9 Burst results for "Dr Richard Valerie"

Ebola health risk raised to very high in Congo

UN News

01:21 min | 3 years ago

Ebola health risk raised to very high in Congo

"The risk of Ebola spreading in the Democratic Republic of the Congo remains very high the head of the World Health Organization or WHO said on Monday Ted dwells at hanham Gabrielle, his warning follows a recent spike in the number of infections of into the virus in the unstable north east of the country since January, there have been dozens of attacks on health facilities in North Kivu, and on the nineteenth of April forty two year old Dr Richard Valerie, from Cameroon was killed in Battambang. Oh, here's Ted Rosser telling the World Health Assembly Geneva. What Dr Valerie's colleagues told him when he visited them. India see, they told me I caught we're here to save lives. We will not be intimidated by violence. We will finish the job Ebola does not take sides. It's the enemy of everybody unless we unite to end this outbreak. We ran very risk that it will. Become more widespread and more expensive and more aggressive to date. WHO has vaccinated some one hundred and twenty thousand people against Ebola which Ted said was more than ninety seven percent, affective and four experimental. Treatments have been given to eight hundred patients. The outbreak has claimed more than twelve hundred lives since it began last August.

Dr Richard Valerie Ted Rosser Ebola World Health Organization North Kivu Hanham Gabrielle Cameroon Congo Battambang India Ninety Seven Percent Forty Two Year
News in Brief 23 April 2019

UN News

03:40 min | 3 years ago

News in Brief 23 April 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations nearly three weeks since fighting began in the Libyan capital Tripoli, the U N health agency want on Tuesday that large numbers of people are sheltering in medical clinics, while civilians continue to be killed or injured and refugees and migrants remain trapped in detention centers in an update to journalists spokesperson targes Revich from the World Health Organization or WHO said that two hundred sixty four people had died so far in clashes between the UN recognized government of national accord or GNA and the Libyan national army Ellena, including twenty one civilians echoing those fears above our Bella from UNHCR, the UN refugee agency appealed for humanitarian access to thousands of refugees and migrants believe trapped in state run detention centers, south of the capital. Our concern is for some six thousand who still remain in detention inside some of the detention locations. But also the. Major concern is for about three thousand six hundred refugees that are currently trapped in some of the detention center, which are very close where the fighting is taking place now in the past two weeks UNHCR has moved five hundred and forty one vulnerable refugees from the detention centers of are Casablanca Garcia IB Salim and genzer to a safe location in central Tripoli to the DRC now or Democratic Republic of the Congo where the World Health Organization or WTO says it has been forced to suspend some Ebola related activities following the killing of a N epidemiologist in Battambang last Friday, according to the U N health agency, the body of Dr Richard Valerie, Mizuko Kibben, a father of four will be flown back to Cameroon on Wednesday. In addition to Dr Masuku's death to other people were injured in the attack on temple university hospital, but they are recovering WHO spokesperson Tarik Jezora, which said it was not yet clear who was responsible. But that the. Incident had forced at WHO to suspend some activities in potential, although not elsewhere. But cannot really give you the answers on who did this and why they'd be number of incidents whether being directly targeting evola responders or security incidents on something else where we were caught in the middle. But the result is that we do not provide vital services. And then once we get back to community, then we see increasing number of cases because the transmission was ongoing while we were not their latest data from the authorities indicate that the Ebola outbreak has claimed more than eight hundred seventy lives since it was confirmed last August and finally to Sri Lanka where some forty five. Children are now believed to have been killed in the coordinated terrorist suicide bombings across the country on Easter Sunday. According to you and children's fund UNICEF today to more than three hundred and twenty people are believed to have died and around five hundred more have been injured in a statement condemning the outrage. Which targeted churches and hotels. The UN agency said that the young victims were a mixture of both Sri, Lankan and other nationalities. The youngest victim is believed to have been eighteen months old, UNICEF spokesperson Kristof. Billions and said twenty children have been admitted to hospital in Colombo with four of them in intensive care. As a result of the plastic in Columbine, many children have lost one or both parents and countless children have been witnessed to shocking and senseless violence, according to reports, Sri Lankan police have arrested dozens of suspects in connection with the bombings. Daniel Johnson UN news.

United Nations Unhcr World Health Organization Tripoli Ebola Libyan National Army Ellena Unicef Casablanca Garcia Ib Salim Sri Lanka Targes Revich Colombo Dr Masuku Kristof Tarik Jezora Temple University Hospital U N Cameroon Congo Daniel Johnson
"dr richard valerie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:37 min | 3 years ago

"dr richard valerie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. It's all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro as free Lanka investigates who was behind yesterday's terrorist attacks on churches and hotels. The government continues to block access to social media, their Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp all owned by Facebook are among the services under a blackout this. Once again brings into focus the fear that Facebook cannot rain in disinformation and calls to finance and pears. Arthur Shahani is following the situation hierarchy high. What explanation did tree long has government give for shutting down these social media apps? So in a nutshell, the government doesn't trust Facebook to yank down fake news and call to miles before they go viral keep in mind. Sri Lanka is only a decade out of civil war. That's not a long time people. Remember it peace feels tenuous to them just a year ago last March Buddhist extremists torched, Muslim homes and businesses and used Facebook to incite violence in response to that the government had had. Had announced a seventy two hour block on social media in this time around the government is not putting a time limit on it. It's unclear when the band will come to an end. Of course, there are lots of examples of hoaxes going rampant on on Facebook from Myanmar to the United States. We have to note, they aren't NPR sponsor. How is the company responded to what's happening? Sri Lanka responses. Me company leaders are not defending themselves. They issued a statement and a pretty conciliatory tone saying, hey, we're working to support first responders and law enforcement and to identify and remove harmful content. Facebook had so many screw ups executive can't give themselves up Pat on the back or claim. Hey, we have a handle on calls to violence as recently as the New Zealand massacre Facebook failed to remove twenty percents of the video footage of the mass shooting, even though in that instance, people in the company knew what to look out for tell us how people in Sri Lanka are responding to the Senate you've been reaching out to people affected by the blackout. What are you hearing? I have you know, social media has been used time and again to help in crises right people turn to. Facebook to check in and broadcast that their faith to get updates from local officials and hospitals, and especially in Asia where WhatsApp is replaced regular phone calls for much of the population. The ban really threw people off. I spoke to one woman in American named Rena Aurora who is in Sri Lanka on vacation her family. Didn't know she was in Colombo near a bomb target. And this is her they tried to call me several times. I believe what's happened. They weren't able to get in contact with me. And so they were very concerned for my safety because all of them that I was traveling enchilada the time she had to worry about her parents worrying that she was injured or even worse than that. And she had no idea what was down when she tried to reach driver to get to the airport. He didn't respond and she figured, okay. He's blowing me off. And you know, he wasn't. He just didn't get the messages. So the both of them were operating in an information. Vacuum feeling totally isolated when what they really needed was to connect in a moments of panic. Can we say whether the blackout has actually worked at prevent. Eating the spread of hoaxes and conspiracy theories. Yeah. You know, I actually spoke to a man who lives in Colombo. And he told me that even though Facebook was banned some people use the back door tool. It's called a VPN to get on. Anyway. And lo and behold there ripostes online designed to so fear one one post claims a bomb went off in a nearby local park that was not true and other post claim that terrorists had poisoned the water supply. That was also ally TV and radio journalists had to jump in on that. And report that hey, you can trust the water you can drink at faith. That was extra work for them. It could have been worse with more people on the platform. Wow. So just briefly how does what's happened in Sri Lanka compared to what you've seen in other parts of the world. You know, what we've just seen in Sri Lanka is very swift unilateral action. Other countries like France and Germany have gone. The regulatory route, right. Germany path laws to find Facebook severely for its failure to pull down white supremacists. Content. Either approach quick or regulatory methodic the illustrate that because Facebook has. Been able to take control governments have decided that they're going to have to act. It's NPR's Arthur Shahani, thanks so much. Thank you now to the Democratic Republic of Congo where for months health workers have been struggling to contain any bull outbreak. Despite the fact that more than one hundred thousand people have been vaccinated. There's been a surge of new cases and more than thirteen hundred people have been infected so far the biggest obstacle to stopping the outbreak armed groups who keep attacking health workers in just the last few days. They were two assaults here to tell us. More is NPR's and read is in and welcome to the studio. Hi outy. Give us the latest on these attacks. I well the first one was on Friday afternoon. It was at a local hospital in a city called Mutombo. That's one of the current epicenters of the outbreak and about twenty members of one of the local Ebola response teams were having a meeting in witnesses say two gunmen Burstein, they took everyone's cell phones and other they started shooting injured two people and they killed the team leader. His name was. Dr Richard Valerie was Oko. He was an epidemiologist from Cameron had been deployed by the World Health Organization to help fight Ebola. And then just a few hours later there was an attack on another local command center, this one was at a hospital in a nearby. Suburb called Koch wa it's one of the worst hot spots in the outbreak zone. And this one was around three AM Saturday morning. Four people tried to set fire to that command center. Police fought them off they killed one assailant, and they captured the rest are these centers being targeted on purpose in if so how come it seems so yes, and it's not clear exactly who was behind each of these attacks. But I spoke with Dr Michel Yow who is leading the response for the World Health Organization, and he says witnesses in that first attack told him that the gunmen were shouting Ebola doesn't exist. You're just here to make money off of us and it fits into a larger problem of mistrust in the local population. There have been years of armed. Conflict in this part of Congo and people feel victimized by the government. So they don't trust authorities and by extension health workers. What does this mean for the effort to try and contain the outbreak? Well, there's a lot of concern because this is just the latest in a series of violent incidents that directly target health workers since February two Ebola treatment centers have been attacked Dr Masuku the doctor who was killed on Friday. He had only arrived four weeks ago. And he apparently told colleagues that he was really worried he's left behind a wife and four children in Cameroon. And so each time there's been an attack the health workers need to regroup. They slow down their efforts to vaccinate people who've been exposed, and then you see the effect in the outbreak. It gets worse. Basically more people start to get sick. And you know to give you an example in February just before these attacks on the bullet treatment centers started. They were saying about thirty new cases a week. And then this month, we're already up. To seventy new cases every week even as high as one hundred new cases every week. If this violence continues is there a chance at the outbreak could grow into a catastrophe similar to what we saw in twenty fourteen in some west African countries there are some really important differences, first of all the WHO and the government have been on this from the beginning. There's also a vaccine now which has been a game changer as you noted they've managed to get more than one hundred thousand people to take it and the evidence is highly effective. So there are still reasons to be hopeful despite this latest violence, that's NPR's Eisenman. Thank you for explaining.

Facebook Sri Lanka NPR Colombo Arthur Shahani Lanka Audie Cornish Ari Shapiro Democratic Republic of Congo World Health Organization Asia Ebola Instagram Congo Germany Rena Aurora
Ebola Doctors in the Congo Threaten Strike After a Health Worker Was Killed

All Things Considered

03:26 min | 3 years ago

Ebola Doctors in the Congo Threaten Strike After a Health Worker Was Killed

"Now to the Democratic Republic of Congo where for months health workers have been struggling to contain any bull outbreak. Despite the fact that more than one hundred thousand people have been vaccinated. There's been a surge of new cases and more than thirteen hundred people have been infected so far the biggest obstacle to stopping the outbreak armed groups who keep attacking health workers in just the last few days. They were two assaults here to tell us. More is NPR's and read is in and welcome to the studio. Hi outy. Give us the latest on these attacks. I well the first one was on Friday afternoon. It was at a local hospital in a city called Mutombo. That's one of the current epicenters of the outbreak and about twenty members of one of the local Ebola response teams were having a meeting in witnesses say two gunmen Burstein, they took everyone's cell phones and other they started shooting injured two people and they killed the team leader. His name was. Dr Richard Valerie was Oko. He was an epidemiologist from Cameron had been deployed by the World Health Organization to help fight Ebola. And then just a few hours later there was an attack on another local command center, this one was at a hospital in a nearby. Suburb called Koch wa it's one of the worst hot spots in the outbreak zone. And this one was around three AM Saturday morning. Four people tried to set fire to that command center. Police fought them off they killed one assailant, and they captured the rest are these centers being targeted on purpose in if so how come it seems so yes, and it's not clear exactly who was behind each of these attacks. But I spoke with Dr Michel Yow who is leading the response for the World Health Organization, and he says witnesses in that first attack told him that the gunmen were shouting Ebola doesn't exist. You're just here to make money off of us and it fits into a larger problem of mistrust in the local population. There have been years of armed. Conflict in this part of Congo and people feel victimized by the government. So they don't trust authorities and by extension health workers. What does this mean for the effort to try and contain the outbreak? Well, there's a lot of concern because this is just the latest in a series of violent incidents that directly target health workers since February two Ebola treatment centers have been attacked Dr Masuku the doctor who was killed on Friday. He had only arrived four weeks ago. And he apparently told colleagues that he was really worried he's left behind a wife and four children in Cameroon. And so each time there's been an attack the health workers need to regroup. They slow down their efforts to vaccinate people who've been exposed, and then you see the effect in the outbreak. It gets worse. Basically more people start to get sick. And you know to give you an example in February just before these attacks on the bullet treatment centers started. They were saying about thirty new cases a week. And then this month, we're already up. To seventy new cases every week even as high as one hundred new cases every week. If this violence continues is there a chance at the outbreak could grow into a catastrophe similar to what we saw in twenty fourteen in some west African countries there are some really important differences, first of all the WHO and the government have been on this from the beginning. There's also a vaccine now which has been a game changer as you noted they've managed to get more than one hundred thousand people to take it and the evidence is highly effective. So there are still reasons to be hopeful despite this latest

World Health Organization Dr Richard Valerie Dr Michel Yow Democratic Republic Of Congo Ebola Dr Masuku Congo NPR Mutombo Burstein OKO Koch Team Leader Cameroon Cameron Four Weeks
"dr richard valerie" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:58 min | 3 years ago

"dr richard valerie" Discussed on KCRW

"Pears. Earthy Shahani is following the situation hierarchy high. What explanation Detroit has government give for? Shutting down these social media apps. So in a nutshell, the government doesn't trust Facebook to yank down fake news and calls to violence before they go viral keep in mind. Sri Lanka is only a decade of civil war. That's not a long time people. Remember it peace feels tenuous to them just a year ago last March Buddhist extremists torched, Muslim homes and businesses and used Facebook to incite violence in response to that the government had had announced a seventy two hour block on social media. And this time around the government is not in a time. Limit on it. It's unclear when the band will come to an end. Of course, there are lots of examples of hoaxes going rampant on Facebook from Myanmar to the United States. We have to note, they aren't NPR sponsor. How is the company responded to what's happening? Sri Lanka responses. Me company leaders are not defending themselves. They issued a statement in a pretty conciliatory tone saying, hey, we're working to support first responders and law enforcement and to identify and remove harmful content. Facebook had so. Oh, many screw ups executives can't give themselves Pat on the back or claim. Hey, we have a handle on cost of violence as recently as the New Zealand massacre Facebook failed to remove twenty percents of the video footage of the mass shooting, even though in that instance, people in the company knew what to look out for until us how people in Sri Lanka are responding to the center, you can reach out to people affected by the blackout. What are you hearing social media has been used time and again to help in crises right, people turn to Facebook to check in and broadcast that their faith to get updates from local officials in hospitals, and especially in Asia where what's his replaced regular phone calls for much of the population? The ban really threw people off. I spoke to one woman in American named Rena Aurora who was in Sri Lanka on vacation her family. Didn't know if she was in Colombo near a bomb target, and this is her they tried to call me several times believe what's happened. They weren't able to get in contact with me. And so they were very concerned for my safety because all of them knew that I was traveling enchilada the time. She had to worry about her parents worrying that she was injured or even worse than that. And she had no idea what apple is down when she tried to reach driver to get to the airport. He didn't respond and she figured, okay. He's blowing me off. And you know, he wasn't. He just didn't get the messages for the both of them were operating in an information. Vacuum feeling totally isolated when what they really needed was to connect moments of panic. Can we say whether the blackout has actually worked at preventing the spread of hoaxes and conspiracy theories. Yeah, I actually spoke to a man who lives in Colombo, and he told me that even though Facebook was banned some people use the back door tool. It's called VPN to get on. Anyway. And lo and behold, there were posts online designed to so fear one one post claims bomb went off in a nearby local park that was not true and other post claim that terrorists had poisoned the water supply. That was also ally TV and radio journalists had to jump in on that. And report that hey, you can trust the water you can drink at faith that was. Extra work for them. It could have been worse with more people on the platform. So just briefly how does what's happened in Sri Lanka compared to what you seen another parts of the world. You know, what we've just seen in Sri Lanka is very swift unilateral action. Other countries like France and Germany have gone. The regulatory route. Right. Germany pass laws to find Facebook severely for its failure to pull down white supremacists. Content. Either approach quick or regulatory methodic the illustrate because Facebook hasn't been able to take control governments have defy that they're going to have to act ten Arthur Shahani, thanks so much. Thank you now to the Democratic Republic of Congo where for months health workers have been struggling to contain any bull outbreak. Despite the fact that more than one hundred thousand people have been vaccinated. There's been a surge of new cases and more than thirteen hundred people have been infected so far the biggest obstacle to stopping the outbreak armed groups keep attacking health workers in just the last few days they were too. Two assaults here to tell us. More is NPR's read is welcome to the studio. Hi ati. Give us the latest on these attacks. I well the first one was on Friday afternoon. It was at a local hospital in a city called Matombo. That's one of the current epicenter of the outbreak and about twenty members of one of the local Ebola response teams were having meeting in witnesses say two gunmen Burstein. They took everyone cell phones. And other quick they started shooting injured two people and they killed the team leader. His name was Dr Richard Valerie was Oko. He was an epidemiologist from Cameron had been deployed by the World Health Organization to help fight Ebola. And then just a few hours later there was an attack on another local command center this was at a hospital in a nearby. Suburb called Koch wa it's one of the worst hot spots in the outbreak zone. And this one was around three AM Saturday morning. Four people tried to set fire to that command center. Police fought them off they killed one assailant and the captured the rest are these centers being targeted on purpose. In if so how come it seems so yes, and it's not clear exactly who was behind each of these attacks. But I spoke with Dr Michel Yow who is leading the bully response for the World Health Organization, and he says witnesses in that first attack told him that the gunmen were shouting Ebola doesn't exist. You're just here to make money off of us and it fits into a larger problem of mistrust in the local population. There've been years of armed conflict in this part of Congo and people feel victimized by the government. So they don't trust authorities and by extension health workers. What does this mean for the effort to try and contain the outbreak? Well, there's a lot of concern because this is just the latest in a series of violent incidents that directly target health workers since February two Ebola treatment centers have been attacked Dr MS Oku, the doctor who was killed on Friday. He had only arrived four weeks ago. And he apparently told colleagues that he was. Really worried. He's left behind a wife and four children in Cameroon. And so each time there's been an attack the health workers need to regroup. They slow down their efforts to vaccinate people who've been exposed. And then you see the effect in the outbreak. It gets worse. Basically more people start to get sick. And you know to give an example in February just before these attacks on the bullet treatment centers started. They were saying about thirty new cases a week. And then this month were already up to seventy new cases every week even as high as one hundred new cases every week. If this violence continues is there a chance at the outbreak could grow into a catastrophe similar to what we saw in twenty fourteen in some west African countries there are some really important differences, first of all the W H O and the government have been on this from the beginning. There's also a vaccine now which has been a game changer as you noted they've managed to get more than one hundred thousand people to take it and the evidence is tightly effective. So there are still reasons to be hopeful despite this latest violence, that's NPR's Eisenman. Thank you for explaining to us. Glad to do it. Tomorrow on morning edition, New York City has just passed legislation requiring large buildings to dramatically cut their carbon emissions. The retrofits could cost property owners. Billions of dollars will other cities follow suit that story and the latest news from around the world tomorrow on morning edition. Esther smart speaker to play NPR or your station by name. You're listening to all things considered from.

Facebook Sri Lanka NPR Colombo World Health Organization Germany Democratic Republic of Congo Detroit Ebola New York City Asia Congo Rena Aurora Pat Cameroon
"dr richard valerie" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:37 min | 3 years ago

"dr richard valerie" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"From NPR news. It's all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro as Sri Lanka investigates who was behind yesterday's terrorist attacks on churches and hotels. The government continues to block access to social media, their Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp all owned by Facebook are among the services under a blackout this. Once again brings into focus the fear that Facebook cannot rain in disinflation and calls to finance and pears. Arthur Shahani is following the situation hierarchy what explication Detroit has government give for shutting down these social media apps. So in a nutshell, the government doesn't trust Facebook to yank down fake news and calls to violence before they go viral keep in mind. Sri Lanka is only a decade of civil war. That's not a long time people. Remember it peace feels tenuous to them just a year ago last March Buddhist extremists torched, Muslim homes and businesses and used Facebook to incite violence in response to that the government had. Had announced a seventy two hour block on social media in this time around the government is not putting a time limit on it. It's unclear when the band will come to an end. Of course, there are lots of examples of hoaxes going rampant on on Facebook from Myanmar to the United States. We have to note, they aren't NPR sponsor. How is the company responded to what's happening? Sri Lanka responses. Meek company leaders are not defending themselves. They issued a statement in a pretty conciliatory tone saying, hey, we're working to support first responders and law enforcement and to identify and remove harmful content. Facebook had so many screw up -secutive can't give themselves Pat on the back or claim. Hey, we have a handle on Kalsa violence as recently as the New Zealand massacre Facebook failed to remove twenty percents of the video footage of the mass shooting, even though in that instance, people in the company knew what to look out for tell us how people in Sri Lanka are responding to the Senate you've been reaching out to people affected by the blackout. What are you hearing? You know, social media has been used time and again to help in crises right people turn to face. Facebook to check in and broadcast their faith to get updates from local officials in hospitals, and especially in Asia where WhatsApp is replaced regular phone calls for much of the population. The ban really threw people off I spoke to one woman and American named Rena Aurora who is insure Lanka on vacation her family. Didn't know if she was in Colombo Niro bomb target, and this is her they tried to call me several times believe what's happened. They weren't able to get in contact with me, and they were very concerned for my safety. Because all of them knew that I was traveling insure Lanka, the time she had to worry about her parents worrying that she was injured or even worse than that. And she had no idea what apple is down when she tried to reach her driver to get to the airport. He didn't respond and she figured, okay. He's blowing me off. And you know, he wasn't. He just didn't get the messages. So the both of them were operating in an information. Vacuum feeling totally isolated when they really needed was to connect in a moment of panic. Can we say whether the blackout has actually worked at prevent. The spread of hoaxes conspiracy theories. Yeah. You know, I actually spoke to a man who lives in Colombo. And he told me that even though Facebook was banned some people use the back door tool. It's called VPN to get on. Anyway. And lo and behold, there were posts online designed to so fear one one post claims bomb went off in a nearby local park that was not true and other post claim that terrorists had poisoned the water supply. That was also ally TV and radio journalists had to jump in on that report that hey, you can trust the water you can drink at faith. That was extra work for them. It could have been worse with more people on the platform. So just briefly how does what's happened in Sri Lanka compared to what you see another parts of the world. You know, what we've just seen in Sri Lanka is very swift unilateral action. Other countries like France and Germany have gone. The regulatory route. Right. Germany pass laws to find Facebook severely for its failure to pull down white supremacists. Content. Either approach quick or regulatory methodic. The illustrate that because Facebook hasn't been able to take control governments have decided that they're going to have to act ten pairs, Arthur Shahani, thanks so much. Thank you now to the Democratic Republic of Congo where for months health workers have been struggling to contain any bull outbreak. Despite the fact that more than one hundred thousand people have been vaccinated. There's been a surge of new cases and more than thirteen hundred people have been infected so far the biggest obstacle to stopping the outbreak armed groups who keep attacking health workers in just the last few days, they were to assaults here to tell us. More is NPR's read is welcome to the studio. Hi ati. Give us the latest on these attacks. I well the first one was on Friday afternoon. It was at a local hospital in a city called Mutombo. That's one of the current epicenters the outbreak and about twenty members of one of the local Ebola response teams were having a meeting in witnesses say two gunmen Burston, they took everyone's cell phones. And other quick they started shooting injured two people. And they killed the team leader. His name was Dr Richard Valerie was Oko. He wasn't EMMY allergist from Cameron had been deployed by the World Health Organization to help fight Ebola. And then just a few hours later there was an attack on another local command center, this was at a hospital in a nearby suburb called Kotla it's one of the worst hot spots in the outbreak zone. And this one was around three AM Saturday morning. Four people tried to set fire to that command center. Police fought them off they killed one assailant and the captured the rest are these centers being targeted on purpose in if so how come it seems so yes, and it's not clear exactly who was behind each of these attacks. But I spoke with Dr Michel Yow who is leading the response for the World Health Organization, and he says witnesses that first attack told him that the gunmen were shouting Ebola doesn't exist. You're just here to make money off of us and it fits into a larger problem of mistrust in the. The local population. There've been years of armed conflict in this part of Congo and people feel victimized by the government. So they don't trust authorities and by extension health workers. What does this mean for the effort to try and contain the outbreak? Well, there's a lot of concern because this is just the latest in a series of violent incidents that directly target health workers since February two Ebola treatment centers have been attacked Dr MS Oku, the doctor who was killed on Friday. He had only arrived four weeks ago. And he apparently told colleagues that he was really worried he's left behind a wife and four children in Cameroon. And so each time there's been an attack the health workers need to regroup. They slow down their efforts to vaccinate people who've been exposed, and then you see the effect in the outbreak. It gets worse. Basically more people start to get sick. And you know to give you an example in February just before these attacks on the bullet treatment centers started. They were saying about thirty new. Cases a week. And then this month, we're already up to seventy new cases every week even as high as one hundred new cases every week if this violence continues is there a chance at the outbreak could grow into a catastrophe similar to what we saw in twenty fourteen in some west African countries there are some really important differences, first of all the H show and the government have been on this from the beginning. There's also a vaccine now which has been a game changer as you noted they've managed to get more than one hundred thousand people to take it and the evidence is highly effective. So there are still reasons to be hopeful despite this latest violence, that's NPR's read item in thank you for.

Facebook Sri Lanka government Lanka NPR Arthur Shahani Audie Cornish World Health Organization Ari Shapiro Democratic Republic of Congo Colombo disinflation Colombo Niro Asia Ebola
"dr richard valerie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:11 min | 3 years ago

"dr richard valerie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Arthur Shahani is following the situation hierarchy what explanation Detroit has government give for shutting down the social media apps. So in a nutshell, the government doesn't trust Facebook to yank down fake news and calls to violence before they go viral keep in mind. Sri Lanka is only a decade of civil war. That's not a long time people. Remember it peace feels tenuous to them just a year ago last March Buddhist extremists torched, Muslim homes and businesses and used Facebook to incite violence in response to that the government had. Had announced a seventy two hour block on social media in this time around the government is not in a time. Limit on it. It's unclear when the band will come to an end. Of course, there are lots of examples of hoaxes going rampant on on Facebook from Myanmar to the United States. We have to note, they aren't NPR sponsor. How is the company responded to what's happening? Sri lanka. Responses. Me company leaders are not defending themselves. They issued a statement in a pretty conciliatory tone, saying, hey, were working to support first responders and law enforcement and to identify and remove harmful content. Facebook had so many screw apps. Executive can't give themselves Pat on the back or claim. Hey, we have a handle on call violence as recently as the New Zealand massacre Facebook failed to remove twenty percents of the video footage of the mass shooting, even though in that instance, people in the company knew what to look out for until us how people in Sri Lanka are responding to the Senate you've been reaching out to people affected by the blackout. What are you hearing social media has been used time and again to help in crises right people turn to. Facebook to check in and broadcast that their faith to get updates from local officials in hospitals, and especially in Asia where what has replaced regular phone calls for much of the population. The ban really threw people off. I spoke to one woman in America named Rena Aurora who is in Sri Lanka on vacation her family. Didn't know if she was in Colombo near Niro bomb target, and this is her they tried to call me several times believe what happened. They weren't able to get in contact with me, and they were very concerned for my safety because all of them knew that I was traveling insure Lanka time, she had to worry about her parents worrying that she was injured or even worse than that. And she had no idea what was down when she tried to reach driver to get to the airport. He didn't respond and she figured, okay. He's blowing me off. And you know, he wasn't. He just didn't get the messages. So the both of them were operating in an information. Vacuum feeling totally isolated when what they really needed was to connect moments of panic. Can we say whether the blackout has actually worked at? Preventing the spread of hoaxes and conspiracy theories. Yeah, I actually spoke to a man who lives in Colombo. And he told me that even though Facebook was banned some people use the back door tool. It's called VPN to get on. Anyway. And lo and behold there ripostes online designed to fear one one post claims bomb went off in a nearby local park that was not true in other post claim that terrorists had poisoned the water supply. That was also ally TV and radio. Journalists have to jump on that and report that hey, you can trust the water you can drink at faith. That was extra work for them. It could have been worse with more people on the platform. Wow. So just briefly how does what happened in Sri Lanka compared to what you see another parts of the world know what we've just seen in. Sri Lanka is very swift unilateral action. Other countries like France and Germany have gone to regulatory route. Right. Germany pass laws to find Facebook severely for its failure to pull down white supremacists. Content. Either quick or regulatory methodic. They illustrate because Facebook hasn't been able to take control governments have decided that they're going to have to act ten pairs arthy Shahani. Thanks so much. Thank you now to the Democratic Republic of Congo where for months health workers have been struggling to contain any bull outbreak. Despite the fact that more than one hundred thousand people have been vaccinated. There's been a surge of new cases and more than thirteen hundred people have been infected so far the biggest obstacle to stopping the outbreak armed groups keep attacking health workers in just the last few days, they were to assaults here to tell us. More is NPR's read is and welcome to the studio. Hi ati. Give us the latest on these attacks. I well the first one was on Friday afternoon. It was at a local hospital in a city called Mutombo. That's one of the current epicenter of the outbreak and about twenty members of one of the local Ebola response teams were having meeting in witnesses say two gunmen Burstein. They took everyone cell phones and other. They started shooting injured two people. And they killed the team leader. His name was Dr Richard Valerie was Oko. He wasn't ebony Miala just from Cameron had been deployed by the World Health Organization to help fight Mola. And then just a few hours later there was an attack on another local command center, this one was at a hospital in nearby suburb called Kotla it's one of the worst hot spots in the outbreak zone. And this one was around three AM Saturday morning. Four people tried to set fire to that command center. Police fought them off they killed one assailant and the captured the rest are these centers being targeted on purpose in if so how come it seems so yes, and it's not clear exactly who was behind each of these attacks. But I spoke with Dr Michel Yow who is leading the response for the World Health Organization, and he says witnesses in that first attack told him that the gunmen were shouting evil. It doesn't exist. You're just here to make money off of us and it fits into a larger problem of mistrust in. The local population. There've been years of armed conflict in this part of Congo and people feel victimized by the government. So they don't trust authorities and by extension health workers. What does this mean for the effort to try and contain the outbreak? Well, there's a lot of concern because this is just the latest in a series of violent incidents that directly target health workers since February two Ebola treatment centers have been attacked Dr MS Oku, the doctor who was killed on Friday. He had only arrived four weeks ago. And he apparently told colleagues that he was really worried he's left behind a wife and four children in Cameroon. And so each time there's been an attack the health workers need to regroup. They slow down their efforts to vaccinate people who've been exposed, and then you see the effect in the outbreak. It gets worse. Basically more people start to get sick. And you know to get an example in February just before these attacks on the bullet treatment centers started. They were saying about thirty new. Cases a week. And then this month, we're already up to seventy new cases every week even as high as a hundred new cases every week. If this violence continues is there a chance at the outbreak could grow into a catastrophe similar to what we saw in twenty fourteen in some west African countries there are some really important differences, first of all the television show and the government have been on this from the beginning. There's also a vaccine now which has been a game changer as you noted they've managed to get more than one hundred thousand people to take it and the evidence is highly effective. So there are still reasons to be hopeful despite this latest violence, that's NPR's Eisenman. Thank you for.

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"dr richard valerie" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:48 min | 3 years ago

"dr richard valerie" Discussed on KCRW

"Well, it looks like on the northbound five at seventh street, we have a crash involving a semi that's on the right shoulder, but that's causing a little bit of backup. There. Also, northbound four five at the ten connector vehicle with the flat tire in the center divider. Much west LA, sixty four degrees from NPR news. It's all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro as Sri Lanka investigates who was behind yesterday's terrorist attacks on churches and hotels. The government continues to block access to social media, their Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp all owned by Facebook are among the services under a blackout this. Once again brings into focus the fear that Facebook cannot rain in disinformation and calls to finance and pears. Arthur Shahani is following the situation hierarchy what explication did Sri Lanka's government give for shutting down these social media apps in a nutshell. The government doesn't trust Facebook to yank down fake news and calls two months before they go viral keep in mind. Sri Lanka is only a decade out of civil war. That's not a long time. People. Remember it peace feels tenuous to them just a year ago last March Buddhist extremists torched, Muslim homes and businesses and used Facebook to incite violence in response to that the government had had announced a seventy two hour block on social media. And this time around the government is not in a time. Limit on it. It's unclear when the band will come to an end. Of course, there are lots of examples of hoaxes going rampant on on Facebook from me and mar to the United States. We have to note, they aren't NPR sponsor, how is the company responded to what's happening. Sri Lanka responses. Me company leaders are not defending themselves. They issued a statement in a pretty conciliatory tone saying, hey, we're working to support first responders and law enforcement and to identify and remove harmful content. Facebook had so many screw ups executives can't give themselves Pat on the back or claim. Hey, we have a handle on costs violence as recently as the New Zealand massacre Facebook failed to remove twenty percents of video footage of the mass shooting, even though in that instance. People in the company knew what to look out for us. How people in Sri Lanka are responding to the center you've been reaching out to people affected by the blackout. What are you hearing social media has been used time and again to help in crises right, people turn to Facebook to check in and broadcast that their faith to get updates from local officials in hospitals, and especially in Asia where WhatsApp is replaced regular phone calls for much of the population. The ban really threw people off. I spoke to one woman in American named Rena Aurora who is in Sri Lanka on vacation her family. Didn't know if she was in Colombo near bomb target, and this is her they tried to call me several times believed. What's happened? They weren't able to get in contact with me. And so they were very concerned for my safety because all of them knew that I was traveling enchila- uncut the time she had to worry about her parents worrying that she was injured or even worse than that. And she had no idea what was down when she tried to reach driver to get to the airport. He didn't respond and she figured, okay. He's blowing me off and. You know, he wasn't. He just didn't get the messages. So the both of them were operating in an information. Vacuum feeling totally isolated when they really needed was to connect moments of panic. Can we say whether the blackout has actually worked at preventing the spread of hoaxes and conspiracy theories. Yeah, you know, I actually spoke to a man who lives in Colombo, and he told me that even though Facebook was banned some people use the back door tool. It's called VPN to get on. Anyway. And lo and behold, there were posts online designed to so fear one one post claims bomb went off in a nearby local park that was not true and other posts claim that terrorists had poisoned the water supply. That was also ally TV and radio journalists had to jump in on that. And report that hey, you can trust the water you can drink at faith. That was extra work for them. It could have been worse with more people on the platform. So just briefly how does what's happened in Sri Lanka compared to what you see another parts of the world. What we've just seen in Sri Lanka is very swift unilateral action. Other countries. Like, France and Germany have gone. The regulatory route. Right. Germany pass laws to find Facebook severely for its failure to pull down white supremacists. Content. Either approach quick or regulatory methodic the illustrate that because Facebook hasn't been able to take control governments have decided that they're going to have to act. It's NPR's Arthur Shahani, thanks so much. Thank you now to the Democratic Republic of Congo where for months health workers have been struggling to contain any bull outbreak. Despite the fact that more than one hundred thousand people have been vaccinated. There's been a surge of new cases and more than thirteen hundred people have been infected so far the biggest obstacle to stopping the outbreak armed groups keep attacking health workers in just the last few days, they were to assaults here to tell us. More is NPR's read is and welcome to the studio. Hi ati. Give us the latest on these attacks. I well the first one was on Friday afternoon. It was at a local hospital in a city called Mutombo. That's one of the current F. Centers on the outbreak and about twenty members of one of the local Ebola response teams were having meeting and witnesses say two gunmen Burstein. They took everyone's cell phones and other quick -ment. They started shooting injured two people and they killed the team leader. His name was Dr Richard Valerie was Oko. He wasn't Eddie meteorologist from Cameron had been deployed by the World Health Organization to help fight Ebola. And then just a few hours later there was an attack on another local command center this was at a hospital in a nearby. Suburb called Koch wa it's one of the worst hot spots in the outbreak zone. And this one was around three AM Saturday morning. Four people tried to set fire to that command center. Police fought them off they killed one assailant and the captured the rest are these centers being targeted on purpose in if so how come it seems so yes, and it's not clear exactly who was behind each of these attacks. But I spoke with Dr Michel Yow who is leading the polar response for the World Health Organization. And he says witnesses in that first attack told him that the gunmen were shouting Ebola doesn't exist. You're just here to make money off of us and it fits into a larger problem of mistrust in the local population. There've been years of armed conflict in this part of Congo and people feel victimized by the government. So they don't trust authorities and by extension health workers. What does this mean for the effort to try and contain the outbreak? Well, there's a lot of concern because this is just the latest in a series of violent incidents that directly target health workers since February two Ebola treatment centers have been attacked Dr MS Oku, the doctor who was killed on Friday. He had only arrived four weeks ago. And he apparently told colleagues that he was really worried he's left behind a wife and four children in Cameroon. And so each time there's been an attack the health workers need to regroup. They slow down their efforts to vaccinate people who've been exposed, and then you see the effect in the outbreak. It gets worse. Basically more people start to get sick. And you know to give you an example in February just before these attacks on the bullet treatment centers started. They were saying about thirty new cases a week. And then this month, we're already up to seventy new cases every week even as high as one hundred new cases every week if this violence continues is there a chance at the outbreak could grow into a catastrophe similar to what we saw in twenty fourteen in some west African countries there are some really important differences. First of all the W H O in the government have been on this from the beginning. There's also a vaccine now which has been a game changer as you noted they've managed to get more than one hundred thousand people to take it and the evidence is a tightly effective. So there are still reasons to be hopeful despite this latest violence, that's NPR's Eisenman. Thank you for explaining it to us. Glad to do it. Tomorrow on morning edition, New York City has just passed legislation requiring large buildings to dramatically cut their carbon emissions. The retrofits could cost property owners. Billions of dollars will other cities follow suit that story and the latest news from around the world tomorrow on morning edition. Esther smart speaker to play NPR or your station by name. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. This is Anthony burns opening the curtain on LA theater for KCRW in the playhouse latest production. You're going to office.

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"dr richard valerie" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:33 min | 3 years ago

"dr richard valerie" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish Shapiro as Sri Lanka investigates who was behind yesterday's terrorist attacks on churches and hotels. The government continues to block access to social media, their Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp all owned by Facebook are among the services under a blackout this. Once again brings into focus the fear that Facebook cannot rain in disinformation and calls to finance and Arthur Shahani is following the situation hierarchy. Hi, what explanation Detroit has government give for shutting down these social media apps? So in a nutshell, the government doesn't trust Facebook to yank down fake news and calls to violence before they go viral keep in mind. Sri Lanka is only a decade of civil war. That's not a long time people. Remember it peace feels tenuous to them just a year ago last March food extremists torched, Muslim homes and businesses and youth Facebook to incite violence in response to that the government had had announced a seventy two hour block on social media. And this time around the government is not putting a time limit on it. It's unclear when the band will come to an end. Of course, there are lots of examples of hoaxes going rampant on on Facebook from me and March of the United States, we have to note, they are NPR sponsor, how is the company responded to what's happening. Sri Lanka responses. Me company leaders are not defending themselves. They issued a statement and a pretty conciliatory tone saying, hey, were working to support first responders and law enforcement and. To identify and remove harmful content. Facebook had so many screw ups executive can't give themselves Pat on the back or claim. Hey, we have a handle on Kalsa violence as recently as the New Zealand massacre Facebook failed to remove twenty percents of the video footage of the mass shooting, even though in that instance, people in the company knew what to look out for us. How people in Sri Lanka are responding to the Senate you've been reaching out to people affected by the blackout. What are you hearing social media has been used time and again to help in crises right, people turn to Facebook to check in and broadcast that their faith to get updates from local officials in hospitals, and especially in Asia where what has replaced regular phone calls for much of the population. The ban really threw people off. I spoke to one woman in America named Rena Aurora who is in Sri Lanka on vacation her family. Didn't know if she was in Colombo near a bomb target, and this is her they tried to call me several times believe through what happened. They weren't able to get in contact with me. And so they were very concerned from my. Safety because all of them knew that I was traveling enchilada the time she had to worry about her parents worrying that she was injured or even worse than that. And she had no idea what apple is down when she tried to reach driver to get to the airport. He didn't respond and she figured, okay. He's blowing me off. And you know, he wasn't. He just didn't get the messages. So the both of them were operating in an information. Vacuum feeling totally isolated when they really needed was to connect moments of panic. Can we say whether the blackout has actually worked at preventing the spread of hoaxes conspiracy theories. Yeah, I actually spoke to a man who lives in Colombo. And he told me that even though Facebook was banned some people use the back door tool. It's called a VPN to get on. Anyway. And lo and behold, there were posts online designed to so fear. One one post claims a bomb went off in a nearby local park that was not true in other post claim that terrorists had poisoned the water supply. That was also ally TV and radio journalists had to jump in on that report. That hey, you can trust the water. You can drink at faith. That was extra work for them. It could have been worse with more people on the platform. Wow. So just briefly how does what happened in Sri Lanka compared to what you've seen in other parts of the world. You know, what we've just seen in Sri Lanka is very swift unilateral action. Other countries like France and Germany have gone. The regulatory route. Right. Germany pass laws to find Facebook severely for its failure to pull down white supremacists. Content. Either quick or regulatory methodic the illustrate because Facebook hasn't been able to take control governments have decided that they're going to have to act NPR's arthy Shahani. Thanks so much. Thank you now to the Democratic Republic of Congo where for months health workers have been struggling to contain any bull outbreak. Despite the fact that more than one hundred thousand people have been vaccinated. There's been a surge of new cases and more than thirteen hundred people have been infected so far the biggest obstacle to stopping the outbreak armed groups who keep. Attacking health workers in just the last few days. They were to assaults here to tell us. More is NPR's read is and welcome to the studio. Coyote, give us the latest on these attacks. I well the first one was on Friday afternoon. It was at a local hospital in a city called Tembo. That's one of the current epicenter of the outbreak and about twenty members of one of the local Ebola response teams were having a meeting in witnesses say two gunmen Burston. They took everyone cell phones and other. They started shooting injured two people and they killed the team leader. His name was Dr Richard Valerie was Oko. He wasn't FDR from Cameron had been deployed by the World Health Organization to help fight Ebola. And then just a few hours later there was an attack on another local command center, this one was at a hospital in nearby. Suburb called Koch wa it's one of the worst hot spots in the outbreak zone. And this one was around three AM Saturday morning. Four people tried to set fire to that command center. Police fought them off they killed one assailant, and they captured the. West are these centers being targeted on purpose in if so how come it seems so yes, and it's not clear exactly who was behind each of these attacks. But I spoke with Dr Michel Yow who is leading the response for the World Health Organization, and he says witnesses net. I attack told him that the gunmen were shouting Ebola doesn't exist. You're just here to make money off of us and it fits into a larger problem of mistrust in the local population. There have been years of armed conflict in this part of Congo and people feel victimized by the government. So they don't trust authorities and by extension health workers. What does this mean for the effort to try and contain the outbreak? Well, there's a lot of concern because this is just the latest in a series of violent incidents that directly target health workers since February two Ebola treatment centers have been attacked Dr MS Oku, the doctor who was killed on Friday. He had only. Four weeks ago? And he apparently told colleagues that he was really worried he's left behind a wife and four children in Cameroon. And so each time there's been an attack the health workers need to regroup. They slow down there efforts to vaccinate people who've been exposed, and then you see the effect in the outbreak. It gets worse. Basically more people start to get sick. And you know to give you an example in February just before these attacks on the bullet treatment centers started. They were saying about thirty new cases a week. And then this month, we're already up to seventy new cases every week even as high as one hundred new cases every week if this violence continues is there a chance that the outbreak could grow into a catastrophe similar to what we saw in twenty fourteen in some west African countries there are some really important differences, first of all the WHO and the government have been on this from the beginning. There's also a vaccine now which has been a game changer as you noted they've managed to get more than one hundred thousand people. To take it. And the evidence is highly effective. So there are still reasons to be hopeful despite this latest violence,.

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