2 Burst results for "Dr Prescott Weinstein"

"dr prescott weinstein" Discussed on Hysteria

Hysteria

02:50 min | 9 months ago

"dr prescott weinstein" Discussed on Hysteria

"So can you like explain the appeal of ninety day fiance and the shows that seem matrimony based you why i love them all so well like look. There's ninety day fiancee. There's ninety day fiance the other way there's ninety fiance heavily ever happily ever after. I love them. All and the premise is basically that you have these people who fell in love and one of them does not live in the united states. and so it's just. The american go live abroad. Does the person who's not american. Try to get to american on the k. One visa now one of the interesting things about the last few seasons i would say is that despite everybody's issues getting to america. No one was mad about trump. like i don't know of natan edited all the talk. How did nobody may lack trump fan careful and michael. Michael love trump michael on barrack and everything that he knew was based on the apprentice and read all the books so but either way when angela is with immigration attorney and she's just screaming mad about everything i was like. How is she not mad at trump. But anyway i love that. I love married at first sight. A lifetime special which is like people who sign up to be matched by matchmakers and get married and they've never met each other before i love that one. What's crazy really quick about mary for. Is that like ninety day fiance. It's the kind of person who goes on that. Show you kind of get married at first sight. The kind of person who goes on that show is like seemingly like a normal twenty three things the gamba. Yeah and it's just shocking. Not there are so many people who are willing to agree to just get married at first sight who are like quote. People wouldn't ordinarily see on reality. Tv are going on this show. You know and the thing that i like to about ninety day fiance is that you would think and be wary that the premise is just all of these people who will do whatever they can to get to america and that everybody just wants a green card and that is like the opposite kind of of what's going on with the show. There is one one of my all time fades yara currencies season. Who is like what is so great about america. You're all wanna go home. I was like girls singing. I will say the my favorite thing about happily ever after is none of those couples are happy. They seem so miserable. Unlike the why are you together. This seems so. I'm really excited for the next season because the people who really hated each other seemed to all be have made this next season Dr prescott weinstein. I you know. I saw you tweeting about this and i really curious to hear your expanded thoughts..

america natan michael barrack angela Michael Dr prescott weinstein
"dr prescott weinstein" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:46 min | 1 year ago

"dr prescott weinstein" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of the leading physicists of her generation. To Chanda Prescott wants Pan is also one of fewer than 100 Black American women to earn a PhD from the Department of Physics. So let's get started by Dr Prescott Weinstein. I know you are known in both the science community, uh, but also for being a great writer, and you talk to us a bit about the inception of your book. And what inspired you to write it? Yes, sir. I have tol credit my agent Jessica Pathan for contacting me and saying you've been doing a lot of writing on your blogged, and it's reaching certain audiences in the sciences. But it's not reaching broader audiences and, you know, have you thought about writing a book and have you thought about just collecting these things into the book? And so actually, the original idea behind the book was that it was going to be a collection. Of things that I had been publishing online, maybe cleaned up a little bit. As I wrote the book, it became something completely different. There was definitely a journey, even in the process of understanding what I thought the book was going to be, and then what I realized I needed the book to be and what I wanted the book to be, And you know, I think the one comment I will make about being known for writing well is that when I graduated from college when I started as a graduate student at UC Santa Cruz, I was a pretty bad writer. My NSF Graduate research Fellowship application. My mom's credit it and like the edits were way more brutal than I think anybody in college had ever given me And so I would say writing is hard but still for me, and it's just something that you work for. The person you bigger. Your touch upon in your lot in your book is Robert Oppenheimer, the father of the atomic bomb and is complicated life that is marred with regret for what he created. The life that remained intrinsically tied to the American military Industrial complex on do you know importantly, you tie these two issues within a larger framework off his Jewish identity. And you touched upon what his life is so important to you and your work. And why do you find himself fascinating. You know, I think the interesting thing about J. Robert Open heimer. It's always like a feedback loop because other people find him interesting. So he's been unpacked in a very particular way that I think makes him available to us to think with. And thanks for you. And so I think of him, You know, It's very easy to say. Okay, well, he's just a warning. Don't be like that guy don't end up in his situation, but I think it's very important to trace the stuff. That I am. It's not that he had bad values First day It's not that his family he grew up in the ethical culture School. I am that he was actually surrounded by people who were thinking about his deep ethical questions. I am. But he was also a new, interesting personality. There's this question of did he try and poison his tutor at Cambridge. It's still not known whether he just told people he tried to tutor him with a hate tried to poison him with with an apple. Or whether the the Apple was really poison, like, luckily, no, it was not tough. It went untested, right, but his parents had to sail to England to sort it out. I don't know and take him to therapy, and so Heard of what makes open Homer. Interesting is that we know so much about him, and he is a three dimensional human figure to us in a way that Him like our historical bogeymen are beginning. Our are usually not. And so you know, you can say Well, he just shouldn't have done that atomic bomb thing. But I think that the interesting thing question there is. How does someone who just wants to do physics end up in that situation in the first place? And that's where it becomes interesting to me in a very personal way. I'm as someone who has similar Jewish values for the ones that he was raised with. And you know if someone here is similar passions like I'm even doing work right now that involves solving the woman open Heimer Balkaria creations. How do I not accidentally walk in that direction? And importantly now that I'm a professor, what are my responsibilities to my students in terms of providing them the guidance and support That when they're confronted with difficult ethical questions. You know how to think them through on day have a sense of history and context for which they were having these conversations with themselves, And I think that that's something that we don't do particularly well in the physics and astronomy communities. We don't generally speaking equip our students. Do you think about ethics to think about? Not just, you know, maybe we have some conversations about plagiarism. Maybe I think we don't even always do that well, but the ethics of interacting with other human beings and the fact that the work that we do can actually touch other people's lives or the worst, not always for the better. And I'm open Hammer. I think You know, the silver lining of his story is that we have his story. I think with You're making me think about several regrets in the story in a way that you don't intend. I know one of the things I'll always regret is my first faculty position. My first faculty shortlist was visiting Cornell. And the thing I was most excited about was one on one time with Carl Sagan, who are you know a Z go around the faculty doctor Individual factor, but he was out of town that day. So this great regrets are so few. A few years later, I was at a double s meeting at American Astronomical Society meeting where I was in the audience when you were speaking and the thing I was Absolutely struck by for Con Sagan was just his thinking on his feet. So you know, this is the old days off a slide tray projector that he was, You know, he was someone else was operating the projector. They were going to be projecting. It's like he was going to be speaking. And it was some miscommunication. He was sort of shouting across to the person who's operating the slides, and they weren't getting what he was asking. And one point he just got frustrated. And, he said, is the problem. The finite speed of sound. That's what he it was just, you know, everyone laughed at. Of course, interest mean to the poor person. It was moderate. It was managing the slides. But, you know, he couldn't have professed that light. I think that was just on the spur of the moment. We've talked about, you know, we've talked about your mother called Sega and Robert Robert J. Robert Oppenheimer. I'd love to chat about other individuals who touched your life, you know, in in ways that are not obvious from the book. I encourage people to read the acknowledgement section because actually, I think aside from the content of the book, the Acknowledgments of the book was actually may be the most stressful part for me, and I'm certain that I left people hours. Um, but I want to point in particular to the acknowledgment tol my teachers from from high school and middle school in a particular my math teachers, Frank Wilson and warn Buckner. And also my history teacher, Randi Richmond. I'm I am a product of the Los Angeles Unified School District. And you know, l U. S. T is usually in the news because there is a problem and you know our schools were not as well. Resources they should have been. I was really lucky. I went to magnet schools for her grades one through 12. And so I had better access to resources and the typical L, a USC student. Even so, my classes were too big. I think Mr Richman taught AP U. S history to a class of 45 students. I think Mr Buckner taught and my first year AP Calculus Class Few a class of 40 or 45 students all in one room at the same time. And these teachers. I can't think I can't like a state too much the significance of the impact they had on my life from And when my mother got released think when I was 12 and I was home alone and freaking out about it, and my grades took a nosedive, and Mr Wilson called my mother and said, What's going on? And how can I help you get through this, I am, which is going above and beyond. And I think that people don't really appreciate that public school teachers are constantly finding ways to do that. Of course, you know they're They're racist teachers out there. There was one that was just in the news and in California this week I am their teachers who are in perfect, but I'm there. So many teachers who are working really, really hard. And I am Mr Wilson did that Mr Buckner points when I was a 14 year olds getting distracted and not paying attention and calculus class, he called my mother. And insisted that my mother and give give him my father's phone number and called my father to. I'm inside. She needs to tutor people because I know she knows the material..

Robert Oppenheimer Frank Wilson Jessica Pathan Randi Richmond England Carl Sagan California J. Robert Open heimer Richman warn Buckner Robert Robert J. Robert Oppenh 40 USC Chanda Prescott 14 year Prescott Weinstein 45 students Buckner Los Angeles Unified School Dis this week