't experienced any sense of autonomy. I really said no. That's not going to be nothing my life to fulfil someone else's dreams. So i really parked it for quite a while. Had a difficult decision for me to change course after i had already graduated from college to go back and take premed courses income dr but it wasn't after having tried a number of things and realize a few things one is that although i liked reading books about philosophy i didn't let my time in libraries and writing books as my exclusive connection to the world needs to be physically. Under nacho. steve electra number. And the second is that. I have unless experiences myself that i think tip the balance and said okay. I saw an experienced suffering in a way that i had really understood in a personal a four and actually ultimately had to come to peace with the fact that i would never be able to fully untangle my family expectations from my own aspirations that there will always be some ambiguity of intention. There was okay. I subsequently fee author. George choices or conditions are prior experiences. Whatever they are allusion of total autonomy is just. It's it's a gift to the medical world and to patients that someone like you is in the healthcare profession and is treating us ona's people in medicine discovered for one gloriously about writing. Is that when. I first started writing about mindful practice over twenty years ago. The correspondence i got this extraordinary people would email just nascent stance on letters and phone calls. You wrote an article in. I think it was nineteen ninety nine and you said that it just struck a chord. Tell me a little bit. About what cord were you striking a coming from. A few perspectives. One is that tried to understand what reflection really meant in practice and admitted for me more than just monday morning. Quarterbacking not more than sitting around a table figuring out what happened and how you might do to lighter your needs to be some of the reflection you need to be able to observe yourself and immersed your work at the same time and i did see a model for that. There are two miles that came to new one was meditation. My view of these people. The from its practice is practice. And then you bring what you earned from that practice out of the world so to relationships with people. I second attempted. A career. effort decided among was becoming decision. And if in playing you can't hear what the listeners hear much just what you playing want to hear but if you find yourself in the shoes of the listener understand receives fact what you're doing and you're not really arts have that reflective capacity that massachusetts pasadena moment and how you develop that from you the most powerful experience. I haven't developing about liz meditation and everything that went along with it. That's where the dots connect me and you talk about in the book as a doctor being a guardian for your patient health. But also you talk about you. Call it your inner operating system in each moment and this. I'm assuming as what you are talking about with this reflective capacity. When you're with a patient how does that work. How do you think about the metaphor because it may strike a chord with people. I have a friend who's at engineer ad designs. When you might call intelligent chains machines that can tell when they're malfunctioning. Then fix function. So that a program without propensity not crude approximation of what we're doing by or.

steve electra huron ona George pasadena massachusetts liz
"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

01:59 min | 8 months ago

"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

"Connection to the world to everything that the world offer and an internet connection wasn't just observe that but i have merged myself in this i jumped into the water and the deep end and swim through it. So that was the place i started. And as how i ultimately got interested in meditation and autos actually at age nineteen thought i would become a monk. A serious attempt back. Yeah you spent a few months. At the zen saying cisco center person there. And why did i. I can't imagine what some of the older students were thinking about this young kid. Who is there that i just needed to do. That was the next step for me. It sounds like you could have gone down this path of being a spiritual monastic or a philosopher. How did you take what you were learning from. Meditation and from studying at the zen center and then decide to be a doctor. The subtitle of your book is medicine. Mindfulness and humanity. And i think that's so perfectly represents the essence of who you are as a human being but when did this and how did this all come together for you. As a child. I was interested in things medical and originally when we first got an encyclopedia paper encyclopedia. Nothing and i look up. I interested asthma. As as matic started reading about other illnesses aspects of human experience and that coupled with a fair degree of family. i wouldn't call it pressure. I guess some expectation or hope or aspiration that the family would somehow produce a doctor you at the says in wine my grandmother. My mother's mug was very explicit about.

zen center cisco matic asthma
"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

05:27 min | 8 months ago

"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

"Dr ron epstein. It is so great to have you on tangled. Thanks so much for being here real to be with you. I just want to read some of the quotes that are in the beginning of your book because they really struck me. John cabot zand says this book will be phenomenally useful to all of us who are desperately in need of true health. Care and caring. Dan siegel says the book is a beautiful synthesis of inner wisdom and hard earned impure cle findings and you start the book by saying that you believe the practice of medicine depends on deep understanding between clinicians and patients and that human understanding starts with the understanding of oneself. And i would just like to start with this question. where did you begin with understanding of oneself. It's probably in my james to some degree. Because i remember even as a young child being interested not only in the world outside but also the world inside pat. I was interested in what thought was and i was interested in breeding. I was has not as a child so badly. Learn how to briefing not cost kind of interested in how the body were town on a mind. Were tell ideas got into your mind. Things like that from a pretty young age. I guess it's the upside of being somewhat introverted at that dual view of the world just that interior human observers you. When did you first recognize that in yourself. will you ten years old. Did you have some influences. It sounds like you a seeker that you were asking a lot of questions. Her number certainly started before high school. I was really interested in reading. And i read things that were beyond the point where my world experience but allow me to truly understand and i was reading cavu when i was in junior high school. Obviously you can't really get what he's talking about. I mean i knew the words. But i kind of had the sense that he was really trying to understand the world and sewers. I am discovered hermann hesse fairly early on also that actually resonated with the because all of his novel is basically the same plot to people who start out life one becomes a contemporary live and spends there's lives on monastic search for wisdom and the other goes out in the world becomes longer and tries to understand universe through experiencing the world in a deeper way and i saw both of those in myself and quite a young age thought was drawn to that. I think it was sometime. In highschool that i learned about maslow's hierarchy of human vs botanist like survival and at the top was self actualization wanted the express train to sell <unk>. That's where i wanna be. I can't say that there's wild ridden. It does the same thing from the. I discovered his poetry. We had to read some of his poetry like a junior high school or something that i really discovered it as a personal manifesto probably but i was like fourteen or fifteen history of connection to the world to everything that the world offer and an internet connection wasn't just observe that but i have merged myself in this i jumped into the water and the deep end and swim through it. So that was the place i started. And as how i ultimately got interested in meditation and autos actually at age nineteen thought i would become a monk. A serious attempt back. Yeah you spent a few months. At the zen saying cisco center person there. And why did i. I can't imagine what some of the older students were thinking about this young kid. Who is there that i just needed to do. That was the next step for me. It sounds like you could have gone down this path of being a spiritual monastic or a philosopher. How did you take what you were learning from. Meditation and from studying at the zen center and then decide to be a doctor. The subtitle of your book is medicine. Mindfulness and humanity. And i think that's so perfectly represents the essence of who you are as a human being but when did this and how did this all come together for you. As a child. I was interested in things medical and originally when we first got an encyclopedia paper encyclopedia. Nothing and i look up. I interested asthma. As as matic started reading about other illnesses aspects of human experience and that coupled with a fair degree of family. i wouldn't call it pressure. I guess some expectation or hope or aspiration that the family would somehow produce a doctor

ron epstein Dr ron epstein John cabot zand Dan siegel hermann hesse maslow
Interview With Dr. Ron Epstein

Untangle

05:27 min | 8 months ago

Interview With Dr. Ron Epstein

"Dr ron epstein. It is so great to have you on tangled. Thanks so much for being here real to be with you. I just want to read some of the quotes that are in the beginning of your book because they really struck me. John cabot zand says this book will be phenomenally useful to all of us who are desperately in need of true health. Care and caring. Dan siegel says the book is a beautiful synthesis of inner wisdom and hard earned impure cle findings and you start the book by saying that you believe the practice of medicine depends on deep understanding between clinicians and patients and that human understanding starts with the understanding of oneself. And i would just like to start with this question. where did you begin with understanding of oneself. It's probably in my james to some degree. Because i remember even as a young child being interested not only in the world outside but also the world inside pat. I was interested in what thought was and i was interested in breeding. I was has not as a child so badly. Learn how to briefing not cost kind of interested in how the body were town on a mind. Were tell ideas got into your mind. Things like that from a pretty young age. I guess it's the upside of being somewhat introverted at that dual view of the world just that interior human observers you. When did you first recognize that in yourself. will you ten years old. Did you have some influences. It sounds like you a seeker that you were asking a lot of questions. Her number certainly started before high school. I was really interested in reading. And i read things that were beyond the point where my world experience but allow me to truly understand and i was reading cavu when i was in junior high school. Obviously you can't really get what he's talking about. I mean i knew the words. But i kind of had the sense that he was really trying to understand the world and sewers. I am discovered hermann hesse fairly early on also that actually resonated with the because all of his novel is basically the same plot to people who start out life one becomes a contemporary live and spends there's lives on monastic search for wisdom and the other goes out in the world becomes longer and tries to understand universe through experiencing the world in a deeper way and i saw both of those in myself and quite a young age thought was drawn to that. I think it was sometime. In highschool that i learned about maslow's hierarchy of human vs botanist like survival and at the top was self actualization wanted the express train to sell That's where i wanna be. I can't say that there's wild ridden. It does the same thing from the. I discovered his poetry. We had to read some of his poetry like a junior high school or something that i really discovered it as a personal manifesto probably but i was like fourteen or fifteen history of connection to the world to everything that the world offer and an internet connection wasn't just observe that but i have merged myself in this i jumped into the water and the deep end and swim through it. So that was the place i started. And as how i ultimately got interested in meditation and autos actually at age nineteen thought i would become a monk. A serious attempt back. Yeah you spent a few months. At the zen saying cisco center person there. And why did i. I can't imagine what some of the older students were thinking about this young kid. Who is there that i just needed to do. That was the next step for me. It sounds like you could have gone down this path of being a spiritual monastic or a philosopher. How did you take what you were learning from. Meditation and from studying at the zen center and then decide to be a doctor. The subtitle of your book is medicine. Mindfulness and humanity. And i think that's so perfectly represents the essence of who you are as a human being but when did this and how did this all come together for you. As a child. I was interested in things medical and originally when we first got an encyclopedia paper encyclopedia. Nothing and i look up. I interested asthma. As as matic started reading about other illnesses aspects of human experience and that coupled with a fair degree of family. i wouldn't call it pressure. I guess some expectation or hope or aspiration that the family would somehow produce a doctor

Dr Ron Epstein John Cabot Zand Dan Siegel Hermann Hesse Maslow Cisco Zen Center Matic Asthma
"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

03:55 min | 8 months ago

"dr ron epstein" Discussed on Untangle

"Also discusses his hope that the human aspects of medicine can become at least as important as the technical aspects. I love that. Life's work has been discovering that mindfulness might just be the quality that creates a wholehearted master clinician. Now here's ron epstein. Dr ron epstein. It is so great to have you on tangled. Thanks so much for being here real to be with you. I just want to read some of the quotes that are in the beginning of your book because they really struck me. John cabot zand says this book will be phenomenally useful to all of us who are desperately in need of true health. Care and caring. Dan siegel says the book is a beautiful synthesis of inner wisdom and hard earned impure cle findings and you start the book by saying that you believe the practice of medicine depends on deep understanding between clinicians and patients and that human understanding starts with the understanding of oneself. And i would just like to start with this question. where did you begin with understanding of oneself. It's probably in my james to some degree. Because i remember even as a young child being interested not only in the world outside but also the world inside pat. I was interested in what thought was and i was interested in breeding. I was has not as a child so badly. Learn how to briefing not cost kind of interested in how the body were town on a mind. Were tell ideas got into your mind. Things like that from a pretty young age. I guess it's the upside of being somewhat introverted at that dual view of the world just that interior human observers you. When did you first recognize that in yourself. will you ten years old. Did you have some influences. It sounds like you a seeker that you were asking a lot of questions. Her number certainly started before high school. I was really interested in reading. And i read things that were beyond the point where my world experience but allow me to truly understand and i was reading cavu when i was in junior high school. Obviously you can't really get what he's talking about. I mean i knew the words. But i kind of had the sense that he was really trying to understand the world and sewers. I am discovered hermann hesse fairly early on also that actually resonated with the because all of his novel is basically the same plot to people who start out life one becomes a contemporary live and spends there's lives on monastic search for wisdom and the other goes out in the world becomes longer and tries to understand universe through experiencing the world in a deeper way and i saw both of those in myself and quite a young age thought was drawn to that. I think it was sometime. In highschool that i learned about maslow's hierarchy of human vs botanist like survival and at the top was self actualization wanted the express train to sell That's where i wanna be. I can't say that there's wild ridden. It does the same thing from the. I discovered his poetry. We had to read some of his poetry like a junior high school or something that i really discovered it as a personal manifesto probably but i was like fourteen or fifteen history.

ron epstein Dr ron epstein John cabot zand Dan siegel hermann hesse maslow