35 Burst results for "Dr Phil"

How to Press the Left's Ideology

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:09 min | Last month

How to Press the Left's Ideology

"What an interesting perspective to hear. And first, let me point out what a privileged position we sit in as a society that we can be sitting on national television arguing over whether white people can put cornrows in their hair. I think that puts the whole world in perspective for me that that's what we're arguing when it comes to black oppression in America. Now let's actually dive into the idea of cultural appropriation because I feel like I posed a question there that remained unanswered. If I saw an outfit that I liked and I bought that outfit in war at the next day, apparently I'm not appropriating. But if I see something a hairstyle, maybe from an Asian culture or a Hispanic culture and I adopt that the next day, that's cultural appropriation. There's so many plot holes in pitfalls when it comes to left leaning ideology that you can't keep up. And what's important is that we just continue to ask questions and press and press. You might not get a changed mind in that very moment, as I'm sure I didn't being on Dr. Phil, but those questions will remain in their minds and they will remain unanswered until they choose to truly face them. And if

America Dr. Phil
The Boundaries of Cultural Appropriation

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:53 min | Last month

The Boundaries of Cultural Appropriation

"Now, I'd like to tell a little story because I had an interesting experience very recently. I got to do something that I think most people don't get to do in their lives. And that is be on national television for an episode of Dr. Phil. I never thought in a million years I would be sitting on the Dr. Phil show because in my view, Dr. Phil was one of those guys who was just on the TV in the background as I was a kid, bringing on families that were going through immense amounts of turmoil and I thought, I'll stay as far away from that show as possible. But now Dr. Phil is dipping his toes into political cultural and social conversations, and they invited me on to be the representation of a conservative perspective on cultural appropriation. For those of you unfamiliar with the idea of cultural appropriation, the left says that white people in particular are people outside of marginalized races that being African American, black, Hispanic, should not be able to adopt or take cultural elements from those cultures, a good example of this would be Kim Kardashian choosing to wear braids. Kim Kardashian is an Armenian woman who is typically viewed as a white woman. That's how people refer to her and she chose to put cornrows in her hair, and of course the left went insane because cornrows and braids are apparently black, hairstyles, and how dare a white woman take on that hairstyle. So I got on Dr. Phil to express my beliefs on this and to debate a few left leaning people with their perspectives on cultural appropriation and as much as I don't like to hear myself talk in recording. Let's play a little clip from that Dr. Phil experience so you can hear what they had to say. Kim Kardashian is part Armenian. Is it okay for her to wear cornrows? I personally think that it depends on what boundaries that culture has said. So I can speak for black culture. The reason why some of us are offended and have problems with white women wearing braids is because it's documented. Black women are getting fired from a job so wearing braids. We are called ghetto. We are not seen as professional with our natural cultural hairstyles. They're a part of black culture and men and women white women wear them. They are glorified, praise and even sometimes have the credit attributed to them. So that discrepancy is what where the issue comes into play. If I could respond to that, I think you can speak for yourself as an individual as far as whether or not you are offended by something, but you can't speak on behalf of the entire black culture. There are plenty of black people who watch what Kim Kardashian did and thought the braids looked absolutely fine. And again, I do think imitating is flattery. She didn't step up and say that she's invented the hairstyle. If people attribute that to her, that's something that you do on an individual basis. I

Dr. Phil Kim Kardashian
Was Coolio Killed Because of a QAnon Conspiracy?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:54 min | 2 months ago

Was Coolio Killed Because of a QAnon Conspiracy?

"I watched a video the other day of Coolio. And he's talking like crazy, late at night. And it's said to be the last video he ever made, and in it, he talks about that old tale how celebrities feast on adrenochrome gives them life. It makes them glow. It's almost like immortality. Late night night late in 2020, there was a report that a dangerous conspiracy theory was being spread by supporters of the right wing group QAnon. About a drug called adrenochrome. And this conspiracy theory is still the center of a lot of curiosity. A lot of people believe it, I personally don't. The story goes that adrenochrome is being harvested by liberal elites from the blood of kidnapped children. You know, sometimes we saw these artists all these Tony Podesta, the old guy in Obama's cabinet, Obama's confit not what have you. These guys had artwork that seemed to have always images of babies and blood and there's that one artist Abramovich who does a lot of blood work in her artwork and includes babies as well. Just then there was also the pizza connection, you know, with the kids, there's a tunnel under the pizza shop. It goes so far and so deep. The theory is that liberal eats kidnap and chuck this blood, this adrenochrome out of the children. So supposedly it gives them a psychedelic experience and even holds the promise of immortality for those who take it. It may sound absolutely ridiculous. But the adrenochrome conspiracy theory has now made its way far beyond those people who sit at their computer with Bloodshot eyes, scouring YouTube all night. Now it's in mainstream culture. Even Dr. Phil had a woman on his show who claimed that her missing daughter had been kidnapped and tortured for adrenochrome. Now, as I said, I don't believe it, but Bernie Mac, the old comedian was somebody who brought that up in the past, then there was that crazy man. Isaac Kathy, who people who listen to my show, know all about him. He terrorized Hollywood for a few months a couple of years ago with stories of pedophilia and adrenochrome and how, you know, all these tippy top Hollywood people are on it, and now there's a video of Coolio saying much the same thing. The one thing all those guys have in common, they're all dead now. So some people are drawing a line between wait a minute. They all talked about adrenochrome, and now they're all dead. They must have gotten killed. They must've gotten whacked.

Tony Podesta Barack Obama Abramovich Cabinet Isaac Kathy Dr. Phil Bernie Mac Youtube Hollywood Coolio
"dr phil" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

05:45 min | 2 months ago

"dr phil" Discussed on WJR 760

"Thanks for listening everyone. Jerry berson, Dr. Phil knight, last segment for this show, Jerry, is a little different show for us. You know, just having a conversation with Mark, our producer that because of these circumstances, are you no longer convinced that we can solve this problem? Oh, quite the opposite, right? We learned during the pandemic, we can solve this problem. But it takes a certain kind of effort to do it. And now we've got to relearn what we've dropped all of a sudden, that we learned during the pandemic, right? And so our goal is let's get back to understanding the cost and benefit of doing things a certain way, and let's make the highest and best use of all the resources that we have that is part of the reason that the problem of food insecurity can be solved is because it's not bigger than we are. It's not smarter than we are. What am I missing, doctor? And it's not beyond us to solve. There we are. So I still believe that, but there are times who is our boss, right? Who are we accountable to? At the end of the day, we're accountable to the community. And that's who we have to make sure we're elevating in everything that we do. We've got to elevate the community. We can't elevate institutions over the community. And what we're trying to say today is time to be accountable to the community. The honest truth that we've got to face is that the solutions to food insecurity are not right now tagged to the need. Yeah. They are tagged to other things rather than defining the problem weighing solutions and using the best solutions we are arguing about the problem, figuring out what's popular and doing what we can. We can not do that. We've got to get back to the discipline of good decision making throughout the partners that are working to reach the people in our community. Again, I say to my team all the time, our boss that we share is the community. That's who's got to come first. Right. And I agree with you. I couldn't agree with you more. I really hate saying that because you're going to give me a big head too. Yeah, right. Too late. Yeah, it's almost like a good question, call me, you know? But the honest truth, as you say, is that we are accountable. It's not we can not allow our loyalty to an institution, me, on the executive director for the food bank council, I have 7 food banks, feeding America food banks that serve all of Michigan county. They are really my bosses. My board of directors, along with my at large members, they are my bosses. But really, it's the kids, it's the seniors. That's right. That's who I'm accountable to, and I can not. I can not. It's not in me to ignore when something is designed to meet this need, whether it's seniors or kids, and the programs are not being as effective as what they can be. I can't ignore that. Right. That's right. And so that's why we've got to be at the table together solving these problems. Yeah, I'm probably a little more passionate about on it to show today. I'm not mad, though. I am passionate about this because I know when we're not at our highest and best kids don't have access to food. Well, that's the consequence. I agree. And that's what drives us all to this. That's why we're still in it. And I'm sure that's why you are listeners are still listening to this show because it's what you want to and we appreciate being in this with you and we just want to say we are in it with you and we're grateful for your continued being with us on this journey. So Jerry, let's unpack just for a minute more if you could. You say our food distributions have never been tagged to need. You say that, you know, all the programming, not just not just food, food banks do, but the other programs that are incorporated into the safety net. Are they tied to need? Yeah, only if you think about the income limits as being tied to need. But income limits aren't the only thing that measures need, right? So when you think about if you were going to solve this problem logically, you define the problem first, well, how many people are food insecure, and who are they? And how do we get them the food that they need? So they're not food insecure. And another way to say that is so they can thrive, right? So you'd start by defining the problem. Then you'd say, okay, well, this is who they are and this is where they are. Now here's the possible ways to reach them. So we're going to change what we do based on what solutions work best. That's how you would do it. That's how you would tag programs to need. But that's not what actually happens, right? What actually happens is that the resources that are available, whether it's free food, or whether it's through government legislation, doesn't actually say this is how many people are food insecure, and this is who they are. And this is the best way to reach them. They say, well, these are the resources we have, so do what you can. Well, then there's huge mismatches. Sometimes during the pandemic there were times when we had more food than there was a need for at that time. Now we know how to manage that a little bit easier, right? It's always easier to manage more than less. But now we have the opposite, where we have significantly less food than what the community needs because that problem solving methodology that logical way of connecting the need to the resources to meet that need just doesn't exist. Well, I think that's exactly right. And you know, I saw a statistic just this week that said that 30% of the people who are food insecure are ineligible for snap. For food stamps. And so where are they going? Well, I think one of the places they're going is to us. That's why when these programs don't run at a high level of efficiency, whatever it is, it makes our lines longer puts more burden on the charitable Food Network, and that's why we're doing the topic of this show today. And we all want to live in a community where children and seniors and the whole community thrives because that's just a better place to live overall

Jerry berson Dr. Phil knight food bank council Michigan county Jerry Mark America
The Little Mermaid Is 'Woke'

The Officer Tatum Show

01:12 min | 2 months ago

The Little Mermaid Is 'Woke'

"They've made The Little Mermaid black. Why does Little Mermaid have to be black? Why can't you just make another character or another cartoon? Why do you need to change the character to a black girl? I don't understand. So what do they do? In the spirit of virtue signaling, they make a little trailer and then there's a trend right now that shows the mermaid swimming and then when she come out of the water, she pop up and obviously she's Brown and these parents are recording and brainwashing their children. The next generation of idiots, they're pushing out into the world. They say, wow. Little Mermaid looks like me. So what about the mixed kids? Little Mermaid don't look like you shit darker than you. What about the albinos? Albino kids ain't black? They may be come from black parents, but they white. My cousin, albino, he came in, he got to wear sunglasses. He came to go outside, that burned his eyes. He like a vampire. He don't look like me. His skin ain't Brown. He looked like the original mermaid.

Swimming Brown Albino
The Facts About Boys and Porn

The Officer Tatum Show

01:17 min | 2 months ago

The Facts About Boys and Porn

"Shout out to the forgotten man, my producer. He sent me some facts because I knew I knew something. I read so much stuff that I draw from stuff that I've read years ago. But my producer is going to make sure I'm right. So the average age of boys being exposed to pornography since the average age of first exposure was 13 years old. With the youngest exposure being 5 years old and the latest exposure to pornography being 26 years old. So most people have been exposed to pornography at least by the age of 26. It says that more men indicated their first exposure was accidentally 43% of them and the intentionally was 33% and forcibly with 17%. And the information comes from a study done by the American psychology association. So if you want to go look it up in fact check me American psychology association. With the facts. But I was close. I was pretty close. I said 8. So the difference between the 13 and the 5 year old is probably right around 8. And that's pretty young to get exposed to pornography.

American Psychology Associatio
R. Kelly Found Guilty for Child Pornography

The Officer Tatum Show

01:26 min | 2 months ago

R. Kelly Found Guilty for Child Pornography

"It's R. Kelly thing. I'm just reading it in the break and it's just weird to me. I mean, maybe I should be thanking God and saying God, thank you that I have my right mind. I don't know why a man would want to mess with young girls like that. But he that man can have any woman in the world. There are grown women that look young. Why don't you get a grown woman that look young? Dress up or whatever. Why are you gonna mess with kids? And it says that he was, I lost count of how many counts of crimes he's being charged with. They just piling it on, and I don't blame them. It's just 55 year old R. Kelly faces 13 total charges, including obstruction of obstructing justice by paying off a minor victim and witnesses in a Chicago case filed in 2002. Producing and receiving child pornography and coercing miners into engaging in illegal sexual activity. Now, you know, I'm maybe a little more sinister when it comes to some of these things because I 100% believe he should go to prison. But I also feel like that we need to these parents because if your kid is 14, it says right here, it says said this girl named Jane said that she was 14 at the time that she was recorded having sex with R. Kelly. What is your 14 year old doing with a grown man?

R. Kelly Chicago Jane
Pro-Life Activist Clashes With Dr. Phil, Audience Member

The Officer Tatum Show

01:05 min | 2 months ago

Pro-Life Activist Clashes With Dr. Phil, Audience Member

"So I don't know her name. I can't think of it right now. I should be better at this. I don't know, maybe I smoke too much weed when I was a kid. But the young lady, huge pro life advocate. Was on doctor feels show. It was literally a gang up on her, and she was talking about abortions. Now, you know, I think that I don't understand, unless you are a simp, or you are a coward, I don't understand why people are acting like there's no consensus as to when life starts. I don't even know what to say. You must be a coward. Even if you assign to you, I don't care where you are. You are a coward. If you act like that, we don't know when life starts. What do you mean? When something starts growing, that unobstructed, if it's unobstructed, it's gonna grow into a human being. So when that thing starts to move, that's a life.

How the Government Attacks Political Opponents

The Officer Tatum Show

01:04 min | 2 months ago

How the Government Attacks Political Opponents

"We have a nonprofit organization me and canon's own started blexit. Why did we get out of there by the IRS? Lexie didn't raise and it's all public record. Lexie didn't raise nowhere near the money that Black Lives Matter has raised. Why aren't they getting out of it? Patrice colors have to step down a cofounder of Black Lives Matter had to step down because they found out she was using donation money to buy mansions. Then she then they bind $1 million properties during her kid's birthday party at one of the properties, paying a baby daddy almost a $1 million. Another guy who just got busted, they're suing him. Because they claim that he stole money from the organization. When you look at it, they got $60 million or something they can't find. Michael Brown's family, Eric Garner's family, many people who family members have died and Black Lives Matter have raised money on, they're trying to sue Black Lives Matter. Because they got none of the money. George Floyd family didn't get a dime from Black Lives Matter. But they don't get out of it.

Lexie Patrice Colors Black Lives Matter IRS Canon Eric Garner Michael Brown George Floyd
The FBI Seized Mike Lindells Phone in a Hardees Parking Lot

The Officer Tatum Show

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

The FBI Seized Mike Lindells Phone in a Hardees Parking Lot

"We have Mike lindell being jumped by FBI agents when I say jumped. I don't mean they physically beat him up. But they ran up on him and decided to take his house as pillow. They decided to take his phone as an investigation or during an investigation into his involvement. I believe his involvement with January 6th. I could be wrong. I got to look at this in more detail. However, they did run up on him. And it seems that the FBI is taking a liking to attack Trump supporters.

Mike Lindell FBI Donald Trump
"dr phil" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

05:57 min | 3 months ago

"dr phil" Discussed on WJR 760

"Once again, here is Dylan Jerry. We're back jury person Dr. Phil knight with our guest Anna almanza first time on food first Michigan. Certainly will not be your last. And so we were talking a little bit in the previous segment about the farm Bill. Can you kind of put a bow on that? I mean, you talked about why it's so important, our positioning here in Michigan because of senator stab and Al. I mean, again, you know, it really houses a lot of the, I don't know, the resources that food bank shoes in order to help families across the state. Absolutely. So I'd say this is probably going to be one of the most important farm bills that we pass. It's coming off an unprecedented time where we've had so many opportunities to be able to learn from doing things in new ways and having new resources that were provided for each of these programs that I hope is not lost in when we're thinking more permanently this piece of legislation, there's a lot of great things that came out of that. I'd say particularly with snap thinking about benefits adequacy, there was some improvements to the thrifty food plan. That's going to be something that's really important to see maintained or add to that benefits adequacy as we've seen what the impact has been like particularly with those emergency allotments during the pandemic. It's helped take some pressure off the food banks with people having a little more snap dollars and it's going to be a big hit when they lose that. So on the other side of the coin, the emergency food assistance program is a big piece of the resources of what us as the Michigan food meat network and the food banks all across the country rely on. Sure. And Jerry can speak more eloquently to this and more intimately to the experience of what we're seeing right now with USDA food, but at a time where these warehouses are empty, like I've never seen before, it's in a very important time to invest in tfap and our commodity programs overall. And so I'm really hopeful that we can help to address some of the short term needs, but also think long term what some solid investments in programs like tfap and CSF could look like to really think about having an impact on creating food security in our state. Yeah, food banks depend on the USDA to get access to food. And the USDA has vendors of all kinds nationally, right? They have access to growers, producers, distributors, right, all those people are part of the federal system of managing how the USDA deals with commodities and deals with making sure that markets are right for farmers. You know, one of their biggest priorities at the USDA is to support farmers and farming communities. And they do that by making sure that there's a market for the products that our communities need. We need our farmers to be successful because everybody needs to be able to eat, right? So one of the levers they have is to take some of that food that the market isn't so good, but the farmers really need the income and they take that food and they through the emergency food assistance program. Get that food to people in need. The food banks are the logistics that make that real. That's the USDA can't just dump it on somebody's doorstep, right? And you have to keep it safe. So you got to make sure that it's handled safely and efficiently and food banks play a big role in partnership with the USDA to make that happen. Except it's not working very well right now. The USDA who we depend to have access to food is not having access to food and part of its supply chain issues, part of its way more global and dynamic than any one simple thing or explanation. But let's just say there's still a job to be done there. There is still food to be had, and you know, what did my dad used to say when the goal gets tough, the tough get going, right? So, you know, we had to get going. We've heard enough complaints. It's time to get food to hungry families, and it's time to continue to support those farmers. That's the miracle of tea fap. It supports farmers and helps hungry families, so we have thriving communities, rural, urban, and everything in between. Not that I get excited about this topic, but the farm bill is where the legislation happens to enable that wonderful piece of work. And when it works, it is one of the least expensive, most impactful programs in the federal government. I believe that. And that is an excellent segue to the stateside of Anna's work because a guest we've had on the show recently and often, senator roger victory, who happens to be one of Anna's favorites. Is has a bill that is number 8 8 5. We talked about it on this show before, and in contained within that Bill is a $15 million food box program that we really would love to see past. Immediately, if not sooner. Absolutely. So that, that's we'll mention that $15 million for a farm to food bank, food box. It could not come at a better time. When food banks are desperately in need of food overall to have access to fresh Michigan grown and produced food would be just so impactful in ways you can't describe right now. And our food bank network is so well equipped to take on that program immediately. So we have the Michigan agricultural surplus system

USDA Dylan Jerry Dr. Phil knight Anna almanza Michigan CSF Al Jerry senator roger Anna federal government Bill
"dr phil" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:12 min | 4 months ago

"dr phil" Discussed on WJR 760

"Welcome back everyone, Jerry bresson, Dr. Phil knight here. Jerry, that was our guest, Cheryl kirshenbaum, who is a wealth of knowledge about so many things that impact our work. Yeah, I'm glad we gave her as much time as we practically could and still do the show. She is so good. She's so exciting. She's so smart and it just reinforces so much of what we do in our work to try to get the right conversation and the right policies around how do we address food insecurity and it's so important from so many angles I just can't say enough about how great a show that was. I really appreciate how practical I said it on the show how practical and how candid, but also how positive she is. It's not too late. For either climate issues and certainly it's not too late for food insecurity and it's a thing that you started on this show that said, you can't solve a problem if you don't believe it can be solved. Yeah. Yeah. And it can be solved, and it can be solved with the right perspective. You know, we can stop arguing and start solving. I mean, let's do it. I'm pumped. Let's do it. I like it. Stop arguing and start solving. That'll be a new mantra for us. Jerry time for a little food for thought. The mission of the food bank council is to create a food secure Michigan. A place where children, seniors, and everyone in between are free from the toxic stress of hunger. A place where hunger comes off the table and is replaced by access to nutritious food that leads them to healthy lives. A seemingly impossible task, but consider once again the words of Saint Francis. Start by doing what is necessary, then what is possible and soon you will be doing the impossible. And for that, we believe that hunger is not bigger than we are. It is not better than we are, and it is not beyond us to solve. And we solve it by putting and

Jerry bresson Dr. Phil knight Cheryl kirshenbaum Jerry food bank council Michigan Saint Francis
Matt Walsh's Reaction to Ketanji Brown Jackson Not Defining 'Woman'

The Dan Bongino Show

01:24 min | 8 months ago

Matt Walsh's Reaction to Ketanji Brown Jackson Not Defining 'Woman'

"What was it like to be witnessing that lifetime You must be thinking to yourself my gosh this is it We're on national broadcast television right here And I'm showing the entire world how crazy these people are Yeah I mean if someone told me 15 years ago that I'd be writing a book titled what is a woman I would have been able to find that pretty bewildering also But it is that's what it is The gender ideology stuff like so much of the left views on things in the worldview It all starts to collapse under the weight of very simple questions All you have to do is ask the questions and watch your collapse on its own There's part of what happened in that Dr. Phil clip But what they do their tactic is they know that they can't answer the questions They can't really explain their ideas because there's nothing under the surface There's nothing really there So what they try to do is they try to complicate matters And use a bunch of words use a bunch of fancy language use a lot of just buzzwords and jargon and get you lost in the weeds so that you forget what you're even talking about And they do this what they do is with abortion It gives it every issue And that's why the tactic on among the same people among conservatives is that you just have to stay on message like you know this is what a woman is This is what this is what we're talking about How do you define these terms and stick with that Don't let them don't let them bring you out in the weeds where you get lost out there You got to stay on message because all they can do All they can do is just stop And that's the only tactic they have So important

Dr. Phil
Matt Walsh: Why People Struggle to Define 'Woman'

The Dan Bongino Show

01:56 min | 8 months ago

Matt Walsh: Why People Struggle to Define 'Woman'

"Matt I saw you on Dr. Phil like everyone else did the clip one nuclear And you just asked the really simple question the title of your upcoming book what is a woman And watching the rhetorical words salads the verbal jiu-jitsu coming out of people's mouths to answer a question that Matt your children and mind can answer with the snap of a finger I got to tell you it's one of the more bizarre things I've ever seen in my life Really this is the hill you guys are going to die on that you really confused about what the XX chromosome package is I mean what was it like to be witnessing that lifetime You must be thinking to yourself my gosh this is it We're on national broadcast television right here And I'm showing the entire world how crazy these people are Yeah I mean if someone had told me 15 years ago that I'd be writing a book titled what is a woman I would have been able to find that pretty bewildering also But I'll tell you what it is The gender ideology stuff like so much of the last views on things in the worldview It all starts to collapse under the weight of very simple questions All you have to do is ask the questions and watch your collapse on its own which is part of what happened in a Dr. Phil clip But what they do their tactic is they know that they can't answer the questions They can't really explain their ideas because there's nothing under the surface There's nothing really there So what they try to do is they try to complicate matters And use a bunch of words use a bunch of fancy language use a lot of just buzzwords and jargon and get you lost in the weeds so that you forget what you're even talking about And they do this with ideas with abortion It gives it every issue And that's why the tactic on among the same people among conservatives is that you just have to stay on message like you know this is what a woman is This is what this is what we're talking about How do you define these terms and stick with that Don't let them don't let them bring you out in the weeds where you get lost out there You've got to stay on message because all they can do All they can do is stop And that's the only tactic they

Dr. Phil Matt
"dr phil" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:32 min | 11 months ago

"dr phil" Discussed on WGN Radio

"On is it NBC or CBS It's the one with the peacock That would be NBC Okay so it's a network show See I don't know I absolutely know nothing about these shows So you could get all the shows on your computer right Well yeah I can do that without a problem but you have YouTube TV and all that But let's see what they let me be a part of the audience Well at least tell me where I can see it I don't want to be in the audience Just tell me where I can see it Is it the peacock I don't know I think CBS is the peacock now No no no no The peacock will always belong to NBC as far as I know It is But didn't they displace the peacock a while ago It's on Kay W in Philadelphia Oh okay But EBS it's on CBS Yeah but what time I can watch it It's not the one with the peacock So now let's see what it's not the peacock Well again I don't know if it's a network show or if it's a syndicated show so it might be Yeah I don't know either What we're trying to find out when on the C I know nothing about television in Chicago So let's find out Okay wbm TV 3 p.m. Monday through Friday And W CIU that would be a little south 7 p.m. Monday through Friday It's a Peoria Yeah okay So we can find out where to watch Dr. Phil Well I'm just so pleased All right so you can absolutely do that But I would say 3 o'clock on BBM TV would do it Or if you're in Phoenix I'm not going to see this show Leah This is on a ten in the morning here I'll be happily sleeping on the Internet late or couldn't you You probably probably It's also on a 3 o'clock somewhere else here So yeah I'll see what I can do to watch this watch this show And so yeah because I think it's going to be very interesting And I'm like Albert what don't you get about it But don't you get now Fran and Gary loves the joke I just told it to him on text messaging And she loved it She laughed She said ha ha she liked it Yeah no I think it's hilarious So there should be something online like a little promo of coming up tomorrow but I don't see Yeah there should be but I've been seeing previews for it all week So yeah Okay so let's see if we can this week on Dr. Phil Okay well good We have this week on doctor Phillips So Monday it was surviving evil or can want to see surviving evil That's over Tuesday surviving evil What's Wednesday The gender pronoun debate Have you ever noticed pronouns such as she or her written in someone's email signature pronouns or words that can be used to refer to someone without using their name most commonly she or he but there's a growing number of people who say they do not identify with gender binaries of man woman and therefore prefer to use other pronouns such as they supporters say using a person's choice of pronouns fosters and inclusive environment and affirms a person's own gender identity It also slaughters the English language Some critics say they do not want to feel forced by others to use these pronouns or get canceled if they refuse While the issue is divisive and can't be solved in an hour I bet open dialog So Dr. Phil is having two LGBTQ+ activists on who answered general questions about pronouns and their overall importance How about an English teacher Then Dr. Phil meets a host and an author who disagrees Next he talks to a communications professor who specializes in gender and feminism and two concerned parents who feel discussions about gender pronouns do not belong in schools Yet it's hard enough diagramming a sentence Lastly Dr. Phil meets a gift who is raising their baby as gender neutral I want to see that wardrobe tune in today and hear this important discussion Yeah I just thought it would be very interesting to hear what people in your audience thought after seeing the show and you know hearing all the different opinions My guess is that right after the show my reaction will be that's an hour of my life I can't get back Well I'm also interested in what my opinion will be after seeing so because I have an opinion now but I want to see if my opinion changes after I see the show And my answer will be if this is the biggest problem I got I'm in clover All right so that's true Well thank you everybody for caring about me so much I really appreciate it Glad you're well and we'll talk to you tomorrow Okay thanks Bye Yeah So how about someone coming on and just explaining pronouns since you know that that doesn't seem to be taught in schools like I say who diagrams the sentence anymore God knows from the way they're speaking them They don't Yeah And all the things that we were taught are completely out the window such as never never end a sentence in a preposition Or a proposition as far as echoes but a preposition and yet you hear people coast to coast or the one that's gotten me in the last couple of weeks and I'm not sure is people saying things like when I wake up No no it's when you awaken apparently not Yes I know I'm a fossil 888-876-5593 on WGN radio.

Dr. Phil NBC CBS Kay W Peoria Leah YouTube Philadelphia Fran Phoenix Albert Chicago Gary Phillips WGN radio
"dr phil" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:34 min | 11 months ago

"dr phil" Discussed on WJR 760

"Welcome back everyone Jerry bresson Dr. Phil knight here Jerry that was our guest Sheryl kirshenbaum who is a wealth of knowledge about so many things that impact our work Yeah I'm glad we gave her as much time as we practically could and still do the show She is so good She's so exciting She's so smart and it just reinforces so much of what we do in our work to try to get the right conversation and the right policies around how do we address food insecurity and it's so important from so many angles I just can't say enough about how great a show that that was I really appreciate how practical I said it on the show how practical and how candid but also how positive she is It's not too late for either climate issues and certainly it's not too late for food insecurity and it's a thing that you started on this show that said you can't solve a problem if you don't believe it can be solved Yeah yeah And it can be solved and it can be solved with the right perspective You know we can stop arguing and start solving I mean let's do it I'm pumped Let's do it I like it Thought stop arguing and start solving That'll be a new mantra for us Jerry time for a little food for thought The mission of the food bank council is to create a food secure Michigan a place where children seniors and everyone in between are free.

Jerry bresson Dr. Phil knight Sheryl kirshenbaum Jerry food bank council Michigan
"dr phil" Discussed on Nightly Pop

Nightly Pop

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"dr phil" Discussed on Nightly Pop

"These don't look like pillows to me, though. This looks like a bag. It looks like a bagel. Yeah, it looks like that stuff. It doesn't look soft at all. These are different types of pillows. Yeah. If you guys are wondering, it does go to knockout. That's the only way that it ends. And so each are you being serious? Yeah, each fight's about 3000 rounds. I don't know if you've been in a pillow fight, but it's not like the cutesy thing. People get aggressive during a pillow fight. Like, we end up really fighting. Do you deal have a lot of pillow fight? Still. I'm an adult. Yes. And this year said not today Satan. It was the first day of hunting season. So this buck broke into a jerk. Oh my word. Oh, my word. What is happening? That is a buck. No, don't go up there. He went through the window in the auditorium. Yes. What a cute. I was worried I was like, are they gonna shoot the deal? They did right after the video ended. Well, for sure. Dang. He just went right out the window baby. He didn't care about nobody's door. Nope, nope, no. I was just on Laurel king in the other day of the year. I ran right in front of this car and freaked that car out. It's really scary. You can hit that. The guy was like, can you believe it? We had a whole canyon sir. Yeah. I can't wait to make territory. Yeah, I could believe. Get your ass to sunset. Yeah. Really cars up. They'll kill people. A lot of people, it's scary. I have deers that visit me on my hillside almost every day. My dog hates them. They do. Am I not allowed to share my dear story? The deer would they don't give a damn about you. So you have to watch out for them. And it can be dangerous, especially if somebody is behind you. It's like serious business. It's bad. They should get rid of those deer 'cause they're a hazard to other people. Yeah. Have yourself a little mozzarella and venison pizza in that new oven you got, you know? Jesus. Oh my God. Thank God. We are out of time. Venison pizza. The finger hole they wish come true and set your DVR so you don't miss us tomorrow night or any night of the week. We will see you guys next..

FBI searches Florida home of Gabby Petito's boyfriend

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

FBI searches Florida home of Gabby Petito's boyfriend

"The FBI executed a search warrant in total weight a Mustang at the family home of Brian Landry wanted for questioning after a body was found the thought to be that of his girlfriend van life blogger Gabby potato out side the family home of Brian Landry a person of interest in the disappearance of Gabby potato a crowd of reporters huddled under umbrellas on a neighbor's lawn exactly I agents came in and out of his parents home with boxes of evidence at least a dozen agents and police officers converged on the home a day after authorities discovered a body believed to be hers on the edge of Grand Teton National Park Landry's whereabouts are still unknown in an interview broadcast Monday on the Dr Phil show Gabby's father Joseph potato said Landry and his daughter had dated for two and a half years and there were no problems during a previous road trip to California Patino said Landry's family was complicit by protecting him he says he wants later to be held accountable for whatever part he played in Gabby's disappearance I'm Jennifer king

Brian Landry Gabby Potato Van Life Landry FBI Joseph Potato Grand Teton National Park Dr Phil Gabby Patino California Jennifer King
The Haunted Hallway

The Confessionals

02:50 min | 1 year ago

The Haunted Hallway

"As a kid. I used to have a lot of issues asleep arouses. I didn't know at the time it was. And that was pre internet pre dr phil kind of thing But i used to wake up a lot in the guy felt like goes being pulled from my bed. i used to have a lot of. I guess like hallucinations. Because i know there's a medical description for sleep paralysis but often see a lot of strange things in my room so there was a lot of times i spent a lotta nights sharing a room with my brother because i was just terrified to go to sleep at night. I don't think that had anything to do with what was going on in the house. But it kind of made me. I don't know maybe open to just being scared and looking for those kinds of things. That would terrify a child. Because i couldn't understand what was happening to me at nights and And i never really talk my parents about it until as an adult so they never really knew how how much i struggled but Yeah basically the house was a nineteen fifties rancher. My dad always told us like a post second world war house. He bought it off a gentleman who is actually terminally ill with cancer and basic. The previous owner. As far as i know passed away but part of the house was left unfinished an area of the house that we call the room. It was kind of a no go zone especially when we were kids later did become a bedroom but the house was a basic rancher on one side it had a garage on the opposite side of the house that had a living room and kitchen and it was just connected you know the two sides are connected with the long hallway had three bedrooms and a bathroom. The two bedrooms that me and my brother had were across from each other closes to the garage in the bathroom has crossed my parents closer to the living room in the kitchen. So i do. I'm a little nervous. It's hard for me to kind of figure this stuff out but Yeah it's all good man. Yeah my Basically the hallway was just kind of unspoken no-go zone for me and my brother. And i actually spoke to him yesterday. He's not as open to the subject as i am but It was just an area of the house. You didn't go especially as a kid. We never walked in the hallway so he had to leave your benjamin go to the kitchen me. It was leave your bedroom. Go and run in a full sprint. Was never just nonchalantly walking minding your business. We didn't play in the hallway as kids until we got older. We it would just be a full sprint from the living room to the bathroom from the bathroom to the garage. It didn't matter where you're going. You never walk in the hallway

Dr Phil Paralysis Cancer Benjamin Sprint
"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"If you look historically we've been through the great depression we've come through difficult times as recently as the last twenty years when there was an economic two labs and we're a divided country right now politically in myself. This is the worst. It's ever been well. Apparently they forgot about the civil war. No this is not worse. It's ever been we come through these things and the only person you control. Is you others. You can inspire but you control you. You've got to ask yourself. What can i do in my life and my family to make things better. You know people say politics are local. Know politics aren't local politics or personal. Ask yourself what am i doing to improve the rhetoric. What am i doing to improve the dialogue. And then what am. I doing to improve my family. If i know that. I'm waking up at three o'clock in the morning hyperventilating and staring at the ceiling get help. You're not in this alone. And i think the most important thing people can do is to talk about their feelings. 'cause they will fastly find out that their neighbor there an their uncle. Their friend shares a lot of those feelings. Monsters live in the dark gay and we give these things invoice then all of a sudden. They don't see quite so overwhelming it. We give it a voicemail. I say a lot of people feel this way and together. We'll climb out of this. I believe in the american spirit. I'm believe in the american people. And i think we'll get through this. If we just decide we're going to take action and put one foot in front of the other and stay the course. I think we will climb out of this. I really do dr phil. Thank you so so much for being here. It's really appreciated jay. Thanks for having me. I you ask wonderful questions and i hope i was at least somewhat responsive i go off on tangents. Oh tangents are no problem. I go off on them all the time and to our listeners. If you want to learn more about dr phil like where to get any of his nine books or what. Time and channel is television. Show is on. Please visit his website. Dr phil dot com. My name is gave.

depression Dr phil jay
"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"On your forehead. You know mentally ill and walk around and people are going to judge you. It's okay these are things that you can manage. You can eliminate from your functioning. And if it's something you can eliminate there are people that have psychiatric diagnoses that are married and happy and their moms and dads and have careers is felt. Like it's the end of your life. And i think there's that stigma and so we really have to challenge people to not judge themselves and judge others. They think there's a mental illness involved a challenge and second. I think there's a terrible access problem in the united states. We have to increase access. And we've got to have education about it. We've got to reduce risk factors and we have to increase diversity of providers because of the culture insensitivity one of the big problems we have and it shows up. Really big in rural counties. Sixty five percent. Don't have a psychiatrist. Forty seven percent. Don't have psychologists eighty-one percent don't have a nurse practitioner and half of these counties which accounts for like a hundred and eleven million adults have no mental health practitioner at all. And that's why. I say access is such a big problem. And we've got to fill that gap and it's important to point out that those were the statistics before the pandemic when for whatever reason there was less interest in mental health care so demand has gone up to assist them that was already not able to handle lesser demand. Exactly and i think one of the things that we're going to have to do is awareness is one thing but putting money behind it and funding these. These agencies is critical. We've got to divert cleanse to these places so we can have those professionals available. And i think that's very very important. You know dr phil. Many of us myself included. Feel like we've just been tossed around for the last eighteen months. I i really feel like. I spent three rounds in the octagon with a heavyweight. Ufc fighter. How can we start to regain some sense of agency over our lives. And that's one of the biggest issues right gave because when we feel out of control. That's where we start feeling depression and anxiety. People want to feel that they're in control of their own destiny and when they realize they don't have their hands on the wheel. They're not in control of their career. Their economics their children's developmental activities their ability to provide for their family. They get very anxious about that. And they get passive because there's really nothing they can do. And i think we need to challenge people to say okay. Look i need to maximize the things that i do have control. I need to sit down. And say what can i do. And if during this pandemic you lost your job. Then you need to work as hard at finding a job as you would. If you had a job if you work fifty hours when you had a job you should work at least fifty hours looking for a job. You should get up every morning shower get dressed and get out there looking for a job you need to get back in the game and i think that's so important for people's dignity and self esteem to say. I'm doing something to help my family. If people can sit down and say look okay. There are things. I can't control but there are things i can and let me focus on those things and maximize that control. They'll feel so much better about themselves and we need to think about this in terms of role modeling as well because their children are watching them. What are they doing are they being passed even surrendering to this or are they saying. No look we. We make our own way. Let's grab a hold of this and do what we can. That's great role modeling for the children. Dr phil thank you so much for being here now. You had mentioned that you've been a mental health practitioner for forty five years. So i want to give you the last word. What wisdom or advice do you have for all of us as we turn the corner and move into twenty twenty one. Twenty twenty two and beyond. I don't mean to be pollyannaish about this. But i believe in the spirit of people. In america we have the ability to land on our feet..

Dr phil america anxiety depression
"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Dr phil mcgraw. The pandemic has seen a huge shift in how society views mental health and while that is a good thing we still have the same barriers to care that we always had. Can you discuss the challenges. We are facing not only in encouraging people to be willing to seek out mental health care but to be able to assure that they can receive it if they do seek it out. I think the biggest challenge that we face in society in general while really break it into two. I guess and that stigma and access. Because i do believe. There still is a very active stigma in society about mental illness. There's a lot of shame still associated with being labeled as having some kind of mental illness and people are loathe to say. I need help. I need to go see a psychiatrist or a psychologist or some type of mental mental health worker in their own mind. They labeled themselves as broken or less than i always encourage people to think about that in a different way because you know to me having worked in it for the last forty five years there is no judgment. There is no stigma. I mean. I look at an anxiety neurosis or psychosis no different than i do. A kidney infection or a a knee problem. It's it's part of our functioning and if something is needing attention it deserves attention and also that it's not one dimensional so many of our mental illnesses so many of the diagnoses have neurological components to them as well. So you just have to try to get people to understand. This is not something to be ashamed of They're not gonna put a a big red m..

Dr phil mcgraw kidney infection psychosis
"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"See who you're exposed to and how you can help and we'll be right back. Is there something interfering with your happiness or preventing you from achieving your goals. I know managing my mental health and busy recording schedule seemed impossible until i found better. Help therapy they can match you with your own. Licensed professional therapist and under forty eight hours just visit better help dot com slash psych central to save ten percent and get a week free. That's better h. e. l. p. dot com slash psych central. Join the over one million people who have taken charge of their mental health. Hey everyone my name is. Rachel star withers and i live with schizophrenia. I'm also the host of inside schizophrenia. A podcast that dives deep into all things schizophrenia featuring personal experiences and experts to help you better understand and navigate. schizophrenia inside. Schizophrenia is a psych central and health. Line media podcast and we're available right now on your favorite podcast player. Check us out hair everyone your host gabe howard here. Before we continue. We went to thank you for listening to the inside. Mental health podcast. We're always striving to bring you the best content so we'd like to invite you to share your thoughts with us by completing a short survey go to central dot com slash survey forty to complete it. Now everyone who completes the survey. We'll have the chance to win. One of five fifty dollar amazon gift cards. This is a great opportunity for you to give us feedback and for us to learn more about all of you. We cannot wait to hear from you. Again to take the survey go to psych central dot com slash survey forty void where prohibited by law. And we're back with mental health advocate and tv host..

"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Believers out of people by saying look what happened but they don't say what the incidents per thousand or per hundred thousand would be if you took the vaccine away. Did it increase the likelihood or the occurrence of that. They don't report on that. They just say oh. Here's a headline grabber. So they put that out there. And i think it scares people but i do think that they're going at this wrong. Psychologically i am a incurable optimist. And i do think that as a society we're made up of caring and empathetic people and i think instead of trying to challenge people to get the vaccine for their own health. I think people are more willing to take a risk with themselves than they are willing to take a risk with other people and i think if the emphasis was on. Look look at your orbit. How many people in your orbit where you go store you go to work you go to church. You go to community activities. How many people in your orbit are in an at risk group. And how many of those people could you decrease the likelihood of a bad koga outcome if you were vaccinated i think if you really asked people to audit their own live and ask how many people they could lower the risk for if they got the vaccination people really don't think about that until you help them thinking about how to quantify that in their own life. It's not that they don't care it's just that's not their point of view right now and. I think we need to help them. Focus on that by doing that. Kind of an orbit audit is what i call it..

"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"I don't know if you agree or not but assuming that you do. How do we get people away from that. Because people are very emboldened right to believe that they know what's best ignoring years of scientific theory scientific research and study. Well that's the problem and is said it's become very politicized and whichever side you're on. It's really sad when we're relying on people that have an agenda other than the science. I i do agree with your point of view and i think you have to find a reliable source and what we've seen. Is that some of the sources that we did depend on world health organizations center for disease. Control have come under attack and so people have started to question whether those are reliable or and it's so easy to challenge yourself to take one more step and don't let someone interpret the science for you but read it yourself. And i'm not telling people. They need to go to harvard online and download a bunch of chemical studies about antibodies etc but there are some scholastic some reasons some scholastic articles that people can read. That don't have an agenda. They say here are the facts and you know right now. We see so many people debating whether they should get the vaccine or not. And and i'll can 'fess on my own bias and saying that i have gotten the vaccination my wife and i both have it. My adult children Both got the vaccine. We made the decision based on science that it was the most responsible thing to do. We didn't wanna make others ill. The fda with the vaccine that we have now with pfizer madonna or the different vaccines. We have more data on this vaccine. Now than probably any vaccine in the history of the fda. Because of how many people have been back sedated by dr phil one of the things that you said there is that you and your family chose to get the vaccine. Not because you were worried about your own health but because you were worried about the health of those people that you come in contact with this is often missed. When i hear about people not wanting to get the vaccine they say while i'm healthier i already had covert or i'm not in a risk group. Is there a way to help people understand that. There's a a secondary argument because as you pointed out people are very entrenched in their positions when it comes to the vaccine but we really do need this to get out of it. I mean it's it's literally the cure for what we've all been going through for the last eighteen months. Well i think you're right and visor has tens of millions. Modern has maybe half that and astrazeneca maybe ten million think of all that. There's no vaccine in history. That has that much data generated before it was ever authorized so we have a lot of information about this. And what gets reported in the media are the anecdotal situations where someone takes the vaccine. And a week later they have a blood clot dye. Well they don't report. How many people get blood clots and die whether they have the vaccine or not they just take it in the study and they scare the.

pfizer madonna fda dr phil astrazeneca
"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"I believe what you're describing is that this isn't just like a light switch. It's not dark. We flip the switch and then it's light right. it's slowly gonna go from darkness to light. And i i love the grease reference. I just had the convertible flying away with john travolta in pictured in my head. I can't get that out of my head now. But what practical advice do you have for people. because i. i think that you're right. I think that people were under the delusion that it was gonna be pandemic one minute no pandemic the next minute life was going to go back to normal. We were all gonna be okay. We were going to put it in the rear view mirror and much like that convertible we were just gonna fly off into the sunset. Well i'm glad you re say that. Because i described the circumstance and failed to answer your question. I need to answer your question. It's like what advice. Can you give the people in. I believe in successive approximations. It's kind of like if people have a tremendous fear of snakes. You start out by getting them really relaxed and then give the least threatening symbol of the snake you possibly can and see if they can handle that and then they can then you move to the next approximation of a snake and then the next and if they get anxious you back up a little bit you you move by successive approximations until they can not recklessly but safely be in the presence of the snake without running through late last window to escape and i think that's what needs to happen here. Don't expect yourself to leap tall buildings in a single bound. What you need to do is say okay. Well what can i feel comfortable doing. start with. Maybe it's interacting with people that i know their history and know their pattern. So maybe it starts with having a couple or a few couples over and you interact where you need it to track at the high school and you walk around together some. I know several businesses in. La where they're starting to go to work two days a week. They started ease back into it. I've talked to so many of them. Personally they said the rewards that have come from that have overwhelmed the anxiety they had about going in the first day. Everybody was looking at each other like they don't know what to say. And it's like wow. This has been crazy. You can only say that like ten times and then it's like what are we talking about now but you start out with something. You're comfortable with handling. Then you move to the next level then you move to the next level you may not feel comfortable going back to live church sitting in a pew shoulder to shoulder and the place packed but you might go to sunday school where there's ten in a room or something where you start out. Just step at a time until you have. Some confidence built up and people have to win themselves from this addiction to the new cycle. Fine one reliable non-political news source that will give you scientific information that you have competence in and check in in the morning and maybe check again in the evening or check in a couple of times a week because let me tell you this is not going to change our to our. This is something that they're having to do. Studies on it takes time to see how this is unfolding. And we've got to get away from being glued to that television and listening to every theory and every talking head. Give their spin on things. I personally think that before. The pandemic people were distracted. People just didn't sit and watch the news twenty four seven because we had other things to do. We could go to sporting events concerts movies then. The pandemic made us all stuck at home. To where the only thing that we could do was watch a net flicks or or get an update on when the pandemic was going to be over and then of course the media gave us what we wanted. We wanted information about vid so we started to get more and more information about the pandemic now at into that a basic lack of understanding of science or infectious disease control and then poof misunderstanding creeps in. And that's gave howard's personal theory..

john travolta La infectious disease control howard
"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"What practical advice do you have for people. because i. i think that you're right. I think that people were under the delusion that it was gonna be pandemic one minute no pandemic the next minute life was going to go back to normal. We were all gonna be okay. We were going to put it in the rear view mirror and much like that convertible we were just gonna fly off into the sunset. Well i'm glad you re say that. Because i described the circumstance and failed to answer your question. I need to answer your question. It's like what advice. Can you give the people in. I believe in successive approximations. It's kind of like if people have a tremendous fear of snakes. You start out by getting them really relaxed and then give the least threatening symbol of the snake you possibly can and see if they can handle that and then they can then you move to the next approximation of a snake and then the next and if they get anxious you back up a little bit you you move by successive approximations until they can not recklessly but safely be in the presence of the snake without running through late last window to escape and i think that's what needs to happen here. Don't expect yourself to leap tall buildings in a single bound. What you need to do is say okay. Well what can i feel comfortable doing. start with. Maybe it's interacting with people that i know their history and know their pattern. So maybe it starts with having a couple or a few couples over and you interact where you need it to track at the high school and you walk around together some. I know several businesses in. La where they're starting to go to work two days a week. They started ease back into it. I've talked to so many of them. Personally they said the rewards that have come from that have overwhelmed the anxiety they had about going in the first day. Everybody was looking at each other like they don't know what to say. And it's like wow. This has been crazy. You can only say that like ten times and then it's like what are we talking about now but you start out with something. You're comfortable with handling. Then you move to the next level then you move to the next

Dr phil Emmy hollywood america bipolar disorder
Dr. Phil McGraw Talks Transitioning Out of the Pandemic

The Psych Central Show

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Phil McGraw Talks Transitioning Out of the Pandemic

"What practical advice do you have for people. because i. i think that you're right. I think that people were under the delusion that it was gonna be pandemic one minute no pandemic the next minute life was going to go back to normal. We were all gonna be okay. We were going to put it in the rear view mirror and much like that convertible we were just gonna fly off into the sunset. Well i'm glad you re say that. Because i described the circumstance and failed to answer your question. I need to answer your question. It's like what advice. Can you give the people in. I believe in successive approximations. It's kind of like if people have a tremendous fear of snakes. You start out by getting them really relaxed and then give the least threatening symbol of the snake you possibly can and see if they can handle that and then they can then you move to the next approximation of a snake and then the next and if they get anxious you back up a little bit you you move by successive approximations until they can not recklessly but safely be in the presence of the snake without running through late last window to escape and i think that's what needs to happen here. Don't expect yourself to leap tall buildings in a single bound. What you need to do is say okay. Well what can i feel comfortable doing. start with. Maybe it's interacting with people that i know their history and know their pattern. So maybe it starts with having a couple or a few couples over and you interact where you need it to track at the high school and you walk around together some. I know several businesses in. La where they're starting to go to work two days a week. They started ease back into it. I've talked to so many of them. Personally they said the rewards that have come from that have overwhelmed the anxiety they had about going in the first day. Everybody was looking at each other like they don't know what to say. And it's like wow. This has been crazy. You can only say that like ten times and then it's like what are we talking about now but you start out with something. You're comfortable with handling. Then you move to the next level then you move to the next

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"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"dr phil" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Many of my coping skills were well literally illegal. Now you add into that the uncertainty and disruption to routines and even people with no mental health issues began to struggle. Dr phil with all of that in mind. What has been the biggest implications of cova nineteen on society's overall mental health. Well that's a short question that calls for a long answer. Unfortunately because the implications are really far reaching at age. I guess my greatest concern is the impact that we're having on the children. The disruption to the developmental cycle in the children is profound. It's far reaching educationally. It's far reaching developmentally in terms of their interpersonal skills. Their intra personal skills. As far as their self confidence their self-worth their self definition is so disrupted because they need the interaction than this inability to interact with their peers have really affected. This young generation profoundly first second and third graders still prominently with fourth fifth and six. And it's a little less as it goes up the chain. But i think it's had a tremendous impact that we're not going to see the results of for decades to come. I think it's going to express itself now but we're going to be measuring this decades from now when we see the impact on employment attainment and lifetime achievement so i think beginning with the children. I think this has had a profound effect and we see it now in terms of increase in anxiety. Depression loneliness all of these things. So you know gave us just been a really significant event in people's lives beginning with the children. I think that any adult who is being honest with themselves and understands their own stress mental health. If they're in touch with their emotions have suffered greatly over the last eighteen months. Because there's plenty to choose from on whether it's quarantine whether it's six hundred thousand people dead whether it's political rhetoric that's coming out of this the fear etc. That's a lot. How do we begin to shift out of the were in the middle of a pandemic narrative and shift into the were coming out of a pandemic narrative game. I think everybody kind of thought or hoped it would be a very clear line that said okay. This is over now. we're okay. I was never under that delusion that this was going to be clear transition because of all the confusion and the mixed messages that were getting of us. An example of that scene from the movie grease when you remember that old movie where school was out and they all came racing out the doors. You had the gm and the carnival was going on and everybody was running around just going school's out for summer way and i think everybody thought boy when this is over. It's going to be like that. It's gonna be pinup appetite. Everyone's gonna be raising out the doors. Yeah we're back into our lives but that's not what's happening There's a lot of fear. There's a lot of intimidation there's a lot of trepidation do things that people for granted going and getting in groups small talk conversations face to face meetings people feel awkward they have some there in trepidation like who's vaccinated who's not are. We really protected. What about all of these variants that are on the scene now and you look at all of the mom and pop shops across the country that that are gone and will never come back so people's livelihood has been put in jeopardy so people have all of this to deal with at one time and so it's creating a sense where people don't feel mastery in their life. You know we learn about ourselves by watching what we do. We make attributions to other people by watching what they do right. If you've got somebody that comes to work every day and always been the first one there they turn on the lights. They start the coffee. They kind of get everything going. And you just know. There's going to be there everyday so you attribute to them dependability. Reliability being buttoned up. You make those attributions because of what you watch them do across time. The same thing is true with ourselves. We watch what we do and we see ourselves. Master certain challenges master our environment. We say okay well. This is what we're capable of doing and then it gives us confidence well now. We haven't observed ourselves do that for over a year and that let's doubt creep in so people don't have the confidence that they one time..

Dr phil cova Depression confusion gm
 "Triad of Comedy"  featuring Don Friesen, Steve Smith, and "Mr. Bullhorm" Glen Super Show #75  - burst 01

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"Triad of Comedy" featuring Don Friesen, Steve Smith, and "Mr. Bullhorm" Glen Super Show #75 - burst 01

"Right now one of the funniest on the road ladies and gentlemen. Here's done freezing talking appliances in the next couple of years ago but talk to your kitchen. Is that gonna help our lives. Life done goofy burke. Microwave say cook you say how hot the blender and the toes we'll keep you up on that was Losing weight and have fridges pissed. Cheer loud he took it wrong. Going to couples. Counseling blender with issues. You know enough cities with your toaster. On the dr phil show. So you're just and he just want to come home. Have your bread all ready to go up. They know understand guys. Never see that coming like Yeah that's pretty much what i do. Who do you think you like a dr phil. Alarm clock heavy great. How can you sleep through that. You need to wake up. You need to wake up. Wake up this news more than twice as war. Were you walk in the jimmy j. christmas. Did i miss a turn off to crazy town here

Smirnoff Coulier Sagat Leno Carvey Seinfeld Nightclub Stand-Up Comedy Dr Phil Burke Jimmy J
 "Audience of One" Carlos Alazraqui Bonus Show #15 - burst 1

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"Audience of One" Carlos Alazraqui Bonus Show #15 - burst 1

"Near here to work on it. And let's say. I love dr phil kind. Gentlemen occasionally does take the mic. But carry dangerous man dr phil because he will tell you that. I don't care how you are your life. I don't care. I'll screwed up your childhood. You give me for fourteen minutes commercial. And i'm gonna turn your life around. You're going to get a fog. You're gonna be okay for the rest of your life very dangerous. An actual episode that i watched i left off the couch. I remember my out. He was on his show. There was a woman the show addicted. I get the tim. Mcgraw the country singer and that woman was you thought she was. Oh no that's the thing you hear. Mcgraw speak y. Deans like south along naylor reading and he looked at her miami limited limited. Stop you out there okay. What's going on is europe. Seth with a stranger. You're participating in something that is not reality. You're overwhelmed by his fame and your knowing what you have in your old real live like your children like your home. Your husband and this is what he said to her. And i think what you need to do is stop okay. Where does he get that account. Today i went through the year university. Of what you need to do. And i majored in. Stop doing it. I have a master's degree in cut it out in a phd and knock it off are stuck in the stomach.

Nightclub Stand-Up Comedy Carlosalazraqui Reno911 Dr Phil Mcgraw Naylor Deans Seth Miami Europe
"dr phil" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

06:36 min | 1 year ago

"dr phil" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Waves coming off Africa. I'm joined by Dr Phil Klotzbach research scientists and the Department of Atmospheric Science. Colorado State University. We're talking about hurricanes and hurricane seasons, so The storms that we're familiar with along the east coast of the United States and the Gulf Coast. Those are the same types of storms that we also see in the Pacific, even though they're called something different over there, right. That's correct, so hurricanes in the Atlantic, their counterparts in the Western Pacific Ocean, so near Japan, China Korea. Those are known as typhoons so basic, but the generic term is often used. This iPhone are tropical cyclone, um and not to use that can be used anywhere so Atlantic specific even in Indian Ocean all can refer to as tropical cyclones but the more specific term in the Atlantic and in the eastern North Pacific as hurricane in the western North Pacific. Um, is Typhoon and then the ingredients that you were talking about earlier that impact the size and intensity as we continue through hurricane season. When these storms start to develop, what is it that everyone should look out for? To get a sense as to whether or not this could turn into a serious storm? Perhaps a major hurricane? Yeah, So if you look at the discussions at the National Hurricane Center puts out when they're writing advisories on the particular storm like, for example, Ailsa what they look at. You look at things like how one the waters are. The waters are warmer than normal. That tends to provide more fuel for the storm and also tends to make the atmosphere a little more unstable, which helped Basically just helps to make a stronger hurricane. Another thing again they talk about a lot is that work was on his vertical wind shear. So basically in the Atlantic in general, your low level wind you wind at low levels in the atmosphere, Blood in the East. And at upper levels they blow out of the West. So basically, there's a sheer between low levels an upper level, so there's a change in wind direction with height. If there's a lot of that share that Bad for the hurricane. Good for the people in the hurricane path, worry that there's low shear than these songs to really intensify quickly. And like, for example, last year Um we had a ton of storm activity, especially leak. And that's because we had really, really low levels of that wind shear and that really allowed these storms to ramp up and intensify into being the strong hurricanes. Are there certain atmospheric conditions that lead to lower wind shear or higher wind shear? How does that work? Yes. So when we do our seasonal forecast, one of the big things that we talk about every year and are we going to have L Nino conditions are not now Al Nino is warmer than normal water they meet eastern and central Tropical Pacific Ocean. When you have an El Nino event in the tropical Pacific Ocean, it tends to increase the upper level winds the winds of, say, 20 30,000 ft In the atmosphere, it increases them out of the West, and that tends to tear apart Hurricane As we're developing and intensifying. So when we do our seasonal forecast, one of the big things we're looking for every years. Are we going to have El Nino conditions are not. For example, 2015. We had a very strong El Nino event. It was a very quietly in a hurricane season with a lot of wind shear. Last year, we had effectively the opposite of El Nino, which is known as La Nina. When you have one media conditions at times, we need much more conducive. Weaker upper level winds, and that's what we saw last year, which is one of the reasons why we had such an active hurricane season. Last year. I'm joined by Dr Phil Klotzbach research scientists in the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University. We're talking about hurricanes and hurricane season as we're all watching these storms make their way towards the United States. Usually, once they start to get to the Caribbean. We hear about the impact that land and mountainous regions could have on the storm. Can you talk a little bit about that and step us through how that affects the size and intensity of a hurricane? Yes, Yes. So basically, hurricane live off of warm ocean water. So when they run out of that warm ocean water, AK go over land. Um, that is detrimental for the hurricanes. Hurricanes will weaken when they go over land. Now there is a difference of hurricane goes over fairly flat lands a small island. It might not be particularly impacted. But if you have a lot of topography, we have high mountains, for example, parts of Cuba and Haiti and Dominican Republic that can really, really significant the impact. Um, the hurricane circulation such you know, we can really, really dramatically And that's one of the challenges with these forecasts for an individual storm is that a lot of these landmasses, especially in the Caribbean, and Central River, especially Caribbean are fairly small, but they may have Paul Mountain so Very subtle changes in the track and the big differences as to how impacted these hurricanes are by the mountainous terrain. For example, a couple of years ago with Hurricane Dorian, there was a thought for a while, but it might significantly be impacted by The Dominican Republic and if that had been the case And there's just and I've gone over the high mountains there. Perhaps that would have been pouring apart really wouldn't have been that much of a storm. The storm, unfortunately tracked farther to the East completely avoided that land and was able to ramp up into the very, very powerful hurricane, and it ended up becoming taking a look back. Historically, what are some of the region's sum of the parts of the United States that are most susceptible to hurricanes? Yeah, So if you look historically at hurricane, you know the state that they get hit the most for enough, and that makes sense for a couple of reasons. One. Basically, the state kind of sits in the kind of a predominant track of where these storms go, but also, obviously like Florida or state like Texas. Has a large amount of coastline. So, for example, you know it's it's hard to get a hurricane making landfall, saying Alabama because the coast of Alabama's fairly short whereas if they exploit our Texas Obviously has a much longer a much larger coastline and obviously then get pissed more often. Louisiana also is fairly often by hurricanes. Obviously last year, they were the only under the gun last year, getting went by three separate hurricanes. Then we have seen hurricanes stay in the Atlantic Ocean and brush up or directly hit the Carolinas and that part of the U. S. What would cause that to happen? Yes. And so typically, what kind of steers Most hurricanes especially was coming off Africa basically work known as the Bermuda High pressure area. I mean, so I thought for semi permanent high pressure area near Bermuda, but it doesn't days park over the mood every year, it can shift He's taking shift West. It can be stronger. It can be weaker and so basically a lot of the storms kind of a nice garden variety. Hurricane doesn't impact anyone will track generally from east to west across the Atlantic, and then what we'll do is we'll reach basically the western.

Atlantic Ocean Japan Texas Florida Bermuda Africa Caribbean Paul Mountain Last year Central River Carolinas Louisiana Indian Ocean 2015 Dominican Republic Alabama Cuba U. S. Gulf Coast last year
Understanding User Intent with Openstream's Raj Tumuluri

VOICE Global 2021

03:18 min | 1 year ago

Understanding User Intent with Openstream's Raj Tumuluri

"We're trying to see how we can understand what the users to intent our goal is as opposed to just literally following what. The user is asking the guessing point. Let's take the case of a health insurance company offering this this kind of an assistant what you tend to their members so the member could could be interested in knowing whether there are are there any court centers nearby so the literal answer for that would be yes that off a note that should really satisfy the constraint and maybe a slightly better You know what would say. They're not three which three geico does nearby ensure them probably on the map but nothing beyond that but if you go beyond that in understand true goal of the end user as to why they asked this question what we call as goal based i log model so optique scientists is actually dr phil cohen. Since you mentioned city he was the original one that that helped write the city from with adam shot and he is so out of bag on the foundation so strong in that space so we are on to the next level which is goal based dialogue engine. So when you ask this question so we kind of understand the plan of the user. The battle of the user is not to merely know Percents nearby but rather like to probably go there and get tested so when that is the case you have to be a good watch losses to insured basically understand okay to find out which ones are closest and then try to find out more information about them whether the renew obstacles in executing the plan of the end user for example if the it could simply say that there are three close by the nearest one is one way but that doesn't have any appointments but the next one these twenty minutes a day and that take walk ins. Shall i get actions for that. And that would be a really powerful thing and this you should be able to do the script fashion. We are not playing to cord and like most other people do are just follow Prompts so that this has an approach and then when you apply that to since pledged up on the insurance domain the policy documents other things tend to be really complex and they're kind of Oftentimes they're legally binding so a lot of language. Therefore you know is is not something that is easy for a common man understand. Why a lot of information could be presenting those documents. You still have to call the are calling your health healthcare payer to get an approval for for the next procedure or next bragged that you're trying to play take or you want to find out why your claim is Declined or your naoko. Claim of property claim in trying to find out what. Your limits are You know whether the whether you have got the plane processed so all these things Required knowledge of knowledge and relationships among various entities present in these documents so one should be able to glean from that The information and and kind of pro dancers To to the end users without requiring in law data staff to sit there and write a lot of ccording to expect these documents so we tied to automate that process

Dr Phil Cohen Geico Adam
"dr phil" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"dr phil" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Taken build unaided layers of complexity like you're talking about, like having answers that all Skip a certain letter, for instance, or having answers that read backwards. How well does Phil do with these types of challenges? It's terrible. Uh, s so there was a puzzle at the tournament one year where every clue was a spoon Tourism. Dr Phil can figure that out. It doesn't understand. It has new way to sort of get started. And if you've got these, you know these overarching themes. I made a puzzle once where every word was a hominid. You were supposed to entrance. The grid wasn't the actual word. It was Haman him of that word. Dr. Phil can't do that. It just doesn't understand that none of it's sort of rules will help it. It does understand simple seats. So you might have a puzzle where you know the long injuries ad and E to a common phrase to get some wacky phrase. It will understand about that. And it'll say, Oh, look, the theme is agony. But these overarching themes are are too hard for it because it doesn't It doesn't really know what it's doing right. It's just following rules to fill letters in a grid. And when will says you know something truly imaginative. Humans have the edge. He is absolutely right. I'd like to thank my guests this hour. Matt Ginsberg Computer programmer. His program. Dr Phil Unofficially won the most recent American crossword puzzle tournament. Thank you, Matt for taking time to be with us today. Thank you very much. That is also author of the book Factor, Man. Finally on a personal note. Congratulations to build simmering Susan Stamberg and the other public radio pioneers celebrating the 50th anniversary of all things considered this week. I was privileged to work with them back in 1971 and still honored to count them as my friends. Well done, folks. You should all be proud. Charles Burnquist is our director. Our producers are Kristie Taylor, Katie Feather and Kathleen Davis. Our senior producer. Alexa Limb are contributing Editor John Jankowski B. J. Liederman composed our theme music. Also on the side Fry voxpops Hamp. We want to know if you've had a conversation with your physician with your doctor about medical marijuana. Do you use marijuana to treat a medical issue?.

Susan Stamberg Charles Burnquist Kristie Taylor Kathleen Davis Matt Ginsberg Katie Feather Alexa Limb Matt 1971 Phil today 50th anniversary this week John Jankowski B. J. Liederman one year Factor, Man American Dr. Dr Haman
Top 15 ideas for an equitable economy

Work In Progress

05:32 min | 1 year ago

Top 15 ideas for an equitable economy

"I'm pleased today to be joined by dr phil jackson of new profits. She's one of the managing partners. Enchila- thank you so much for being with us ramona. Thank you for having us especially on this exciting day where we're finally announcing the fifteen solutions for the grand challenge. I am so glad we could talk about this today. Because we've been we've talked about this in the past as you were taking in the applications for this so for those in the audience who don't know what the grand challenges when you tell us. Kind of broadly. What it is and then we can talk about. Who's some of the people have been selected to the future burton grand challenges partnered by new profit in partnership with x prize foundation. Mit solve and j f f. And what we're doing is we're giving finalist access to six million dollars. In funding to implement solutions that will rapidly reskill twenty five thousand workers into higher wage jobs and it quip influential workforce boards with vetted tools to help get americans back to work in why this is so important as that many times philanthropy. We actually give grants based on ideas. These grants are going to be given based on outcomes so it's really going to be down to how many people were trained and how many people were placed in jobs with living wages. What were you looking for as you're looking for the organizations the groups to go forward in this competition so yet so even before cova working on this initiative for two years and really what we senator around were were adults busy people who are in need of upskilling but who can't take the opportunity cost to take off a year or go back to get a four year degree so we know going into this that we were looking for accelerated learning programs and also programs that would allow a learner or a worker to earn while they learn. We know that you know people. We think. A lot about the fifty six million. Us residents who are are working minimum. Wage jobs you know less than living wage jobs that they need opportunities to to skill up in a fashion that works for their complex and busy lives and so we really wanted these entrepreneurs to be willing to center the experience of these learners right and to create solutions that will work alongside their busy lives. We talk a lot about trying to upskill four jobs now. Actually and jobs of the future are each of the program. Said are in your rapid reskilling. Are they ernest. You learn absolutely in the way that we're thinking about it. There's two things one is like you said ramona. The future of work has become the president of work right so a lot of things that we thought were going to happen. Happened in cove. It industries went away that we thought were recession proof. And so what we've tried to do with all of these trainings. Is that one is their offered free of charge to the job seekers. And we're asking about preneurs a train for jobs that will not be impacted in the future works of thinking in the next three to five years and where people can leave the short term training and actually get a job with a living wage in so those are the parameters that we looked at. And we want to make sure that these trainings were geared towards people. Don't have a bachelor's degree and have other barriers employment. There are fifteen different organizations. That will be part of the solution. They're a combination of rapid reskilling. An mit sauce. And so we're looking at the fifteen solutions of the cohort that. We're validating at workforce boards. They just came to us from different challenges. There's a couple that. I'm just really excited about the first. Is this company. That's called charger help. And what's so interesting about that. One is that they are training people to be technicians into service electric car charging stations. What's interesting to me about. The idea is one is who knew that that was a job. You know. I didn't in to who knew that you could do that type of job and not have a bachelors degree so in a sixteen week program. They're able to train someone to do this job and they can go and make upwards of hundred and fifty dollars an hour but the company itself charged for help actually pays their employees up to fifty dollars an hour but they're giving them this training. That has a great market potential. And so that's one example. Another example that we're really excited about is generations. Usa there are national nonprofit ner actually international in many ways but they're allowing people to on the job while they're like learning a new trade and they do everything from building trades to manufacturing to data to technology while they're getting the technical training they're also giving them the wraparound supports of that professional training. And what some might call soft skills but are you know really important professional skills if we're going to actually obtain a job. They're getting paid while they do it. They're tuning to like the wraparound supports. A worker might need so in terms of transportation and childcare and they are promised a job on the other end of it and so as a learner. When you're thinking about that opportunity cost of taking you know sixteen weeks or three months off to learn. You're getting some upside in the beginning. And also you've got this guarantee on the back end.

Dr Phil Jackson Ramona X Prize Foundation Cova Burton Ernest Cove USA