2 Burst results for "Dr Rey Za Rha Nagi"

"dr rey za rha nagi" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:44 min | 3 months ago

"dr rey za rha nagi" Discussed on KCRW

"Skies. The air quality is hazardous in lots of California, especially if you have respiratory issues. And even if you don't Too much of this. Will. You were going to talk about this now with Dr Rey Za RHA Nagi. He's a pulmonologist at U C l a medical center. Hello. Hi. Thank you for having me. Well, it's wonderful to have you. Well, even if you don't live right near one of these fires, the smoke seems to be everywhere. Here in Southern California and really, really bad in Northern California. So how bad is the air quality these days? Every day is getting a little bit worse. Obviously, Northern California has had it worse for the past about week or so ago, And now we're starting to see it get worse on a day to day basis and so buy like you said. Just looking outside. We're starting to see a lot of kind of smoke filling the air. Air quality has just been getting worse every day in Southern California in northern California and even central I mean, it's just all over California. And if you smell the air, and it smells like a campfire is that a good indication that the air quality is bad smell and by just looking outside is actually not going to be a great indicator in terms of is the smoke particles in the air. Now, typically, if you look outside and there's a lot of smoke, or you know you smell it. Obviously, those are the extreme conditions and those suggests that yes, the air quality is extremely extremely poor. However, even in the scenario that you may not see or smell it, these particles can still exist in the air. We're talking about micro millimeter sized particles that you may not be able to detect the smell or visually see, so it is important to keep that in mind as the fires get better. These particles may still be there. So these are as you say, really, really small. I read that they're 1 30 of the width of a human hair is that accurate? Correct? Yeah, we're talking Micro Micro millimeters in size. So that is absolutely correct. And so visually seeing these is not definitely going to be something to rely on as well as even smelling and even that size plays an important factor in terms of how deep these particles can get into our lungs. So what happens when these tiny tiny particles get into your lungs? What they'd do if they get down and they cause irritations in our lungs. And so you may get a burning sensation in the back of your throat. You may end up getting a cough. You may get some burning sensation in your chest. A zealous sometimes If it gets into your eyes, you may get some runny eyes in some kind of, you know, running nose thes air, the typical most common symptoms that you see. However, if you do have some underlying lung disease, it may also exacerbated worsened underlying lung disease making you feel more short of breath making. You have cough and sputum production if you have some lung disease. So that's if you have, like asthma or something worse than that, right? Such a COPD and Cosima, chronic bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, asthma. Anything that you know. Has your lungs have some disease to begin with these fires, and these particles can make those diseases worse. Making you feel more short of breath and kind of having more of a cough. Can they cause those diseases in short term exposure? Once or twice a year? Here and there? No in a healthy person? They won't. However, if someone is chronically exposed to these smokes, then absolutely. You can end up developing emphysema and COPD over many, many years of again chronic exposure, but once or twice a year. They will not cause any long term diseases. However, we live in an area that has smog. Nearly all the time. So I mean so once or twice a year exposure to these fires on top of all the smog is not dangerous. So again, the exposure to the smog because we live in the Southern California can cause some lung disease. And this has been something that's been studied many, many years on top of like you said, exposure to the smokes. However, again majority of us get such little exposure to that smug because we are indoors that you are not being chronically exposed to this kind of like a smoker would be exposed. However, We have definitely seen some patients that have lung disease. Just by living in a you know, area like Los Angeles where the smog is a lot. And now if you add an extra component of lung damage, such a smoking, you can just increase the risk of developing these diseases. So the, um sad irony is that we're being told to go outside to avoid catching Corona virus. But you're saying the safest place to be is indoors. Right. And you know during these fire seasons, obviously, you know, everyone is telling us don't be indoors and definitely make sure that you social distance. However, during these fire, weeks and fire season, it's really important to try to avoid actually being outdoors as much as possible again for two reasons. One is Thies particles will be in the air for weeks to come. Even after the fire has been completely gone. These particles can still remain in the air for a couple weeks. Second of all, the typical masks that we wear for Kobe 19 being, you know, just regular face coverings. These are not goingto create enough of a seal or be able to prevent these micro millimeter particles from going into the lungs. And so they're not actually be protective. If we are going outside, and so it is really important to try to stay inside your house. Make sure all your windows are closed. Make sure there's no seal that allows this smoke to come in..

lung disease Southern California California cough COPD Northern California Dr Rey Za RHA Nagi lung damage Los Angeles Thies Kobe emphysema bronchitis sputum
"dr rey za rha nagi" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:15 min | 3 months ago

"dr rey za rha nagi" Discussed on KCRW

"I literally have no patience for climate change deniers. It's simply follows completely inconsistent. That point of view with the reality on the ground, the facts as we experience you may not believe it intellectually, but your own eyes. Your own experiences tell a different story particularly out here. The West Coast of the United States Governor Gavin Newsom earlier this week talking about well, just look outside your window there. Smoke everywhere, ash blanketing doorsteps. Orange skies. The air quality is hazardous in lots of California, especially if you have respiratory issues. And even if you don't Too much of this. Will. You were going to talk about this now with Dr Rey Za RHA Nagi. He's a pulmonologist at U C l a medical center. Hello. Hi. Thank you for having me. Well, it's wonderful to have you. Well, even if you don't live right near one of these fires, the smoke seems to be everywhere. Here in Southern California and really, really bad in Northern California. So how bad is the air quality these days? Every day is getting a little bit worse. Obviously, Northern California has had it worse for the past. About week or so. So and now we're starting to see it get worse on a day to day basis and so buy like you said. Just looking outside. We're starting to see a lot of kind of smoke filling the air. Air quality has just been getting worse every day in Southern California in northern California and even central I mean, it's just all over California. And if you smell the air, and it smells like a campfire is that a good indication that the air quality is bad smell and by just looking outside is actually not going to be a great indicator in terms of is the smoke particles in the air. Now, typically, if you look outside and there's a lot of smoke, or you know you smell it. Obviously, that was at the extreme conditions and those suggests that yes, the air quality is extremely extremely poor. However, even in the scenario that you may not see or smell it, these particles can still exist in the air. We're talking about micro millimeter sized particles that you may not be able to detect the smell or visually see, so it is important to keep that in mind as the fires get better. These particles may still be there. So these air as you say, really, really small. I read that they're 1 30 of the width of a human hair. Is that accurate? Correct? Yeah, we're talking Micro Micro millimeters in size. So that is absolutely correct. And so visually seeing these is not definitely going to be something to rely on as well as even smelling and even that size plays an important factor in terms of how deep these particles can get into our lungs. So what happens when these tiny tiny particles get into your lungs? What do you do if they get down, and they cause irritations in our lungs, And so you may get a burning sensation in the back of your throat? You may end up getting a cough, You may get some burning sensation in your chest. A zealous sometimes if it gets into your eyes, you may get some runny eyes in some kind of, you know, Running knows these are the typical most common symptoms that you see. However, if you do have some underlying lung disease, it may also exacerbated worsened underlying lung disease making you feel more short of breath making you have coffee. And sputum production if you have some lung disease, so that's if you have, like asthma or something worse than that, right? Such a COPD and Cosima, chronic bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, asthma. Anything that you know. Has your lungs have some disease to begin with these fires, and these particles can make those diseases worse. Making you feel more short of breath and kind of having more of a cough. Can they cause those diseases in short term exposure? Once or twice a year? Here and there? No in a healthy person? They won't. However, if someone is chronically exposed to the smokes, then absolutely. You can end up developing emphysema and COPD over many, many years of again chronic exposure, but once or twice a year. They will not cause any long term diseases. However, we live in an area that has smog. Nearly all the time. So I mean so once or twice a year exposure to these fires on top of all the smog is not dangerous. So again, exposure to the smog because we live in the Southern California can cost some lung disease And this has been something that's been studied many, many years on top of like you said, exposure to the smokes. However, again majority of us get such little exposure to that smug because we are indoors that you are not being chronically exposed to this kind of like a smoker would be exposed. However, We have definitely seen some patients that have lung disease. Just by living in a you know, area like Los Angeles where the smog is a lot. And now if you add an extra component of lung damage, such a smoking, you can just increase the risk of developing these diseases. So the, um sad irony is that we're being told to go outside to avoid catching Corona virus. But you're saying the safest place to be is indoors. Right. And you know during these fire seasons, obviously, you know, everyone is telling us don't be indoors and definitely make sure that you social distance. However, during these fire, weeks and fire season, it's really important to try to avoid actually being outdoors as much as possible again for two reasons. One is Thies particles will be in the air for weeks to come. Even after the fire has been completely gone. These particles can still remain in the air for a couple weeks. Second of all, the typical masks that we wear for Kobe 19 being, you know, just regular face coverings. These are not gonna create enough of a seal or be able to prevent these micro millimeter particles from going into the lungs. And so they're not gonna actually be protective if we are going outside. So it is really important to try to stay inside your house. Make sure all your windows air close. Make sure there's no seal that allows the smoke to come in..

lung disease Southern California California cough COPD Northern California Governor Gavin Newsom Dr Rey Za RHA Nagi United States lung damage Los Angeles Thies Kobe emphysema sputum bronchitis