17 Burst results for "Dr Robert Bullard"

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:06 min | 9 months ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Sports Talk radio. Why didn't we select this man to undertake this Herculean? Because will his name is on a marquee? Here he is Robin. Anyone recently become aware of how it is around Celebrated of pretty alive by quickly. Environmental move. What's your load off just payments, Imperial weather and the Romney people don't talk about him are black and minority players first, anywhere on the magic. Jonathan wineries, power plants or dumps are often loving words. Go, Greg Papa! Yes, They're residents often roughed out about Hollis and coaches. On Today's program really make you want to weigh shaper explores the intersection between racial inequality and the environment. Joining him in this discussion are three veterans in the field of Social justice. Mustafa Santiago Ali is vice president of environmental justice at the National Wildlife Federation. Prior to that he worked for the U. S Environmental Protection Agency for 24 years. Glinda Car is president and CEO of Higher Heights for America, an organization she founded to grow Black women's political power, and Dr Robert Bullard is distinguished professor of urban planning and environmental policy, a Texas Southern University in Houston. Dr. Bullard is widely recognised as the father of environmental justice and is a recipient of many awards, including this year's Stephen Schneider Award for Climate Science Communication presented by Climate one. Now here's Greg Dalton and his Panelists. I'd like to begin today's program with inviting everyone to take a breath. Humans breathe about 25,000 times a day. But what they breathe and how they breathe is a lot of racial connotations. Covert attacks the lungs, coal attacks, the lungs, and.

Dr Robert Bullard Mustafa Santiago Ali Greg Papa U. S Environmental Protection Greg Dalton president and CEO vice president Climate Science Communication Glinda Car Romney National Wildlife Federation Stephen Schneider Hollis distinguished professor Higher Heights Texas Southern University Houston America
"dr robert bullard" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:42 min | 9 months ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on KGO 810

"On the systemic racism that has permeated this country for centuries. Many white people have only recently become aware of how racism is embedded in every aspect of our society. The environmental movement is no exception. Air pollution, severe weather and the economic upheaval brought on by climate change, impact black and minority communities first and worst. Refineries, power plants and dumps are often located in lower income neighborhoods. Yet they're residents are often left out of policy responses and market solutions. On today's program Climate, one host Greg Dalton, explores the intersection between racial inequality and the environment. Joining him in this discussion are three veterans in the field of social justice. Mustafa Santiago Ali is vice president of environmental justice at the National Wildlife Federation. Prior to that, he worked for the U. S Environmental Protection Agency for 24 years. Glinda Car is president and CEO of Higher Heights for America. An organization she founded to grow black women's political power, and Dr Robert Bullard is distinguished professor of urban planning an environmental policy, a Texas Southern University in Houston. Dr. Bullard is widely recognised as the father of environmental justice and is a recipient of many awards, including this year's Stephen Schneider Award for Climate Science Communication presented by Climate one. Now here's Greg Dalton and his Panelists. I'd like to begin today's program with inviting everyone to take a breath..

Greg Dalton Dr Robert Bullard Mustafa Santiago Ali Climate Science Communication U. S Environmental Protection vice president Stephen Schneider president and CEO Glinda Car National Wildlife Federation Higher Heights distinguished professor Texas Southern University Houston America
"dr robert bullard" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:45 min | 9 months ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Outrage sparked by the murder of George Floyd has cast a spotlight on the systemic racism that has permeated this country for centuries. Many white people have only recently become aware of how racism is embedded in every aspect of our society. The environmental movement is no exception. Air pollution, Severe weather and the economic upheaval brought on by climate change, impact black and minority communities first and worst. Refineries, power plants and dumps are often located in lower income neighborhoods. Yet they're residents are often left out of policy responses and market solutions. On today's program Climate, one host Greg Dalton, explores the intersection between racial inequality and the environment. Joining him in this discussion are three veterans in the field of social justice. Mustafa Santiago Ali is vice president of environmental justice at the National Wildlife Federation. Prior to that, he worked for the U. S Environmental Protection Agency for 24 years. Linda Carr is president and CEO of Higher Heights for America, an organization she founded to grow Black women's political power, and Dr Robert Bullard is distinguished professor of urban planning and environmental policy, a Texas Southern University in Houston. Dr. Bullard is widely recognised as the father of environmental justice and is a recipient of many awards, including this year's Stephen Schneider Award for climate science Communication. Presented by Climate one. Now here's Greg Dalton and his Panelists. I'd like to begin today's program with inviting everyone to take a breast..

Greg Dalton Mustafa Santiago Ali Dr Robert Bullard U. S Environmental Protection George Floyd Linda Carr murder vice president president and CEO National Wildlife Federation Stephen Schneider Higher Heights distinguished professor Texas Southern University Houston America
"dr robert bullard" Discussed on Climate 2020

Climate 2020

08:20 min | 11 months ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on Climate 2020

"Lower most impacted must be in a room to speak for themselves and have the capacity and resources to make that voice is heard now that to me is a simple argument, and for those of us who work on justice is a recipe for victory is a recipe for victory. We have to remember the Environmental Protection Agency was created on the Republicans on the Richard Nixon. When we when we make those policies and provide those cabinet positions that we put the right people in new. We ended regionally administrators. We have to make sure that they are diverse reflecting America. So. I just. I'm going to predict that I believe you're going to get that. Call from Joe Biden I'm just going to stay there right now. You're going to get that call so I hope you're prepared when you. When you do have that call, are you gonNA I? Mean I know you're following the green new deal. Groups are green new deal at line groups. The sunrise movements been out front on that do and I assume that you you like the messaging that around racial justice and the Green India right I mean that's that's going to be part of your message to Joe Biden. When you when you do, get that chance to talk to him. Yes, If I got that call, it would be basically putting the meat on the bones of the green new deal infusing the racial justice across economic justice health justice. You talk about climate, just all of the things that we're talking about because it's connected, not written eighteen books on a whole lot of stuff. Is Just it's just one book, but don't tell anybody I mean and the key glue that holds all that together is fairness. Justice in equity are written books on transportation housing. Land use you start naming Allah. It's one book, and and so the idea is to the word for the day. Is Intersex analogy out things? Connect in as a sociologist you know. We're good at connecting dots and I tell people you know I'm sociologist, but I don't do dead white man sociology I do what's Scientifically Call Kick Ass Theology You, do you? Do you sociology work? And then you work with communities to assist and support in if they need us with this and support we do that. We don't lead them. We don't tell we don't tell them what to do with when they want us to assist and support, we do that and that's the role of a kick ass, though CIALIS. In everybody's not built for that. but those who are built for we welcome into our full you back in nineteen, seventy eight. There was just I could count the folks on one hand that was doing this. And have a couple of fingers leftover, but that lots of folks doing it now, thank God. So Dr Bullet Let me present two possible paths for you. I would like to comment on both of them. Path one is. President trump is reelected so these issues of Environmental Justice Racial Justice Education Justice Criminal Reform Justice, those are probably GonNa have to be dealt with at the local level at the mayor level, sometimes the governor's levels at the business level because we're not gonNA, see National Leadership I mean. Let's just be real about this. That's path one path to is Joe Biden's elected, and then there is a pretty much a free for all in terms of which issues you're going to deal with. He's or his administration is going to deal with in that first six months and I'm climate is going to be one of those big topics hot, so assess those to pass if you would. If you wouldn't mind for us, let me just say this. Lessons from the civil rights movement in coming out of the environmental justice and coming at it from a Justice Equity Perspective. It does matter who's in the White House. It does matter who's in the governor's office is does matter WHO's. The mayor. But the fact that no matter who's in offices. The Movement for Justice Must Continue. And that we will not bake our our self determination in our fight for justice based on one person elected to office, and that if we and I'll speak as a black person as a black man, I been black most of my life. That if we. Had counted on. Having a person being in a Position. To make a change or the president to make a change mayor, a Blackhawk would still be picking cotton in Alabama, so we have to gauge our work. In our motivation in our commitment, no matter. What officeholder! Is there. The WHO's on the city council and who's in the mayor's office and WHO's on the board of? County Board of supervisors. In, the legislature is just as important as who is in the White House. When you talk about some of the changes that need to be made at the local level, and so that's the. That's the I guess the the plan that those of us who have been on this earth long enough to know that we can't have a four year plan. We need a thirty a plan. In some cases we need a fifty year plan. Because if we just planned for two years four years. We am. This is not a sprint marathon, and so we had to plan for marathon. We have the plan running twenty six point two miles. In it's a marathon. Really actually you run twenty six point two miles, and then you pass the baton to the next generation to run that twenty six point two. We know there's no such thing as America on relay. What is when we fight for Justice Dr Bull you've spent you spent most of your professional life working on this issue in you are justifiably thought of as the father of the environmental. Justice Movement. Really, appreciate your taking the time to talk to Jeff and Media Day. Oh my pleasure, my pleasure and Dr Bullet before you go. E. Spoke earlier in the interview about black people needing more opportunities to speak for themselves and advocate for their own communities when it comes to the climate. Now. I understand that you recently relaunched an organization. That's going to go along way hopefully toward making that happen. The National Black Environmental Justice Network. Tell us more about that. Yeah, our national black ramble network basically is reformed from nineteen, ninety nine that that had kinda like have been put on hiatus, and the this this rule out of this reverse include myself. Dr Beverly Right. WHO's over the deep? South Center, in Vinyl, justice, in Wallin's Peggy Shepherd who's. Executive Director at the act, in. In Harlem and we have Donell Wilkins's from a grain door. Our Organization in Detroit Michigan and we have it's like. It's a bunch of people We have some individuals on our national steering committee. Who who are from environmental groups Some of the white armed groups will after America's work inside of of environmental groups, but it's lead. Our Organization says that we as Africans. Speak for ourselves when he wants to do. We must organize mobilize. Energy generation. Great to meet you. Dr Bullard by pleasure. Climate Twenty Twenty is produced in association with the yours. Project and postscript audio. Funding is provided by Exelon. The Nation's largest clean energy provider. Today like never before people are talking about clean energy innovation environment we share. That's why Exelon is committed to electrifying its transportation clear across all utilities to further reduce the carbon footprint. Bringing cleaner air to low communities, they serve and creating economic opportunity through job. Creation reduced energy costs. By twenty twenty five, they are committing to electrify thirty percent of their vehicle fleet, and by twenty thirty fifty percent for more info visit Exelon Corp Dot Com. To show is hosted by me David. Gilbert and Jeff Nesbit climate twenty twenty s produced by Jamie Kaiser.

Joe Biden America National Black Environmental J Movement for Justice Must Dr Bullet Justice Movement Exelon White House Jeff Nesbit president Environmental Protection Agenc Climate Twenty Twenty Richard Nixon twenty twenty Dr Beverly Right Dr Bullard Exelon Corp
"dr robert bullard" Discussed on Climate 2020

Climate 2020

08:14 min | 11 months ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on Climate 2020

"The the Houston study was forty years ago up. Again Dixie was thirty years ago. Fast forward to twenty twenty. We'll deal with the same. Trying to unravel and dismantle systemic racism. What sort of anticipated my next question I mean. How are things different now if it all different in terms of the the location of these hazardous sites and Health perils that we that you've documented for for thirty forty years by now. How different is it now? It's different, but it's the same you know. the Nineteen eighty-seven United Church of Christ toxic waste ray study showed that race was the most potent factor determine where has its way soon located across the country. Colleagues now we updated as study twenty years later in two thousand seven. Two thousand seven fifty six percent of all the residents live within a two mile radius of a hazardous waste, hazardous waste facility of people of it, and if you look at two more facilities, that number jumped to. Will jump to sixty nine percent. So things have gotten better, but in some cases, things have gotten worse. In eighty seven? About thirty five percent of the people living around these houses. Were people color. And if you look at you know when twenty years later you talking almost seventy percent, the reason why those numbers job is that full white people can move away from these facilities whereas Middle Income African Americans. Other people call stop because of what Sabre Gatien in housing discrimination. This is the pattern again. If you look at redlining, that occurred in the thirties talking in the nineteen thirties. The, impacts of that in the effects of redlining, showing up in terms of urban heat islands, the areas that are hottest in cities right now are the areas that experienced redlining. redlining also is now showing up in terms of areas as being hit the hardest by the corona avars overlay those same maps, so systemic racism is doing a lot of things to a lot of people and has been doing that over. One hundred one years sixteen nineteen Dr Buller did did any of the folks in the civil rights movement back then to you well, you know this is. This isn't great, they're. They're dumping garbage in our neighborhoods, but this isn't really the main fight. The main fight is about civil rights. It's about the vote. Did you get any kind of feedback like that? From from other black leaders in town? Well, we got. We got some support from some. Of Black wanted officials that we got support from was young. Justice of the peace, African American Justice Isa. He's a congressman from now green. We went to the N. double ACP. We went to the environmental groups and environmental groups base Lewis said well, you know eighty two percent garbage is dumped in black neighborhoods where the got garbage disposal to go now this is green allies now but back then. They basically saw wrong when we went to. Civil rights organizations invasive said we don't work on environment. We work on housing mission in voting education. Etc. it took almost. You know twenty years to have that convergence of civil rights in environmental environmental issues, but what we must remember in nineteen, sixty eight. Ten years before being. A Martin Luther King went to Memphis Tennessee. On a Nevada justice issue, striking garbage workers is just somehow. It didn't get foot on the radar. Dr Bull You. Raise the corona virus. Tell us a little bit about what racism has to do with Corona virus and the fact that blacks have been disproportionately. Affected, by are in fact, does racism anti anything to do with black being disproportionately affected by the coronavirus? Well, the Chorale Vars is is like a heat seeking missile. Zeroing in on the most vulnerable population and when it hits. It's like a death bomb. Because of the target that is seeking is seeking vulnerability, and because of structural and systemic racism. The reason why? African Americans in other people call have so many underlying. Health conditions is it has to do with structural stroke that so clinic while has do it racism. There's a whole field all social determinants of health. You tell me a zip code I can tell you I'll health your zip code still the best predict of health and wellbeing so when those numbers started coming out. In terms of the differential incidents of of WHO's getting sick and dying for those who work on environmental justice, those numbers are not surprising surprising. If we look at for example, asthma rates, asthma has been a been a epidemic in the black community for decades. African, American children, ten times more likely to die from asthma and white children I'm talking free. It I'm not talking something that is happening because. When you look at you, know a a respiratory illnesses you look at diabetes. Obesity, look at all those park parking heart disease. And kidney disease, those are the underlying conditions. That's the CO morbidity that's making those populations very vulnerable and then, and is also mixed vulnerable. If we just wipe away cold, it and just talk about health disparities. Environmental conditions free eight those vulnerabilities for for these elevated. Illnesses and deaths. That's like eighty five percent of Americans feel like we're living in a time of chaos right now. I! Mean it's extraordinary. Let's talk about the national level just for just for a second. We know how I. Feel free to weigh in on President Trump and I. I'm more interested on your views about Joe Biden when it comes to talking about race and more specifically about climate justice. How do you see that? Go I mean. What do you think of Joe Biden? How he's talking about race this moment in time specifically climate justice how he's reacting to the climate issue, I think. Biden will have to address issues of systemic racism and. Environmental Justice and Climate Justice in criminal justice. All of those things that are are now swelling up in the massive movements around this we talk about climate change. Climate change has to be within parts per million in greenhouse gases. Anybody who's going to put it in that context, the science is solid, but the policy has to follow the science, and we talk about these communities that are on the front line that co that are experiencing climate. Change Right now. We're not talking twenty years from now, not talking thirty years from now. We're talking right now, so the policy that that will come out of of A. Team! We are pressing that those policies address equity issues, and we cannot just have the green groups, and in the white environmentals, speaking for us in the US, that I'm talking about the people of Color in the communities and in front line communities that that has experienced the issues of climate issues of economic injustice and the racial injustice end the injustice in the criminal justice, as we have to have those voices in those rooms at those tables, so that so that so that people can speak for themselves in Nineteen ninety-one, we had the first national people of Color Environmental Leadership summit, and we developed seventeen principles of Environmental Justice and the core principle that really. brings a doll home is that people must speak for themselves, and those.

Environmental Justice Joe Biden asthma redlining. redlining Dixie United Church of Christ Houston Color Environmental Leadership US Martin Luther King Dr Buller Obesity congressman Dr Bull Lewis Memphis Tennessee
"dr robert bullard" Discussed on Climate 2020

Climate 2020

07:18 min | 11 months ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on Climate 2020

"But I climate. Twenty twenty is brought to you by Exelon the largest generator of zero carbon electricity in the US. Excellent stance with it's more than ten million customers who believe confronting climate change is essential to the health and prosperity of all communities learn more at Exelon Corp Dot Com. So Jeff. Dr Bullet is lived through the civil rights movement, and he also ushered in the birth of the American. Environmental Justice, Movement Yeah, he's, he's known as the father of environmental justice, because of all the deep research did in the nineteen seventies where he highlighted the birds of pollution on black communities. His work continued in in every decade since so when the corona virus hit, he was one of the loudest voices calling out the links between air, pollution, systemic racism and Cova deaths. He's a sociologist and he's also the author of eighteen books on ecological racism. And he has also recently helped relaunch the national black environmental justice network after a fourteen year hiatus. Dr. Berlet is based in Houston. That's George. Floyd's funeral took place. I asked him what it's like being in Houston now while Histon is. The center of the universe right now, and it's ground zero for issues around racial justice and. Joyce four Lords. Homecoming. Journal in the memorial in. Demonstrations before that you know it's, it's You cannot be touched by it by all the things that are going on the fact that Houston hot. It's always been hot nine five degrees ninety percent humidity. People are out there. Making their voices heard the corona virus right now is still rising in Texas, still rising in Houston. And the idea that. People are are making some choices as saying that these things happened right now, and there's a sense of urgency in young people. You know old people, black people white people. Hispanics Latinos are out trying to make their voices heard in many cases voices that have been just drowned out I've been interested in how you initially got into this whole issue of of equal racism and I I saw that you started in Houston and and at least early on your career, you were focused on the citing of of garbage disposal. Places sites. In Houston and there was a hood that you involved in a in a fight about called Northwood matter. Can you tell me about Northwood Manor well? My introduction to. Issue of. Laced in garbage in landfills and race and racial disparities. Was accidental. Worked at Texas, on university is a sociologist and my life attorney. In one day she came home and said Bob just sued the state of Texas. And I said why she said Yeah I sued them. Because the state of Texas grand per ranting a permit to this continent that wants to locate this sanitary landfill in the middle of this flag, middle class, suburban community of homeowners and I took the case. She said I took the case and. I need somebody to. Help me. to collect the information to find a walled landfills are in Houston, and so what we found was five out of five with the CD landfills. Six out of eight of the city on incinerators in five four out three out of of the privately owned landfills located in black neighborhoods that eighty two percent of all the ways dumped in Houston from the thirties number until nine, hundred, seventy, eight were in black neighborhoods, even blacksmith only twenty five into population. Tells tells how came out what happened well. We had the data we had. We had the maps in. We had the charm. We had the facts, but what having a facts is not enough. To to win in court, we have to prove intent. Even have an overwhelming data that I. did I told you we in court. Deductible I have to say I am profoundly struck by what you just said that you were unable to to prove intent. Despite the fact that? These garbage sites were located within thirteen hundred feet of the school playground. That's that's shocking to me is shocking and it's so unfair that you have to. The victims have to prove somehow that the perpetrator is doing it on purpose, and and the the the outcome of that case when we lost so impelling to me that even when you have the facts, facts are not enough and so. That's when I went on this. This care went on this mission. My thing is is. Is Houston just isolated incident this outline? That's when I started looking at a the less smelters in Dallas all the let's Nelson. Data's located black neighborhoods start looking across Louisiana Cancer Alley for those concentration of petrochemical plants are living closest who's been impact like people when all the way across the Alabama to find the the nation's largest hazardous waste landfill located in Alabama black belt in a town. That's ninety five percent black in a county that seventy five percent. MSA, well, you know this is doing a time when I was writing. Dumping in Dixie book eventually came out that research you had you. The the factory that blew up that Union Carbide plant that blew up. The place the prototype for the Union Carbide plant was in institute, West Virginia a little black town where this chemical plant union, Carbide plant, the only place in the country that manufactured that chemical mental isocyanate was located in institute, so the idea that this was not just an isolated Houston's not an isolated incident. This was a pattern that needed to be documented in. That's how dumping. In dixie. came up in nineteen ninety. So so you. You found in your research. Going back, you know thirty years thirty forty years that there was an over representation of hazardous sites in black neighborhoods compared to white neighborhoods. And and what was the doing the residence of those neighborhoods well, if you look at Wealth. middle-income wealth most as it is embedded in homeownership. Any few are segregated. In terms of of black people in this country, and if and if you, your neighborhood is inundated with Lucien, you're losing your health. Because of pollution US losing your wealth, because of your property is not being able to appreciate you. Are you have a double whammy? That's impacting you at you. That's GONNA. Keep you in a lower economic strata. Even when you own homes, your property is not appreciated, so you're theft of health and the death of wealth, and that is a systemic. That's what we're dealing with right now..

Houston Texas Exelon US Twenty twenty Exelon Corp Union Carbide Dr Bullet Jeff Northwood Manor Dr. Berlet Floyd Joyce George theft Alabama Lucien Dallas
"dr robert bullard" Discussed on Climate 2020

Climate 2020

03:19 min | 11 months ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on Climate 2020

"Dr Bob Bullard is a sociologist prolific writer in environmental justice activists. He came of age during a moment of sweeping change in America I came out of the sixties in the civil rights, movement and young activists. You know fearless termine surely before Dr. Bullard turned eighteen. In nineteen, sixty four congress passed the civil rights at the law that ended segregation racial equity became his life's work in and through his research decades later, he exposed the ways that minorities bear the burden of pollution. Started working on environmental racism before it was A. Concept that was. I guess steeped in the DNA of the country racist today, anger over racism and policing is energized. The black lives matter movement. Public opinion is shifting. It feels like an historical parallel to the sixties, but bullard says this time around things are different when you look at you, know the sixties and you see. The, most cases, it was Likable out there with with whites. And in many cases, it was sprinkling a life. People out there, and this seems different. You look at the images rolling across the screen. and you see that you. You have young people. You have old people. You have in a generation of folks of all colors and sizes than and whatever saying a. we need to do something about race. Oh injustice! His observation is backed up by polls that say more Americans than ever believe racism is a big problem and pretty much. Every major climate group is joining the movement in solidarity, saying that their goals aligned with the goals of the protesters blurred sees. This is a positive step. We're talking about climate. We also talked about. Climate is racial justice. Climate is health. Climate is economic justice so the justice. Justice part in the part. Those things have to be front and center, not a footnote, but sympathetic politicians and Enviro groups lineup in support. He wants to know. What are they going to do about it? All of our groups got statements now everywhere you look. Everybody got a statement on. Racial Justice and what we say is racial justice starts at home so the Biden campaign and the Biden. Team and hopefully it will be a transition team will need to live up to this whole idea of of inclusion, an infusion of that transition with racial justice. That's the kind of leadership that I would like to see in the white. House, that can inspire motivate and get people working together. This is climate, twenty twenty, a podcast about climate change and the twenty twenty election. I'm David Gelber of the Climate Media Company the Years Project and I'm Jeff. Nest, but I run climate nexus, a climate communications group coming up how fighting racism is inextricably tied to fighting climate change and cleaning up the environment. We spoke with Dr. Bob Board about whether the momentum of black lives, matter will breathe new life into the Environmental Justice Movement, plus how President Biden could put supportive words into action..

Dr Bob Bullard Environmental Justice Movement President Biden twenty twenty writer America David Gelber Dr. Bob Board
"dr robert bullard" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"My we are one oh four five six eight welcome to today's program of the Commonwealth I'm Gloria Duffy president and CEO of the club a nonpartisan non profit public forum dedicated to airing diverse views on important topics of the day Dr Robert Bullard is the distinguished professor of urban planning environmental policy Texas Southern University he's often described as the father of environmental justice for his work highlighting pollution his many books address issues such as environmental racism Clement justice disaster relief and he came to the Commonwealth club to receive the Steven Schneider award for outstanding climate communication and annual honor bestowed by the club's Clement one program he was in conversation with climate one founder and host Greg Dalton they will be joined a little later by Adriaan a queen Tero the director of diversity equity and inclusion at the energy foundation now let's listen in on the conversation at the Commonwealth club great Dalton in two thousand seven I went to the arctic on a global warming expedition with scientists and journalists aboard an ice breaker experiencing climate change at the top of the world change my life and when I returned create a climate one here at the Commonwealth club for the last twelve years I've been interviewing leaders about how burning fossil fuels disrupts all of the systems around us our food system our water system our ecosystems our lifestyle and our economy climate changes everything today were honoring a revered champion of people in a respectful and inclusive relationship with our environment Dr Robert Pollard is distinguished professor of urban planning and environmental policy at Texas Southern University he's the author of eighteen books that addresses the animal development environmental racism urban land use climate justice disasters smart growth regional equity and more topics his titles include race place an environmental justice after hurricane Katrina and my favorite the wrong complexion for protection how the government response to disaster endangers African American communities doctor Bullard is highly decorated in two thousand fourteen Sierra Club name gets new environmental justice award after him in two thousand nineteen.

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on KGO 810

"The day Dr Robert Bullard is the distinguished professor of urban planning and environmental policy Texas Southern University he's often described as the father of environmental justice for his work highlighting pollution his many books address issues such as environmental racism Clement justice disaster relief and more he came to the Commonwealth club to receive the Steven Schneider award for outstanding climate communication and annual honor bestowed by the club's Clement one program he was in conversation with climate one founder and host Greg Dalton they will be joined a little later by Adriaan a queen Tero the director of diversity equity and inclusion at the energy foundation now let's listen in on their conversation at the Commonwealth club I'm great Dalton into thousand seven I went to the arctic on a global warming expedition with scientists and journalists aboard an ice breaker experiencing climate change at the top of the world changed my life and when I returned create a climate one here at the Commonwealth club for the last twelve years I've been interviewing leaders about how burning fossil fuels disrupts all of the systems around us our food system our water system our ecosystems our lifestyle and our economy climate changes everything today were honoring a revered champion of people in a respectful and inclusive relationship with our environment Dr Robert Pollard is distinguished professor of urban planning and environmental policy at Texas Southern University he's the author of eighteen blocks that addresses the animal development environmental racism urban land use climate justice disasters smart growth regional equity and more topics is titles.

director Greg Dalton Clement Steven Schneider Dr Robert Pollard Dr Robert Bullard Adriaan founder Commonwealth club Texas Southern University distinguished professor
"dr robert bullard" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on KGO 810

"The day Dr Robert Bullard is the distinguished professor of urban planning and environmental policy Texas Southern University he's often described as the father of environmental justice for his work highlighting pollution his many books address issues such as environmental racism Clement justice disaster relief and more he came to the Commonwealth club to receive the Steven Schneider award for outstanding climate communication and annual honor bestowed by the club's Clement one program he was in conversation with climate one founder and host great Dalton they will be joined a little later by Adriaan a queen Tero the director of diversity equity and inclusion at the energy foundation now let's listen in on their conversation at the Commonwealth club great Dalton in two thousand seven I went to the arctic on a global warming expedition with scientists and journalists aboard an ice breaker experiencing climate change at the top of the world changed my life and when I returned create a climate one here at the Commonwealth club for the last twelve years I've been interviewing leaders about how burning fossil fuels disrupts all of the systems around us our food system our water system our ecosystems our lifestyle and our economy climate changes everything today were honoring a revered champion of people in a respectful and inclusive relationship with our environment Dr Robert Pollard is distinguished professor of urban planning and environmental policy at Texas Southern University he's the author of eighteen blocks that addresses the animal development environmental racism urban land use climate justice disasters smart growth regional equity and more topics his titles include race.

director Dalton Clement Steven Schneider Dr Robert Pollard Dr Robert Bullard Adriaan founder Commonwealth club Texas Southern University distinguished professor
"dr robert bullard" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"The day Dr Robert Bullard is the distinguished professor of urban planning and environmental policy Texas Southern University he's often described as the father of environmental justice for his work highlighting pollution his many books address issues such as environmental racism Clement justice disaster relief and more he came to the Commonwealth club to receive the Steven Schneider award for outstanding climate communication and annual honor bestowed by the club's claim that one program he was in conversation with climate one founder and host Greg Dalton they will be joined a little later by Adriaan Tero the director of diversity equity and inclusion at the energy foundation now let's listen in on their conversation at the Commonwealth club great Dalton into thousand seven I went to the arctic on a global warming expedition with scientists and journalists aboard an ice breaker experiencing climate change at the top of the world changed my life and when I returned create a climate one here at the Commonwealth club for the last twelve years I've been interviewing leaders about how burning fossil fuels disrupts all of the systems around us our food system or water system our ecosystems our lifestyle and our economy climate changes everything today were honoring a revered champion of people in a respectful and inclusive relationship with our environment Dr Robert Pollard is distinguished professor of urban planning and environmental policy at Texas Southern University he's the author of eighteen blocks that addresses the animal development environmental racism urban land use climate justice disasters smart growth regional equity and more topics is titles.

Dr Robert Bullard distinguished professor Texas Southern University Commonwealth club founder Adriaan Tero director Dr Robert Pollard Steven Schneider Greg Dalton
"dr robert bullard" Discussed on Important, Not Important

Important, Not Important

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on Important, Not Important

"But I think that's kind of perfect. And you're right. I mean, I I I. They wouldn't exist without people like incredible John Lewis and all those other folks who've been doing it for so long. It's like you said it's interesting to see these folks have been doing it forever. And the new folks taking the mantle using some of these new tools, and recognizing that their their voice can can have such a broader broader reach. Now, you know, obviously, young black men have been getting shot in the streets or worse for for many decades and centuries in America. It's just that when it happens everyone in the world finds out about thirty seconds later, and right because it is broadcast live or someone is they're reporting it or his family reports at. And we're able to see that. And again, it can make things chaotic. But it is I think starting to cause some change. And I think that's really important. So yeah, go ahead, Brian where are you going to say, we'll let you know. How how does it go down? You know, let's let's get to. Why wa wa how was it happening in, you know, in the US are we are we only making affordable real estate for minorities in communities that already have power plant or trash water. Or is it vice versa? Are are are we dumping in their nice backyards ruining it or do we build a power plant in their backyard and poison the air and destroy their property values or or both probably? The data is in in terms of you know, the way in which environmental racism works. And this is this is very little good. If, you know, very little chicken egg problems with an old debate, you know, maybe twenty years ago when people dared, you know, sort of, you know, argue, you know, those poor people moved in next to that facility. But the reality is that there is been a good long, you know, sort of now coming into almost generation of data, you know, from folks, whether it's Dr Robert Bullard, you know, folks, like Paul Mohi, again, another big criminal massive research university of Michigan. You know, Paul Mohi Dr Brown you Brian emeritus professor at Michigan under a CD Taylor. Who's there now that have been collecting and gathering data for again going on a couple of generations. And unfortunately, United States, we call it environment raises, and because there has been a good hefty track. Record of the disproportionate citing. Of toxic and hazardous waste facilities in communities of color. People would call her more many many times over more likely to do to be the recipient of that disappointment citing than their white counterparts the United States, so that the facilities themselves, you know, are targeting those communities, and they often times the date is in that that target those community independent of wealth. So if not the case image that you think well, okay, you perhaps if you have you more economically advantage, you know, African Americans that somehow they're going to miss the toxic facility. And indeed the opposite is true. The facilities are tracking and setting up and disproportionately citing themselves in black and Brown communities more so than they are in white communities, and that's just that's just the facts. You know, there's nothing to dispute about it. And that's why I like what you began with the EPA the very reason. That the EPA set up its office now called the office of environmental Justice. You should be called the office environment equity back in the twentieth century when they first began with that name was quickly changed over to the office of Justice. We're reason why this up was to tackle this problem that they recognize and despite the office being consistently underfunded consistently marginalized by president after president, you know, going back now, you know, twenty five plus years. The the fact is that you pay recognize this problem, and it's it's one of those taken seriously is one where we've seen a lot of litigation as well. On behalf of a great number of communities. It's one we've seen in the Flint case in Michigan. We seen the criminal activity touch to the doorstep of the former governor state of Michigan. So where we've gone number folks have been indicted. Some folks facing quite serious. Criminal charges for the environmental racism that they met it out against the citizens of Flint Michigan..

United States Michigan EPA John Lewis Flint Michigan university of Michigan Paul Mohi office of environmental Justic office of Justice Dr Robert Bullard president Brian America wa Flint Brian emeritus Dr Brown professor
"dr robert bullard" Discussed on A VerySpatial Podcast

A VerySpatial Podcast

07:14 min | 2 years ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on A VerySpatial Podcast

"You're listening to episode six hundred twelve a very special podcast February tenth twenty nineteen. Hello and welcome to a very spatial podcast. I'm jesse. I'm sue. And this is Frank today. We've got a great Laura interview with David pageant. It was a wonderful sit down that Barbara, and I had with him a talk a little bit about the stuff that he's doing in Tennessee hurry up. So that's going to be our our interview any anything. We wanna talk about this week before we get to the interview. Any newses there's more Galileo satellites as part of the constellation now. Anything else? Israelis are ten point seven's out there. You haven't played with it. That's beta as the beta yes, you can mess around with that. It's actually on the list of things you can license now. When you go in there, which is unusual. And then two point three Artigas pro came out just before as well and were just a few weeks away from the next generation of art Jocelyne with saved bit ten point seven released. Well. Well, I'm guessing May June certainly before the UC, and of course, for for the as Rian of it the death summit. I believe is coming up as usual. Yes. I actually on. I was playing a game the other day solitaire something like that Microsoft solitaire. And of course, the all have ads now in one of the ads the popped up was the depth summit. So she usually another game or something that you get an ad for. But it was kind of amusing. Coz since I was logged into my account. Of course, is connected to everything Microsoft related to me showed me the depth summit. You click it I didn't. But. I get those every now, and again, I click on sometimes, well, you know, it was a little bit slow week for judicial news. I think is a is part of it. It was the weird thing is like you have the whole federal GS conference from Essary, and that was kind of it. Right. These folks in the fed area are doing these things, and we're going to be rolling out this stuff. Some good presentation. So I know I watched some of the stream for the census bureau's thing. It's awesome photos and stuff, but that's part of the this. Who's not get enough Twitter, so madman somebody recording stuff? But either way I got to see some some of their stuff. So I think the polar vortex and the thorough shutdown calmed everyone down a bit. And they just know it's not going to do a bunch too cold. And we're just trying to figure out what the heck we've been doing. What haven't been doing for months, literally, the the government opened and two days later was the conference. So, yeah, it's it makes sense. Yeah. Yeah. So okay. Then I guess we will head onto the conversation. This is Barbara, and I have the pleasure of talking with David a patch it from Tennessee State university, and you wear many, hats, you work in GI science, you work with environmental Justice. You work a lot with communities and doing participatory J us in the community and generally working to make life better for everyone. And you're also the director of a GS lab. Okay. So this is so many things you could talk about the speak to our listeners. So I wanna ask you something you probably get asked a lot, which is how did you get involved with all these different things? Did you first get involved with GI science, and then working with communities or did you start working with communities and then get involved with geoscience? In terms of working with communities. I when growing up in Baltimore, Maryland, and my parents, and my family are, you know, very progressive in very active, and so I've always been involved in social Justice and really grew up being exposed to social Justice. But then when I became an environmental scientist or very early age. I started considering environmental science as a career path of it took a while for me to see there's an intersection between the environment and social Justice, probably when I was in graduate school, interestingly enough, and so I guess for the past thirty years or so, and that's been my area of emphasis of looking at how I can use my background in specifically geoscience and earth science. To help communities solve problems such as flooding or impacts of climate change upon health or brownfield sites or landfills and communities which are often associated with groundwater and soil contamination. And so I have a unique position of being able to not only understand, but communicate the earth science side of things in the resolution and mitigation of some of those problems. Whereas the majority of people who were involved in social Justice issues, including environmental Justice, you know, their backgrounds are either in social science or theology, which is absolutely needed. But a lot of these problems have their basis in the earth or Anthony. Genyk? In issues that are related to climate or water or soils, and you have to have climatologists Potala gist or atmospheric, scientists sometimes to really deal with those issues. Fully. Okay. So I had another question. But you said a word there that I think is very fascinating. I don't think we've ever talked about on the podcast with this Dianchi. And it's not something we generally associate with GI science or environmental science. And clearly you've got a lot of experience trying to work with the interface between these two 'cause 'cause you talk a little bit about your experience with that. And where the challenges have been and where it's maybe evolved the way you think about environmental science. Yeah. Will in terms of specifically environmental Justice. If you look at some of the leaders of we have, you know? Reverend Benjamin Chavis. Or even if you look at just social Justice in general, you know, we have a dot Reverend Dr Martin Luther King and many of the other leaders, Dr Robert Bullard, the father of environmental Justice is a sociologist Dr Beverly right is a sociologist. Dr Maha Palma high from university of Michigan's sociologist, which we absolutely need people with that background. But like I said in these fights oftentimes

Microsoft Barbara David Benjamin Chavis Frank Dr Maha Palma Dr Robert Bullard Dr Martin Luther King Tennessee Twitter Laura Rian Essary university of Michigan Tennessee State university Baltimore Dr Beverly director
"dr robert bullard" Discussed on The City

The City

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on The City

"About another podcast, you might enjoy the impact by vox in Washington. The story often ends when congress passes a law, but on the impact that's where the story begins. The impact focuses on the human consequences of policy making its first season looked at healthcare policy and its second season looks at policy experiments in cities all across America from housing to education to family leave. The impact is traveling to cities and states that are fundamentally rethinking the way we do things you can listen to season two of the impact or been season one right now check out the show via apple podcasts or ever. You're listening. Okay. Back to our story. Earlier this spring. I went to visit old guild gardens a sprawling public housing complex on Chicago's far south side all killed gardens is a hundred and thirty blocks south of the loop as far south as you can go and still be in Chicago theory feels isolated now. But it's two story row homes were originally built in nineteen forty four to house black workers from the cities nearby steel mills there were once dozens of mills here that employed hundreds of thousands of workers the steel mills have long since closed, but the area still wrestles with the legacy of their departure, the vacant land waste facilities and thirty industry. That's come to take their place and out gardens is still home to nearly seven thousand residents almost all of whom are black and low income. I came to old guild gardens because it was the home of Hazel Johnson. Johnson who died in twenty eleven is often called the mother of the environmental Justice movement in Chicago. She was one of those activists who fought alongside Dr Robert Bullard, the Houston sociologist we met in our last episode. Here's Hazel Johnson's daughter, Cheryl, mother, loved him. So is it wasn't just an aberration. She loved that man light. He was her out Cheryl Johnson still lives in old gardens. And now runs people for community recovery. The environmental action group her mother founded like Dr Bullard Hazel Johnson spent her whole adult life.

Dr Bullard Hazel Johnson Cheryl Johnson Chicago Dr Robert Bullard congress Washington America environmental Justice movement Houston
"dr robert bullard" Discussed on The City

The City

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on The City

"Break. There's nobody on the planet like you. So why would you buy generic mattress built for everyone else? Helixsleep built a quiz that takes just two minutes to complete. I took it and they used the answers to match my body type and sleep references to the perfect mattress for me. I was matched to the helix dusk. And this last month has truly been the best sleep. I have ever gotten. I also tacked on a cooling cover to my order. And that last minute decision turned out to be a great one. I used to be such a sweater at night, but not anymore. Do what I did. And go to helixsleep dot com slash the city, take their two minutes sleep quiz, and they'll match you to a mattress that will give you the best sleep of your life. Right now, helix is offering up to a hundred and twenty five dollars off all mattress orders. And all you have to do to get up to one hundred twenty five dollars off your. Mattress is go to helixsleep dot com slash the city. That's helix. Sleep dot com slash the city for hundred twenty five dollars off your mattress order. He looked sleep dot com slash the city. Before we get back to the story. I want to tell you about another podcast, you might enjoy the impact by vox in Washington. The story often ends when congress passes a law, but on the impact that's where the story begins. The impact focuses on the human consequences of policy making its first season looked at healthcare policy and its second season looks at policy experiments in cities all across America from housing to education to family leave. The impact is traveling to cities and states that are fundamentally rethinking the way we do things. You can listen to season two of the impact or been season one right now check out the show via apple podcasts or ever, you're listening. Okay. Back to our story. In nineteen seventy nine the same year. Northwood manor residents filed a lawsuit to fight the dump proposed for their neighborhood. Dr Robert Bullard was still a relatively new sociology professor at Houston. Historically, black Texas Southern University. Let's go back to Wilson. Robert Bullard split his time between research and teaching one of his idols was w e b boys who like Dr Bullard was a black sociologist. Dubose was the first black person to earn a doctorate from Harvard and one of the founders of the N W C P, Dr Bullard admired what he called the boys brand of kick ass. Sociology combining hard research with social activism, and now Dr Bullard suddenly found himself confronted with the same kind of issue that devote himself might have tackled was racial discrimination to blame for northwood manners. Landfill problem. Getting testimony from black residents who believed this was true wasn't going to sway a judge. He needed to come up with solid evidence. And he needed to produce it fast enough to help stop the landfill before it could open the clock was ticking. What I think about that period of time. It was frantic. It was emotionally draining because you're embarking on something in terms of trying to collect data. You're trying to put together a puzzle that you'll have a lot of time to think about is full. Steam ahead. Dr Bullard wanted to know whether there was a link between the locations of waste facilities and the demographics of the surrounding neighborhoods. He enlisted the students from his research methods class to gather data the first step was to find all of the garbage facilities that had been built in Houston. Dating back to the nineteen thirties. Keep in mind, this is happening in the late nineteen seventies. You couldn't just Google a list of all of the dumps and incinerators even phone book was of little use because going back to the nineteen thirties meant that some of the waste facilities have been closed for years. So Dr Bullard and his students started digging into dusty old filing cabinets in city hall, pulling up newspaper clippings on microfiche and interviewing old timers in the community to ask if they remember where various dumps had been located in giving my students lists. You do have five. On a list, and they'd go out and verify and we'd come back and put it on the map and when the other methods failed. Dr Bullard told them to trust there is and I would tell my students if you see a mountain in Houston. Houston is flat below sea level you see a mountain using these species. Landfill wants his students had cobbled together. The list of dumps they looked at the demographics of the surrounding neighborhoods. Again. This is the nineteen seventies today. A sociologist would tackle this problem with all sorts of modern tools, GPS digital maps and powerful computer programs. Dr Bullard had none of those tools. They weren't widely available at the time when he needed to run a computer analysis, he did it using one of those massive computers. You might see in a movie it took up more space than

Dr Robert Bullard Houston Helixsleep Northwood manor Texas Southern University Google America Landfill congress Washington Wilson Harvard northwood professor Dubose N W C two minutes one hundred twenty five dollar hundred twenty five dollars twenty five dollars
"dr robert bullard" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Houston we host a roundtable discussion with dr robert bullard father of environmental justice brian paris of the sierra club undocumented immigrants activists sr espinoza and goldman environmental prize winner houghton kelley who gesture received his fema trailer uh i wanna begin in with dr robert bullard whose house we visited just after he'd been evacuated and then come back dr bullets distinguished professor texas southern university on the steering committee of the coalition for environment equity and resilience his books include invisible houston the black experience and boom and bust welcome back to democracy now dr bullard six months after what is the state of houston for the different communities and how disparate has been the response to them and cleanup while houston is a is a big city and it has very diverse communities and there were extreme inequality when it comes to environmental protection and land use sand and problems related to land and air quality and harvey exacerbated they made those inequalities and disparities come alive and be more apparent in terms of the larger larger community and so what we've seen is is that many qian communities are are bouncing back have come back and those resources are are able to get back quicker and it should be no surprise or is not rocket science to understand that disasters exacerbate inequality in so those communities that struggle before the storm are still struggling after in so what we have to do is to ensure that all boats rise in all communities able to recover in a way that makes them much more resilient and much healthier when resources flow into the city and a doctor border are talking about those resources to the trump administration initially got a lot of praise for its response to a harvey's impact but that that hasn't followed through a understand the mayor of houston recently complained that only 1100 households have been approved by fema for assistance where there were three hundred forty five thousand households at were affected your sense of how the federal response has either exacerbated or ameliorated the the inequities that existed in houston before the storm or if you look at those families in households that have nestor eggs and resources actually started to recover and rebuild shortly as the you know after the water receded and they were able to get back in malkin gut but but for those families in households.

Houston brian paris sierra club dr robert bullard harvey fema sr espinoza goldman environmental houghton kelley distinguished professor dr bullard malkin six months
"dr robert bullard" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"dr robert bullard" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Teaching our children how to become better human being speaking of education whether it's harvey hurricane harvey or hurricane erma while the media covers it extensively almost twenty four hours a day puerto rico dealing with maria i would say less but still there is has been significant coverage flashing the words extreme weather severe weather almost never and i'm not trucking fox some trucking msnbc and cnn did they talk about global warming climate change climate give me give some people think gets a hoax well we have a very proud climate change water what is yeah but it's not a home but is the media and the considered the more liberal media and we are seeing the effects of this tomorrow we are expected they have heavy rains in san juan and then the rest of puerto rico so you at eden you have muddy but my he had didn't stop until just like harvey the rain didn't stop until a few days later rain didn't stop until a few days later so you have global warming it is happening it israel in here it it's there's no denying it and we have to deal with the consequences of our actions and take actions to revert that and make sure that we don't screwed up for the next generations more than we've already done that was san upon mayor carmen you lean crews i interviewed her last month in san juan's roberto clemente coliseum where she and almost her entire staff were living after hurricane maria devastated puerto rico when we come back from the aftermath of one hurricane to another we'll go to texas to speak with dr robert bullard he's known as the father of the environmental justice movement what is environmental racism stay with us woo so your team to seoul the suit split two two two two the source one foreign funds young man you here guy.

harvey hurricane harvey puerto rico cnn san juan global warming roberto clemente coliseum hurricane maria texas dr robert bullard fox climate change israel seoul twenty four hours