35 Burst results for "Dr Peters"

Americans Deserve the Truth About Peter Daszak and Anthony Fauci

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:57 min | 5 d ago

Americans Deserve the Truth About Peter Daszak and Anthony Fauci

"Does that say for our public. Health officials that someone like peter desk is able to insert himself is able to put himself into what is supposed to be a scientific journal and published a statement that covers his own interests but actually have has lose focus on china and focus on masks or vaccines are mass inoculation. The wuhan institute of veracity received six hundred thousand dollars from a five year three million plus grant that vanity fair said eko health alliance. Stop from wire. Where did they get it from the us national institute of allergy and infectious diseases. Which is headed up by tony. Thoug- so tony. She gave dacix the money to the eco health. Alliance the echo health alliance. Then gave it to the wuhan into the variety and they're they're then trading love letters like pen pals in their email saying hey thanks pal for covering our back year because we don't want people to know that we were actually involved in pushing the natural order in putting science of above morality that actually ended up having a leak which is now infected. The entire planet. Dr peter data if you go to ito eko health alliance dot org. It shows this long bio from him. And you start to realize that this man might have the disguise or the camouflage of being a medical doctor with dr. peter. Dasent is the ultimate mad evil. Scientists is the man behind the man that coordinates all of the things that foul. She can't do because technically he's restrained as being a government. Employee data is able to call the prime ministers of other countries. He's able to orchestrate lockdown type programs.

Eko Health Alliance Peter Desk Wuhan Institute Of Veracity Us National Institute Of Aller Dacix Echo Health Alliance Tony Dr Peter China Peter
Peter Daszak: The Man Behind Anthony Fauci

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:51 min | 5 d ago

Peter Daszak: The Man Behind Anthony Fauci

"We are governed by currently in this era of public health. Put that in quotes lockdowns and draconian drank draconian ism by a group of people that was largely unknown a couple of years ago but they have come to the forefront and have more power than any other people in the history of domestic american policy. One of those people is dr peter desk. Dr peter dasent is the villain behind the villain. Is the man behind foudy. Now many people ask the question. How is it that they spied on. Donald trump the same playbook that they used spy on donald trump. And go after lieutenant general. Michael flynn is precisely the same playbook that they use to launch this fraudulent campaign saying that the chinese corona virus came from the himalayas. It came from some bat soup. I'm reading from the daily mail dot com. It was revealed earlier last year. That peter desk a british scientists with longstanding links to the wuhan institute of variety had secretly orchestrated in landmark statement in the lancet in february two thousand twenty which attacked conspiracy theories suggesting the cove in one thousand nine does not have a natural origin. The now infamous letter signed by twenty-seven seven public health experts said they stood together to strongly condemn the theories that which they said quote do nothing but create fear rumours and prejudice. See that there. You have medical scientists telling us that it creates prejudice. They also lavished praise on chinese scientists. Who said they worked. Diligently and effectively to rapidly identified a pathogen behind this outbreak and share. Their results transparently the global health community. But now the lancet which is the top level of medical discourse and publication said near agreeing to publish an alternative commentary which discusses the possibility that laboratory research might have played a role in the emergence of the sars kobe to ouchi chinese corona virus. The scientists say quote. They need to evaluate all the hypotheses on a rational basis and away their likelihood based on facts evidence devoid speculation concerning potential and possible political impacts in february two thousand twenty. They even add that that statement in part of a silencing effect on the wider scientific debate. Yeah no kidding. Because peter dasent inserted themselves under orders from bouchier he is the pulp fiction equivalent of mr wolf.

Dr Peter Desk Dr Peter Dasent Foudy Donald Trump Peter Desk Wuhan Institute Of Variety Michael Flynn Peter Dasent Mr Wolf
FDA Official Hopeful Younger Kids Can Get Shots This Year

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 weeks ago

FDA Official Hopeful Younger Kids Can Get Shots This Year

"The head of the food and drug administration's vaccine program says he's very helpful younger children will be eligible for cobra vaccines before year's end Dr Peter marks of the FDA tells the Associated Press the agency will quickly evaluate Kobe nineteen shots for kids ages five to eleven as soon as it gets the necessary testing data but he says he's very hopeful it could happen in months or even weeks both by Saran materna are testing vaccines on young children even babies with study results expected soon right now only people aged twelve and over can get a vaccine but with the delta variant spreading rapidly among children many parents are getting concerned Jackie Quinn Washington

Dr Peter FDA Saran Materna The Associated Press Jackie Quinn Washington
COVID-19 Detection in Masks and Wearables

Talking Biotech Podcast

02:14 min | 2 months ago

COVID-19 Detection in Masks and Wearables

"Our guest. Today is dr peter godwin. He's from the institute of biologically inspired engineering. Which sounds like a really cool really cool place to work. Yeah welcome to the podcast newman. Thank you yes so this is really cool. Because anyone who's listening to the podcast understands cove in nineteen the pandemic and many of the health implications that we've seen come from it. How important is early detection in solving a pandemic Well devon. I think that most epidemologists have told as it's an essential part of our toolbox for doing with the spread of a pandemic and especially early on in a pandemic and throughout epidemic that still raging the one that we have right now. You really need to understand where the the virus spreading and quickly it spreading so that you can implement a measures to kind of tamp down that spread such as a social measures as well as technical technology measures such as vaccines Things of that sort. So surveillance is key in Trying to prevent the virus from spreading in so currently were doing tests of this kind of surveillance but how is that being done right now and is that really enough shirts so right now there's two main ways of doing testing for individuals. One is the gold standard and that is something called. Pcr so a pr tests or rtp. Cr test basically takes the virus from an individual sample such as you know nasal swab that we've seen People get and what it does. Amplifies up that genomic signature of the virus. So you're actually looking at the viral genome and you're amplifying it up so that you can test it. Unfortunately this again. This is the gold standard but unfortunately required a laboratory. So you need a you need a technician And it it's it. It takes quite some time for that sample to go to the laboratory laboratory to process the samples and then information back out

Dr Peter Godwin Institute Of Biologically Insp Newman
Vaccines with Heather Simpson

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

03:58 min | 3 months ago

Vaccines with Heather Simpson

"Today we're talking about vaccines well. More specifically about the toll. The anti vaccine movement has taken on our public health. Let's start with some basics x one of the most successful public health interventions in human history. They've saved millions if not billions of lives. They protected generations of children in the us and around the world from deadly diseases and right now the surest path out of the covid nineteen pandemic is to vaccinate as many people in as many places as possible but that of course requires wide scale public trust and participation two things that the anti vaccine movement has been working really hard to undermine vaccine movement has been growing in darkness for decades and now they've captured the spotlight as an is fear uncertainty to so doubt and spread lies about the coupe nineteen vaccines their efforts have been amplified by public figures who used their platforms to elevate debunked conspiracy theories and all of this is made much much worse by lack of accountability from social media and technology platforms themselves. The nfl move hurting our ability to recover from this pandemic and it could affect which vaccines this generation of kids received well beyond covid nineteen. So what can we do. How do we fight. The powerful tide of disinformation that began long before this pandemic and has unfortunately gained momentum during it. How do we overcome mistrust around vaccines and help more. People get the facts that they need to make the right decisions for themselves and their families while to answer this questions. I'm talking with two people who are confronting these challenges head on later. We'll hear from my friend. Dr peter hotels vaccine researcher and advocate and co director of the center for vaccine development at texas children's hospital. But i i'm talking with heather. Simpson a mom who fell down the rabbit hole and then pulled herself back up. Heather is an activist a freelance writer and a mom to three year. Old daughter hers is a story of how effectively the anti vaccine movement entraps people and a reminder that it's possible if not always easy to change minds. I started our conversation by asking heather how she went from someone who had always gotten vaccinated then anti-tax social media influence my mom vaccinated all of ice. It wasn't until i was eighteen. I had the choice to get my meningitis shot. And i hate needles so on. That alone chose not to get it going in college which was stupid. I did get the tea dot in two thousand fifteen. I got the flu shot school. It wasn't until me and my husband really started trying to have our daughter that we were like Should we do the schedule. I mean we haven't given much thought. And a documentary series popped up on facebook as an ad and it was nine hours a just pure propaganda. It was doctor after doctor blaming everything under the sun on vaccines so by the time. You're done watching all nine hours of terror. You're not gonna wanna inject your kid. I mean i was terrified. I was thinking if we inject charlotte. She will die in her sleep that night. The strength of the fear that i had was so so strong i was ashamed a little bit a little bit embarrassed about it because my mom groups were so pro vaccine so it didn't really tell anybody but when she was about eighteen months old i decided to start talking about it casually on the internet on facebook and it just took off and i didn't realize that their birth thousands and thousands of antibodies mom's on facebook that had all found each other and that there's this huge huge growing community and they just accepted me as one of them and it just took off from there.

Dr Peter Hotels Center For Vaccine Development Texas Children's Hospital Heather NFL Simpson Meningitis United States FLU Facebook Charlotte
U.S. Seeks to Pause J&J Shot After Rare Blood-Clot Cases

Glenn Beck

01:00 min | 5 months ago

U.S. Seeks to Pause J&J Shot After Rare Blood-Clot Cases

"Covert vaccine side effects. I'm Dave Anthony Fox news, and it's why Johnson and Johnson shot has been put on hold in the U. S to investigate six rare cases. Fox is Evan Brown has an update live, Yeah. Dave, One of the six people who developed blood clots following injection of Johnson and Johnson vaccine died. Another is in critical condition. Now. The CDC and the FDA insists that condition is caused by a number of factors and is rare. But doctors need to listen to patients who received the Johnson and Johnson vaccine who shows severe headache, abdominal pain, leg pain or shortness of breath, The veer They would want to seek medical attention. And if there are low platelets at that time, one needs to consider this entity the FDA is Dr Peter Marks. Treatment for these clots is difficult because heparin can't be used. However, the regulators say they expect this pause to last days while they review more data. Dave Ivan Johnson and Johnson's also know delaying the vaccine rollout in Europe. President Biden's going to

Johnson Dave Anthony Evan Brown Fox News U. FDA FOX CDC Dave Dr Peter Marks Abdominal Pain Headache Dave Ivan Johnson President Biden Europe
"dr peters" Discussed on The Know Show

The Know Show

26:52 min | 6 months ago

"dr peters" Discussed on The Know Show

"dr peters" Discussed on Reefer MEDness

Reefer MEDness

03:39 min | 6 months ago

"dr peters" Discussed on Reefer MEDness

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"dr peters" Discussed on Reefer MEDness

Reefer MEDness

04:01 min | 6 months ago

"dr peters" Discussed on Reefer MEDness

"Off of this. I don't know of any plan to get me off this well. that's because it. This is harm reduction. The idea is it is safer for you to be on suboxone for the rest of your life. Then to get a possibly tainted supply of opioids. Yes so essentially. You've said you go from i. I think i think we've only known one person who kicked it cold turkey and basically went through a week and a half of hell as far as there are no is not on just box them for grammar as far as always on. Opiates so yeah. The our mutual equate. Yes yes as far as i know. That's going well. And and we don't have a huge number of suboxone slash methadone people and not a lot end up off of opiates. We've had some off the program come back on and someone very low doses for and they're they're dysfunctional members of society jobs and spouses and kids and all that so. I consider that a success when you know they're the low dose and continuing on but but yeah but but you're right. That is the most common question you get at. The beginning from sort of knew pharmacists new texts new people who are suddenly getting up to speed on the on the the opioid replacement. Therapy is okay. So do we get them off of it. Answer is maybe that well again. This is now in six. The odd episodes we've had We are learning over and over and over again that cannabis can play a role in the opioid overdose and the opioid crisis private canada. And here's another gentleman. That not only has lived experience but as a harvard. Graduate harvard professor. Who's preaching breaching. The benefits of cannabis. Trevor i think i think i think i think doctors family physicians need to start listening to reefer madness. Podcast and learning how cannabis can help. They can and at your encouragement. I think we're going to turn this one into a little bit of a miniseries. We've got at least one more episode coming up with Someone who's so. Dr grin spoon was definitely on the clinical. And you know the one on one patient end and lots of good stuff from there We've got one episode coming up for sure on more of the researcher end. And i've got one guy i'm chasing who there might be some guidelines out there for how to get people off of opioids and put them up with cannabis. But i haven't got that one yet by for sure got the. I've got the researcher in the can. I think we'll have a little opioid and candidates trevor. So kirk nyquist. I'm the nurse. Reefer madness podcast. Temperature filled out the pharmacist. Remember to come back. We have new music in town. And rene i understand produced engineer del. So maybe we'll let's we have got to hear that everyone needs to hear that. Okay okay yes. I guess that's my cue so i did produce and record a four song. Ep for nicole yonker local dolphin. A beautiful awesome person extraordinary and the music on this song is played by also local musician named gary precision. And this ep. Called my dream so by nicole younger and you can find it online to search for my dream. Nicol younger and the song is called in canada on the show. Let us know. We're rieger menace on instagram. And facebook madness on twitter or head over to the website permit dossier about and what's coming up next.

Graduate harvard Dr grin kirk nyquist Trevor harvard canada nicole yonker trevor gary precision rene Nicol younger nicole facebook twitter
"dr peters" Discussed on Reefer MEDness

Reefer MEDness

07:15 min | 6 months ago

"dr peters" Discussed on Reefer MEDness

"Encourage perspective so trevor. There's no free lunch manse. There's no free lunch. No no and i really like his saying that. Because with all the amazing things that cannabis does get more convinced. The more we learn about this it is easy to forget. It's not good for everything all the time. And it's still a medication and we still have to treat it with respect. Yes yes and again. We are kind of positive on a on this program because we've seen a lot of positive things that come from cannabis but it goes right back to our first episode. Why worry there are. There are things to considerable cannabis. It is a drug. It is something that you know nine percent. If not less people can be addicted to it. There are syndromes that come from it so and we don't know a lot of pregnancy and breastfeeding that. We've done to series on on prenatal consumption of cannabis and and i took a Executive links program on it and again people speak out of that coker. Well it was good. It was good to take education from other people. But as you. And i have said we've research candidate cannabis in such a way that we see the harm reduction. It can have now. I'm not saying that people. We don't know how cannabis works with pregnancy. But we do know that how we have reacted to people who women who have used cannabis in pregnancy. How we've reacted to them has has also not been positive. So yeah that's the big takeaways people should go back. And listen to your. I think we have to return on on. But yeah that was the big one of the biggest takeaway i took from both of our experts on that is the biggest harm. Is you do a drug test. After a woman delivers find some cannabis metabolites inter system. And take take the baby. That's not hard dutch well with no. It's not because these been done in the and if damage is going to happen you know. The damage would have happened already. But but yeah. So i agree with. I agree with what he's saying is it. There's no free lunch. We have to remember that cannabis is a drug And we have to respect that. But one thing i always say about cannabis is that although it is a drug one thing that we do know from a harm reduction perspective. It's not gonna kill you by gopi it swell or other benzes will where you can actually do some serious harm. I mean people don't realize one of the one of the worst drugs out. there is taller. No right tylenol. What is four grams. A day man is mad. She take anything other than that. You hit your liver gets a hit. And and so you know if towel or aspirin of aspirin was to be legalized again. Would would they allow it so asked for absolutely would not be an over the counter medication and not that i'm telling this as a how to manual so just but they always use tylenol and our toxicology course says Kind of an interesting one because again. Not just for your information. If you're going to try to take your own life. Tylenol is the way to do it because you're not if you overdose on it and you're gonna tell me we're going to cut this out later and we might but if you overdose on tylenol. You don't feel any pain like you you just you. Don't notice it when you start having symptoms of liver. It's all too late already whereas if you overdose on aspirin you you feel sick right away. You probably end up feeling sick enough that you call someone and say i feel terrible. Take me the hospital. Where the tylenol overdose. They tend to end up by the time they need to go. The hospital might be too late. I you cut this off. I deal with telling overdose. Gosh when i'm up north. I i deal with a lot two or three rotation common drug overdose and what. I keep reminding by what. I keep reminding. My patients vote is that i don't recommend it because you can take and there's drama and we do all the things to get you to city and we we flush it out with neck and we we do all the right thing but if you don't come in within a specific time line and you do damage your liver day no going back. You die slowly over a period of four five days to a week and there's nothing we can do so there may not. There may not be any pain but you lay in bed with a destroyed liver and die slowly so i would suggest it's a horrible way to kill yourself. I'd rather have a bail of cannabis land on me from an airplane. Do it suddenly began get opioid. Because i i deal with people who are on suboxone and methadone you as well so we're not. I'm not saying we're experts. It comes up in our practice. But i think one of because i know it sounds silly but it sort surprised me when i started doing it. I think it was surprise. You know people hear about opioid crisis. Well the biggest. While there's lots of problems with opioids but one of the problems is recognized. You have an issue. You've you went to seek. Help your diagnose you've got an opioid use disorder and you end up a suboxone program. Even one of the things. That surprised me is even when things are going. Well you know you've been on. You've been stabilized six months a year thing. Things are going okay and decide. Wean yourself off maybe against medical advice. Maybe not but you feel good. I i. i'm good. I'm good and so you know you. You stop taking suboxone and then something happens. Your boyfriend girlfriend breaks up with you. You lose whatever you know some trigger eligible figure something pops pops up in your life that trigger and then you go back to the street drugs that used to take to sort of help you deal with that pain. That's a really common time to have an overdose because you didn't realize that we brought your tolerance way down and what you used to be able to do a year ago will kill you now like. It's just it's so insidious how how easy it is to die. From kate unintentionally taking opioids. You thought the other problem. I have with the with the suboxone program and again in my limited experience with it because i i'm not as i don't do it daily but i do deal with it depending on the community. I mean we do deal with it. But i i've had these conversations with them because they're purposely. I wanna know what's the plan of getting you off. This and one hundred percent of the patients have said to me plan.

coker trevor gopi kate
"dr peters" Discussed on Reefer MEDness

Reefer MEDness

08:00 min | 6 months ago

"dr peters" Discussed on Reefer MEDness

"There's only about two or three but The fact is you know that's great example of like you know as as growing up in school they'd be teaching us of this bullshit about cannabis like the causes a motivational syndrome. And then at home like not believe the luminaries that would be like sharing joint with my dad and having these like brilliant discussions and like he doesn't cause a motivational syndrome and that's a perfect example of like high learned at an early age that was all propaganda and none of it was true and learned first of all to think for myself. Second of all that you know cannabis is not what they're telling us. It is in third of all that you know you just after You'd have to figure these things out on your own because there's so many different agendas when it comes to something like this. In by the time. I started medical school. I felt very immune to a lot of the drug were propaganda that unfortunately made up our curriculum in medical school about about cannabis. Thank you so we fast forward through medical school. And now you're out on the other side now you you. You had mentioned your your book about opioid addiction. Now we've weak. Opioid addiction to cannabis. Comes up on our podcast. Actually quite a bit now. I know it's an enormous topic but Can you tell us a few sort of a summary of an enormous topic about cannabis and helping people get off of opioids absolutely. I consider there to be five different ways in which cannabis could help people get off. Opiates only one of which is controversial. Why they're controversial but only one which i consider controversial. I mean first of all you can transition people who are on chronic. Opiates therapy off of opiates onto cannabis has to be voluntary You shouldn't be taking. Opiates away from anybody. People have a right to pain medication to stand the. Opiates if that's what they prefer. But you know i find. The quality of life is much better on cannabis for the people who make the transition and it's it's arguably much safer so that's number one number two i start new chronic pain patients on canvas instead of opiates because it's as defective in much safer so that decreases the people who are at risk from opiates if the chronic pain is very severe you might need. Opiates because opiates are stronger than cannabis. But for the mild to moderate chronic. Pain did for example many americans who are getting more rotund older arthritic are suffering from I can't relate any of those neither can i The third thing that you can lower the dose of opiates using cannabis because they work on the same receptors and studies have shown you over the dose of opiates By about eighty percent. And that's really important because a lot of the trouble yet into the. Opiates overdoses and dependency and constipation. Mental status changes happens to be dose related. so he it'll go where the dosing be by up to eighty percent. That's the big win number. Four and i could vouch for this both from personal experience and from the studies that are out there is at cannabis is probably the best drug for opiate withdrawal syndromes and. We're talking before you mentioned. You had heard of that well on your your clinical experience. And you know that's a really big deal. If it keeps people retains people in treatment the only one that's controversial is whether cannabis can serve the same function as methadone and be pornography in as medication four opiate use disorder as substitution treatment for opiate use disorder. Now i know of thousands of patients that have told me if they're successful use of cannabis to transition out of their opiate addiction in consider cannabis a gateway drug out of addiction yet at the same time. there's hardcore evidence that buprenorphine and methadone to fifty to eighty percent reduction. Overdoses and deaths When people who are suffering from opiate use disorder. and we don't have that data yet for cannabis. It needs to be studied. And i wouldn't be surprised if we found that however we don't have that yet so given that we have the data for buprenorphine and methadone and don't have the data for cannabis. It just doesn't seem right to recommend a treatment when it's life or death where we don't have data when we could be recommending a treatment. Were we do have the data again. If i treat your mic agreeing with medical cannabis and it doesn't work you get a migraine not the end of the world. But if i treat your opiate use sorter and it doesn't work you could overdose or die so it's better to stick until we have the data to the proven the proven treatments. So again i think in the as i mentioned absolutely helpful To lessen are dependent on. Opiates which will thus Help with the opioid crisis but the fifth one is still a work in progress. Asked think that The novel tabloids. That were just starting to learn about you. Know the cbgb's he'd see eight or the delta atc's zbc's teach which control weight loss blood. Sugar fasting blood sugar Potentially help us with this epidemic of obesity diabetes. Which i see every day is a primary care. Physician think these things are profoundly. Exciting some concern that like with cbd. The enthusiasm in the marketing is going to soar high above the actual science. So if to keep an eye on that. But i think there's such untapped unbelievable unlimited potential for us to exploit the endo cannabinoid system and all of these cab for health purposes in wellness purposes again. I mentioned this before but bears repeating. This is a incredible incredibly setting time to be involved in this field in like every day i wake up and i'm like wow what am i gonna read about. Today's really fun thank you. Dr didn't spoon. So i know this has been a bit of a disjointed interview. But i'll wrap up by asking. What's there was there anything else you you wished i'd asked and anything else you you think. Our listeners really need to know about cannabis medicinally or otherwise. Just said you know just like any medication. There's no free lunch like there are risks that like we don't know the safety in pregnancy or breastfeeding. So it probably should be avoided unless there no other options. That's true for a lot of medications that a primary care. Doctor really cautious about any medication pregnancy or breastfeeding can. It's not excluded. People have to be careful with driving. Teens shouldn't be using it and it just the way i look at it is that the reason can't have mrs so safe is it. It's safer than whatever else would be using. I mean think of what else would be using for insomnia ambien or you know some tricyclic or some other sedative. Benzodiazepine i mean. Of course cannabis is safer for those or what else will be using for pain. Certainly safer than opiates. And then you'll get non steroidal. I mean if they don't give you an ulcer heart attack they're gonna kill your kidneys. So many patients in the seventies kidneys are slowly dying. There's all preventable. If they've been using a little bit of cannabis tincture all along. They wouldn't be having reno insufficiency. So i just think that it's important that people keep cannabis in context and i don't like oh cannabis advocates Dismissively dismissive reflexively dismiss any and all harm about cannabis because it does have harms. But you've gotta keep it in context it. There's no free lunch with.

delta atc zbc obesity diabetes migraine Dr ulcer heart attack insomnia
"dr peters" Discussed on Reefer MEDness

Reefer MEDness

07:46 min | 6 months ago

"dr peters" Discussed on Reefer MEDness

"He doesn't want to get to our head of the science. But but and this is like fun with trevor but what you did capture. Your interview is the five the five points he makes. I want people to really pay attention those. What are the first things he said in his five points was that you can't hold pain medication from someone back again in the eighties when i was starting over a nurse doing para medicine and working on ambulance and discussing paramedics should have analgesics on ambulances or not. The big debate was if someone has pain. The human should not have to live with pain right. That was the big thing so doctors at the pain scale. I can remember being at this conference with our medical director and the owner of the ambulance. He was the ordering. The ambulance is about ten years on me so he would have been. I think in those days he was in his late forties. I would have been in my early late thirties. And he came up to the doctor after the after the presentation and said you know what their presentation said is that i have the right not to live with pain so i can remember from that point forward and again in practice. How the pain scale. How people were always given injections for pain. People weren't expected live with pain. So we and he saying here. Peter dr greenspan spoon is basically saying that people have the right to have medications. But should it be. Oprah should should be the first choice and i like how he says that chronicle therapy you might be able to augment it with cannabis and the results that he's had people with chronic pain cannabis can be used instead of. Opiates if if it's a chronic pain you don't maybe need all that. Opiates and what he's finding is if you do give people cannabis with zero bits. They're using less. Opiates now without getting too far ahead. You've also done another interview which we're going to talk about where that also comes up in the re- in the research that they're finding that actually not just clinical observations but actual clinical research is. The suggestion that cannabis cannabis can be used in conjunction with. Opiates so it's something that opioid sperry and the other thing since we're and he'll talk about it more but just it's worth mentioning his people you know doctors. What do they know about opioid addiction. So if you're one of those grins spoons again man. Because unfortunately it's very common in healthcare in general as we talked about much addictions in in the healthcare professions we raised. This is fairly common and dr grins. Boone is openly saying that was him to he literally has booked free refills. The doctor confronts his addiction. So dr gordon spoon no knows from firsthand experience about opioid addiction. And what it takes to treat it and then knows all sort of the medical stuff around as well so again could couldn't be a better guy to talk to a than the doctrines and again in the science here and the whole the whole science of the methadone program. What did you have discussed this before. And i don't remember who actually gave me the definition. It could have been a conversation. I had but i always always you know in the north. We have the methadone program. Methadone the the soapbox boxing program what people come. And i have to observe them and i give them. They have a lock box and go away with the lock box but i was. You know just transferring the addictions from the opium to this this minor. Opiate suboxone but again. What was what i was taught. Is that because people are able to get some relief with the suboxone. We can harm reduction. Put them on a on a milder. Opiates suboxone and keep them away from the opiates. That will kill them. What he's saying that he doesn't necessarily know yet how. Opiates how how cannabis can help there. But he is saying that there might be an opportunity for that. And i think there's the research coming i think that's number five on his list. How what let. How let grins booed do his thing. That we'll come back and shirt and we'll talk about that talk about this okay so without further ado dr peter. Grins spoon slightly disjointed interview. Dr it really good talk dr. Grins food usually. I start by asking people about you. Know how they got interested in cannabis. But i'm going to start a little further back. I'm gonna start with your dad lester. He was sort of a pioneer after not loving candidates. He sort of a pioneer in the cannabis world. Can you tell me a little bit about him. Yeah unfortunately he passed away about four months ago this summer. But he was a a giant in the cannabis field. He initially was anti cannabis as many psychiatrists war back then and unfortunately are today until he did. A deep dive into the literature Partially because he had a disagreement with a friend of his and partially because he was gonna write a book about it and when he did a deep dive into literature that the scale sort of fell from his eyes and he realized that most of the research was just dedicated to finding harms supported by the us government. in that. When you really look at it there wasn't much house of cards. Upon which the whole argument for making illegal for prohibition in that cannabis if you look at the big picture was had been used for thousands of years safely's medicine and Was relatively nontoxic and what really impressed him with. The the harms prohibition were so much more than the harms of actually using cannabis that he wrote his book. Nineteen thousand nine hundred. Seventy one marijuana reconsidered very well received. It was reviewed in the front page of the new york times book review when it came out very strongly in favor of legalization at that point in the united states support for legalisation Was about twelve percent. And i think in partly student my dad's steadfast advocacy for fifty years now. The support for legalization is about sixty seven percent so He literally has been involved for fifty years in legalization movement. And because of that. I've been involved in this issue my entire life. Thank you and that goes nicely into the mackey from high on homegrown and said i should really ask you about he About carl sagan. Being involved in teaching you to read is is that is that true. Yeah if you pick up a copy of my memoir free refills. A doctor confronts his addiction. 'cause i'm in recovery from opioid addiction. I talk a lot about growing up with carl sagan my living room in this perpetual cloud of marijuana smoke but it You know he and my dad were always having these and there's a picture my twitter profile of me sitting on carl. Sagan's lapin him teaching me to read. I always joke about. How is teaching him to read. But in actuality houston humidity but.

Peter dr greenspan dr grins dr gordon trevor dr peter sperry Oprah Boone boxing lester us government carl sagan new york times united states lapin Sagan carl
"dr peters" Discussed on Reefer MEDness

Reefer MEDness

07:42 min | 6 months ago

"dr peters" Discussed on Reefer MEDness

"Hey trevor. So good have have seen you in person in a little while you were. You're up north for a bit. Well actually you endorse can walking by my house a couple of about a week ago and dropped off those Gummy bears yes. Gummy stars in this case. But yes gummy stars yet. For those of you haven't seen our reefer bend dismiss. Gumy's it's on youtube channel and we made some guppies and they turned out really well good. I was removing snow from my sexy roof from our solar panels that we got from our early sponsor evolve green way back when people who listen to our early episodes where remember evolved green. I was cleaning up and snow. You guys walk by your handed me the gummy stars and i decided why not try one and so what did you about an hour about an hour. Later i was quite happy and ended up ended up cleaning. actually yeah. We had grandchildren over. So i played with my grandchildren a little bit. That was fun but what happened afterwards. After five days of being a grandparent. Reminding myself what it was like to have free preschoolers in the house. They left and then. I had a second gummy about a week. Later and basically cleaned up the whole house like we all the stuffy. Barriers went into the bags. All the toys went into the boxes. We dusted dusted and the roomba went around and cleaned and washed the floors and got our house back into order. Went for a walk. Came home and went. That was a nice afternoon so it was a thirty milligram afternoon. Four three or four hours of work. It's interesting because for me. I find it. I find an opportunity to do something whereas you find enough to find a pillow. Yes yes i am. I'm a. I'm going to take something with high. Thc to goddess thirty milligrams is too much for me. So i took about half an end of the evening thing. You know like you said it about an hour later. I'm ready for nap. So that works just fine for me. So yeah glad to these guys but but we have an actual episode okay. Well you're up north couple interviews in in with dr peter. Grins booed really enjoyed this one and he was recommended to us for mackey from high on homegrown which was kind of cool. Got us in touch so fantastic interview. Really intelligent man and we'll get into it and another one of these guys that has more candidates knowledge in his little finger than most people. You run into so just just real quick thing. So he's he's a harvard trained. Doc he is. He's a primary care so we look looks after people out in the out in the real world. he's an internist at massachusetts general hospital. And he's not just trained at harvard. He is now an instructor and harvard medical school. And it's not just him and he'd candidates is a big part of what he does. His dad was actually a psychiatrist. And professor psychiatry. Who thought candidates was evil until he started doing some research and found. It really wasn't and he wrote a seminal book. The dad lester grins boone. Wrote a seminal book called marijuana reconsidered in nineteen seventy one and that's still considered. A seminal book on why marijuana should be legalized. so there is a lot of a lot of cannabis. Knowledge in in doctrines. Boone dr goodson senior junior. Yeah well multigeneration all right. I love the fact that you know. Harvard trained harvard trained. And he's a cannabis physician and and what he was talking about about. How we use candida canada cannabis and his five his five points again. What we'll let him tell the story but some of just the real exciting stuff caso pre pharmacy. I was in physics. Thought that that's what i'm gonna do. And i've always been a bit of space nerd. There's pictures of peter. Grins spoons sitting on. Carl sagan's lap learning how to read. That just blew my mind. Blew my mind even more. Carl sagan was smoking pot with Lester grins boone. Peter is dead and having you know really deep conversations that Peter grins food interviewed talked about well. They always talk about A motivational syndrome. You know if people smoked pot. You know the the typical storeowner who doesn't do anything right right said no i saw and it wasn't just carl sagan lots of other harvard profs and other luminaries. Smart people were coming over visit lesser smoke a joint in the living room and have really deep discussions so these were not a motivational. This take triple eight personality. Who goes out and gets the stuff done. We're getting more stuff done arguably after joint. This this guy is offering multigenerational understanding cannabis. And i really liked that. That that component because again. I've often said that my experience with cannabis is over forty years of of being recreational user and learning. Now how to medicinal user of cannabis and medicating mindfully. But what he has said is he made some comments. You know through my experience some seventies eighties and nineties the propaganda that medical literature is thrown out at us. And i've always sat the back of the room going interesting. I i don't experience that. Like when i when i consume large quantities of cannabis or thirty milligrams. I don't think about going to sleep. I go look into. I looked gopher run back in the day when i used to run marathons. I'd go for a run. I'd have a hoot and go for a run. It's interesting now. there's lots of marathoners are talking about it. Back in ninety s. I would go for a run. I helped to help with my muscles. I didn't have any of the science at that time. It was just what i knew about cannabis and what it did for me. So it's interesting to listen to these guys. Harvard harvard trained. Dr saying things that that i kind of intuitively understood back in the day when i was ignorant the cannabis. What's the big deal. While another thing. I liked it will. We'll will let him talk but being harvard trained internist. I know i say this every once a while when we talked to internists but internists are the doctors doctors. Internists are the. If i don't see evidence skies and blue kind of guys and doctrine soon is still one of them. As much as he is pro cannabis. He doesn't wanna do anything without the evidence like he. He thinks anecdotally that. Getting people off of opioids with cannabis and he talks about the some. I don't want to give too much away. But he's not ready to say. Everybody should do that tomorrow. Because in his mind evidence is still much better for like the methadone and suboxone then then the canaveral. So he's still. He's still cautious not to get ahead of the sciences. What i'm trying to say is not. He's and he's not. He's not just a canvas. Good for everything you know. He's a good for a lot of things. But.

Gumy harvard carl sagan dr peter Boone dr goodson trevor Lester grins boone Peter grins harvard profs mackey massachusetts general hospital youtube harvard medical school boone Doc Harvard harvard peter canada
"dr peters" Discussed on Supporting Leaders

Supporting Leaders

05:26 min | 7 months ago

"dr peters" Discussed on Supporting Leaders

"Come along with us on the road to growth and learning. I'm your host dr lisa hartman in today's episode of supporting leaders. I have dr peter. Gabriel on the show and he spent about twenty years in corporate Life and he then transitioned into coaching and so he coaches a variety of leaders and a variety of different environments and he has so much knowledge to share with us. We talk about self awareness. We talk about emotional intelligence. i asked him about. What's the secret sauce for high functioning teams so much great advice in this episode. It is a must listen. So here's a little bit more about peter. Dr peter gabriel. He's passionate about people. He gets energy by helping leaders and executives grow and developed to be the best leaders. they can be. He's an expert in executive coaching leadership development and emotional intelligence with key leadership. Peter coaches c. suite executives emerging leaders and managers to develop self-awareness behaviors and skills to be more effective as leaders pry. Peter has extensive experience in the corporate environment prior to key leadership. He spent many years working with corporate clients at vanguard a global investment manager. Peter had responsibility for twelve teams with four to five employees associated with each team. He completed his doctorate of education and leadership at creighton. His dissertation focused on gender diversity and leadership was presented at the two thousand eighteen international leadership association global conference. He's an abject professor at robert morris where he teaches human resources to undergrad students. He was the twenty twenty president for the pittsburgh human resources association and the two thousand eighteen president for the pittsburgh chapter of the international coach federation. Peter leverages his professional and volunteer experience research areas in education with coaching clients. While this afternoon. I have dr peter. Gabriel with us and thank you so much for being on the show. I i don't think. And i have actually met in person but we both went through the same program through creighton. So i'm so excited to talk to you. And i'm so happy that you agree to be on the show today likewise and it's always good to see a solid blue jay so so good to see you. Yes yes so. Let's just dive in. I think your background is so interesting and fascinating and one of the roles that you serve in an executive coach so tell us a little bit more about what you do. What's an executive coach of to. I'm a professional certified coach through the international coach federation There's three levels to coaching in the sense of the certification process and some of the mid tier. I would say not. Master coach of that will be the next level. But i did attained professional certified coach level in. What i do is work with leaders. I think we all know. Or maybe we don't but did. Self-awareness is the foundation of leadership so i helped leaders develop their self awareness so that they can become better leaders So i worked with them. Asking powerful questions getting them to reflect in think about You know there's certain situations That they're working on. Wanted to come a better leader and getting them to reflect you can typically help develop that self awareness that can struck first coaching..

Peter peter four twelve teams pittsburgh both five employees about twenty years each team peter gabriel today this afternoon three levels dr lisa hartman peter. Gabriel first coaching twenty twenty resources association two thousand
"dr peters" Discussed on Supporting Leaders

Supporting Leaders

05:13 min | 7 months ago

"dr peters" Discussed on Supporting Leaders

"In today's episode of supporting leaders. I have dr peter. Gabriel on the show and he spent about twenty years in corporate Life and he then transitioned into coaching and so he coaches a variety of leaders and a variety of different environments and he has so much knowledge to share with us. We talk about self awareness. We talk about emotional intelligence. i asked him about. What's the secret sauce for high functioning teams so much great advice in this episode. It is a must listen. So here's a little bit more about peter. Dr peter gabriel. He's passionate about people. He gets energy by helping leaders and executives grow and developed to be the best leaders. they can be. He's an expert in executive coaching leadership development and emotional intelligence with key leadership. Peter coaches c. suite executives emerging leaders and managers to develop self-awareness behaviors and skills to be more effective as leaders pry. Peter has extensive experience in the corporate environment prior to key leadership. He spent many years working with corporate clients at vanguard a global investment manager. Peter had responsibility for twelve teams with four to five employees associated with each team..

Peter four peter peter gabriel twelve teams about twenty years today vanguard each team peter. Gabriel five employees
Who are we vaccinating now? Who should be next?

The Big Story

05:58 min | 7 months ago

Who are we vaccinating now? Who should be next?

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Dr. peter uni sits on the covid science advisory table and he co-authored a new report. That suggests that better. Way i mentioned. Hello peter why don't you start out for those of us who aren't familiar with it by explaining. What is the covid. Nineteen science advisory table. Who's on it. What role does it play. The science advisory table is grew ball scientists and Senior 'em health systems decision makers that advised the province ministry of health and elected decision-makers vera bar with forty five people meanwhile but we also have several subgroups for instance a subgroup of congregate settings on behavioral sciences etc. The me twice a week typically So we spend. It's the best part of Three hours together every week which helps associate to keep to develop a continued common sense of reality and we meet once a week with the health. Coordination table and half multiple meetings are more talk basis with various representatives of the different ministries Public health on -tario on that. And other stakeholder groups can you outline before we get into this new report. How ontario is currently approaching vaccine distribution. And did you guys advise the government on their initial plan. B didn't the initially advice on the vaccination rollout bouts galt relatively as strongly involved when discussing the importance of speed in vaccination of Long term care home residents and staff and which also goltz incorporate in the strategy of the province the current strategy is focusing on different woman apple groups as i implied already one of them. Of course the most important one is long term care home residents we had Roughly fifty percent of the deaths Covid nineteen deaths in the province long-term care home residents and they're glad to report back that that this really went extremely well and that we really now see the impact of Covid nineteen vaccines in this. Very vulnerable grew the challenges. We had which were big changes in the province actually have nearly completely been eliminated there at an ulta groups that are important including a frontline healthcare workers again this is important because they can't get continuously exposed but also because you need to make sure that the healthcare workers are actually able to work obviously and not part of an outbreak that could result in prolonged isolation and quarantine and then chester in a decrease in the workforce that we currently urgently need and the the current surge strategy also focuses on those who are aged eighteen boffin again. This makes perfect sense because that's the people who were most likely to die except for people in the long term care home see respective of their age so this all makes perfect sense where we are right now and that's why we're coming in actually with this new report so everything that we're doing already makes sense but isn't necessarily the optima way and this is what your new report gets sent. Iran this is correct. Yes so vault we now just. They're trying to address. Is the fact that that this pandemic all over. The world is socio economically driven very clearly. Life is unfair and this also halts for the impact of this pandemic. those people are most vulnerable live in precarious living situations. Get the chop stall on behalf of all of us you know. Make sure that we actually have act are able to buy you know foods on the shelves in the supermarkets. That's those people are most heavily burdened by this pandemic and what we know ways that the pandemic is heavily concentrated in terms of its burden on ten to twenty percent of the neighborhoods in the province and at this has been historically the case and assist case. Most of the time in life you with the past is the best predictor of the future. Even if we would not like this to be the case and what we know is also for in in terms of short-term or maidstone predictions that this continues to be the case host neighborhoods that were most heavily burdened in the past. They haven't reached an herd immunity yet. they're not sufficiently protect against against infections. And they will continue to have freely. High numbers of cases of hospitalizations viseu missions deaths. If you're not being careful and just look into how to protect these neighborhoods best and that's where it is. Report comes in. We try to describe the magnitude of the problem and try to outline solution. That actually looks into two different dimensions. Here one continues to be h really important about the second dimension and basically then just across tap these. Two dimensions against each other is neighborhood the residence.

Jordan Heath Rawlings Dr. Peter Uni Covid Science Advisory Table A Ministry Of Health And Elected Vera Bar Hello Peter Galt Ontario Apple Iran
FDA vaccine advisers recommend Johnson & Johnson's single-dose COVID-19 vaccine

The World and Everything In It

01:28 min | 7 months ago

FDA vaccine advisers recommend Johnson & Johnson's single-dose COVID-19 vaccine

"Truckloads of the johnson and johnson corona virus vaccine will soon roll out across the country that after the fda gave a thumbs up to what will be the third vaccine in emergency use in the united states. The fda is dr. Peter marks made the announcement saturday night guided by careful review of the science and data. We've determined that the vaccines known of potential benefits clearly outweigh its known and potential risks. Johnson and johnson expects to ship twenty million doses in the united states this month and a total of one hundred million by the end of june. The vaccine has two big advantages over the madeira. And pfizer vaccines now in use. It can be shipped and stored at refrigerator temperatures and it only requires one shot rather than to on the other hand studies have shown the other two vaccines to be slightly more effective overall. President biden. stop medical adviser. Dr anthony found she told. Abc's this week. This is a good vaccine. I think we need to pull away from this comparing and parsing numbers until you compare them head to head. Just be really grateful that we have three really efficacious vaccines. And the fda says the johnson and johnson vaccine offers strong protection against what matters. Most serious studies showed one dose was eighty five percent protective against the most severe covid nineteen illness and that protection remained strong. Even in countries like south africa were a worrisome. Variant of the virus is spreading

Johnson Corona Peter Marks FDA Johnson United States President Biden Dr Anthony Pfizer ABC South Africa
Vaccinations moving in the right direction despite winter storm, Biden says

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:40 sec | 7 months ago

Vaccinations moving in the right direction despite winter storm, Biden says

"The country is moving in the right direction. He issued a statement after the Food and Drug Administration granted emergency use authorization to Johnson and Johnson's Covad 19 vaccine. The FDA is Dr Peter Mark, says one key advantage of the J and J Vaccine. It could be kept in the refrigerator rather than a deep freezer. The ability for the Yanks and vaccine to be stored in the refrigerator as opposed to a freezer could be beneficial in certain circumstances. J and J Vaccine is also a single dose shot. The FDA clearance means it will be distributed beginning early this week, along with the Fizer and modern a two shot vaccines. And Myanmar

FDA Dr Peter Mark Johnson Yanks Myanmar
Biden Applauds Approval Of J&J Vaccine

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:40 sec | 7 months ago

Biden Applauds Approval Of J&J Vaccine

"Says the country is moving in the right direction. He issued a statement after the Food and Drug Administration granted emergency use authorization to Johnson and Johnson's Covad 19 vaccine. The FDA is Dr Peter Mark, says one key advantage of the J and J vaccine. It could be kept in refrigerator rather than a deep freezer. The ability for the Yanks and vaccine to be stored in the refrigerator. A supposed to a freezer could be beneficial In certain circumstances. Change. A vaccine is also a single dose shot. The FDA clearance means it will be distributed beginning early this week. Along with the Fizer and modern a two shot vaccines and

FDA Dr Peter Mark Johnson Yanks
The positivity rate for new COVID-19 cases remains below 6% in Miami-Dade

Todd Schnitt

00:24 sec | 7 months ago

The positivity rate for new COVID-19 cases remains below 6% in Miami-Dade

"South Florida mayor's commissioners and medical officials are not letting down their guards. But for the moment we are winning the fight against covert 19. Miami Dade chief medical officer Dr Peter Page says. The last two days the county's positivity rate was below 6% drop substantially over the past two weeks, which obviously is favorable are impatient. Positive, admitted Covert patients has actually dropped 20% in the

Miami Dade Dr Peter Page South Florida
"dr peters" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

CATS Roundtable

08:08 min | 7 months ago

"dr peters" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

"Imagine your home totally organized with the p touch home personal label maker practical and useful home organization templates and attractive durable labels make it fun easy to turn every room into personalized clutter free haven even the tiniest family members will benefit from an organized space. And yes the furriest family members to make the most of your time at home. Half fun and get organized with the p. town personal label maker only from brother for details. Visit p touch home by brother dot com. Good morning america. This is the cats roundtable chunk truncates here sunday morning. So many things happening in america. Well we this morning. Is our in house. Genius tells us about a medical issues he tells us about the virus. He says about energy problems tells us about. Electric cars is a good morning. Dr me hello. how are you this morning. good morning john. Good morning chats roundtable audience. Where do we begin today. Well today where. I wanted to talk about some reason. Information where dr fauci mentioned that the To vaccines that have been released may not give complete protection against the new variants that have been appearing the united kingdom and the brazilians area and the south africans area. So we've learned about vaccines may be less potent but they're not impotent and some protection is better than no protection and we learned that it is important to vaccinated because if enough people dead vaccinated the virus can spread and mutate as easily and vaccines are basically a dress rehearsal for a major virus attack preparing for the real thing some vaccine for example the measles mumps and rubella can give you a lifetime of protection. The flu vaccine is an annual event. The vaccine is a ten year with this vaccine. We really don't know how long it will protect us but what we do know is recent studies have shown that people who've gotten sick and develop their natural immunity they detected antibodies up to eight months after getting the infection. So that's very very important to know and the other interesting thing is that the mutated variants from brazil south africa. That you say they're very sneaky and they've mutated so that antibodies can't even recognize them so that's what's very peculiar about these new variants and has scientists concern how they will respond to the various antivirals readymade. Antibodies and the study done convalescent. Plasma we're human antibody didn't recognize the new variant so that they concern going forward as a as we deal with this a worldwide pandemic. Now who wanna vaccines have to be kept under super coke conditions or some of them have variable. Well then you Johnson and johnson vaccine which will be presented to the fda on next friday The twenty seven I Coming up this later. This week we'll find out more about that but it seems that that one can be in regular refrigeration other viruses needs to be a super cold environments so the transportation of these things is very important and They have to be kept in special freezing temperatures and after the thought out after be used immediately where the johnson and johnson can be in a regular refrigerator and can be used up to several days after vials. Open anything else in the virus front before we we approach what the heck is going on in texas. Yeah well. I think something very interesting is that the ready made antibodies by like really were given to nursing home patients and it was found that have protective them. Eighty percent from getting corona virus. So i think that if there are people out there eventually. If i was in charge i did emergency authorization to give those at risk when they aren't available Vaccinations give them a one. Hour of ready made. Antibodies like they did in that nursing home study which gave people eighty percents protection which is better than nothing and there may be some people are refusing vaccines and they may be candidate for the ready made infusions from regeneron and eli lilly and i would ask the government to do emergency authorization to be able to give readymade antibodies to patients who are at risk where there are no vaccines available and there are ready made antibodies available. Like you said. Something's better than nothing. And i know a couple of friends of ours. A mutual friends of ours who got covert testing got. The antibodies recovered quickly. Absolutely does like ben carson did and chris. Christie did so. I think that that's something to consider. Even as a protective and prophylactic measure in some cases where the vaccine isn't available in high risk individuals. Dr we also discussed the effects of electric cars on on human beings. We also discussed that. The effect of tana's like pine antenna. What have you say about. What's going on texas now. Why all right now. We're realizing that. The power grid really can't handle the electric car charging and electric trucks that We did transfer them would not even be able to deliver vaccines on time or deliver groceries the supermarket and fortunately right now fashioned oil and gas generators at keeping people alive hospitals nursing homes and refrigeration in the stores and supermarkets that are feeding people. The reality is solar just doesn't work and snowstorms and Unless even after snowstorm unless you clean off the panels You know the concern is whether i'd like to know whether the carbon footprint to build new grids to catch up with the demand for electric cars needs to be studied whether it's even feasible or whether it makes sense for its carbon footprint and also freezing weather guess what electric cars get up to one third less mileage in cold weather because the batteries don't work as well though there are Those kind of issues that people haven't really bought out well but the freezing weather you know. Cold has basically also affected the water supply or cleaning stations. though if we didn't have the guests Backup systems there. We'd really be in trouble and really that's part of our national security and You know turning completely green speed that they are talking about damage our economy and our national security in my opinion We have a minute left anything else you want to tell. The american people want to tell people that You know more research needs to be done. I bought a small meter that measures electromagnetic fields and out of curiosity. I put it inside an electric car. While it was charging in the meter went off the wall off the chart and when you turn on the wifi and bluetooth and electric car and you begin to engage the motors. These a portable devices show electro-magnetic fields those wild and out of control so i think more research needs to be done before large scale use of such technologies. You and you know we're learning. We need to learn a little bit more and do a little bit more studies before we Completely converts of that. 'cause the union body is much more susceptible to electro-magnetic radiation in my opinion from the studies. I've been reading and one might think i'm disturbed me. Hello thank you so much for calling in today and keeping. All of your is listeners Informed and whoever wants to reach attack for me hoses. Dr dr peter. At wabc radio dot com. Thank you so much. thank you very much on. Thank you laudi. This is the catch roundtable. Be right back..

Christie ben carson chris texas john south africans today brazil south africa Eighty percent laudi This week ten year next friday Johnson sunday morning wabc radio dot com johnson america this morning peter
WHO says coronavirus unlikely to have leaked from China lab

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

03:22 min | 8 months ago

WHO says coronavirus unlikely to have leaked from China lab

"Keane is retired four star general and the chairman of the Institute for the Study of War and a Fox News. Senior Strategic analyst. General King Great Have you back with us here at the large angry here? That's America, Sir. Big news this week. One of the big headlines. I'm not sure how much we can take from it is the World Health Organization announcing that we should no longer look seriously at the idea that the Corona virus originated in A Level four laboratory in Wuhan, China, that Wuhan Institute of our ology, they said. It's very unlikely it came from there, and in fact, we shouldn't research it anymore. The United States came out and said, Well, not so fast. The jury's still out. That's what the State Department said the White House, Additionally, saying they're looking forward to actually scrutinizing the data to come to a conclusion. What do you make of this? I think we have to have a pretty healthy dose of skepticism when it comes to anything dealing with The World Health Organization. It was not a completely dependent investigation that because the Chinese were getting graded on on the back on that entire team. Uh, you're right. And from what I understand most of what the team was looking, that was Chinese analysis of data, as opposed to the raw data itself. That remains to be seen. I have certainly haven't seen Seen the report. But given the lives that have come out of China for almost a year, given the fact that it is well over a year since the disease broke out of Wuhan City, and the Chinese have had denied anybody from taking a look at this issue. Certainly by now, they've got this story straight in the Davis Strait to support their conclusions. And it's likely took place transcript from from bat stolen animals to humans and that likely place was in the Wuhan market. They want to see her hurt anybody away from the fact that this could happen in the Chinese government laboratory. Uh, where possibly of experiments were taking place with that particular disease or similar diseases themselves for their own purposes, not the least of which is Uses a pie biological weapons. General Kane. Additionally, my concerns don't just aren't just about the Chinese members of this team. There's a member of the team called Dr Peter De Zack. He's a molecular biologist from Rutgers University is one of the lead guys here for this World Health Organization investigation and he's been responsible for directing American and British taxpayer funding. To that lab. Specifically, that's not that's not unknown thing. That is public knowledge. Should he even be a part of a team that's investigating? Ah place that he directed money to certainly absolutely not given that that particular conference Conflict of interest, which is alarming in it of itself, much less you know why he's on the inspection team? Yes, we know full well that the fusion Of what has taken place in the civilian and commercial sector and the military in China is very, very significant. It is priority one at any activity. What's the weather like this? Under the guise of trying to bend after prevent pandemics could possibly lead. To military capabilities is the issue. I really have the whether this guy's on the inspection team or not, but it does point to the bias that's likely inherent. On this inspection team will begin with sure.

Institute For The Study Of War World Health Organization Wuhan Institute Of Our Ology Wuhan Wuhan City Davis Strait Keane America China Fox News Chinese Government General Kane State Department Dr Peter De Zack White House Rutgers University
"dr peters" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

CATS Roundtable

04:02 min | 8 months ago

"dr peters" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

"And what the should do in the government should do studies on it. The legitimate studies is is it unhealthy for human being to drive in electric car. I think that's what he goes out. You know absolutely and that's one of the studies that are found. They're kinda scared. Me was that Burma towel nineteen ninety. Lifted chick embryos and they expose them to these types of magnetic fields that you'd see electric motors and batteries and then show that those chick embryos had developmental no maladies and then in two thousand and two to california department of health of all the states By study by leah towel. Put the stated that there's possibly more miscarriages upon exposure to sustained electromagnetic fields and there's concerns about infertility and the exposure the field. This is the bottom line is that we need to look at this. Further the world health organization has had letters for many scientists around the world asking them to please look at this more before we start converting large swath of cars electric. We need to know what effects has on our frail. You know human bodies sitting inside this box basically like a microwave wifi bluetooth. Ems and what is it doing long term so before we move forward. I think we really need to have transparency and has more research that This is this broadcast today. Sunday make sure. Wabc radio people have that forbes article and whatever article listen put it on our website so people want more information about the health factor of driving an electric car. Then let let them have access to their those. Those articles absolutely. I'm to supply them with the link to the united nation report on The electric cars and also the forbes article and You know they can read and basically The more i look into this more questions. I have so i think we just need transparency to keep the public safe and make sure that we know everything about it before we go ahead and sit under a giant electromagnetic deal with our families children's for our. I don't want to buy a. I won't buy a home underneath the alpine insana. No absolutely again. I don't have you know No proprietary interest in any of these things. But i just want people to be safe and also it's about national security and everybody talks about climate change. The united states is only a small part of it. We can do all the things and stopped using oil and damage our economy but the rest of the world is still using all these different things. And you know we're not the major polluters of the world and we need to also look at the big picture and our national security. Well i tell that to the people that all forty the paris climate program. And you know what i say to them. Why do we have to comply with it. The united states in today or tomorrow morning and the chinese don't have to comply to twenty thirty five. Who is chinese. Have five times the amount of population and they ought to be polluters. And why do we have to compete tomorrow morning. I mean it's sounds daunting me. But i want to thank you. Dr peter me hallows For coming on. And telling the american people the truth and anybody. That wants dr peter. It's pr peter at wabc.

tomorrow morning Sunday five times two thousand Wabc california today two nineteen ninety peter alpine chinese forty one of twenty thirty five paris states dr peter united states united nation
Biden ups vaccine goal to 1.5 million shots a day, says vaccine to be widely available by spring

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:58 min | 8 months ago

Biden ups vaccine goal to 1.5 million shots a day, says vaccine to be widely available by spring

"Big announcements about vaccine distributions from the biden administration. Dr peter hotels who specializes in molecular virology microbiology at baylor. College of medicine says that the newly increased goal of one and a half million vaccine shots per day. The old goal was a million shots a day. Now president biden's has a million and a half shots per days. The goal dr houghton says even that might be enough. He's now arguing in the pages on the op-ed pages of the washington. Post that to get closer to what we need. We need to three million doses a day. How possible is that. And why is that the right number to aim at star peter. Hotels is co director of the center for vaccine development at texas children's hospital. He's dina the national school. Tropical medicine at baylor dr hotels. It's a real honor to have you back with us tonight. Thank you for making time. Thanks rachel great to be here so these are big numbers. And it's hard to sometimes conceptualize what they mean. I know that we just got to the point as a country where we can do a million point one. Maybe one point two million shots day. Why do you say that that number the number we need to be aiming at is actually triple that we need to be up to three million a day. I first of all. I think it's really important not to diminish the the accomplishments of the biden administration. We've now got a national plan in place. We have a national vaccination strategy. We didn't have that before so In a matter of a week we've already got a national vaccine plan in place that's so absolutely important. So i give a lot of credit to the biden administration. I'm a little concerned. However that we're not picking up the pace fast enough. The reason i say that is our estimates. Indicate that in order to stop virus transmission remember. There's two things these vaccines do they keep you out of the hospital. In the icu. But if enough americans get vaccinated we could actually hold virus transmission potentially and we think that number is around three quarters of the us population of two hundred and forty million people. Most of the vaccines are two doses. So that's about half a billion immunizations that we have to take care of. And i want to do that by the beginning of the summer. Not the end of the suburb. Erase ahead of the virus variants. So the simple back of the envelope. Numbers are five hundred million over five months. That's a hundred million a month three million a day so we're only a striving for half of that and it's not good enough because we have the according to the centers for disease control now the uk variant may be the dominant variant in the united states by march or april the transmissions. Go way back even up way back up even though we're down by about twenty thirty percent now from where we are. That's only temporary. I think we're in the eye of the hurricane in those numbers are going to go back up. So i feel like even as ambitious as the plan is the biden plan is still not ambitious enough and we can have to vaccinate of half a billion people by the summer in order to prevent that terrible number of six hundred thousand. That's that's the bottom line. I want to save

Biden Administration Dr Peter Hotels College Of Medicine President Biden Dr Houghton Center For Vaccine Development Texas Children's Hospital Baylor Dr Hotels Baylor Dina Rachel Washington ICU United States Centers For Disease Control UK Biden
Electric Propulsion is Positively Electrifying

Innovation Now

01:08 min | 9 months ago

Electric Propulsion is Positively Electrifying

"Instead of fire. The exhaust produced by electric propulsion is glowing. Greenish blue trail reminiscent of science fiction. Movie but engineers like dr. peter peterson at nasa glenn. Research center are making electric propulsion a reality whereas electric propulsion as we carry our energy from basically from the solar arrays or light from the sun and we convert that energy from the sun until electricity. Then we put that electricity into a device that i is is a propellant accelerates it out to produce thrust an electric propulsion system iannes or positively charges inert gas propellants. Like zima. there isn't we use z. Non as you can imagine a promotion system is basically a person sitting on a spacecraft thrown. Baseball's the heavier the baseball throw the more progressive. You get be throw big softball or a bowling ball. you're gonna get more thrust. and z. Nine is the heaviest gas we can use for that advanced propulsion systems can run for years at a time enabling new missions that will make the future of space exploration positively electrifying

Peter Peterson Research Center Nasa Baseball Softball Bowling
"dr peters" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

CATS Roundtable

01:56 min | 9 months ago

"dr peters" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

"The tear film and then goes down into our tear duct into our sinuses. So even places where they're strict mass orders like california. There's no lot an increased number of cases. It's not just breathing. It in this thing probably also enters into the eye and as we discussed the new variants the be one one seven from the united kingdom and the south african strain are far more contagious because the virus mutates because it wants to live so i want to jump from human-to-human the more people that are vaccinated where it can survive then. That's what herd immunity. Does it basically stops in his tracks and it doesn't have any susceptible humans to jump to so that's why So i used a sunglasses or or those yellow glasses or Of some fake a blank classes when walking so they don't get into is recommended to. Yeah absolutely that's why. Oslo workers wear face shields and And goggles because in addition when the wind or it's carried in the air it at least that some type of barrier to be stopped on the front surface of the classes. And also i tell the audience not to wear masks that have one way about the painting. Thousands of the bike shop mass. Because if you have it every time you exhale your viewing the virus on people. So that's why. I recommend that people get real matthew better off with close mask with a valve that has an acceleration vow so we don't spread spread the virus not to meet. Hello thank you for the update. We'll talk to you during the week during me Cats at night hour on. Wabc radio at five o'clock. We'll talk to you again during the week. Thank you john. Thank you always getting the truth. Out to the people on the frontlines. Thank you and what audience wants to contact dr. dr peter at wabc radio dot com. Thank you again. And god bless america..

five o'clock john Wabc radio california dr. dr peter america wabc radio dot Thousands of the bike shop mas one one way south african Cats united kingdom com Oslo . seven
World Health Organization team arrives in Wuhan to investigate COVID-19's origins

Here & Now

05:32 min | 9 months ago

World Health Organization team arrives in Wuhan to investigate COVID-19's origins

"Today, China announced its first covert 19 death in eight months. That news comes the same day, a team from the World Health Organization arrived in Wuhan to investigate the origins of the pandemic. You may remember the first cases of the Corona virus were reported from that city in December, 2019 Cluster emerged at a wet market where wild animals are sold, along with meat produce and other items. I spoke earlier with Dr Peter Ben embark. He's a scientist on the team. He was on a cell phone from Singapore. Where he was in quarantine before heading to Wuhan, and I asked him what his team will try to accomplish there. Gold with this mission is to help improve our understanding off the origin of the virus. We all know that various trump out from its natural Environment, impact population and then way had the detection of the first cases in Wuhan. But in between, we don't know We don't know what happened and that's what we want to try to. Get rid of your hell important Is it to be there in person Rather than doing this research remotely. It's important to be there because being there enable 55 concepts with Chinese researchers and counterparts. It also enable us to visit different sites. Visiting the market would give us a good idea off the dynamic within that market. We have done that for months. Now we have the actual meeting and Over the Internet, but it doesn't replace a faithful face interactions, smaller groups and retried in larger groups. So it's it's important to have that physical dynamic in a face to face environment. So I hear you referring to the wet market where some of the early cases first appeared. You say you'll be visiting there. I mean, this was a place where the whole world Had its eye on this market when the outbreak first started a year ago. When you get there, what will you do? What questions? Will you try to answer the market on how includes since last year? However, the records off what in a mountain that markets do still exist and have a lot of value in terms off. Understanding identifying animals that were brought to that market understanding what goods were brought into that market where they went out afterwards dispose the wholesale market. Mind do so. It was also serving the number for the markets in the city. And understanding what people who are working there. Where did they come from? Do they have any travel history too particular places that could give us some clues where the Some of them could have got the disease from outside to the market. So it's it has still a lot of value. Even a year after you know, there have been questions about whether China would even let you And your team into the country. The government has been floating the idea that the outbreak started in a different country. Do you think that Beijing can be trusted to give you access to what you need to do Your job? Yes. I mean, we are in on the way to the wall Hard now, So we have had many meetings with Chinese experts. Over the past few months, so that is the same interest to participate on do support this different studies. But of course and understandably day and others also interested to ensure that or the other news and all the study also conducted If the initial data On and results of studies indicate that there is a value in in looking elsewhere. We would, of course, also do that. But as always in these type of investigations, we start where the press cases where detective that was shot had December 2019. And we go from there. Every photo with the science studies tell us and that approaches also been agreed and supported by by China s O explain that a little bit more if he could, or are you going in assuming that the pandemic Started in Wuhan. Or how will you be able to even confirm that and frankly, why does it matter? When will the first cases they fix it with detective people will have in December 19. It doesn't mean that these were the first cases and remember that the papal defected where only severe cases we did not know that time. There was a lot off my cases a lot off security cases. And trying to identify these will be extremely interesting as well. They may be the one holding the clue to this. We have the first cases originated from on about the city. A case is that the door so it's also important to try to find all the places and other cases and the one that we're detectives in December. Because it's not people the first cases where it's a good one, But the whole thing started one easily have started somewhere else. Never province few 100 kilometers away or even further away. It's a starting point for the work, but it's not the starting point. Mrs. Every defendant, Peter Benton, Barak is the World Health Organization scientist joining us on a cell phone in Singapore. I'm part of a team headed to Wuhan, China to investigate the origins of the cove in 19 pandemic, Dr Ben and borrow. Thanks for making time for us today. We appreciate it. Thank you very much.

Wuhan Dr Peter Ben China World Health Organization Singapore Beijing Mrs. Every Peter Benton Barak Dr Ben
Ohio researchers discover new strain of COVID-19

The Boxer Show

00:22 sec | 9 months ago

Ohio researchers discover new strain of COVID-19

"Before returning the blend of learning Researchers. Ido issues were extra Medical center have discovered two new strains of covert 19 in the state chief scientific officer Dr Peter Mueller said. One similar to a highly contagious variant discovered earlier in the UK said the second strange, unique to Central Ohio and different from other mutations seen another places in the U. S, like Colorado. Researchers say they don't have enough data yet Show off. The new

Ido Issues Were Extra Medical Dr Peter Mueller UK Ohio U. Colorado
Pfizer vaccine protects against new Covid variants, study suggests

Mark Blazor

00:47 sec | 9 months ago

Pfizer vaccine protects against new Covid variants, study suggests

"At the University of Texas safe Visors Corona virus vaccine works on the new and more highly contagious variant that has been found. The study looked at the blood of those who have received the vaccine, and it supports other experts and saying This vaccine should offer the same protection. Against the new variant states have been encouraged to open up large spaces for vaccination sites in order to pick up the pace of those vaccinations. Some of the big outdoor stadiums, creating venues where people know that they could just go and get vaccinated when we have to make it easier failure, Baylor Infectious Disease expert Dr Peter Hotez says. We need to make vaccinations Maura efficient around the nation. So far, A total of 17 million doses of the vaccine had been distributed in the U. S. But only around five million shots have been administered.

University Of Texas Baylor Infectious Disease Dr Peter Hotez Maura U.
Dallas County providers preparing to vaccinate groups at high-risk for COVID-19 complications

Eric Harley and Gary McNamara

00:28 sec | 9 months ago

Dallas County providers preparing to vaccinate groups at high-risk for COVID-19 complications

"The race is now on for vaccine providers in Dallas County to gear up and start vaccinating people who are at high risk for covert 19 complications. Dr. Peter Hotez of Vaccine expert It barely College of medicine in Houston says Operation Warp Speed has succeeded at getting the vaccines out. But passing the batons to states has not been so smooth. The last day of 2020 marked a busy day of vaccine inoculations. With city violent in and Tarrant County. Using the very last doses of their first

Dr. Peter Hotez College Of Medicine Dallas County Houston Tarrant County
"dr peters" Discussed on Your Brain at Work

Your Brain at Work

05:04 min | 11 months ago

"dr peters" Discussed on Your Brain at Work

"Neighborhood. Maybe even your family. But what about in your organization in within your team this widening chasm of right and left of what we think is right and wrong affects how we see understand and work with each other and often it leaves us looking across seemingly impassable barriers of suspicion and resentment so what can organizations and leaders do to stem this drift and bring people together. That's what we asked. Dr peter coleman a professor of psychology at columbia university who specializes in conflict and bridging deep divides. I'm gabriel bears and you're listening to your brain at work from the leadership institute. We continue to drive episodes from a weekly webinar series. The analyze been hosting every friday. This week our panel consists of analyze. Dr david rock dr camilla sip and professor coleman together. They discussed the history of polarization in america in the world. At large explore. The science of conflict in the brain and the outline the strategies organizations can employ to successfully bridge divides among their employees enjoy. Thanks.

Dr peter coleman dr camilla sip professor coleman Dr david rock professor of psychology leadership institute gabriel columbia university america
"dr peters" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"dr peters" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"We then spent some time. Talking about empathic atonement and the ways in which Peter or people who practice somatic experience and methods are able to really tune in to the people that they're working with drawing on really very subtle signs inside of the physical presentation of the body that allow them to make good choices inside of clinical space. Much of. This simply comes from practice but Peter also pointed to great mindfulness and observational techniques. That can be useful either in a clinical sudden or simply frankly in everyday life. When talking to France we went from there into a conversation focused on shame which Peter described as the eight hundred pound gorilla in the room. A lot of the time. People have a challenging time interacting with their trauma material. Because there's so much shame built up around it. We internalize our own oppression. We internalize that dismissive use of people around us and this could make it really hard to come to terms with the ways in which we truly were impacted by named of experiences and for me one of the most touching examples of this is looking at soldiers coming home from war experiencing. Ptsd you really can't describe a more tough minded valiant group of people than wartime veterans and even so these people are absolutely afflicted by the consequences of the experiences they suffered in those completely traumatic environments. So it's really not about how tough you are. It's not about keeping a stiff upper lip. Anyone can be affected by that. Shame and anyone can internalize those traumatic experiences and hold them in both the body and the mind. We closed with a brief conversation on what I described as little T. trauma versus big T. Trauma Big T. trauma being singular traumatic events or even a cycle of major traumatic events happening over a period of time. These are the things where if you describe them to somebody they would go. Oh yeah that was a big deal. These are some of the things that we think of as classically traumatic in nature and we contrasted them with little T. traumatic events. This has just the normal stress that occurs during everyday life either aloe static load building up over time things like being in a family with a slightly dismissive or void end or distant parent or things like being a minority ethnic child going to a majority ethnic school or negative experiences while at school with other kids that were processed into nature. These are everyday stresses but still significant ones that over time build up in the body and Peter shared a story that kind of subverted my framework that I offered a story of a person who had had a pretty normal event happened in their childhood pulling the tablecloth and causing dishes clatter to the floor and even though that was a pretty normal event that most people would not view as quote unquote traumatic nature. It had long term impacts on that individual's ability to relate to a certain kind of environment so even the little tease can in their own way. Be Big tease. If that cycle inside of the body is triggered before we close the show. I'd like to remind you one more time about our new patriot. Account you can go to patriots dot com slash being. Well podcast if you would like to support the show and receive a variety of benefits in return. If you've been enjoying the podcast we would really appreciate it. If you take moment to subscribe to it through the platform of your choice. Maybe you leave a rating positive review and also telephoned about it. If you can do that it really does help us out. It's one of the absolute best ways to support the podcast so until next time. Thanks for listening..

Peter France
"dr peters" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

08:41 min | 1 year ago

"dr peters" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Ooh and then just rest and notice. Any sensations feelings thoughts our inner images noticing them trying to needing to do anything but number just noticing them and then just notice what happens next next. So let's a exercise often do with a client at the beginning of it well at all different times often at the beginning of the session and I'll offered to do it with them but that's partly cheating there because I'm using that for myself as well. It's this whole idea when you shift something in the bottom up and things really can open up in our thought processes in our perceptions. That's a wonderful practice. Peter and just in response to that as a quick comment. I remember very distinctly. Being in my late teens early twenties I did not have any kind of acute traumatic experience in my childhood. That is of the kind that were talking of but you know I had a lot of accumulation of stress of various kinds and I remember the first couple of times that I started getting more in touch with by Interior and actually let it my body's for fully relax in a variety of different ways and often it would make me want to cry and I didn't really know why I wanted to cry just because I was relaxing my body but it really just shows the connection that you're speaking to between that for relaxing settling sensation and The body the God whatever it might be and the release of that emotional psycho emotional material with right you. Don't sometimes tears can be relief. You know you're letting go. Oh my Gosh I've been holding onto this often when I'm working with the person and on notice there is starting to moisten. I'll say something like if you could let your tears speak not you but let your tears speak. What might your tears want to say? And they would say something it could be. I'm so angry or I'm so sad or feel relief so it takes out of the head and that's why I give the guidance to let your tears speak and then that's a really beautiful practice for really for anyone as either thought experience or when talking with somebody so I want to close with a question that I've really been musing on a lot recently and I'm really curious about your take on it. We've mostly been talking about what I'll call capital t versions of trauma acute incidents that have that seizing effect on the body at trauma in wartime a physical abuse. Whatever it might be something that's been interesting me recently. Is this idea of lower case t versions of trauma not a single major incident but little things that accumulate over the course of alive whether it be kind of dismissive family environment trouble in school. The normal stresses that we go through and obviously big T. trauma is potent and horrible and very apparent in the space but sometimes the lower case t trauma you know. People don't really view it as problematic the same kind of way. I just have to wonder from your experience. What have you seen and working with those two different kinds of trauma and are there any differences there? It's interesting my doctoral. Dissertation in Berkeley Was Accumulated Stress Reserve capacity. And this dash es yes. These things can accumulate over time and when a person is in a situation as a child then even as an adult where. There's just this ongoing stress. Nothing really shows you call a T- a big trauma but it just the roads. A roads and accumulates and in a sense wears us down also is somewhat different. Something can happen. That you know just don't seem like that big thing for example. I am thinking one client that I work with and he would experience anxiety when he'd be invited out for dinner to a friend's house or even to arrest Iran but at the end. That was pretty. Didn't seem like an other anxieties but that was a clear trigger for him so we began to work on though it turns out went to an image a memory. Abbadi memory when he was about five years old. They would visiting a friend. Housewere Relatives House to the table was full of dishes and food. He's curious five year old and one of the corners from the from the table cost was hanging down. Of course he grabbed it and Poland and stuff came crashing down and they didn't scream at him but the startle and seeing their faces were they were startled. That just got locked in so again. Had the symptom which doesn't make any sense except if you know why it made sense again. Every time he would go into the restaurant into somebody's house that anxiety so he was back in like five year olds day. That's really fascinating just to opine for a second here. One of the things you really pointing to is the way in which we tend to dismiss or gloss over events in life that truly were impactful for us in a variety of different ways. That person may have never thought that that pulling the tablecloth moment was something that would have that kind of an impact on them long term. And if you're telling that story to somebody might seem like really a very small thing that you should have quote unquote just gotten over but if you're activating that fight or flight mechanism if the vagus nerve getting triggered if it's been held and clenched in the body in that fashion you know. It's kind of hard sometimes. Maybe for the body to tell the difference between that event and one that was more a truly life threatening and what really matters is whether that embodied experience is getting triggered whether it's by little tease or a big tease. Sometimes it's worth pointing out. We can also internalize the dismissal of other people toward our own negative experiences. How many times can person be told? Oh that really seemed like it. Wasn't that big of a deal or have somebody kind of laugh at off with them before they just start to think. Oh Yeah I should really think about that as being significant event in my life but as has been a theme throughout our conversation. It's the difference between top down and bottom up. You might top down and prevent like. Oh it's not that big a deal but bottom up. The body still might really be held in a in a cycle of closing and holden around at that event which is just a A really wonderful thing to point out something that's released reshaping in the moment. The way that I think about this kind of material so again Peter you know. Thank you so much for taking the time here. It was really wonderful having you with us today. Just lovely seeing the two of you really. So today. We had the pleasure of speaking with Dr Peter Levin. We began with Peter Story of waking the tiger and the experience that he had working closely with a client who has really gripped by the symptoms of trauma by using imagery that forced her body into release and movement. Peter really discovered a methodology for helping people move past the embodied symptoms of their traumatic experiences. A major feature of which is allowing the body to complete the response that was seized or held at the time that the trauma happened. The example that was given the story was a gas mask being put over somebody to knock them out in them struggling against the doctors that were holding them down. The body wasn't able to run away in that moment so by allowing it to complete that cycle of running that traumatic material can be released or lessened inside of.

Dr Peter Levin Peter Story Berkeley Iran Poland holden
"dr peters" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

09:09 min | 1 year ago

"dr peters" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"There was a line up the street and then around the corner and so I went to the people who own the house where I rented a little room as my office and I asked if I could bring people in and we had our first group session where we worked with some of these tools. How do you work with some difficult? Emotion or sensation occurs. Howdy reference it in your body. And how do you? When I called Penn Joey you move into just a little bit and then move out. Move into a just a little bit and then move out further so when a person has been fighting. Barra sensations for who knows sometimes their whole lives. It seems like it's going to be completely overwhelming. But if you help guide them just touching into those sensations Ananta coming back go internally little and then come back out in Oriente externally by those kinds of shifting somatic exercises semantic awareness exercises. The person then begins to move out of the trauma. They started to have new experience in their bodies and again. It's the new experiences that shift the person from trauma to awakening. Inflow has beautiful so peter on that I have two quick comments than a question so the first comment is that it has struck me when I very. I watched you work that you're the trauma whisper and what I mean by. That is that you speak the bodily language the non verbal language. And you're able to read it really really well and then help others understand it in parts of using Verte language. But you're really talking about a kind of language of trauma. That's very bodily expressive. It's a sensory motor language. And also you're very adept with syntax of that language its structure its sequencing its proper flow and I think that's also an opportunity for people in general both through getting formal training from you in your trainings in reading your books and also more generally do to kind of reflect on with the body is communicating with this intelligence but in non verbal ways exactly you know a roomy does the. Sufi poet said there is a language that doesn't use words listen observe. That's exactly right so then Annette in that kind of leads to my second comment your way. You just said there about listening. I WanNa make very explicit which hugh implied in somewhat said which is it's critically important to resource ourselves as we grapple with trauma including understandings or the skills of mindfulness. Let's say that allow us to pendulum. In or Penn Jillette in and then pendulum out really really important. Annals have resources of extra support such as therapists. Have People like you. So here's my question. Most of the people listening to this who have had either macro trauma you know. A single acute trauma or a lot of accumulation of micro traumas and in some case multiple macro traumas. Most of those people are not currently seeing a therapist and may well never see a therapist and yet there are certainly things they can do themselves that are within range and skillful and sufficiently resources themselves and so I went to see if you could speak to that a few takeaways for people in general civilians as it were for what they can do with themselves and in particular. I wonder if you want to speak to the topic of shame. Feelings of worthlessness damage. In so because that's such pervasive and unfortunate side effect as it were of being horribly mistreated. Yeah yeah shame. That's probably the eight hundred pound gorilla fits in the consulting room and it's something that really can kind of arrest the therapeutic process even with if not extreme trauma one of the things that I realized that I discovered is that in shame remember described Nancy running and then her heartbeat went to very low level. Well this way later learned to call. The Nepali Beta theory. That at a certain stage of development is around eighteen months to two years. The this is the first time the baby infant is now becoming a toddler and running all over the place and to pretend to be inflicting danger to itself and so the parent has to be able to say no and that stops whatever they're doing and it's feels harbor. It feels almost like death because it's a very similar physiology to what Nancy was exhibiting that escape and so again using the same basic principles of having to move the president move very very slowly into the shame posture moving very very subtly slowly increasing posture. Shane looking away looking down that collapsing the front of the body. But just a little teeny bit and then moving out of it very very slowly because again. It's the inner movement that's critic in night you can't. You can't just change your posture while change that feeling and this is someone. This is something a person could do themselves. Peter yes it is something but you know it's really was shame it's really important that there's somebody there the impact that gather. Who's just there who's present for you when you're doing that and often what happens when the person does this than they're able to really look at where the shame is coming from. I think it's really really critical to really understand what people can do by themselves. And also where there might be a limit. There are literally tens of millions of people who have symptoms like Nancy's so again people who have these conditions they have considerably higher level of trauma in their histories but also just having those kinds of symptoms can't itself extremely stressful and not being able to get a treatment or diagnosis. It'd be very stressful to people. But here's one exercise that people can do the idea here and we haven't really talked about the vagus nerve but the vagus nerve goes from the brain stem down in throughout the whole of the interior of the body. Vegas MEANS VAGABOND. Wanderer and particularly it goes to the organs of digestion. And what happens is when we see something horrible that a message goes down that nerve and by the way is the largest nerve in the body and it twists the gut step in the guts. Go but what was but his little known and the porges revivify this idea so we see something and we go Yak. That's a motor action. But then the sensory input sensory receptors in the guts send signals backed up eighty percent of that nerve backed up into the brain stem where it gets amplified and they get sent down again. So it's like start with some somebody being hit by a car you go in. That goes up to the brain stem amplifies in of God and again. That's how it gets stuck in the body. So I designed this little exercise within very particular sound vibrated down in those receptors in the gut. Singlet back up into the brain stem to say the threat is over. You can go now. So the idea is the taken easing photographs. And on the excavation making the sound blue as though it's coming from the belly and letting the breath in the sound go all the way and then just waiting for the new breast to come in on his sound filling ballet and then chest and then again who sound so demonstrated can anybody is of course. Welcome to join in. And you know if it feels intimidating or doesn't feel right for any reason than court don't do it or just listen to it often. That's enough to help the person shift a little bit out of a state of shutdown so we go easy breath easy program.

Nancy Peter Penn Joey Penn Jillette Barra Ananta Annette hugh Oriente Shane president Vegas
"dr peters" Discussed on Breaking the Underdog Curse

Breaking the Underdog Curse

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"dr peters" Discussed on Breaking the Underdog Curse

"Welcome to breaking the underdog curse for chiropractors. I'm your host, Dr dawn McDonald, author of the bestselling book the underdog curse, we give vita Listrik carb Rackers a chance to learn from the best around the world discovering how they overcame their challenges and achieve success in order for chiropractic to thrive in must have thriving chiropractors. Now, listen up it's time to crush the curse. Hello, everybody. And welcome to another episode of breaking the underdog curse this Dr. Dawn McDonald your host and today, I get to head out to Mississauga Ontario. And I get to interview Dr Peter ambler, who I've heard of for many many years, and I only just recently met him pry truth rears back at a wave at the wave. I think we kinda act ran into each other Dr Peter ambler, he graduated from Sam sec- in nineteen eighty five and he's been practicing Mississauga ever since and it will get into the rest of the story. But he's done tons of stuff. So he's been like on the college and regulatory he's been to D And speaking at D E, and he travels all around the world, and he helps inspires inspire chiropractors all over the place. Very fine Listrik, and I know his message is going to help a lot of us who are driving to work in our car listings, podcasts Guinness, jacked up the day. So welcome to the podcast Dr Peter thank fam-, Don. It's pleasure. That's great. So it's so funny because I've heard of you for so long, and then it was just great. To actually I think we just bumped into each other at the airport. I think it was the airport. Yeah. And I if I remember correctly, it was the airport, and then brandy had a sub in for somebody because somebody couldn't make the meeting. Yes. And and and so I heard her speak. She spoke before able even she she gave up fantastic caulk. And so that kind of inspired, man. And and then we got together after my talk and spent some time together and realize you got a woman common. Yeah. I still visual at all. Yeah. I know. And then there's the Osceola connections all the world. So this is the it's a tight knit community. And so it's nice to kind of connect out. And of course, brandies coming to speak at pure powerful here first weekend November. So this like Asoka moat probably the Wednesday right before that seminar, so fibber so people haven't richer, I know already sold out or close, but we haven't so people have time. And and we always do and it's a it's a beautiful event. And we're really excited a brand either. Because a we liked have female energy on the platform, if you believe in male female energy, I'm not sure that he do. That's another discussion. I believe in unconditional love, which doesn't know. Gender. But but we have a lot associates that come to the program. So we're really excited for brand. Ada not be able to stand up and share as CA as well. We need more CA still brand new stone. That's great. Well, I always like to start off. Now, you know at this point in your career. How long you've been practicing I so I graduated in nineteen eighty five and a week ago today. So what are we the twelve Koper fifth of nine hundred eighty five was the day hung out Michelle and open the doors might practice. I'm in the same office building servant for thirty three years and one week exactly when he will happy anniversary through three years when we thank you. Thank you. So how did this all start in the first place? How did how did Dr Peter get into chiropractic in the first place low? That's a great question. And I was I grew up in a small town in on tarot called Kitchener, and is in a all boys Catholic high school. And it was the end of grade eleven and I wasn't the most centered and focused individual you could say I'm gonna leave it at that. But I I, and I and I thought that I might. You know, wanna be a teacher and that would teach. Phys Ed and French because is good at French. And you know, I love sports. And so I have to be in the guide Sofit for various reasons at the end of end of the school year. And they were having a meeting about me. And anyway, I just happened to pick up a book, and it was this EMC course calendar, and I read the definition of chiropractic in something inside me said, this is what you're supposed to do with your life. And I remember it is if it was yesterday, and I said, okay. And in that moment, I decided I didn't know what chiropractic was nobody in my family hit ever been to a chiropractor. My sister was a nurse. We are a medical model family, and I was going to be a chiropractor. And and and the priests came out of the meeting, and I had a chat with them and committed the turn in new leaf and.

Dr Peter ambler Dr Peter Dr dawn McDonald brandy Mississauga Dr. Dawn McDonald Asoka Ontario Guinness Michelle Sofit EMC Sam sec Catholic high school D E Don thirty three years three years one week