4 Burst results for "Dr Picot"

"dr picot" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

05:05 min | 5 months ago

"dr picot" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Picot had typically worked from the assumption that the federal government and it's and the agents were at least trying to operate with native peoples best interests in mind when you can tell from what she's done in her life so far that she agreed with her father and the idea that there needed to be some selective simulation and she seems to have Just sort of thought that people were trying to work with everyone's best interests but that opinion really started to shift. After her husband's death one reason was that he had left their children and inheritance but government officials were trying to give a distant male relative control over it while trying to get control of her sons money. She wrote a letter saying quote. It is strange that i a mother and one who has worked hard to support herself and children and bitterly opposed to whiskey in any form should be denied the right to care for her children's money and it should be given into the care of a man who is a hard drinker and who has seen these children only once in his life and resides in another state. Some of her other opinions were shifting as well as we said earlier. Susan was a devout christian and her father had converted to christianity during his time as chief as well. Joseph la fleche had made it a point not to proselytize not to discourage traditional omaha ceremonies and observances like he wanted the omaha to retain as much of their cultural identity as possible and susan had mostly done the same but she had definitely talked about things like temperance from a very christian viewpoint so when the religious use of peyote started to become more popular among the omaha at first picasso was vocally against it but that changed after her husband's death especially as she began to hear from people that pay out ism had helped them to give up alcohol and to reconnect with their traditional beliefs and practices. She ultimately advocated laws. Outlawing peyote use especially in the context of native american religion and nineteen ninety nine the department of the interior made a number of new policies that related to the omaha without actually consulting the omaha on any of them was they consolidated the omaha and winnebago agencies and that gave agency doctors and other officials a lot more territory and people to try to cover because wrote a number of letters explaining the strained this merger would put on the people who are working in these agencies they also revisited the trust period that had been outlined in the omaha allotment act of eighteen. Eighty two that twenty five year trust period was expiring which meant that people who had been on their land for twenty five years. We're supposed to be evaluated for their competence and if they were competent the land was supposed to be there's competence under this definition included things like self sufficiency in the ability to speak english but instead of starting the evaluation process. The government added ten more years to the timeline across the board. Dr picot was selected to lead the omaha tribal delegation to washington. Dc to try to address all of these policies and issues. Her mother had died that year. She was also very ill and so she had started off not by planning to person but by writing a lot of letters to government officials but when people told her they were going to carry her bodily to the train. If she didn't go herself she went to washington person with the delegation she and three other members of the delegation spent about three weeks there including appearing before the secretary of the interior and the united states attorney. General a big focus of the meeting was the land allotment. In one meeting. Pot said quote. We have suffered enough from your experiments. We are weary of hardships. Needlessly endured we have been practically robbed of our rights by the government therefore in the name of justice and humanity. And because we want to become a self..

omaha Dr picot federal government Susan omaha tribal Joseph la fleche washington winnebago Dc Pot secretary united states attorney
"dr picot" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:00 min | 9 months ago

"dr picot" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Up to transfer center, eight cents a $40.83 a barrel Comex gold, up half percent, or $9.50 at 18 09 80 announced the euro 1.1423 against the dollar. The yen is that 107.23 Netflix is down almost 7% this morning. And US own construction starts rose 17% in June, with builders ramping up production as lockdowns eased. That's a Bloomberg business Flash toman Paul Karen, Thanks so much. He's a Murali gist. He's with the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Should state that Mr. Bloomberg is, of course, founder of Bloomberg LP, this TV this radio operation as well, and he has been philanthropic with his Johns Hopkins. University. We have benefited. From repeated conversations with Murali Gist, Andrew Pickoffs here, an update from Dr Peck lives. Being prepared for this pandemic. Having seen the first large number of cases that came to the country, we should have been better prepared to deal with the eventual surges and small outbreaks that are occurring now It's incredibly dis concerning To see the level of cases that are coming up in places. And, more importantly, the lack of riel responses to get those case numbers down. This's not the way you deal with a pandemic, and we've been prepared not only from our own experiences, but from the experiences of other countries. We know how to intervene here to get these case numbers down. It seems to just be a lack of either political will or personal will to implement those those tools. Okay, I'll go with a personal will, and we've seen some good articles as we showing percentage of mask wearing in societies. In all that. What are we going to see? In the next week or two? I was ripped up on Twitter, Dr Peck off looking at the death dynamics of first and second derivative of log path of deaths. Help me here with the death dynamics lagging the case dynamics right now. Yeah. So we know because of the course of the disease will see Case numbers increased first will see hospitalizations lag that Bye anywhere between 7 to 10 days. And then we'll see deaths lag that by another seven days or so. What's interesting about now is the initial cases are in a younger population. So those surges air really coming up in terms of those What we call healthier individuals who may not be suffering as much death. But what we're going to see is now the transmission of virus from those individuals to more susceptible individuals. And that's going to mean that the hospitalization and the death rates are going to increase on even further delay. So we are expecting to see These surges in severe cases like even further than we have in the first wave in this in the country, and by the time we see that, Serge it's going to be almost too late to intervene because of that delay in in terms of monitoring cases. Yeah, that would certainly be a very serious situation. But Dr Picot in terms of the severity of cases, is it really true that cases A less severe for young people, because you see a lot of anecdotal evidence, particularly on social media of people talking about really frightening symptoms that Ryker for weeks if not months on end, and this is the important thing to understand about things like when people use things like case fatality rates or hospitalization rates it, baby that if you're younger The percentage of individuals that suffer those severe cases is lower across the population, but we have to remember that virtually the entire U. S population is susceptible to diseases. So even to this to this disease, so even a small percentage of severe cases amplified by the entire population of the US turns into a large number of cases, and that's the important part that people have to remember. It's not just about Well, most young individuals won't have suffer severe cases. There's enough of these young individuals that the number of severe cases is really going to be large. And on top of that. They are efficient transmitters of the disease, so you'll see the severe disease and other populations that we know stuff from spirit disease. So this's not a benign disease. This is not a common cold, like virus than the severity of diseases covered with large numbers of susceptible people is gonna translate into a large number of severe cases that were going to say hi and I'm on the transmission. Of course, the W H O is still looking into whether there's airborne transmission of covered 19. But what about the Immune response. What more do we know about whether people can build up sufficient immunity to this as we wait for a vaccine? Yes, With the vaccine trials, we've had some good results. Still, preliminary results still results off small population sizes, but it seems like many of the vaccines That have been fast tracked are generating the immune response that we want to see that we assume will protect us from infection. We still have a lot of safety work to do with these vaccines, and that's going to come in play. When we get the larger trials coming in place now into the early fall in terms of the immune responses to infection, it's kind of a mixed bag. In the same way that this virus causes a wide spectrum of disease ranging from no symptoms, toe hospitalization and death. We're seeing that the virus also induces a wide spectrum of immune responses from rather modest ones that fade wrote him too quickly to rather strong ones. That can last for at least a few months, because that's how much of the data that we have. So it's again a big, hetero genius spectrum. In terms of the immune responses that are induced by infection, the vaccines seem a little bit more. Tighter in terms of their immune response, So that's a good sign. Andr Pecos of Johns Hopkins University. Quick. I got the number guess wrong for the day Paul Sweeney..

Bloomberg LP US Dr Peck Bloomberg School of Public Hea Mr. Bloomberg Netflix Murali Gist Johns Hopkins Johns Hopkins University Paul Karen Twitter Andr Pecos Paul Sweeney Dr Picot Serge founder Ryker Andrew Pickoffs
"dr picot" Discussed on Reason Podcast

Reason Podcast

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"dr picot" Discussed on Reason Podcast

"You know, what you're not trading? You're FOX a lot which tends to pay a lot of lip service to religion to think the country's getting more secular over time. I well. I mean, most of the polls show, you know, that, you know, baby boomers are less religious than their parents were gen Xers are less religious than baby boomers millennials are less religious than gen Xers. I I mean, do you do you get a sense of that? Or do you think that's not quite right? This is my opinion here, Nick, you know, I think that they moved their their sacrifice from God to what they believe is that, you know, as God's messengers here on earth, some of them in politics. So I'm I'm happy to see that the country is getting less religious. But I think ultimately it's for not because we're getting even more collectivists, we're getting even more self sacrificial people are so it's they don't care about sacrificing forgotten anymore, but you know, for their for their neighbor or for the environment for the greater good that has challenged at all. So I one of one of the stark differences. I think at I n I'm thinking about this, partly because of the the dividing line between such of culture, cultural religious culture and whatnot. Rand was very much in favor of abortion unapologetically in favor of abortion. That is something that nobody seems. A very few people are unapologetically for abortion anymore where where is the the moral claim in Objectivism or that ran draws? And I I assume you agree that abortion is. You know, is is a right. You know that a woman has a right to control her body. And that there's nothing to be you know, kind of squeamish of that. Yes. It's it's it's not written about in a new textbook of Americanism. But rain was absolutely. Pro abortion, and the notion that our rights are though, she just don't we talk about rights in being tale that rights belong Nick human beings in that embryo, a fetus is not a human being. It's inside of a mother. It's part of that mother in. It's the mother was the right to her life and her body, and that every decision made regarding her body is up to the mother in that of so I actually believe that approach, and that's all the way through all the way through until birth. Well, the snow tion of your third trimester abortions. They are so rare to begin with Nick, I think if the search very difficult, you know, it's very. It's a very awful procedure for any doctor to perform. I think that's why you have to most most abortions are done very early in the pregnancy row tickets. But absolutely. I mean, I think life begins for me in. This is my perspective here, though, I believe Dr picot with echelman saying life starts at birth fats when life begins and any effort to put government's hand inside of a person's body to say, no, this is what you can cannot do with your body of before that that umbilical cord is cut. I think this is a terrible terrible violation. It's it's amazing. How she you know, that was one of her big knocks on Ronald Reagan, and was that he had as governor of California had signed into law the had helped legalized abortion..

Nick Ronald Reagan FOX Rand California
"dr picot" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"dr picot" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Observances like he wanted Omaha to retain as much of their cultural identity as possible and Susan had mostly done the same. But she had definitely talked about things like temperance from very Christian viewpoint. So when the religious use of peyote started to become more popular among the Omaha at first Picasso was vocally against it. But that changed after her husband's death, especially as she began to hear from people that pay out ISM had helped them to give up alcohol and to reconnect with their traditional beliefs and practices. She ultimately advocated against laws outlawing peyote use especially in the context of native American religion and nineteen nine the department of the interior made a number of new policies that related to the Omaha without actually consulting the Mahal on any of them. One was they consolidated the Omaha and winnebago agencies, and that gave agency doctors and other officials a lot more territory and people to. To cover because wrote a number of letters explaining the strain this merger would put on the people who were working in these agencies. They also revisited the trust period that had been outlined in the Omaha allotment act of eighteen eighty two that twenty five year trust period was expiring which meant that people who had been on their land for twenty five years. We're supposed to be evaluated for their competence. And if they were competent the land was supposed to be there's competence under this definition included things like self sufficiency in the ability to speak English. But instead of starting the evaluation process the government added ten more years to the time line across the board. Dr picot was selected to lead the Omaha tribal delegation to Washington DC to try to address all of these policies issues. Her mother had died that year she was also very ill. And so she had started off not by planning to go in person. But by writing a lot of letters to government officials. But when people told her they were going to carry her bodily to the train, if she didn't go herself, she went to Washington in person with the delegation, she and three other members of the delegation spent about three weeks there, including appearing before the secretary of the interior and the United States attorney general a big focus of the meeting was the land allotment in one meeting Pochot said, quote, we have suffered enough from your experiments, we are weary of hardships, needlessly endured, we have been practically robbed of our rights by the government therefore in the name of Justice and humanity. And because we want to become a self reliant independent self sustaining people we ask for a more liberal interpretation of the law. So in one way, this delegation was successful, the competency commission did reverse that decision to just add a blanket ten years to the trust period across the board. But in another way, it wasn't the government was once again under huge pressure from people who wanted to be able to buy. By the land in question and local governments were really eager for the land to be released because that would make it part of the local tax base. So instead of actually examining the competence of all the people who had been allotted land, the competency commission, just approved the release of hundreds of allotments, including ones that belong to people who had specifically said, they were not ready. This was once again disastrous over the next five years. The vast majority of people who had received land allotments lost their land in nineteen thirteen picot completed a project that had been a lifelong dream. She opened a hospital in Walt hill, Nebraska. This was the first hospital on reservation that wasn't funded by government money pecan used her own money and raise the money. She didn't have herself. In addition to general patient wards, the hospital also had a maternity ward and an operating room, but sadly, Susan leflore didn't live very long. After her hospital was opened she had been having trouble with pain in her head neck and yours for years. We talked about it earlier on the show, and this pain got sickly worse. She also progressively lost her hearing and in nineteen fourteen she had a series of operations, which did alleviate some of the pain, but also revealed that she probably had bone cancer doctors tried every treatment they could think of including using a radium pellet that was sent by Marie Curie on requests from Susan's brother in law. Susan leflore Pochot died on September eighteenth nineteen fifteen for funeral was conducted by three Presbyterian ministers with an Omaha elder giving the final prayer..

Omaha Susan leflore Pochot Susan Omaha tribal Susan leflore Dr picot Marie Curie Washington Mahal winnebago Nebraska secretary Pochot United States attorney twenty five years twenty five year three weeks five years ten years