35 Burst results for "Dr Rick Rick"

Connecting With Your True Nature

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

02:26 min | 3 d ago

Connecting With Your True Nature

"One of the most common topics that we've explored on. The podcast is developmental psychology. How what happened to us as a child can influence our lives today. Those childhood events often have a huge impact on our nature and behavior even in adulthood and sometimes becoming increasingly happy and healthy as an adult is about unwinding the influence of negative events that happened during childhood but alongside that there can be a lot of value in connecting more with the person who we authentically were. When we were young. There might be a sense for you of some kind of core nature. Something that was present for you before the world started getting in the way so today we're going to be exploring that child self and how it might help us become more fully realized as adults so to help us do that. I'm joined today as usual by dr rick hansen. So dad how are you doing today. I'm good and i've been very much looking forward to this topic which has a lot of personal meaning for me in terms of my own childhood my own inner child or layers of inner children inside me and also of course. Because i knew you when you were child and i've also worked with a lot of children So this topic has a lot of meaning and was just thinking there for moment forest when you were talking about the setup here in buddhist psychology there are these five major so called hindrances that hinder our progression in practice Such house angry ill-will can stop others or self doubt and the deep rooted the word. That's true aided hindrances actually means coverings beezer things that cover over our underlying good nature including the underlying sweet innocent beautiful wise innermost childlike being that still resides within each of us. Yeah i think that's something that's been really present for me particularly over the last maybe five years but honestly for most of my adult life. I think that there are ways in which i've been almost trying to rediscover or get back to in some way. The person that i was. When i was pretty young when i was you know three or four. Five years old Like i said in the introduction before the world started pushing back on me in ways that made me feel uncertain or insecure or started editing core parts of my behavior or jesus even my nature and some kind of real way.

Dr Rick Hansen
How to Make a Big Decision

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

01:55 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Make a Big Decision

"Today. We're looking at how to make a big decision and to help us do that. I'm joined as usual by dr rick hansen. So dad how are you doing. I'm really good. And this is one of my favorite topics yuccas s. I think there's a saying in medicine. Good judgment comes from experience and experienced bad judgment. Experience might sometimes have fostered some improvement in my judgment. And i'd love to kind of share that with you. And i know this forest also is a topic that you have really engaged a lot in your own life including putting it into practice. Boy sure brought these principles down out of the ivory tower. And you know one thing. I was really interested in what you said. Is the tension between playing it. Save with the known versus taking a chance on the unknown. And i wondered if you could talk more about that. Yeah i think that there are some big themes that tend to come up inside of these conversations inside of these choices. When we're making decisions and something that i was kind of reflecting on prior to this conversation we were just talking about it a second ago before we started recording is how all of these decisions are different one school or another one person or another place deliver and other whatever but if you drill down deep enough they kind of all become very similar in terms of the process you can go through around making choices and these big themes tend to emerge over and over again and i do think that one of them is absolutely this tension between what you now in what you don't and they're kind of these different biases that are at play here. I talk a lot about bias on the podcast and one of the big ones survivorship bias which tends to tell people toward believing that things are going to work out. Okay if they take one of those big swings kinda like history is written by the winners yeah histories absolutely history is written by the including your personal history absolutely

Dr Rick Hansen
"dr  rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:50 min | Last month

"dr rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Which we don't have to. <Speech_Male> We need a doctor <Speech_Music_Male> prescribing <Silence> in But we don't <Speech_Male> need a doctor on <Speech_Male> site that's going to <Speech_Male> increase costs <Speech_Male> ended really <Speech_Male> makes sense. So <Speech_Male> we're arguing. They <Speech_Male> spoke things out with <Speech_Male> fda but we see them being <Speech_Male> more concerned. <Speech_Male> They believe <Speech_Male> we're going to. <Speech_Male> They believe they're going to end up <Speech_Male> approving it but they're <Speech_Male> worried that <SpeakerChange> if something <Speech_Male> goes wrong then they get. <Speech_Male> I get <Speech_Male> it. Yeah they re trying <Speech_Telephony_Male> to really like <Speech_Male> he said protect themselves. <Speech_Male> Well listen dr. <Speech_Telephony_Male> I've got a wrap <Speech_Male> this thing up in fascinating <Speech_Male> conversation. <Speech_Male> I hope you'll come back <Speech_Male> and discuss <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Male> We just we think <Speech_Male> about it. We really just did a <Speech_Male> survey and did <Speech_Male> one chemical. <Speech_Male> There's <Speech_Male> multiple <Speech_Male> chemicals we could discuss <Speech_Male> equally as in <Speech_Male> the in detail <Speech_Male> different contexts. But <Speech_Male> the lot <Speech_Telephony_Male> out there. And there. <Speech_Telephony_Male> And i've always <Speech_Male> had great admiration for <Speech_Male> maps congratulations <Speech_Male> on. <Speech_Male> I actually wanted <Speech_Male> to do a documentary series <Speech_Male> on the therapeutic <Speech_Male> use of <Speech_Male> genetics. Yeah <Speech_Male> i <Speech_Male> actually pitched it around <Speech_Male> and reject everywhere. <Speech_Telephony_Male> But maybe <Speech_Male> it's the same thing you're dealing with <Speech_Male> with the fda <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> was. <Speech_Male> I've noticed <Speech_Male> netflix. Doing a whole bunch <Speech_Male> of stuff now <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> the actually kind <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> not well done. In my <Speech_Male> humble opinion. I think <Speech_Male> you know we. We could do <Speech_Male> much better job. But <Speech_Male> but be that as it may <Speech_Telephony_Male> I enjoyed <Speech_Male> speaking you. I've always <Speech_Male> wanted to talk to you. I've always <Speech_Male> been watching <Speech_Male> maps <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> admiringly from afar <Speech_Male> and two to <Speech_Male> really dig in with <Speech_Male> us a real pleasure <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> good luck with this <Speech_Male> woman. You're just trying to help <Speech_Male> people. That's <Speech_Male> all all trying to <Speech_Telephony_Male> do here. We'll try to help and <Speech_Male> not hurt our <Speech_Male> goal <Speech_Male> but lots <Speech_Male> of disguised in it's a. <Speech_Male> It's a brave new world there. <Speech_Male> You're getting into and i think <Speech_Male> it will have <Speech_Male> value. I've always <Speech_Male> said if i were dealing <Speech_Male> with end of life stuff i <Speech_Male> would think very seriously <Speech_Male> about some <Speech_Male> hallucinogenic <Speech_Male> if <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> i were having trouble i <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> second. Alex <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> psychedelic i. Get <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> closer right. Gotta <Speech_Music_Male> get that corrected <Speech_Music_Male> But <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <hes> again. I hope <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you'll come back in the meantime <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> i think <SpeakerChange> you for this <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and we will see everyone <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement>

"dr  rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

02:15 min | Last month

"dr rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"In the subjects that got both they had two point one. Since that's amazing record the The other thing is we had no significant variability. According to the sites we had fifteen sites to in israel to in canada one in montreal one in bent over and levin throughout the united states. So that's a big thing for the two bigs you're in. It was just ninety nine hundred group or ninety total ninety slow and so but we've agreed with the fda because what they said is the cursor that's where they push back on you yet but they can't a said that we can prove efficacy quicker smaller number of subjects and they wanna see a there for safety so so because of cova there. Let's go down. Ana ninety the second phase three studies going to be a hundred hundred forty done over one hundred in space too and so we have a lot of data. What what we showed is that. There's no effect by site which means that you don't have to therapists over here that are treating fifty percent of your blender doing great and figuring it out. Yeah what it means is it can scale and so it meets the criteria for a potential at the google on the basis of one phase. Three study with confirmatory evidence from these two studies and we'd applied to the fda for that we think they're going to reject it does. It's no so new and controversial. They're gonna want us to be the second phase three sto trinidad but the results are fantastic. I pride because this is something that's been swirling around for so long and they're they're it's it's md may therapeutic in a as an adjunct to therapeutic. I don't know. I think they might be more positive than you think. There's been coming along. Well it's bureaucratic self projections. Yes so what's going on is because we were projected by special protocol assessment. We have of the two people i mentioned. The first one has to be a therapist. Licensed therapist check. One doesn't even need a license okay now. Fda has tried to impose on the sell side and researchers all of our new staff. Is that the lead person needs. They have an nba which doesn't make sense at wall and they want a doctor on site rather.

"dr  rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:20 min | Last month

"dr rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Analysis plan everything all the other animal studies. Everything they wanna know you get a complete package of what is going gonna take to make the drug into madison and if you can agree to this you get what's called agreement ladder to successfully conclude the special protocol assessment process. Now that delayed things by Almost while three quarters of a year. But because of the problem of doing a a double blind study psychedelics. I felt that we needed to do this. Extra negotiations with fda because we wanted them to agree on our approach The math lachey designs. And we didn't want them to complain later that they didn't like what we did because really there is no perfect way to do a double blind study with drugs. That are so strong that you usually tell if you take right right. L. selena so right after we succeeded in the negotiator with fda 'bout special protocol assessment. Then they break their and raises therapy designation. Which is the most important designation the most promising studies. And then we started face three so enact lubar of twenty twenty we got the results from our first phase three study and since then We started our second phase three study now. These studies have been a delayed by cova agreed with fda that we would do to phase three studies each with people and gets therapy without him. Cma with inactive cbo and half would get therapy was active and And it would be this reaction model. That the twelve ninety minute sessions and we used to therapists instead of want to goes. Let's it's it's an unusual situation again are operating approach was. How do we maximize therapeutic therapists for the same patient her to saint asia male. Female t. interesting so your table. All potential kover confounding variables are trying to be controlled right. Yeah yeah yeah now. We are just starting to do their research. We're just that'd be interesting to roof and this'll be probably portland of da. So we'll start there. That's but what we want to the male female team. It's not necessarily most underground therapists talked about our one. I they do find that with with a male female team a lot of times. People who developed st have had series of traumas often going into child. We talk about the ace scores for adverse childhood experiences and so to have a well-functioning male females working often helps who didn't have that when they were growing and also some people you know you sorta gender stereotypes that we have that you know. Women are more nurturing and so sometimes though people will Speak to a female therapist or speak to the male artists and writers are run differently. Yeah so that. That's our approach. Meet me think that group therapy won't need for one or in and we want one person eventually lead the licensed therapist and the other to be an intern or to be a student because for finance for the insurance and also. That's a great way to train. The next generation share sure of that work is sort of for the first person. But we'd like the the two person model for individuals so anyway. We negotiated all that. The we have completed our I as three snapping and just several days ago we heard from nature medicine which is one of the highest impact factor journals in in madison signs. A anything anything. In the nature family is the highest highest which say prestige the most prestige and we just feel that since it's been so stigmatized psychedelics. An md may in particular that. Yeah we need to go for external validation. I said yes congratulations. I can't wait to read this and when it does come out. They'll be fantastic to see all this. I.

two person three quarters of a year twelve ninety minute second phase twenty twenty first person each double blind study first phase several days one person cova one three phase three studies study
"dr  rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

08:36 min | Last month

"dr rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Be helmets of prolonged exposure. Which we've spoken about four to confront the trauma ct but it's in response to what the patient is revealing initially and we don't have a sense of the proper trajectory or you must mocked by your trauma now people sometimes well and youthful experiences from their childhood that they'd forgotten to draw strength. Then go into the more painful things. So there's an element of choice in the therapeutic nath even though there's this as the as the way we practice even though there's the administration of pharmacological agents silicate process it still supporting people where they wanna go. Angie try or what's emerging a lot we work with fellow vessel vanderbilt was Body keeps score so he's principal investigator. Regard lost insight. Oh fantastic and now thinking that. Md may is the best approach to ptsd. Oh man is he said that publicly. Yes yes about works. And i'm dick schwartz. Does internal family systems sweet. Were doing work as people all the time under the influence of md. May they start. Seeing artemis deals this a part of me feels that and you can kind of way internal conflicts and they against externalize so I think that. What what i meant to say you're by dessel in the body keeps score is that sometimes. We're not ready to have a conscious thought. But pains are things emerging body of the best example that i can give to. That is one time. I was sitting with this guy. He was a german psychiatrist and under the implicit. Mba made his arm became parallels and he can work at it just was paralyzed and ears like scared. And you're like your arm is is there something psychosomatic long on your your arms knocked realized. We don't need to take you to the emerged sharm. Let's just play it out and see what happens. And he calmed down enough over the course of a couple of hours from told us the story about how he and his mother and his siblings were around the death of their father and they hit decide whether to take him off life support and since he was the doctor he wrote this order saying take him off life support and he said the problem was that he hated his father and was conflict was did he kill his father and this was the arms is was the arm that wrote the order to say. Take them off white women. Dr freud have loved this as he tells the story then the feeling comebacks arm and he's totally fine enough paralyzed and no damage at least whatever's emerging even if we were and the patient don't understand well it's funny i i have zero resistance. The idea of mgm. Therapy the though. I always worry the other thing i worry about. Is the timeline problem in in a mental health research. Which is because i. Because i see this addiction medicine all the time that the timelines are so short. They make all kinds of crazy conclusions. You know sweeping mandates that are based on three month windows with the disease years to treat and has a very long arc to it. How do you manage that issue. Okay well off You're totally right about that. And i think that's some of the work was slow silent They just use like three weeks. How crazy zero. It's not. it's not pneumonia. So this is a brain thing. It's a way different deal and you could be in the second dog afterglow. And doubt what so good news well the way we structured things is to avoid the signaling afterglow primary out measure between the experimental group struggle is two months after the last experimental session. So that's not very long but we also but that's the thing i'm guessing you personally have lots of long term follow up i'm guessing published but i'm certain you have lots of experience. Okay so we do the two months follow up we twelve month follow up for the insurance company. They're not gonna money on your right right done in three and a half year follow up. On some of our asian of the insurance company gets priority over the science the f. says yes but that doesn't mean that it's adopted higher standard the insurance companies. But what we have done We're doing now along very long term. Follow up to all of the people in face to face. let's go. let's go to the trauma. tell solve at the trough. Okay so What i started out by saying is nineteen ninety two. We did the first phase what those response safety starting in nineteen ninety nine thousand. We started working on the nba ptsd and we did studies in the united states. Israel switzerland and canada and did sixteen years of that we treated about one hundred five people in six different studies and that was called That those are small pilot. Studies exploratory studies where the purpose is to try to refine your treatment methods figure out a hoosier propagation population Who do you excellent. Hoodoo include What are your measures you so thirty years from the start at. Mda of mass in nineteen eighty six to november twenty nine two thousand sixteen. We had our end of eastern meeting with fda and we presented are face to data. And what we showed. Is that at the The control group. Now these are. We felt that we have to work with the hardest patients And so we enroll people who've previously attempted suicide lot of these studies exclude people if they've actively tried to kill hun and we only work with treatment resistant. People sure and on average they were severe peaky asleep. And so what we show though. Is that at this two month. Follow up the control group. Twenty three percent no longer had. Ptsd now's after getting substantial amount of therapy. Neither no md mayor moat lotos very low dose their own control group. Well it's it's the same. People were randomly assigned and you get Basically it's some forty two hours of their garden. So there's three eight hour sessions and there's twelve thirty minute now. Drugs of their sessions. So there's re ninety minute sessions before the first experimental session which is Either mbna or inactive cbo or in face was low dose the with might muslim confusion And then there's three of these ninety minute sessions through integration after each experimental section. And so you'll get twelve of these men. The final talk to my one year for the insurance companies. So what we showed in matt trench so the control group guest there without mbna versus therapy within the and so we show that twenty three percent in the control group no longer had ptsd at the two month follow but the people that got md fifty six percent no longer had ptsd more than twice debt and more importantly and in as to what we did is everybody that was in the control. Group could immediately go themselves through the experiment again but this time get therapy with md amid so what we showed if the one year follow up is two-thirds no longer had ptsd and of the one third that still had ptsd almost all but not all yet clinically significant reductions at bdo symptoms so it was tremendously successful and we had a very good safety record. And so the fda said yes you can go to face three and sees three are the larger studies that are designed to prove safety and efficacy in order to get permission to market so instead of going straight to face three which we were approved to do we elected to go through. What's called a special protocol assessment process which is Resistant fda pretoria. Yeah isn't an option. Most farmers nobody's ever. I've never heard of before finishing what what what you do. Is you negotiate every aspect of your drugged melt and flow program your face. Three designs your statistical.

Twenty three percent twenty three percent forty two hours ninety minute twelve thirty minute one year two twelve fifty six percent two month one third more than twice face three each experimental section eight hour sessions three Three designs first experimental session mayor moat lotos muslim
"dr  rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

08:10 min | Last month

"dr rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Left behind. Creating the problem makes me think of an interesting question that i didn't know i had So let me just try to frame it. which which is that. I feel like in psychotherapy. The patient really is in command of the process even when their stock right is there any sort of ethical issue using biologic and this is really just a know. Just a curiosity question. I don't position myself. I was just this whole issue of people getting angry because somebody changes too much essentially. It's kinda interesting Is there any ethical dilemma. There in terms of biology. Always worry for instance. Let me say where. I come from this. Which is i have had plenty of patients. Go down and use aiba. Gain or ios. Go to try to stop their opiate. Use and whatever It's my experience. Can just experience has been that. It rarely works. Long-term it always works for about six months But in the cases where i've seen at work there's a personality change the person. I mean i can tell there's something strikingly different about the person and that's when i get worried like oh we're changing the person that's an ethics. I don't want to change the person with a with a with a with a pill. I wanted them to be in control of changing right. I mean you tell me what your name is on that basis. I i i agree with you completely about how it works for a period of time and then relapse yeah now. I think that sometimes it works. I've seen it work. But i but i'm not sure those are real addicts. I feel like those are just dependent people at trouble getting off but we'll should. I don't have any debt on that. Just my sense of it so the problem with this idea that you know it doesn't work. These people is that they're hoping the one dose miracle cure and you have to leave the country to go down to mexico or support again. I've again if it were a legitimate. The group therapy which were also interested in working on You might get a booster six months or a year later when you start to feel like you know something slipping right now. I think it's the idea of the one dose miracle cure. That really isn't the right concept. Got but i actually. I just don't have an opinion on every input but talking about this person. Hey a personal thing and the ethics that so what. I talked about with lsd. About why. I would want to see if i was on a deserted. Is that You you can't It's harder to negotiate with you. You need to surrender But you still can fight so that there's a there's a way in which there's choice that people make to open up the and often does lead the personality change in fact one of the big findings from the research at hopkins and the research. That moved on. Is that with this silted mystical experience. That the dimension that the neo the which is one of the main measures of neuroticism extroversion extroversion and With the os for but openness that's what it was. Yeah that that Openness personality is is considered to be more or less permanent throughout your life and there's been changes in openness in psychedelic research connected to the depth of mystical experience. So i guess. I would the answer ethical question of what you're saying is there's still an element of choice and ineffective experience of people are wanting to go to something or resistance. It's just more painful. The resistant with alistair and i think we'd need to be asking these patients or these people. Are they comfortable with this personality change. Are they landed happened board. Do they sing. It will okay going to push back on that because that has to that because it really concerns me that that stuff. Which is that a we the observer or putting a value judgement on the openness of the individual right. We're saying hey you're better you're more open i. That's me saying that i again. That's not my place number one number two. This is the vampire question in other words before he become a vampire right. The vampire shows up and goes. It's great you have to have to sacrifice your soul but you live forever and is fantastic and we you have to eat other people and not being a vampire is a different state that when you get to be the vampire you may think it's great but you're still a vampire and your previous self may not have liked vampire it you see what i'm saying. That's a transformation of the person that just ethically is a very interesting place to be and get you. Put the person's in control of to me that mitigates at quite a bit but we can't we can't go. You're better off vampire. You're better off open because we decided that that's a weird place for us to said. That's very true. But i would say that. This idea of premium pyrgos vampire implies that somebody is working well premium. You've got people that are addicted to opiates that you're talking about. Their free. state is not healthy for them in many ways and their patients and their sorry. I get you i gotcha. But but there are other roads without becoming a vampire to giving up that pre state nephew. Can't if you really can't then that's an interesting. They're never got a different dilemma. Right it's like the only way we can save you if you become a vampire and then it kind of makes sense than the to become a vampire now are you saying that because there's this pharmacological yeah different than if you just go to therapy and you have personality therapy. Well know what i'm saying. Is we think and this may be wrong. This may be an actor. I because i framed it as this. We think in the slow process of therapy. The patient is in charge of the changes. Now the reality is plenty of therapist. Not only do. They necessarily have to insert themselves into the process. They over insert themselves into the process and do lots of bad things. I see that all the time. But i would argue. That's it's just it's just an interesting last. I don't think we can solve it but it fat kind of fascinates me because i don't object to the people becoming a vampire when that's all they got. I don't object to it. I just don't i don't wanna be the one going. You're better as a vampire. You need to be a vampire so so. Let's get this idea that you were saying about their visit over insert themselves yeah essence of our method. We we have the nba standardized map of the drug regulation drug development research. We have to standardize the drug but we also have to standardize that their -peutic intervention and so we've developed a treatment manual. We call it. Inner directed there. So of the hours of therapeutic session with md may around half. The time is closed there listening to music. They're having these beautiful metaphorical stories. They're telling themselves under lives. Imagery you know. One of the vets came back at rage after coming back from moroccan image of the warrior locked in a cage inside him and so when his eyes close. He's sort of making friends with this for yourself. Opening the cage the teams and realizing make the go together for but people the other half the time. People are more or less talking to the therapists. If it's ursula sivan's more like eighty or ninety percent is close inner experience the rest of the time there's but the essence of the method of inner directed is that we support what emerging in person we. We don't do guided imagery. We don't do Techniques like they'll be elements of cognitive processing therapy cognitive behavioral therapy..

eighty ninety percent One of the vets ursula
"dr  rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

02:08 min | Last month

"dr rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

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"dr  rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

05:03 min | Last month

"dr rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"That She stayed alive only for this session. And because the pain she was under massive. Opiates which make you kind of tranquilized knock you out of it. But the md may is mba methylene dioxymethamphetamine so it has properties to stimulates stimulant in some ways and it wakes up so the md may in combined with the. Opiates woke up this woman and the synergistic effect had better pain control than she had in any other way and so they were able to recapitulate their lives together of this young woman interference and likeness miraculous transformation from somebody that can barely speak for a couple of weeks because she was so. You know tranquilized by these. Opiates but then she could come alive. It was l- asked this question to say goodbye to appearance. I think it's gonna now. That researching has not really been done because people you know this woman was on all these other drugs. There's all these other are interaction issues. The the work. That's being done with people that are with life threatening illnesses are when they're not at death's door. It's not like a hostile situation. It's more but i do think we need to move into the hospital setting since well and and it will be tremendously helped are completely agree with you I become aware that there's a whole world of therapist using plants with psychedelic properties. It's an underworld it's it's exists onto itself as a lot of people in both on the professional side and on the patient side are they interacting with you and they have kind of a different way of looking at things they talk about the plants sort of informing the experience. They sort of. It's not a biological sort of model. They're using you. i'm talking about. You must talking about somebody who has done all. These had some miskel experiences. I'm A lot of dubya. I'm very dubious. Some like the plants speak to me. Yeah yeah it. Why i just look at it. I just look at it kind of the way. People look at eastern medicine. Just it's just a different language or describing the same thing biological frame for it. But so i guess i'll say that my fundamental perspective is that the war on drugs in addition to misguided being. You know good drugs and bad drugs would say fundamental violation of human rights. It's it's and it's never been about reducing drug abuse. it's always had political overlay persecution minorities of we see that. There's been a great book club. The new jim crow about mass incarceration. It's the reason that florida's and play as a swing state is because there's so many Democratic leading people who've been african americans and minorities arrested amid lost their ability to vote so the war on drugs has been vowed suppression of minorities. And so it's it's. It's really something that that's my core beliefs. So therefore the underground sing on. Therapy sitter working. i I applaud them for their courage because they are risking their licenses. They are risking their freedom. And they're doing it because they think that the tools that they have for some of their patients will work great but for some. It won't and the tools that they're looking that we're doing with research with do hold promise to help people who are stocked in other ways and people are willing to risk their licenses and their freedom in order to do that. One of the things that our therapists tell us who work in our research. That's the hardest for them is to go back to their normal patients without emptying may and just to see how they get stuck with that they they could just give them the made that they can make more progress so the underground movement has been growing enormously There's very little Police activity against it. And ironically the the the main way that underground therapists get in trouble. Is you would think it's because something goes wrong in therapy and the asian reports so underground there because bad and somebody doesn't like what happened there reports. But that's not actually what happened. What what happens is underground therapists. Get in trouble. Because they're therapy goes well and the person that they're working with wants to make some changes in their lives and the people that are left behind are the ones that call the police. And that's how undergrounds it so. We are very supportive of the courage of underground therapists But they're they're doing work. That shouldn't be so risky. And that's why we hope that the medicalisation through the fda and drug developed will eventually make it so that we don't need to have this under. You.

Democratic One both jim crow florida african americans things weeks dioxymethamphetamine asian
"dr  rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

10:18 min | Last month

"dr rick" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Dr podcast again. Keep keep the support of the wind in the sales of the corolla partnership. We appreciate that so much and do check out. Not your dot com also announced to gary. Today how much having fun over. Tiktok general tiktok the fact that people spent so much time thinking about condensing information to sixty seconds if you really follow scientists and clinicians and things and businesspeople as a lot of stuff to be learned there but i to of active there so follow me dr drew and also the instagram. Dr drew pinski. And it's all at the website so check it out there and don't forget are streaming shows which you can check out most days today. It's my privilege. Welcome dr rick dublin. website is maps and may. Ps dot org Deductible is executive director of multidisciplinary association for psychedelic studies. People have been asking me for some time to get a good representative from maps in here and finally we have pulled it often do. We are delighted to have him. You can follow all the maps information at at at maps on twitter at maps news on instagram and of course there's a youtube which is pertinent specifically to the study one of the stories. We're gonna be talking about today maps. Md m a dollar welcomed. The program. i said here. So but before we get into the paper that you're so excited about and i think it's gonna be fascinating into you know Adding hopefully some interesting therapeutic interventions to the spectrum of what we can do with assisted. Ptsd therapy talk about. Tell us about maps. I so people know what that is. If they're not already familiar and then we'll talk a little bit about psychedelics. And therapeutics before we get into the that. that's great. Maps is a nonprofit organization that i started in april april eighth actually nine hundred eighty six so And it was started after. Md may was criminalised in nineteen five so maps multiplied this winter association for psychedelic studies. I felt needed. The word psychedelic in the title just to be like a flag to attract people Empty was used irrefutably from the middle seven days of the early eighties under the codename adam and it leaked out of those circles and began to be used as a party drug under the name ecstasy i learned about may as adema in nineteen eighty two and it was clear that there was gonna be the backlash because there was already sales under the name ecstasy in public settings. Mrs nancy reagan and john ronald reagan escalation of the drug work so i started a nonprofit before maps and with buckminster fuller actually in nineteen eighty-four connection. Yeah it was called earth. Metabolic design was not nonprofit. That friend mind yet in connection with buckminster fuller and he wasn't using this nonprofit and we needed of the uncle for suing the da trying to keep mba may use legal and the the nonprofit earth metabolic design was forum new forms of energy re. We said okay. That that counts psychedelic a new guy. We can figure that out. So we sue the da We slow them down from criminalising. The administrative law judge said it should be scheduled three which means illegal for recreational use legal for medical. Use the leader of the. Da ignored the recommendation which was heartbreaking. And and we want a couple of times in the appeals courts but it was eventually the alias figured out how to criminalise therapeutic and recreational use and so maps. I started in eighty six nonprofit pharmaceutical company in a sense with the primary focus on mda to theravada documentary ever been done on maps. There has been a book on it there. There are some people Doing documentaries about arts amar word but the history of is not yet it just seems like something that would be so fascinating for people to see because there's so many issues that pop up right at the right. Read your birth very interesting so yeah. I've always been very concerned. That's the kindest word i can use. This notion that there are chemicals. That are either good or bad good or evil as the fucking most nonsense. I i mean. There's there's chemicals and there's the effect on the human being and there's the relationship that human being has with the chemicals and that's nasty and it's either good nor bad evil nor nor wholly a part of biology right and the the core of they're just tools and how they're used is the determine the core problem with the drug war that we have is. It makes certain drugs bad or good relationship but the best example to illustrate what you're saying. Is that the only person at the fda that ever won the presidential medal of honor. Was this woman branchless. Kelsey and the reason she got. The presidential medal of honor was because she blocked the legitimate from coming into the united states because there is already reports about it causing birth defects that was used for morning sickness and so the litter was the quintessential bad rock in the fda got rewarded for Blocking trillions of the us but decades. Later live i is now medicine. Approved by the fda for cancer certain forms of cancer and leprosy. So it just illustrates that it's about how something is used and then here celsius. Famous quote is the difference between a poison and madison is dose interesting. That's really interesting. All medicines are potentially poisonous. That's exactly right on the water but it's interesting to me absolutely. It's interesting to me. How so the because of this making chemicals bad The only way to dig out from under that is to make them holy an only good which is what we're doing with cannabis now right so it's only it's now the an it's the panacea only good good for everybody. Under all circumstances at all time and things are not all bad. They're not all good. And it's funny. I i you know. I'm an internist by training at a family practitioner dad who just drilled into my head that medicine medications are dangerous. Medications are dangerous. Only use them when the risk reward clearly indicates and that risk reward. Dialysis has has shifted in recent years. Were we sort of. Think of medicines as the solution to everything you know. It's it's it's we. We have to kind of get back in the middle somewhere who we just think objectively these things like you said. Tools instruments helpful. I i also get. I get kind of weird about people who who get freaked out about drug companies to for big farmers been culpable. They got problems there. But but using pharmaceutical agents whether it's a hallucinogenic from a nonprofit or a drug that a large company distributes what else do i use as an intern. What exactly do you think we do as physicians what what is at our disposal physical therapy we have. We recommend maybe psychotherapy everything else. Easy this surgery or medication. everything. And i don't do surgery so i use things to change physiology. Those are calls medications. But anyway that's just my to develop on your statement about people make things fully you know. There's a word loosen agenda. I don't use that word because that's a negative for of word it's about it's false it's delusion it's loose nation but people have come up with a new word for a second. Alex called empha- check capacity yet pathogen. Well pathogen is about dna like the nba. Jim is is mentor. To reveal the god within. So that's a word i don't use either because that's slanted positively. It's not true that every time. You have a psychedelic you on a spiritual experience run. But they're trying to re frame it that way when i also want to say about brockton barney is that i started maps and eighty six as nonprofit farm. Since that time we've raised over one hundred million dollars in donations which is pretty amazing. But in december of two thousand and working we started a for-profit part company but it's the maps public benefit corporation so we maximize public benefit nonprofit. It's innovation of capitalism. And it's one hundred percent owned by the nonprofit so we have the nonprofit phones the foreground and it was important for me to tell stories to donors that we're not going to continually ask you ramani because there's so many different therapeutic uses of md may were a rare nonprofit in that we have a product at the end that we're trying to get approved by the fda and we could make some money and then whatever money we make from selling the made a profit we can use for the mission of the novel which means more research and more education so so even us as a non pro firma a for profit public benefit. I mean that makes sense. I i i've worked for some prostate cancer foundation and they and they they fund amazing research and they keep wondering. Should we participate in the benefit of that research in some small way so we can keep doing what we do. It's a crazy thing when when you're a not for profit and you're solely relied on donations art. You know this fibrosis foundation story. I don't mind okay. So this is the best example of a nonprofit farm so They donated them a hundred million dollars to This is about twenty years ago. Now to accompany that develop drugs or Cystic fibrosis but they retained percentage in royalty be united. Thank like with what universities do yeah..

john ronald youtube sixty seconds Today april april eighth twitter nancy reagan december instagram one hundred percent today twenty years ago early eighties nine hundred eighty six adam two thousand dr drew one corolla nineteen five
Dealing With Life’s Disruptions

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

01:23 min | Last month

Dealing With Life’s Disruptions

"So the question is of course. How can we best manage normal range difficulties. Which can be very very difficult and painful. Alright how do we best manage thumb point one and point to how can we grow as well from the everyday experiences of life including many. That are very positive. We can grow in both ways. Where i start to really squirm is in these theories of you know no pain. No gain yeah. Most pain has no gain. Yeah and most of our gains in life no pain we were simply in situations where we got something done or we rose to an occasion or a beautiful thing happened between us and another person. We walked out. We looked at the sunrise. Something really touched. Our heart know many of these experiences particularly if we take in a good you know gradually build positive resources and scientists including on overall global wellbeing. So we can grow both through pain and through non pain. I think there are certain kinds of people who i don't know why they're like professional grinches. His claim the only way to grow through suffering. No tokyo no growth. And that's just dead wrong. Most suffering makes us weaker. Most tends to break his down so it's important to not have a kind of casual complacent attitude toward Unnecessary upset and

Tokyo
Meeting Your Internal Family with Susan McConnell

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

01:16 min | Last month

Meeting Your Internal Family with Susan McConnell

"Would love to kind of start at the beginning with you and sort of go from there. So i gave as you said kind of a little rundown of the basic premise of it. But obviously you know it and much more detail that i do ad for people who aren't familiar with it. What's this internal family systems model. Well like you said the basis of the model assumes that we're not a unified personality but we are Multiple and that is how we talk. What appreciated about learning from dick schwartz. Back in the nineties was that he had run the same time that i was exploring different types of movement and body workin different therapies and dick was getting his phd in structural family therapy and then trying out and finding limitations to it and he really had mired about him is that when faced with ways that what he had learned in school and worked he just sat down and brought his curiosity as well as his compassion to listening to his clients. Who were talking about well part of me extra time. He was working a lot with bulimia patients beginning theory. Was that if you heal the then. The symptom and one person in the family will. You will become better. He found that oftentimes the

Dick Schwartz Dick Bulimia
The New Normal with Dr. Jennifer Ashton

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

02:49 min | Last month

The New Normal with Dr. Jennifer Ashton

"Today we have the real privilege of being joined by practicing doctor for the last twenty years and the chief medical correspondent for abc news. Dr jennifer ashton. Dr ashton received her medical degree from columbia university's college of physicians and surgeons in two thousand and six. She became the first female medical contributor to the fox news channel and from two thousand nine to two thousand and eleven. She was the medical correspondent for cbs news network and since two thousand twelve. She's also been the senior medical contributor for good morning america and world news tonight. Abc news in october twenty seventeen. Abc announced dr ashton as chief medical correspondent and health editor during the pandemic. She's played a truly critical role in keeping americans informed. She's appeared on the abc network sometimes up to fourteen hours a day in order to bring viewers important medical information and she's widely considered one of the most trusted health personalities on television today. She's also the best selling author of six books including the self care solution and her recently published book the new normal a roadmap to resilience in the pandemic era. It's a real privilege for us. To have dr ashton on the show to talk about the coronavirus pandemic and what we can do to support our own physical and mental health during it. So dr ashton. Thanks so much for joining us today. How are you doing. thanks for having me you guys. It's really an honor and a pleasure to be with you. And i'm doing well awesome. Glad to hear that. That's great so. I want to play off the title of your book. The new normal. I'm in california forces here to without a lot of ups and downs estate. The definitely there's a sense with more and more people getting vaccinated people kind of stabilizing. There's this longing yearning to get back to the old normal and even kind of prickliness said any sort of restriction on a return to that former sort of equilibrium that people were used to and yet you're talking about the new normal that we just have to face. So why do we have to face and deal with a new normal. It is kinda wanna ask the naive question. Why can't we just go back to the hold normal. What's pushing us ended as a new normal. Well as you guys know. I'm a medical doctor. Not a psychologist but in medical school we do have to learn some psychiatry and some mental health and mental illness Unfortunately we learn enough but in speaking to a lot of mental health professionals. First of all your question is a really important one. Because we're not just seeing that people want to go back in time almost magically in the setting of a pandemic. We tend to want to do that in

Dr Ashton Dr Jennifer Ashton Columbia University's College Cbs News Network Abc Network Fox News Channel Abc News ABC America California
Working With Your Anxiety

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

01:35 min | 2 months ago

Working With Your Anxiety

"Over the last year. We've all been through a lot. In addition to the many major costs there have been smaller. Subtler costs as well. One thing i've really noticed is the friction. That's been added to almost any decision that gets made whether it's trying to participate at work effectively. Keep up with friends or even just go to the grocery store this whole new level of thought and effort is involved in most every decision this friction pervades our lives and it's natural for that. Increased friction to lead to increased anxiety would might have once been reserved for particularly stressful events and experiences is now well kind of everywhere so today. We're going to be talking about fear and anxiety particularly we're gonna work through a specific experience of anxiety that somebody might have and create a kind of plan start to finish for addressing. that experience. talbot's do that. I'm joined today as usual by. Dr rick hansen. So dad how are you doing today. I'm good and i'm really psyched about this topic This is one of my favorite topics. Yeah i tend to be a little anxious by government and also it's one that's very profound because it gets out what could be called a kind of underlying crime lang zaidi. This hard wired into us as animals in our evolution. Living in the wild you know vulnerable to being attacked on hedin at any moment potentially. So how do we grapple with this. Underlying sense of uneasiness apprehensive nest world is threat level. Orange deep wonderful topic.

Dr Rick Hansen Talbot Lang Zaidi Hedin
Accepting Our Needs

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

06:48 min | 3 months ago

Accepting Our Needs

"Every one of us has needs. There's no avoiding them when our needs aren't met it's natural for us to feel stressed and worried frustrated and hurt but equally. Sometimes it can be really uncomfortable to accept that we have needs in the first place. And it's common for many people to enter a cycle consciously or otherwise where. They're both frustrated that their needs aren't being met and frustrated at themselves for having needs at all. Today we're gonna talk about needs including importantly how we can identifier core needs get better at accepting those needs and maybe even find some healthy ways to meet the needs of other people. Tell us. do that enjoyed today. As usual by dr cancelled so dad. How are you doing today. I'm actually really good for us. Thanks for asking and some adult children. Stop asking their parents how they're doing so regular opportunity. That's very welcome. If you're a got adult kids you know you'll maybe get a chuckle out of this part and also. Yeah that's pretty real very real and also the subject is enormously interesting in part because it is grounded fundamentally he and three and a half billion years of evolution of life on this planet nets as real as it gets the life and death struggles of all of our ancestors reaching back in an unbroken line of descent of course to the very earliest creatures who somehow managed to live to see the sunrise to pass on genes that passed on. Jane's that became eventually the blueprint for us. Today that's the framework fundamentally for addressing our needs and soda nest. That discussion of needs. That can seem very psychological. A little woo may be in superficial in that. Had profound life and death forging of our capabilities to meet needs. Survival and passing on. Jeans is wonderfully interesting. Yeah so let's kind of talk about that and let's just start there in our book that we wrote together. Resilient we talked about there being three core needs safety satisfaction and connection. You've kind of already done that and your little deduction there but would you mind kind of explaining these briefly including sort of where they come from. We've covered some of this material in the past so we might do this kind of quickly. Great well this notion of the three major needs having to do with safety satisfaction and connection as umbrella terms is fundamental model really in biology and also in psychology and boil down. If you think about yourself maybe. Twenty thousand years ago excluding around the south of france during an ice age trying to avoid sabertooth tigers. You're a hunter gatherer. You're trying to get a meal or yourself. A million years ago in a small hamad band who were able to make fire and manufactured tools with brains roughly half to two thirds of the size of you today even further back about yourself starting to crawl out of the primordial sees three pro izzo well three hundred and fifty million years ago. Your early lizard like creature. It had i- hop scotched a little bit rock. Anyway what are you gonna do. What are you gotta do. What do you need will number one. Don't get don't die today strata. That's a big one number to get a meal. Get fed each some today. Okay so now. We're we're moving the satisfaction satisfaction the then third if you can procreate pass on your genes or fast forward it to stone age humans or us today. Basically don't die today get fed today. Get a hug today That kind of summarizes our needs. And if we don't meet our needs fundamentally especially biologically for a protracted period of time you know what happens for us. i. I have some guesses. You die yeah okay. Yeah so it can get very very real. Yeah for sure. So maybe bringing it into people's experience these days one of the reasons that the pandemic and all of its associated challenges has been so tough for so many people is that in a manner to attacked each of those core needs. It's attacked her. Need for safety because while it's a pandemic it's a deadly virus. It's attack our need for satisfaction because we can't get as many of the things that we used to get and certainly attacked our need for connection where we're more disconnected from people. Were more isolated. We feel more separated. Were doing this through zoom rather than doing it in person you know whatever. Your personal example is the ultimate anchor for meeting needs is raw physical survival so at the ultimate point where potentially dealing with hazards or situations could be in terms of physical body continuing think of that is the most route challenge to the need for safety and we can also be in situations where we starve to death. We cannot access food a lot of hunter gatherers and even agrarians even fairly recently face starvation and even in america today there are millions of people who day to day live with what's called food insecurity and it's estimated loosely that about a billion people worldwide. Go to bed hungry every night. And so this is a real to okay. That's an example in which the lack of satisfaction in a sounds as anchored physically. And we can even say it as well. Socially there's research that shows that certainly in early childhood if infants toddlers who are put into really situations because they're given up for adoption and then they're just languishing and some hospital and nobody touches them for long periods of time or prematurely born infants. Who were not touched. That too can pose a lethal threat but much of the time especially in modern developing countries challenges to the sense of safety tend to be more psychological indicated by feelings of anxiety where anger or helplessness. Those are three big flags challenges to the need for satisfaction that could have to do with accomplishing things or feeling successful or making more money. Being able to access pleasure of different kinds well impediments to the meeting of these for satisfaction are marked by feelings of disappointment loss frustration or immobilization or marked by driven us too extreme and addictions

Hamad Izzo Jane France America
Radical Compassion with Tara Brach

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

06:10 min | 4 months ago

Radical Compassion with Tara Brach

"Hello and welcome to being well. I'm forrest hanson. If you're new to the podcast this is where we explore the practical science of lasting wellbeing. And if you've listened before welcome back. i'm joined today as usual by dr rick hansen. So dad how are you doing today. I'm good and i'm especially good because we're going to have a chance to talk with someone who's been a profound benefactor for me personally which is a term that really means something to me as well as a teacher and a friend and just one heck of a personal the way around. Tara brach so. I'm really happy that we're going to be doing this as super happy to be here with tara. Tara is the founder and guidance. Teacher the insight meditation community of washington dc one of the largest residential meditation centers in the united states prior to that as you said she earned her doctorate in clinical psychology and developed a clinical practice or teaching blends those two backgrounds western psychology and eastern spiritual practices mindful attention to our inner life and then a full compassionate engagement with the outside world which has been perhaps particularly challenging recently. Tara has taught all over the world and is the author of three books radical acceptance true refuge and most recently radical compassion. Which i believe just came out in paperback and podcast is also. I think the largest buddhism focused podcast in the world. Which is pretty incredible. If you like what we're doing here you should definitely get a lesson so tara. It's great to have you here today. How are you doing fires thank you. I am totally delighted to both of you. You're both deers in my heart. Yeah that's sweet. one reason. I wanted to really talk with you. Including in terms of current events has to do both with your new book radical compassion which integrates acceptance and compassion and in particular. I wanna ask you about your use of the word. Radical your first book was radical acceptance. What's the distinction between acceptance and compassion or radical acceptance and radical compassion. What did you mean by that by drawing attention to that word including perhaps in light of current conditions. I've always loved the word radical. Ever since i thought i was a left wing radical in the old days so it has a positive impact but it has to do with going to the roots and there are many expressions that the heart that are really beautiful and i was really wanting to explore the most pure and full-bodied expression of acceptance and compassion. What they mean really in terms of freedom so in both books whether it with acceptance. It's like what does it mean when we unconditionally accept this moment as it is and we fully earned bodied. So we're not just accepting but we're actually fueling the moment so are completely here present and with compassion. What is true compassion. What's mature compassion. Look like feel like. How do we cultivate ed. And it became clear to me that a lot of people have an abstract sense of compassion. Like we'll hear about if we don't have covert or people losing parents with covid but not having to ask though. Be something in us that goes. Oh that's so sad but it's abstract it's not a tenderness in the heart so radical compassionate embodied nor fully here to experience being touched by the suffering and it includes an activity of caring and engage caring so again with both of those qualities of the heart a really wanted to bring alive what it meant to have the most mature evolve version of them. You're a psychologist as well as longtime buddhist practitioner and you have root zoom eastern traditions as well broadly and also europe. Practical person of a functioning. Business you've raised a son. I wondered how you wove all those threads together especially in your interest in getting out the roots of things really the deep roots blah. That's like a really big. And deep question your guam radical to there we go so one of my guiding teachings from this is three saga datta and i come back to this one quote. All the time is that wisdom tells me. I'm nothing love tells me i'm everything. And between the two my life flows. And i find with the radical deep practices. We actually see unveils. What is true is. There's no thing or person here and there's a really deep wisdom and that a real freedom from holding on an openness and were also everything it's like when we send that emptiness there is this fastness. That feels that the whole world is part of us and this is going somewhere in terms of your question that i find in my own life by go off to retreat. It gets very quiet. And i can see clearly the emptiness the no thing ness that. There's nobody here but it's not until engagement with the world and feeling both the suffering and also as i'm just looking at you because your dear friend seeing the goodness and really feeling at that i sent the everything nest that we really are of the same consciousness and awareness were emergent expressions of it and so in my life. It's been a gift to be both really in the mix with humans with social activism with the whole mass and also create the pauses the silence and the stolnis that allows that seen through to the radical roots of the nature of things. And i feel like that blend flowing. It's not really a flow between one thing another. They're utterly inter penetrating but that feels like a very alive path to me.

Forrest Hanson Dr Rick Hansen Tara Brach Tara Washington Dc United States ED Europe
Biden Faults Trump for Slow Vaccine Rollout, Pledges Faster Pace

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

06:46 min | 6 months ago

Biden Faults Trump for Slow Vaccine Rollout, Pledges Faster Pace

"Just a few weeks ago. The trump administration said it would be able to vaccinate twenty million people by the end of the year so far two point one million people have been vaccinated. Just ten percent of what was projected. Ten percent of what people were told they could reasonably expect now to be fair. There is likely some lag time between when a shot goes into the arm. And when the cdc is able to report it so that we can tell you about it but eighteen million people worth of lag. Time is unlikely. The trump administration's operation warp speed released a statement today to explain the slow vaccine. Rollout it they promised to distribute twenty million first doses by next week then explained quote. These doses are being distributed at states direction to the american people as quickly as are available and releasable and the rapid availability and distribution of so many doses with twenty million first doses allocated for distribution. Just eighteen days after the first vaccine was granted emergency. Utah's use authorization is a testament to the success of operation warp speed and quote president-elect biden had this to say today about the quote unquote success of trump's operation warp speed trump administration's plan is to be vaccines as falling behind far behind. We're grateful to the companies. The doctors scientists researchers the clinical trial participants an operation warp speed for developing the vaccines quickly. But as i long feared and warrant the effort to distribute it administer. The vaccine is not progressing as it should the pace of vaccine the vaccination program is moving now as if you continue to exist now it's going to take years not months to vaccinate the american people. I've laid out three challenges at our first hundred days. One of them is ensuring that one hundred million shots have been administered by the end of the first hundred days. Congress provides the funding. We'd be able to meet this. Incredible goal would take ramping up five to six times. The current pace to one million shots. Today this'll take more time than anyone would like. And more time than the promises from the trump administration have suggested joining us. Now is dr rick. Bright he's a member president-elect biden's corona virus advisory board and a former top vaccine expert at the department of health and human services bright. Good to see you. Thank you for being here. Good st ali. Thank you for having me. Let me first ask you about this new strain that we found in colorado this if this twenty year old man who's got it didn't travel anywhere. I guess we can assume and people like you know enough to assume that it's probably already here in the of people like me. You don't really understand you know very well vaccines and viruses. The idea that this is more contagious and infectious doesn't seem as bad as if it were more deadly but folks who understand the say that it actually is. It's worse that it's more contagious. More infectious Because of the exponential nature of how viruses spread in our society. While you hit a lot of great orients. I mean first of all we expect viruses to change. We expect viruses mutate especially once they start Circulating more broadly among different people in such. So it's not a surprise as we find different variants of the buyers the sars virus appearing. Of course we want to monitor those very closely. We don't wanna cause alarm. We wanna take it seriously. And when we find that the virus has changed in properties like this is more contagious Also checked more carefully to know if it does cause more severe disease and if it does do anything to evade the vaccine or the therapeutics. Most of those data are still not available. Scientists are working really hard to get that information but we do have a pretty good indication that it is spreading more easily meaning. More people can get infected with his virus neces- concern however. That's a concern. We can manage. Because we know that wearing masks and social distancing and keep an art group size small etc. Washing your hands will still do everything to reduce the spread of the virus. Stay vigilant and i think we'll give the scientists time to learn more about the virus and epidemiologists infectious disease. Experts have been saying that to us since day one since february and march of last year. That that's that's still the best way. The good news is that we have no evidence that this new mutation of the virus won't react or won't be protected against by the vaccines in other words. The vaccines may still work. But now we've got the issue about a much slower rollout than we expected. What do you make of it well. It's very disappointing. Actually i mean a parole of the great work the scientists have done to make the vaccines in record time band to start producing the vaccines that the companies have really prioritize in the scientists in government had gotten a lot of work and now we see those vaccine doses sitting in freezers sitting in warehouses instead of being distributed in administered to people. You know vaccines in a freezer. We've said numerous times. Don't do anything to help. A person prevent infection. You have to administer those vaccines. We know it's difficult. We know a lot of war. Trump administration made big promises. I think they may have over. Sold their capabilities underestimated the complexity complexity. The challenge now those vaccine sitting in the need to get him out of the. So here's the thing called. Joe biden saying he wants one hundred million people in in the first one hundred days. That's a million a day. That's five to six times where we are right. Now what's going to change the las gonna change first of all we're going to get a handle on how those vaccine to being produced. We're gonna use whatever authorities possible president-elect biden will use whatever authorities are possible and available to him to ramp up production of those vaccines. We have more vaccine available. The biden campaign is also the biden administration to work more closely with the state's in partnerships is not going to be a hand off in good luck. It will be a partnership is present biden said. Today we're all in this together so we're not gonna lately the states alone and had them figure it out on their own. We're going to walk. This grew all the way to the end with educational programs in all communities and make sure the vaccine is getting to those hard to reach communities in people who are black and let lat next end at native americans who are really hit hardest from this virus. We wanna make sure that vaccines are reaching them. So the biden administration is going to move heaven and earth to get the vaccine to the people as quickly as possible.

Elect Biden Dr Rick St Ali CDC Epidemiologists Infectious Dis Donald Trump Department Of Health And Human Utah Congress Trump Administration Colorado Biden Administration Joe Biden Biden
"dr  rick" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

Broncos Daily Podcast

02:19 min | 7 months ago

"dr rick" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

"I <Speech_Male> know you're looking forward <Speech_Male> to having <Speech_Male> your <Speech_Male> prep matter <Speech_Male> for the <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Male> told anybody i might have mentioned <Speech_Male> it on <Speech_Male> sunday so <Speech_Male> i ended up talking to <Speech_Male> both <Speech_Male> vic. Fangio andrew. <Speech_Male> lock for pre-game <Speech_Male> because they've had <Speech_Male> high schools state <Speech_Male> finals so <Speech_Male> they had me last minute <Speech_Male> call to the bullpen. Just because <Speech_Male> the broncos switcher <Speech_Male> timing around with <Speech_Male> the friday <Speech_Male> practice being cancelled <Silence> all that and so <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> talk about your whole game <Speech_Male> and you spend plenty <Speech_Telephony_Male> more time than <Speech_Male> i did on to six minute <Speech_Male> interviews but <Speech_Male> i was excited <Speech_Male> for my conversations <Speech_Male> with both vic andrew <Speech_Male> that they <Speech_Telephony_Male> were going to be part of the pre <Speech_Male> game instead. <Speech_Male> They never saw the light of <Speech_Male> day. So <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it's mike <Speech_Male> tyson lane right <Speech_Male> everybody's got plan <Speech_Male> to punched <SpeakerChange> in the mouth <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> you gotta <Speech_Male> you gotta roll with the <Speech_Male> punches especially <Speech_Male> this year. You didn't make me laugh <Speech_Male> though. And i even told <Speech_Male> you that halftime that when <Speech_Male> you win <Speech_Male> that game starting <Speech_Male> out and there was nobody <Speech_Male> throwing the ball on either side <Speech_Male> of the field <Speech_Male> like this looks must have been. <Speech_Male> What a game in the thirties and forties <Speech_Male> look like. Dave <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> laughed out loud in <Speech_Male> the press. Box <Speech_Male> at nico's might enjoy. <Speech_Male> Look at me. And i was like <Speech_Male> this will. Richardson <SpeakerChange> and they <Speech_Male> both laughed. <Speech_Male> Pre face <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it did remind <Speech_Male> me a lot of that style of <Speech_Male> football. At least <Speech_Male> the broncos offensively. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I had <Speech_Male> an uncle <SpeakerChange> rico. Referencing <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> oh nice. I <Speech_Male> saw it on social <Speech_Male> media. You gotta in the game. <Silence> How'd <SpeakerChange> you drought. <Speech_Male> I actually <Speech_Male> got it in during my <Speech_Male> hot takes right before <Speech_Male> kickoff. <Speech_Male> And actually may <Speech_Male> dave logan laugh with <Speech_Male> it. <SpeakerChange> I said <Silence> that the broncos <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> know they they did <Speech_Male> get a hold of <Speech_Male> Uncle rico. They <Speech_Male> found him in a van in the <Speech_Male> desert. Unfortunately <Speech_Male> he didn't pass <Speech_Male> the physical. <Speech_Male> You know something like that. <Speech_Male> Dave <Speech_Male> the laugh which is hard <Speech_Male> to do when. You're <Speech_Male> calling the game because dave <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> laser focused <Speech_Male> on everything you know. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Telephony_Male> kind of felt good about <Speech_Male> that. I well. I always <Speech_Male> feel good about this. Thank <Speech_Male> you for always making time <Speech_Male> for me I <Speech_Male> know you've got a very busy schedule <Speech_Male> with all of your jobs <Speech_Male> you have three full-time jobs <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and a lot of other stuff <Speech_Male> going on and you still have time <Speech_Male> to chat with me <Speech_Male> here. On the broncos daily podcast <Speech_Male> thank you. Let's <Speech_Male> hope that <Speech_Male> quarterbacks play for <Speech_Male> the broncos <Speech_Male> and that <Speech_Telephony_Male> maybe steal <Speech_Male> a win. And i'll talk to you next week. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> All right <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thank you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> pen fit. That's <Speech_Music_Male> a fact. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Not <Speech_Music_Male> credit card purchases. <Speech_Music_Male> Give me cash back <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> fat. No one <Speech_Music_Male> else gets these rewards <Laughter> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> chink.

Fangio andrew tyson lane Dave <Speech broncos dave logan Richardson football
"dr  rick" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

Broncos Daily Podcast

05:55 min | 7 months ago

"dr rick" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

"And i certainly haven't gotten any indication but when you hear there's some things you get thrown out there whether it's by fans or other media and you dismiss it 'cause you know it'll never happen and that's unfortunately the nature of the way fans approach some things. As my one of my all time favorites. I was working at one point. Four three the fan and and this made me even before is one of four three phantom. I'd have been nine fifty the fan. That's long ago it was But somebody called up and said hey we should trade carmelo anthony for two number ones. It was like okay. That sounds great. Who's offering to number ones for mellow and you would get. You would get calls like that all the time. And so you see stuff on social media fans they. Why don't we do this. Why don't we do that well. I'm not saying that that green jackson is definitely gone. But with the guy who's going to be thirty two and one year left on his deal at twelve million bucks. Could you spend that money somewhere else in and not have as much of a drop off and again. I'm not saying that it isn't a drop off from kareem to will. They play the position a little differently. But we know that will can can a hard hit to just go back to that pittsburgh game. A couple of years saved a touch that that video has been all over the internet. In fact i think steve atwater retweeted it And stephen willer a really close. So it'll be we'll back in town back in the building. Here's last night. Just for a little bit with broncos country tonight you can get their entire interview Broncos country tonight dot com or of course on koa page or on the free iheartradio app. But here he is talking about when he found out that he was coming home to denver. If you will get philly is his own too. But denver's has really been other home especially as an adult right for four years anywhere especially in formal years as you're getting out of college and pro football or whatever. Your career is in this case pro football then wherever you are. There's always going to be an affection for that. I think he has that here. So here is With ryan edwards last night and broncos country. Tonight i got on. I got on the phone. We we buys the You know a lot of other guys on their east. I didn't call you know saying so like you said. May i mean you know maliki maliki saturday so you know i came out there making please film no from watching tape and stuff like batman so you know it just obviously speak to you know that the enjoy that you know the the commodity that they still have you know Already and then you know just me obviously making a return Trying to help them as best as possible you know bringing bringing in new bringing pass and You know what i'm saying. They could recoup. Oh gosh a lot of people. Still there You know obviously with the coaching staff know. He'll even coach. Chris re style. You know what i'm saying. Obviously going on a phone call with You know that's you know that was music to my ears. As far as you know you know like once who may like them you know people you to come back and make a difference. No no matter what is saying so like i said.

broncos steve atwater stephen willer carmelo anthony kareem denver ryan edwards jackson pittsburgh football philly maliki Chris
"dr  rick" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

Broncos Daily Podcast

05:04 min | 7 months ago

"dr rick" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

"Broncos broncos radio network my pal rick lewis. Well rick. I was out at broncos practice today and didn't see drew lock do anything wearing his helmet. He didn't go through stretch. Then we got to see when the quarterbacks are starting to warm up during special teams. He didn't do that. He did hand off. Fake play action. Handoffs debris rippin and then do the throwing motion but not. Actually the ball go then. They got into individual work. Once the team broke out a special teams he just stood. There ended his own footwork stuff while the other three guys threw the ball so as it sits here on a wednesday afternoon. If i were to tell you to go to your favorite betting site fan duel or my favorite betting site draftkings. Would you bet. Drew lock plays based on what we know. And i'll add to this vic. Fangio said he wants them to practice some this week He doesn't want to go into the game without any practice. Res- i'm gonna say no i'm gonna say no. He doesn't play this week. It was obvious calling the game on sunday. That not only was he getting beat up He was hurt You could see him grimace when he'd get up off the ground Greatness teeth at some at some point he was limping. We we couldn't tell what kind of injury add because for a while. He was limping a another time. He was like his ribcage and apparently he doesn't have broken ribs. He's got a severe strained oblique. And if you've ever had that it's pretty debilitating especially for quarterback. I would think it's going to make it pretty tough for him to come back this week so i will say no. He will not play this week. And we will see the return of brett rippin. Yeah and the last thing. We celebrate rippin. It went pretty well. That was the jets before before we moved to burbano about lock's injury i will say dave did keep commenting on i..

Fangio rick lewis Broncos drew brett dave
"dr  rick" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

Broncos Daily Podcast

04:19 min | 7 months ago

"dr rick" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

"Happy wednesday broncos country. It's hot day brought to back on the practice field today. Man rick lewis to chat yesterday and then my schedule dictate that. We weren't able to actually monday his work than mine but we got together. So rick lewis coming up here in just a little bit..

rick lewis broncos
Ohio hospital leaders say staffing is the next challenge with latest COVID-19 surge

Eddie and Rocky

00:23 sec | 7 months ago

Ohio hospital leaders say staffing is the next challenge with latest COVID-19 surge

"Ohio's governor says We're at a critical stage in the pandemic. Hospital leaders just yesterday warned about staffing issues as Corona virus surges Three has had an unprecedented increase in the number of hospital cases since really the beginning of October. Dr. Rick Lofgren with Jussi Health Just yesterday. Today, a new record of cases reported over 6500. New hospitalizations today, coming in Maura than double the three week

Dr. Rick Lofgren Ohio Jussi Health Corona Maura
"dr  rick" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

Broncos Daily Podcast

04:44 min | 7 months ago

"dr rick" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

"Dave coach are on the field in a game and make a play that seems to happen. You know every couple of games are so there'll be somebody that makes a play that dave either coached or coached against it. And i love that. I love to be able to bring that up in a football game and it really also brings a real local connection to the broadcast because some people may not remember mike pinelli you know guys like that actually played at. I think grandview mike. I think key trail one of those kinds of underrates like that. That was a couple of weeks ago. But yeah it a great connection for fans to to hear that type of thing and i try to work in local connections whenever i can so i'll give you one. This is just a freebie so just free planning purposes week fourteen. They play december thirteenth day. Play game in carolina. There's a running back for the panthers. Not my davis. The kid that came back this week. His name's christian mccaffrey. He played his high school ball at valor and was pretty good here. His dad played receiver for the broncos. And then believe it or not actually sat in the chair that you sit in as the color analyst on the broncos radio network before you took over that job ed mccaffrey if you remember that name. So that's a good one. I worked aware of that. yeah week. Fourteen gershon mccaffrey worth noting local good local ties there. That could come up in the broadcast. I think ed is the coach at unc right now. So there's that yeah. I'm sure that will get worked in very pretty easily. Like captain obvious right. I would hope it would be like what's the point of even bringing that up. It would be funny if you if you do the game in. Don't mention it at all. Just treat them like another player. Everybody listening to dumb dave christians. Dad played for the denver broncos eight whenever him one more.

broncos dave christians ed mccaffrey christian mccaffrey denver broncos gershon mccaffrey mike pinelli football panthers carolina analyst unc
"dr  rick" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

Broncos Daily Podcast

04:41 min | 7 months ago

"dr rick" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

"With brandon krisztal. I want everything. I want all the meatballs and the pasta. Have you broncos country. Happy certainly isn't for our okwuegbunam. The broncos rookie tight end announce yesterday that he tore his. Acl is done for the year. Here's vic fangio trying to find a silver lining on the news that the promising youngster is gonna be on the shelf for awhile albert that. Get an acl injury. And he will miss the rest of the season. Fortunate thing i was. It's just the acl. The acl only many times when get an acl. It's awesome other ligaments. So his rehab repair should go clean and he should be back as good as new next season. So eleven catches one hundred twenty one yards that one score should have been more heady of hauled in one or both of those. Td passes that his college qb drew. Lock him with in new england and locked. Join logan and louis like he does every monday and it was pretty shortly after. The news out about alberto here was his reaction to losing his favorite target missouri. They had seventeen catches and eighteen game seventeen touchdowns and eighteen games and into one of his more reliable and clearly favorite targets here at the pro level. Yeah you know just being really really close to albert it. It hurts you know. I don't know it's upsetting for him as sure. I don't really know if he's had to deal with any big injuries yet. you know but i'll be there for them We live pretty close together. So i know he's he's by himself right now and try to fake his life as possible if i can when i can but it is upsetting and then a little bit after that drew on. They talked bradley. Chubb every monday as well. He's no stranger to an acl tear. And you know he has continued to say that it was a great thing for him that he tore his. Acl you talking about turning a negative into a positive. He tells me that he told me that. A bunch early because we talk every week for broncos pre game That and he said it publicly a lot that it allowed him to Kind of refocus and and and understand what's important and play every snap like it could be his last so here bradley job to dave and rick on here in the news about alberto. Turn his acl him. Working in the way your own truck camper and see his work at a lot of those guys that. I ended auto same work same the day. I wanna get back fast. And also his especially albert. And i'm excited to see how he deals off..

alberto broncos bradley vic fangio brandon krisztal louis Chubb england missouri logan rick dave
"dr  rick" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

Broncos Daily Podcast

04:00 min | 8 months ago

"dr rick" Discussed on Broncos Daily Podcast

"With brandon krisztal. I want everything i want. All the meatballs and the pasta heavy wednesday broncos country is. I think it's a happy wednesday. Saying our democracy play out in front of us and seeing every vote counted and seeing people overreact one way or another last night and then still this morning and hopefully some calmness prevails and at some point in the coming future we will know who the president will be for the next four years. And in the meantime we're just trying to see we'll our football season play. I know they didn't wisconsin. They're nervous about the badgers. It seemed like they may not get play any games. This season lease. I saw that rumor out there that possibility here in denver no surprise and i thought this might become in which is part of the reason when to wait a little bit to get the podcast out i thought just in the wake of the john elway and joyless positive tests that we would see the broncos err on the side of caution and maybe shut the building down. Well then we find out that. It's darren palo the practice squad off tackle. You gotta think at some point. He may have crossed. Paths with mike. One checkered graham glasgow. He test positive for coronavirus so they decided to hold everything. virtually almost simultaneously. The niners are doing the same thing. Now the niners play thursday night against the packers. So that's a little different We here. It's out of an abundance of caution but with the the news from the bronx. They're closing down the building. In fact that can read you the statement it says in consultation with the nfl. We're taking the precautionary step of conducting. Today's game preparations virtually and away from ucla. Training center with the recent increase in positive cases and a practice squad player added the covid nineteen reserve list today. This was the safe responsible. Then you do other than player. We have all football activities will take place remotely players and coaches will conduct. Their normal meeting schedule from the broncos are scheduled to resume practicing on thursday at the ucla training centre with meetings remaining virtual and in remote format..

broncos packers football brandon krisztal ucla john elway wisconsin darren palo mike president glasgow denver nfl
Top US immunologist quits health role over Trump's COVID-19 response

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 9 months ago

Top US immunologist quits health role over Trump's COVID-19 response

"Abruptly quit today. CBS is Jim Carcela. Dr Rick Bride, a high ranking government whistle blower, who sharply criticized The Trump Administration's handling of Corona virus, has resigned, saying he was forced out. Bright was sidelined at the National Institutes of Health, where he had been transferred this spring after being kicked out as head of a bio defense agency president Trump Shutdown

Dr Rick Bride Donald Trump National Institutes Of Health Bright Jim Carcela CBS President Trump
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | 9 months ago

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
Virus whistleblower tells lawmakers US lacks vaccine plan

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Virus whistleblower tells lawmakers US lacks vaccine plan

"A government scientist who says he was ousted from high level post after warning the trump administration to prepare for the pandemic says the nation needs to do much more to avoid the darkest winter in modern history appearing before a house panel Dr Rick bright says he's early virus preparedness concerns were dismissed among other things he's worried about efforts to develop a vaccine we need to have a strategy and plan in place now to make sure that we can not only feel that vaccine make it distributed by the minister it in a fair and equitable plan the White House has set up operation at warp speed to do that and president trump is disputing brights believe that it'll take longer than a year and a half to develop a vaccine I think we're gonna have a vaccine by the end of the year product distribution will take place almost simultaneously he's calling bright an angry and disgruntled employee Sager made Donnie Washington

Scientist White House Donald Trump Sager Donnie Washington Dr Rick Bright President Trump
Ousted virus expert warns of "darkest winter in modern history"

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Ousted virus expert warns of "darkest winter in modern history"

"Comes with a blower Dr Rick Wright testified before Congress he filed a complaint that he was fired for political reasons for criticizing the administration's response to the operator of health official turned whistle blower break right he's warning lawmakers that the U. S. could be facing its darkest winter in modern history because he says the country lacks a science based national response to the corona virus pandemic time is running out because the virus is still spreading everywhere right was removed from his top job leading the government agency overseeing the development of a coronavirus vaccine and has since filed a whistleblower complaint alleging his removal was politically

Dr Rick Wright Congress Official
Dr. Rick Bright, ousted director of key vaccine agency, testifying before House panel Thursday

Brian Kilmeade

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Dr. Rick Bright, ousted director of key vaccine agency, testifying before House panel Thursday

"The coronavirus whistle blower Dr Rick bright testifying this morning before the house energy and commerce committee in Washington DC bright was demoted after warning trump administration officials about the corona virus pandemic some scientists raised early warning signals that were overlooked and pages from my pandemic playbook where Nord by some in leadership Dr bright is urging a better national testing strategy the right testing and tracing he says he is confident a vaccine will eventually be

Dr Rick Washington Dr Bright
Ousted virus expert warns of "darkest winter in modern history"

Orlando's Morning News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Ousted virus expert warns of "darkest winter in modern history"

"Dr Rick Wright is named he will tell a house committee today without more action the year twenty twenty will quote be the darkest winter in modern history he says the US needs a more coordinated national response should the virus come back later this year right was the head of a key vaccine agency within the administration he says he was removed from his job and transferred because he refused to promote a malaria drug the president talked about as possible treatment for cover nineteen he has since filed a whistleblower complaint the administration does not agree with his assessment the president calls him a disgruntled employees so we have this back and forth but it's certainly setting up some drama to play out here on the hill

Dr Rick Wright United States President Trump Malaria
"dr  rick" Discussed on A New Direction

A New Direction

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"dr rick" Discussed on A New Direction

"Control the Culture <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> de realized that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you and I have done <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> this <SpeakerChange> show <Silence> <Advertisement> for an hour <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> fast. That does <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> seem but it's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> really really. It's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> GONNA happening time. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It was it really <Silence> <Advertisement> has been an hour <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I want to thank <Silence> <Advertisement> you for coming on <Speech_Male> again. <hes> <Speech_Male> you have <Speech_Male> you've been <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> more than more than <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I could ever ask and for <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> seriously <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I am <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I love you <Speech_Male> to death. I really <Speech_Male> really really <Speech_Male> do. I <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> am so grateful for <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you and I appreciate <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and this book <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dealing with people. You can't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> stand. Please <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> tell Dr Rick <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Kirshner <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that I appreciate <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> his contribution <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> how good I think. This book <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of course I'll be pumping <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> out and pushing it out <Speech_Male> to folks again <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <hes> because it's that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> good <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> You know the drill. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I always ask the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> friends of the show at <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the end of the show. If you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> could leave the people with a <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> new direction <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> what would that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> new direction? Be <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> so <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Dr Eric. Brinkman <Speech_Male> CO author <Speech_Male> of dealing with <Speech_Male> people. You can't stand <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on the revenge. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> She show <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> What's the new <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> direction <SpeakerChange> that you would leave <Silence> <Advertisement> people with today? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Well <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I remember to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Woody Allen quote. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'd like to leave you with a positive <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> message <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> but I don't have one. <Speech_Male> So <SpeakerChange> can I get into <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> negative messages? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Teacher said that would come <Speech_Music_Male> in handy <SpeakerChange> I'd like to leave you with a positive <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> message <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> but I don't have one. <Speech_Male> So <SpeakerChange> can I get into <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> negative messages? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Teacher said that would come <Speech_Music_Male> in handy <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> deposits. <Speech_Male> That's awesome. <Speech_Male> I appreciate <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> your sense of humor <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a gentleman. That's the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> show. You know what I say <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you right be inspired <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> because when you're <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> inspired that means that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you can inspire others <Speech_Male> and in turn <Speech_Male> that means that <Speech_Male> they can inspire <Speech_Male> others as well and <Speech_Male> that can make this world a really <Speech_Music_Male> amazing place <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> be back <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> next week <Speech_Male> with the Memorial <Speech_Male> Day. Show <Speech_Male> Tom Sadly <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> he's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a former special <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> forces guy with the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> unit. We're doing <Speech_Male> a special show <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Talking about him in <Speech_Male> Mogadishu he <Speech_Male> was there during <Speech_Male> the Black Hawk down. <Speech_Male> It's going to be very <Speech_Male> special memorial day <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> show. I really <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> recommend that you visit <Speech_Male> <Advertisement>

Mogadishu Woody Allen Dr Rick Dr Eric Brinkman Kirshner
"dr  rick" Discussed on A New Direction

A New Direction

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"dr rick" Discussed on A New Direction

"Yes. You know what I'm talking about. I am talking about the binge of dealing with people. You can't stand. This is the revenge show. Dr Rick Brinkman. We joking around with Ben Show and then somebody said Oh I heard you guys talk about the revenge show. We should do the eventually went. We're going to do the revenge show. So that's what we're doing. We're doing the revenge show. It's going to be fantastic. Dr Rick Brinkman back with us and we're GONNA have a Lotta Fun. We're GONNA work through some of these people that you have seen. You may even be one of them. You may be all of them at one time or another. I'm telling you you could be the grenade you could be the sniper murder you could be. You could be the know it all you could be. I think I know it all you know who you are because you think you know it all I know you do. I know you know and Dr GonNa talk about that as well but before we do that. Let's do what we do every week. And you know what that is. I check in with the four areas of your life. Look here's the deal. I believe her for part. People physical people mental people emotional people were spiritual people. And you know we're living in a very odd and unique time in riots and one of the things about living in this time in our life is you know what do you do with yourself. Physically mentally emotionally spiritually. Because you actually have control over those things so sometimes it happens. When we are beset with all sorts of circumstances we have a tendency to believe that we are out of control and that we can't control the circumstances around and it's just simply not true. You know the truth is that you have a lot of decisions that you can make in controlling what you can't control this. You could tell everything but let's talk about these four areas the things he could control right. I as the physical area. You can't control a lot of what you're doing physically. You could stop sitting on the couch and get up and walk seriously. Do you. My neighbor my neighbor lady I sh- she's older she did. She just decided to walk around her house. She did laps around a house. It's kind of hilly. That's what she did. She decides she said to me she said you know I'm tired. I should not be sitting around and I just need to get out and so she said every damn do my laps and so she does my my other neighbors they walked. They walked the walk. The neighborhood it's a half mile circle and so they walk a little neighborhood and a half now folks. There's just a lot of things that you can do to enhance your self physically. You can put down the fork. You can get your hand out of the potato chips you can start drinking the soda. There are many decisions that you can make. That can improve yourself physically. So in a scale of one to ten one being miserable outstanding. How you doing physically? And then what are you? GonNa do to change it. That's really the key right. 'cause that's that's why. I want you to do all right. That's the physical..

Dr Rick Brinkman Ben Show murder
Whistleblower: US could face virus rebound 'darkest winter'

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Whistleblower: US could face virus rebound 'darkest winter'

"The government whistleblower who says he was ousted from his job for warning the trump administration about the virus pandemic is cautioning of potentially dark times ahead Dr Rick bright says unless the government moves decisively to prevent a virus rebound America is looking at the darkest winter in modern history in prepared testimony bright will tell a house panel tomorrow he fears unprecedented illness and death unless the nation develops a national coordinated response rooted in science listing and national testing strategy among other things the White House as urges states to take the lead on testing a federal watchdog agency has found reasonable grounds that bright was removed from heading the biomedical advanced research and development authority for sounding the alarm about the nation's virus preparedness Sager mag ani Washington

America White House Dr Rick Bright Ani Washington
Office of Special Counsel says removal of Health whistleblower was retaliatory

Ben Ferguson

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Office of Special Counsel says removal of Health whistleblower was retaliatory

"The office of special counsel found reasonable grounds Dr Rick bright was removed from his office for opposing widespread use of a drug touted as a corona virus remedy by president trump attorneys for bright say the O. S. C. an agency responsible for investigating whistleblower complaints made a determination that department of health and Human Services may have violated the whistleblower protection act HHS is a doctor bright was not fired but rather re assigned president trump has described bright is a disgruntled employee Jared Halpern fox

Special Counsel HHS Donald Trump Dr Rick Bright President Trump Jared Halpern