35 Burst results for "Dr Peter"

U.S. Seeks to Pause J&J Shot After Rare Blood-Clot Cases

Glenn Beck

01:00 min | 3 weeks ago

U.S. Seeks to Pause J&J Shot After Rare Blood-Clot Cases

"Covert vaccine side effects. I'm Dave Anthony Fox news, and it's why Johnson and Johnson shot has been put on hold in the U. S to investigate six rare cases. Fox is Evan Brown has an update live, Yeah. Dave, One of the six people who developed blood clots following injection of Johnson and Johnson vaccine died. Another is in critical condition. Now. The CDC and the FDA insists that condition is caused by a number of factors and is rare. But doctors need to listen to patients who received the Johnson and Johnson vaccine who shows severe headache, abdominal pain, leg pain or shortness of breath, The veer They would want to seek medical attention. And if there are low platelets at that time, one needs to consider this entity the FDA is Dr Peter Marks. Treatment for these clots is difficult because heparin can't be used. However, the regulators say they expect this pause to last days while they review more data. Dave Ivan Johnson and Johnson's also know delaying the vaccine rollout in Europe. President Biden's going to

Johnson Dave Anthony Evan Brown Fox News U. FDA FOX CDC Dave Dr Peter Marks Abdominal Pain Headache Dave Ivan Johnson President Biden Europe
Who are we vaccinating now? Who should be next?

The Big Story

05:58 min | 2 months ago

Who are we vaccinating now? Who should be next?

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Dr. peter uni sits on the covid science advisory table and he co-authored a new report. That suggests that better. Way i mentioned. Hello peter why don't you start out for those of us who aren't familiar with it by explaining. What is the covid. Nineteen science advisory table. Who's on it. What role does it play. The science advisory table is grew ball scientists and Senior 'em health systems decision makers that advised the province ministry of health and elected decision-makers vera bar with forty five people meanwhile but we also have several subgroups for instance a subgroup of congregate settings on behavioral sciences etc. The me twice a week typically So we spend. It's the best part of Three hours together every week which helps associate to keep to develop a continued common sense of reality and we meet once a week with the health. Coordination table and half multiple meetings are more talk basis with various representatives of the different ministries Public health on -tario on that. And other stakeholder groups can you outline before we get into this new report. How ontario is currently approaching vaccine distribution. And did you guys advise the government on their initial plan. B didn't the initially advice on the vaccination rollout bouts galt relatively as strongly involved when discussing the importance of speed in vaccination of Long term care home residents and staff and which also goltz incorporate in the strategy of the province the current strategy is focusing on different woman apple groups as i implied already one of them. Of course the most important one is long term care home residents we had Roughly fifty percent of the deaths Covid nineteen deaths in the province long-term care home residents and they're glad to report back that that this really went extremely well and that we really now see the impact of Covid nineteen vaccines in this. Very vulnerable grew the challenges. We had which were big changes in the province actually have nearly completely been eliminated there at an ulta groups that are important including a frontline healthcare workers again this is important because they can't get continuously exposed but also because you need to make sure that the healthcare workers are actually able to work obviously and not part of an outbreak that could result in prolonged isolation and quarantine and then chester in a decrease in the workforce that we currently urgently need and the the current surge strategy also focuses on those who are aged eighteen boffin again. This makes perfect sense because that's the people who were most likely to die except for people in the long term care home see respective of their age so this all makes perfect sense where we are right now and that's why we're coming in actually with this new report so everything that we're doing already makes sense but isn't necessarily the optima way and this is what your new report gets sent. Iran this is correct. Yes so vault we now just. They're trying to address. Is the fact that that this pandemic all over. The world is socio economically driven very clearly. Life is unfair and this also halts for the impact of this pandemic. those people are most vulnerable live in precarious living situations. Get the chop stall on behalf of all of us you know. Make sure that we actually have act are able to buy you know foods on the shelves in the supermarkets. That's those people are most heavily burdened by this pandemic and what we know ways that the pandemic is heavily concentrated in terms of its burden on ten to twenty percent of the neighborhoods in the province and at this has been historically the case and assist case. Most of the time in life you with the past is the best predictor of the future. Even if we would not like this to be the case and what we know is also for in in terms of short-term or maidstone predictions that this continues to be the case host neighborhoods that were most heavily burdened in the past. They haven't reached an herd immunity yet. they're not sufficiently protect against against infections. And they will continue to have freely. High numbers of cases of hospitalizations viseu missions deaths. If you're not being careful and just look into how to protect these neighborhoods best and that's where it is. Report comes in. We try to describe the magnitude of the problem and try to outline solution. That actually looks into two different dimensions. Here one continues to be h really important about the second dimension and basically then just across tap these. Two dimensions against each other is neighborhood the residence.

Jordan Heath Rawlings Dr. Peter Uni Covid Science Advisory Table A Ministry Of Health And Elected Vera Bar Hello Peter Galt Ontario Apple Iran
FDA vaccine advisers recommend Johnson & Johnson's single-dose COVID-19 vaccine

The World and Everything In It

01:28 min | 2 months ago

FDA vaccine advisers recommend Johnson & Johnson's single-dose COVID-19 vaccine

"Truckloads of the johnson and johnson corona virus vaccine will soon roll out across the country that after the fda gave a thumbs up to what will be the third vaccine in emergency use in the united states. The fda is dr. Peter marks made the announcement saturday night guided by careful review of the science and data. We've determined that the vaccines known of potential benefits clearly outweigh its known and potential risks. Johnson and johnson expects to ship twenty million doses in the united states this month and a total of one hundred million by the end of june. The vaccine has two big advantages over the madeira. And pfizer vaccines now in use. It can be shipped and stored at refrigerator temperatures and it only requires one shot rather than to on the other hand studies have shown the other two vaccines to be slightly more effective overall. President biden. stop medical adviser. Dr anthony found she told. Abc's this week. This is a good vaccine. I think we need to pull away from this comparing and parsing numbers until you compare them head to head. Just be really grateful that we have three really efficacious vaccines. And the fda says the johnson and johnson vaccine offers strong protection against what matters. Most serious studies showed one dose was eighty five percent protective against the most severe covid nineteen illness and that protection remained strong. Even in countries like south africa were a worrisome. Variant of the virus is spreading

Johnson Corona Peter Marks FDA Johnson United States President Biden Dr Anthony Pfizer ABC South Africa
Vaccinations moving in the right direction despite winter storm, Biden says

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Vaccinations moving in the right direction despite winter storm, Biden says

"The country is moving in the right direction. He issued a statement after the Food and Drug Administration granted emergency use authorization to Johnson and Johnson's Covad 19 vaccine. The FDA is Dr Peter Mark, says one key advantage of the J and J Vaccine. It could be kept in the refrigerator rather than a deep freezer. The ability for the Yanks and vaccine to be stored in the refrigerator as opposed to a freezer could be beneficial in certain circumstances. J and J Vaccine is also a single dose shot. The FDA clearance means it will be distributed beginning early this week, along with the Fizer and modern a two shot vaccines. And Myanmar

FDA Dr Peter Mark Johnson Yanks Myanmar
Biden Applauds Approval Of J&J Vaccine

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Biden Applauds Approval Of J&J Vaccine

"Says the country is moving in the right direction. He issued a statement after the Food and Drug Administration granted emergency use authorization to Johnson and Johnson's Covad 19 vaccine. The FDA is Dr Peter Mark, says one key advantage of the J and J vaccine. It could be kept in refrigerator rather than a deep freezer. The ability for the Yanks and vaccine to be stored in the refrigerator. A supposed to a freezer could be beneficial In certain circumstances. Change. A vaccine is also a single dose shot. The FDA clearance means it will be distributed beginning early this week. Along with the Fizer and modern a two shot vaccines and

FDA Dr Peter Mark Johnson Yanks
The positivity rate for new COVID-19 cases remains below 6% in Miami-Dade

Todd Schnitt

00:24 sec | 2 months ago

The positivity rate for new COVID-19 cases remains below 6% in Miami-Dade

"South Florida mayor's commissioners and medical officials are not letting down their guards. But for the moment we are winning the fight against covert 19. Miami Dade chief medical officer Dr Peter Page says. The last two days the county's positivity rate was below 6% drop substantially over the past two weeks, which obviously is favorable are impatient. Positive, admitted Covert patients has actually dropped 20% in the

Miami Dade Dr Peter Page South Florida
"dr peter" Discussed on Bad Science

Bad Science

02:17 min | 2 months ago

"dr peter" Discussed on Bad Science

"Welcome to bed. Science the show that breaks down the signs of a movie with a comedian and scientist today. We're discussing sound of metal saul ask about cochlear implants tonight as and much much more but i assure word from our sponsor did the movie. Get it right. Will we have to fight everyone. I'm your host either edinburgh. And i've got two wonderful guests joining me today. I up. He is the professor of audiology at cal state. La dr peter ivory icing. It's great to be back here on bad science with you. yeah absolutely. it's great to have you. We spoke a bit ago about a quiet place. And ironically that's the big takeaway from this movie. I felt was to find your own quiet place. Character named joe says that still nisus god's kingdom so do you agree with that and do you have a quiet place of your own quiet. Certainly is something that can be sought after for solace as we saw ruben. Doing this particular movie and sometimes too much quiet is not a good thing either k. I like that. That seems like a good teaser. For later i wanna know what that's about but secondly i have to introduce our other wonderful guest. He's in award winning filmmaker. He's a drummer in the band. Lord loud and the brother of our fantastic producer. Emily feld it's michael feld. Hello has it going. Great michael great to talk to you. I'm like shocked that we've never met somehow and yet from my research here. It seems we have a lot in common. Most notably we both love limb biscuit yes I wish that was something you hadn't said but i'll go ahead and owner right now I don't know if i would say that. I love limp biscuit as much as limp as it has been like a very big important part of my life which is kind of is kinda worse and in a couple of ways right. Yeah i honestly. I think i would say the same yeah. I don't currently listen to limp biscuit or have not bro wile but they did make up a good chunk of my upbringing. Say but but you cranked it up a notch. You traveled to russia to see them play. And you made a documentary about it. I did correct. It is yes. So what i did was a couple years ago I got it in my head. Somehow that i needed.

Emily feld michael feld michael russia tonight joe two wonderful guests today edinburgh both couple years ago dr peter secondly cal Lord loud ruben state
WHO says coronavirus unlikely to have leaked from China lab

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

03:22 min | 2 months ago

WHO says coronavirus unlikely to have leaked from China lab

"Keane is retired four star general and the chairman of the Institute for the Study of War and a Fox News. Senior Strategic analyst. General King Great Have you back with us here at the large angry here? That's America, Sir. Big news this week. One of the big headlines. I'm not sure how much we can take from it is the World Health Organization announcing that we should no longer look seriously at the idea that the Corona virus originated in A Level four laboratory in Wuhan, China, that Wuhan Institute of our ology, they said. It's very unlikely it came from there, and in fact, we shouldn't research it anymore. The United States came out and said, Well, not so fast. The jury's still out. That's what the State Department said the White House, Additionally, saying they're looking forward to actually scrutinizing the data to come to a conclusion. What do you make of this? I think we have to have a pretty healthy dose of skepticism when it comes to anything dealing with The World Health Organization. It was not a completely dependent investigation that because the Chinese were getting graded on on the back on that entire team. Uh, you're right. And from what I understand most of what the team was looking, that was Chinese analysis of data, as opposed to the raw data itself. That remains to be seen. I have certainly haven't seen Seen the report. But given the lives that have come out of China for almost a year, given the fact that it is well over a year since the disease broke out of Wuhan City, and the Chinese have had denied anybody from taking a look at this issue. Certainly by now, they've got this story straight in the Davis Strait to support their conclusions. And it's likely took place transcript from from bat stolen animals to humans and that likely place was in the Wuhan market. They want to see her hurt anybody away from the fact that this could happen in the Chinese government laboratory. Uh, where possibly of experiments were taking place with that particular disease or similar diseases themselves for their own purposes, not the least of which is Uses a pie biological weapons. General Kane. Additionally, my concerns don't just aren't just about the Chinese members of this team. There's a member of the team called Dr Peter De Zack. He's a molecular biologist from Rutgers University is one of the lead guys here for this World Health Organization investigation and he's been responsible for directing American and British taxpayer funding. To that lab. Specifically, that's not that's not unknown thing. That is public knowledge. Should he even be a part of a team that's investigating? Ah place that he directed money to certainly absolutely not given that that particular conference Conflict of interest, which is alarming in it of itself, much less you know why he's on the inspection team? Yes, we know full well that the fusion Of what has taken place in the civilian and commercial sector and the military in China is very, very significant. It is priority one at any activity. What's the weather like this? Under the guise of trying to bend after prevent pandemics could possibly lead. To military capabilities is the issue. I really have the whether this guy's on the inspection team or not, but it does point to the bias that's likely inherent. On this inspection team will begin with sure.

Institute For The Study Of War World Health Organization Wuhan Institute Of Our Ology Wuhan Wuhan City Davis Strait Keane America China Fox News Chinese Government General Kane State Department Dr Peter De Zack White House Rutgers University
Biden ups vaccine goal to 1.5 million shots a day, says vaccine to be widely available by spring

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:58 min | 3 months ago

Biden ups vaccine goal to 1.5 million shots a day, says vaccine to be widely available by spring

"Big announcements about vaccine distributions from the biden administration. Dr peter hotels who specializes in molecular virology microbiology at baylor. College of medicine says that the newly increased goal of one and a half million vaccine shots per day. The old goal was a million shots a day. Now president biden's has a million and a half shots per days. The goal dr houghton says even that might be enough. He's now arguing in the pages on the op-ed pages of the washington. Post that to get closer to what we need. We need to three million doses a day. How possible is that. And why is that the right number to aim at star peter. Hotels is co director of the center for vaccine development at texas children's hospital. He's dina the national school. Tropical medicine at baylor dr hotels. It's a real honor to have you back with us tonight. Thank you for making time. Thanks rachel great to be here so these are big numbers. And it's hard to sometimes conceptualize what they mean. I know that we just got to the point as a country where we can do a million point one. Maybe one point two million shots day. Why do you say that that number the number we need to be aiming at is actually triple that we need to be up to three million a day. I first of all. I think it's really important not to diminish the the accomplishments of the biden administration. We've now got a national plan in place. We have a national vaccination strategy. We didn't have that before so In a matter of a week we've already got a national vaccine plan in place that's so absolutely important. So i give a lot of credit to the biden administration. I'm a little concerned. However that we're not picking up the pace fast enough. The reason i say that is our estimates. Indicate that in order to stop virus transmission remember. There's two things these vaccines do they keep you out of the hospital. In the icu. But if enough americans get vaccinated we could actually hold virus transmission potentially and we think that number is around three quarters of the us population of two hundred and forty million people. Most of the vaccines are two doses. So that's about half a billion immunizations that we have to take care of. And i want to do that by the beginning of the summer. Not the end of the suburb. Erase ahead of the virus variants. So the simple back of the envelope. Numbers are five hundred million over five months. That's a hundred million a month three million a day so we're only a striving for half of that and it's not good enough because we have the according to the centers for disease control now the uk variant may be the dominant variant in the united states by march or april the transmissions. Go way back even up way back up even though we're down by about twenty thirty percent now from where we are. That's only temporary. I think we're in the eye of the hurricane in those numbers are going to go back up. So i feel like even as ambitious as the plan is the biden plan is still not ambitious enough and we can have to vaccinate of half a billion people by the summer in order to prevent that terrible number of six hundred thousand. That's that's the bottom line. I want to save

Biden Administration Dr Peter Hotels College Of Medicine President Biden Dr Houghton Center For Vaccine Development Texas Children's Hospital Baylor Dr Hotels Baylor Dina Rachel Washington ICU United States Centers For Disease Control UK Biden
Electric Propulsion is Positively Electrifying

Innovation Now

01:08 min | 3 months ago

Electric Propulsion is Positively Electrifying

"Instead of fire. The exhaust produced by electric propulsion is glowing. Greenish blue trail reminiscent of science fiction. Movie but engineers like dr. peter peterson at nasa glenn. Research center are making electric propulsion a reality whereas electric propulsion as we carry our energy from basically from the solar arrays or light from the sun and we convert that energy from the sun until electricity. Then we put that electricity into a device that i is is a propellant accelerates it out to produce thrust an electric propulsion system iannes or positively charges inert gas propellants. Like zima. there isn't we use z. Non as you can imagine a promotion system is basically a person sitting on a spacecraft thrown. Baseball's the heavier the baseball throw the more progressive. You get be throw big softball or a bowling ball. you're gonna get more thrust. and z. Nine is the heaviest gas we can use for that advanced propulsion systems can run for years at a time enabling new missions that will make the future of space exploration positively electrifying

Peter Peterson Research Center Nasa Baseball Softball Bowling
World Health Organization team arrives in Wuhan to investigate COVID-19's origins

Here & Now

05:32 min | 3 months ago

World Health Organization team arrives in Wuhan to investigate COVID-19's origins

"Today, China announced its first covert 19 death in eight months. That news comes the same day, a team from the World Health Organization arrived in Wuhan to investigate the origins of the pandemic. You may remember the first cases of the Corona virus were reported from that city in December, 2019 Cluster emerged at a wet market where wild animals are sold, along with meat produce and other items. I spoke earlier with Dr Peter Ben embark. He's a scientist on the team. He was on a cell phone from Singapore. Where he was in quarantine before heading to Wuhan, and I asked him what his team will try to accomplish there. Gold with this mission is to help improve our understanding off the origin of the virus. We all know that various trump out from its natural Environment, impact population and then way had the detection of the first cases in Wuhan. But in between, we don't know We don't know what happened and that's what we want to try to. Get rid of your hell important Is it to be there in person Rather than doing this research remotely. It's important to be there because being there enable 55 concepts with Chinese researchers and counterparts. It also enable us to visit different sites. Visiting the market would give us a good idea off the dynamic within that market. We have done that for months. Now we have the actual meeting and Over the Internet, but it doesn't replace a faithful face interactions, smaller groups and retried in larger groups. So it's it's important to have that physical dynamic in a face to face environment. So I hear you referring to the wet market where some of the early cases first appeared. You say you'll be visiting there. I mean, this was a place where the whole world Had its eye on this market when the outbreak first started a year ago. When you get there, what will you do? What questions? Will you try to answer the market on how includes since last year? However, the records off what in a mountain that markets do still exist and have a lot of value in terms off. Understanding identifying animals that were brought to that market understanding what goods were brought into that market where they went out afterwards dispose the wholesale market. Mind do so. It was also serving the number for the markets in the city. And understanding what people who are working there. Where did they come from? Do they have any travel history too particular places that could give us some clues where the Some of them could have got the disease from outside to the market. So it's it has still a lot of value. Even a year after you know, there have been questions about whether China would even let you And your team into the country. The government has been floating the idea that the outbreak started in a different country. Do you think that Beijing can be trusted to give you access to what you need to do Your job? Yes. I mean, we are in on the way to the wall Hard now, So we have had many meetings with Chinese experts. Over the past few months, so that is the same interest to participate on do support this different studies. But of course and understandably day and others also interested to ensure that or the other news and all the study also conducted If the initial data On and results of studies indicate that there is a value in in looking elsewhere. We would, of course, also do that. But as always in these type of investigations, we start where the press cases where detective that was shot had December 2019. And we go from there. Every photo with the science studies tell us and that approaches also been agreed and supported by by China s O explain that a little bit more if he could, or are you going in assuming that the pandemic Started in Wuhan. Or how will you be able to even confirm that and frankly, why does it matter? When will the first cases they fix it with detective people will have in December 19. It doesn't mean that these were the first cases and remember that the papal defected where only severe cases we did not know that time. There was a lot off my cases a lot off security cases. And trying to identify these will be extremely interesting as well. They may be the one holding the clue to this. We have the first cases originated from on about the city. A case is that the door so it's also important to try to find all the places and other cases and the one that we're detectives in December. Because it's not people the first cases where it's a good one, But the whole thing started one easily have started somewhere else. Never province few 100 kilometers away or even further away. It's a starting point for the work, but it's not the starting point. Mrs. Every defendant, Peter Benton, Barak is the World Health Organization scientist joining us on a cell phone in Singapore. I'm part of a team headed to Wuhan, China to investigate the origins of the cove in 19 pandemic, Dr Ben and borrow. Thanks for making time for us today. We appreciate it. Thank you very much.

Wuhan Dr Peter Ben China World Health Organization Singapore Beijing Mrs. Every Peter Benton Barak Dr Ben
Ohio researchers discover new strain of COVID-19

The Boxer Show

00:22 sec | 3 months ago

Ohio researchers discover new strain of COVID-19

"Before returning the blend of learning Researchers. Ido issues were extra Medical center have discovered two new strains of covert 19 in the state chief scientific officer Dr Peter Mueller said. One similar to a highly contagious variant discovered earlier in the UK said the second strange, unique to Central Ohio and different from other mutations seen another places in the U. S, like Colorado. Researchers say they don't have enough data yet Show off. The new

Ido Issues Were Extra Medical Dr Peter Mueller UK Ohio U. Colorado
Pfizer vaccine protects against new Covid variants, study suggests

Mark Blazor

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

Pfizer vaccine protects against new Covid variants, study suggests

"At the University of Texas safe Visors Corona virus vaccine works on the new and more highly contagious variant that has been found. The study looked at the blood of those who have received the vaccine, and it supports other experts and saying This vaccine should offer the same protection. Against the new variant states have been encouraged to open up large spaces for vaccination sites in order to pick up the pace of those vaccinations. Some of the big outdoor stadiums, creating venues where people know that they could just go and get vaccinated when we have to make it easier failure, Baylor Infectious Disease expert Dr Peter Hotez says. We need to make vaccinations Maura efficient around the nation. So far, A total of 17 million doses of the vaccine had been distributed in the U. S. But only around five million shots have been administered.

University Of Texas Baylor Infectious Disease Dr Peter Hotez Maura U.
Dallas County providers preparing to vaccinate high-risk group

Eric Harley and Gary McNamara

00:45 sec | 4 months ago

Dallas County providers preparing to vaccinate high-risk group

"The race is now on for vaccine providers in Dallas County to gear up and start vaccinating people who are at high risk for covert 19 complications. Dr. Peter Hotez of Vaccine expert It barely College of medicine in Houston says Operation Warp Speed has succeeded at getting the vaccines out. But passing the batons to states has not been so smooth. The last day of 2020 marked a busy day of vaccine inoculations. With city violent in and Tarrant County. Using the very last doses of their first shipments, North Texas is seeing a huge surge of covert 19 hospitalizations. Steve Love, president and CEO of the D FW Hospital Council, says one out of every four patients in the hospital says Cove in 19 Love says near future

Dr. Peter Hotez College Of Medicine Dallas County Houston Tarrant County Steve Love North Texas D Fw Hospital Council
Dallas County providers preparing to vaccinate groups at high-risk for COVID-19 complications

Eric Harley and Gary McNamara

00:28 sec | 4 months ago

Dallas County providers preparing to vaccinate groups at high-risk for COVID-19 complications

"The race is now on for vaccine providers in Dallas County to gear up and start vaccinating people who are at high risk for covert 19 complications. Dr. Peter Hotez of Vaccine expert It barely College of medicine in Houston says Operation Warp Speed has succeeded at getting the vaccines out. But passing the batons to states has not been so smooth. The last day of 2020 marked a busy day of vaccine inoculations. With city violent in and Tarrant County. Using the very last doses of their first

Dr. Peter Hotez College Of Medicine Dallas County Houston Tarrant County
College Esports Takeover - Harvard Med Publishes Article on Health Impacts of Gaming

Esports Minute

02:16 min | 4 months ago

College Esports Takeover - Harvard Med Publishes Article on Health Impacts of Gaming

"Published by dr. Peter grinspoon. The article is titled the health effects of too much gaming and I'll link the article below before get into the article and my critique of it. I believe a key part of that title. I want to reiterate is too much gaming has plenty of cognitive benefits as we've discussed in the segment for the last two months, but doing anything all the time, especially sedentary activity like gaming is going to cause some health issues the article first mentions some of the studies and the benefits of gaming before diving into the potentially harmful downsides. The first downside is repetitive stress injuries particularly in the hands and wrists carpal tunnel is usually to go to example of this it's a potentially serious condition, but most Gamers know to do hand stretches while they play these days and that really is important every Thursday. Answer so it's been a few minutes doing some hand stretches and you'll generally be fine here. Just listen to your body. If your hand sort then stretch it it could cause issues but with a little bit of proper care, it probably won't them to mention obesity in the article. And this is where I have a critique as we covered last week Studies have actually found the competitive gamers are healthier than the general public but most Gamers aren't top-level Esports players and that's what that study was looking at home still this author cites a study from the journal of clinical nutrition and that study states that male adolescents Associated video game session with a higher rate of food consumption. But if you're wondering why I haven't covered that study it's because it was published in 2011 and the total testing group was just 22 people. I think it's fair to say the gaming has changed quite a bit since 2011 and that a study of twenty two people is not enough to back up this paragraph that Associates gaming with obesity and that's what the authors claiming here. He says straight out that obesity in teens is tied to video games dead. And that claim is certainly Up For Debate multiple studies found that the link does not exist until adulthood and even then it's pretty marginal a link a competing study below which disagrees with Vinings the author finishes up by mentioning that moderation is the key here, which I of course agree with but I think in this case, even though this was published by the Harvard Medical School a doctor had a conclusion in my mind and search for the studies to back it up. Now Harvard is of course a very prestigious school, but that does not necessarily mean that the author is completely without Folly here.

Peter Grinspoon Journal Of Clinical Nutrition Obesity Associates Gaming Vinings Harvard Medical School Harvard
"dr peter" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

07:50 min | 4 months ago

"dr peter" Discussed on Probably Science

"By the way i i was wrong. We've only brian on the show once but we have had him on the show. It's time to get him back on. And so you see what i did there. You see my reversal. Which normally you congratulate someone for being in a relationship in that way. So one of my reversals. When someone tells me that divorced. I say congratulations but i. Yeah so this is something that That is i think you. I would call it a passion project but his quickly consumed much of my life. So i'm on leave right now from being a professor so a lot of my daily professor royal duties have been put aside and i launched a kind of soft launch in december of two thousand nineteen. But it really got rolling in early. Twenty twenty is this podcast called solo. The single person's guide to a remarkable life and in short it's a it's designed to celebrate single living to de stigmatize. Our time on this planet is single. People and to provide an alternative narrative than the one that we see around thanksgiving the thanksgiving day table or that we see and hear in in the media and i have been pleasantly surprised. I have to admit i launched it with some hesitation. Because it's not. It's sort of taking my backstage. World has a bachelor. I've never been married and never have kids and bringing it to my friend stage world and to talk about these things in a in a sort of genuine as you said. I like this word. Andy unapologetic wag. And i've just been of all the projects i've ever done in my life. It's the one that receives the most unsolicited. Thanks encouragement. that is there's a bunch of people out there who who have been appreciating alternative narrative about single living. You are also. You'll end these goto psychologist question person. Because i know 'cause like there's been a few times the had a question about like there was one about changing habits. I think if yeah indeed actually know what's interesting is. I've been sort of feeding the podcast a lot with that kind of stuff. You know what. I mean so the other the other previous book. So yeah so i. I think i'm fifty. I turned fifty this year. Out in the desert and I think that it was actually turning fifty. That that led me in part to launch this podcast. Because what i got to thinking is turning fifty as a bachelor and living a good life. I'm when i look back on my life i'm sort of. I'm really really quite grateful that things have turned out so well and i wanted to create a resource for people like the kind of things that i wish. I knew when i was thirty. Five her twenty-five that i can do. And then just also just provide as. I said you know some encouragement so people. Isn't it really terrible that some people think that because they're single there are somehow less than that are a failure where the people who've had a relationship that that didn't work out that somehow they felt they feel like they failed in some way when really the creation of marriage is just a social construct. It's not something that was necessarily had to be. And so we're we're living in a world as i like to talk about a world of fictions but these things seem seem really quite real in quite important but rather are quite arbitrary. I should point out. You're not anti american to quote you. Just think marriage is over prescribed. Yes that's exactly right. What i think is this. Is that again in a world. That wants hot tea in a world wants ice tea. If we tell everybody that they should be drinking hot tea. We're doing a disservice to the ice tea drinkers. And so what i think is. I think marriage is fine. Actually i know very happily married couples. And i know people who thrive within marriages. But i just think that when when nine out of ten people try to do anything. It's probably not the right fit. And so what i want to do is say whether it be the case as i say for now we're forever think of the the good the good fit that being single can have for you. And which has this actually ironic benefit that if you lean into your singleness and and learned to play an instrument or you know build a business or were study for a master's degree or or travel the world. Whatever it is that you that you can do. It actually makes you a better person and has ironic benefit of actually making you a more appealing potential partner. Have you seen friend of the show daniels losses last but one special. Yeah so if you could get me in touch with him. I sent a few messages. Tim i want to have him on the podcast because he has this counter on his website of the number of people. He's broken up and the number of divorces he's caused. I think he would be the perfect guests for solo. But i can't get anyone from his shop to ever respond to me but yeah he has this whole bit. About how sort of relationships are overrated. Yeah and it but but also similar point to you. He's he doesn't say a relationship shouldn't happen and he doesn't think marriages ship break-up joust the bad one mediocre mediocre marriage is because she's people think that's what you should do absolutely yes so he and i are like kindred spirits or whatever you know in terms after that he just happens to be way way. Funnier and more persuasive. Because i'm i'm not trying to break people up. I'm just trying to get people to feel good about their state of the world. And i want them to to say like have a different story Than the one that we're normally fed right by the way. I i don't know if this I guess there's no way we could talk about this but you. You're pretty active on this new social media platform clubhouse that's all audio based conversations live audio chat rooms that sensibly should be based around topics as opposed to just being any kind of you've been having a lot of solo chats conversations it within that app. I'm curious have you heard any really compelling things that have made you change your perspective on on the fact that like obviously you're not gonna change whether you think it was good for you but like have you heard arguments for why your philosophy wouldn't work if we're applied to all of society. No nothing at all it's ever made. Well so the issue is this is like this is where my behavioral science scientists had gets put on so for example. I always want to go to the data right. So so i will i part before i get to the data andy. I'll answer your question less cheeky fashion. What happens is so yeah. i'm on. i'm on this app. Clubhouse it's in the beta stage. But i'm it's a really fascinating place and there's a lot of really interesting ambitious people and what i realized very quickly is that these people have challenges around relationships and first of all. The average person has challenges around relationships. Because it's just hard to do relationships hard to match up in a way that's air. No one ever trains us on. How do relationships well. You know our schools don't do it..

goto brian Andy daniels Tim andy
"dr peter" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

09:40 min | 4 months ago

"dr peter" Discussed on Probably Science

"But he will. he will sell radio. Host jokes fairly mainstream audiences partly because of just the quality of the joke. Which i think gives you so much more leeway and then but then also because he delivers it with Level of charm on a level of wink to the audience. That i guess in your analogy were of shift that shift that window towards the benign way. Here's more license. He's built up a lot more licensed to be able to do these things in a way that i think the average comic cast plus. He's a craftsman. Which i think i agree with you in that. And that's so that does that would that also be called by the theory. The idea that the better constructed the joke is better delivered. The joke is the more amenable to violation. Someone is compared to the the compared to if it wasn't delivered with such skill indeed. Yeah absolutely because it's can be so subtle you can also be on this sort of razor blade dancing along and so the choice of a word or like you said a wink or a nod or smile can take what might be a violation and make it more benign and so this is the problem is there's so many degrees of freedom when it comes to this. It's part of the reason why comics in their tool. Kit is constant experimentation that. They're using night in night out as they develop a as developed a joke which is just works. Much much better. When i do it in this order when i move when i when i smile in this way or if i don't pause or if i pause and and so yeah it's the complexity it's so odd that sometimes a joke just not work and then i'll realize some will even tell me. Oh you just said this thing slightly differently you just even this a couple of jokes whereas where it really is simple as opposed before one word that are slight tempo. Change is enough to make it work on. Look yes one of the things that i talked about. Is that it best. When these appraisals happened simultaneously. That is that there's not that you simultaneously can see how it's wrong yet okay And and that's that's just hard. It's just hard to do and you've had plenty of time to think about your your time that you've told a joke. That went horribly awry. You actually. I can't think of all of my worst sets are just crowds. That didn't really want to be there or low energy that i then didn't come at with like okay. I've got to come at them with high energy to to fix this. I just let my set fizzle out. Like i'm just thinking of triple runs like triple runs. What's the triple ron. Sorry david trimble is a comedy booker. Who books a string of one. Nighters that are all over the american northwest and west. So in the course of a week you might drive from a gig in central oregon to eastern montana and to the panhandle of idaho. And they're all awful gigs business. I don't know how he i'm sure he pockets. More than fifty percent of what each these venues are paying to make it worth his while and then newer comics. Were just hungry for stage time. It's sort of a rite of passage for them right so low paying that if you're driving alone and you're the feature as opposed to the headliner will take a loss because the gas will exceed your your pay. It's a bad idea. And when you're impo catella. Idaho for like twelve people who just want wanna do karaoke or whatever it's always crowds at don't want to be there and sometimes it's like a combination Like an casino. Where there. I think blige to to provide some kind of non-gambling entertainment. So those kind of. I can't think of specific jokes. But there was one night when i was in subway in the tri cities in central washington and triple got a call from the book from the owner of the place after my first of two or three nights asking why he had booked. 'cause i was so bad and triple called me to ask why was so bad i know but like how is this supposed to make me be better tomorrow. I think even said well you know. The crowd wasn't very. He was playing the crowd on the shitty. Say like those kind of things that i think about what i think about the worst comedy but it wasn't like i said one thing that got people walking out or booing i can also think of specifically the and this is. This might be interesting to you. Particular teacher in terms of things that make gigs work or not work. And then we move onto your more recent research. But i can think of two times that i had not good gigs. A tool in london in the last five years or so. Maybe a bit more and both of those occasions were like to particular occasions. Where in both times. It was the third gig of a triple up in london. Where you know. You're doing three gigs. In three different venues and under new sort of getting on the train going to the next one so one running between them and both knights had exactly the same pattern where show one was decent. Show too was fantastic. Shows three bombs. And i know exactly what happens because what happened in each of those occasions was show one was pretty good. I got me loosened up and gave me some out of confidence and bounce and And and so i went into the second one just a little bit more just a little bit just just a bit more confident a bit more on. It's a bit more accurate. I guess but bit more my game and it really went well and then show three. I just went on with too much confidence. And just because i had that second game that was fantastic and then i arrive at this third venue. This audience hadn't seen my big might be completely new person to them and just went on with a bit too much swagger and a bit and also just a bit too slow to get to the first couple of jokes. Because i was too confident in my ability to make the love and so she didn't put enough effort to win them round in the first minute or two. I just realized by the three minute mark. They don't like me. And i'm in trouble. Yeah i can imagine. So i have. This is actually a good segue into into my notebook. In the in the following sense artie. So the book that i wrote his stick to business and it's it's essentially about not being funny but about thinking funny and it's it's lessons based upon the practices and perspectives of the world's funniest people. But i have an epilogue in the book and and in the epilogue. I talked about what not to do. Right what we should learn from comedians about what not to do in the world of business and one of those is never blame the audience. At least never blame the audience to the audience you know and so because idea is if if an audience or if a customer is not buying your product it's not the customers fall. It's your fault in some some way shape or form the larger lesson. But i just have sat in just cringing in audiences and then also pissed off as an audience member when an comics starts to berate the audience for not finding him or her funny which never never gets anyone on your side and then just poisons the room for the next comic and some curious about your experience doing that because of course you're going to have bad audiences. Yeah there's nothing to be gained for pointing out for reading an audience for its size. Which is the craziest because you dare there. Yeah you're not talking to a bunch of didn't come so yeah. I can see why that's never gonna win people over unless you you know. There are exceptions. Also like i'm thinking of that bill burr philadelphia. If you're gonna walk through much fun. Yeah and he. He didn't even walk through them so happy when he just kept tearing into them and just telling them that they're awful and not even tempering it with like a wink. Just actually saying you guys got a statue for fucking fictional character. You know what it was. I think that the most first of all if anybody's listening to this you can find this clip on youtube. It's called the philadelphia incident. And i think one of the things about that it reveals. What a master bill. Burr is because he's a lot of the stuff that he's doing is completely improvisational and so he's just busting on to us like childhood term of mine. This outdoor crowd that is just being really shitty. yeah and It's fantastic well. He's also just coaling. The situation which it is effective in any in any comedic context. Mike sometimes just the simplest version is just doing a joke about something in the room you know just like the way backdrop or whatever but just all or joke about breaking the ice with a joke about your parents which is a fairly common thing to do particularly when you're new as an act But that is like you know he. He is just going like he is explaining to them. Why and how shitty and as much as they disliked him they're also like yeah that is actually evacuate needs.

american northwest catella david trimble panhandle blige london idaho montana Idaho oregon washington artie bill burr philadelphia Burr youtube Mike
"dr peter" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

08:56 min | 4 months ago

"dr peter" Discussed on Probably Science

"Attempt went wrong in the way that you're talking about matt which made people really upset. Well i can. I can think of individual jokes. But i also think of every comic has gigs. The just the so. Yeah i can i can think of a roomful of angry people in greenwich at christmas I can think of Think of manchester crowd. I can think of four three and a half thousand people at the brixton academy. That was a phone one. Who can you share that one. You remember the specific this at the mall. oh very clearly. We'll i did. I did two shows. Opening the buddy jim jeffries at the brixton academy and show one was just a treat it was a dream it was lovely and show to the audience was still filing in also. There was a difference between the two audiences. Like i think show one was actually an extra show that have been put on because the first one is sold out so people kind of more excited to be there and then show i think show to maybe had a bit more entitlement in in their attitude but also the timing was a bit different people still filing in when i went on i essentially got booed onto the stage. Roy your head. And i never eighty managed to round the corner off to that one so that was but that one was actually funny to me. More than like. I've had other gigs. Felt much worse than that one because that will soda ludicrous. The i kinda didn't mind. It felt by by ten minutes in. I felt like i was like a wrestling villain or like or pantomime villain whatever just like goading the audience to hate me lara's because like there's no. There's no way. I'm going to turn them around so i would have. I might as well watch that show. That would have been so. I might as well have fun with it and also like knowing that jim's gonna come on after the break and i knew i knew i wouldn't be ruining the show for him as well. That's the thing like. I knew that the audience being riled up and matt hating me. Mb goading them and some people finding that funny like maybe about a quarter of the audience finding that funny and the audience being furious. But i knew that also that would actually if anything just energize the audience for jim. I wasn't fucking him over. Which was exactly what happened. But he won't on stage in his first words was something like you come so you assholes or something like that it was just like boom like huge and then he was in and he was away so i didn't so that was a right. They're the ones that have fall was the ones where he just you. Just fuel the audience slipping away and this worse than anger in an audience. I think but then sometimes it really does turn to just people get really really cross a really upset at the you know what even even you see it when he just discussing. Comedians or comedy shows that they dislike and they dislike so much more passionately than they dislike a drama show that they didn't get on with indie. You don't think you're selecting. There might be a little bias in the circle of people that you run with. I mean maybe but there's probably some of that time exposed far more to people's opinions on comedy drama bullshit around more comics. Does he ever civilian get his worked up as we as our friends. I see what you mean. But no i'm including non comedians including people school friends and other people in my social media. Who on comedy weld or from the comedy welded or just things people comment in general and you know if you watched one of your comedian friends post something and then the just the reaction is like yeah love it and then someone and then people go like this real anger at at the idea of a comedian not hitting them up for someone compared to i think people who don't like game of thrones. Don't get through your game. All star trek old star treks. A good example. I think because people who like it are extraordinarily passionate about s- but people who dislike it on sort of vehemently angry existence. That's right before it gets too. I wanna hear. I don't mean to turn the tape in my own podcast. I'm used to interviewing people. And i'm more curious about what you folks have to say that i what i have to say for myself but before we get to andy's can i just do a quick lesson on the benign violation theory that might spread like might shed some light on this conversation. Yes absolutely so so the thing about al. So first of all the question. What makes things funny. As an age old question it goes back at least to plato and aristotle so twenty five hundred years and so frankly people a lot smarter than me have been trying to crack the humor. Folks like thomas hobbes and immanuel kant sigmund freud wrote about it and so on the only advantage that that that i have with my co creator. Caleb warren is that we can run experiments because of my my psychology training. And the the work that we've been doing builds on a linguist were thomas and and presents the following idea that we laugh at were amused by judge. Hey that's funny things that are wrong yet. Things that are threatening yet safe or what. We call benign violations. And so this is a powerful idea once you start to unpack it. For example it explains the two ways a humor attempt can fail that is it can be to benign and boring right like a knock knock joke. There's nothing wrong there's no arousal or threat or it can go too far. It can be too risque to be just a violation. It can be all wrong in that sense like you know like we've all done where we've crossed the line with the joke but it also explains why the very same joke can make one person laugh. Another person yawn and another person. I want to throw tomatoes at matt. Curtian and And the reason is because what's wrong and what's okay depends on a person's culture their values their beliefs their lifestyle and then also their context so for example if that if that crowd was there to see matt he gets a lot more leeway than crowd. Was there to see jim jefferies. We'll i would say than that as well. It's they framing of you. Which happens relatively quickly one. Someone wants someone if someone likes someone they far more inclined to laugh at them decided. They don't lie like them they. It's almost impossible to make some off if you don't if they don't like you it's easier to make in my vernaculars easy to make a violation. Benign it's easier to take something that's wrong and see simultaneously. Okay when you like the person you give them the benefit of the doubt when you've had a couple of drinks in you when you're in a comedy club and you've been maybe laughing at their previous jokes that you found funny and i think this reveals the complexity of what you guys do for a living and it's why the average person probably shouldn't be doing it at work. It's also yeah. You you can see audiences turns sometimes where i guess the framing of someone changes because of something that they say something happens in the room and then suddenly that scale on which they're evaluating some i guess the metoo moves one pedophile joke and now the whole room has turned on you. Yep all saying something to an audience member. That just goes. That's a bit. Oh what. Oh yes kicking punching down right right. I hadn't thought of this analogy when we first talked about the humor code. Because i think it wasn't as commonplace in the public discourse but the overton window. It's almost like every individual has their own overton window of benign nece and violation notice. And that varies if you're telling nine eleven joke On in october two thousand one in brooklyn. It's that's everyone's over to windows going to be towards that as a violation but if you're in a room where like one person is a nine eleven widow. Mother person is a jim norton fan. Just wants the most. I don't know why. I picked him norton. But you know someone who wants. The cringes thing and everybody had the same joke will land differently. Because of where it falls on an individual's like your your window slides from. What was your own closeness to something temporarily or spatially or whatever it also depends on who is delivering that joke and how they delivering it for example. Select someone like anthony jessil. Nick can sort of. I guess gets away with it but you know what i mean. Roll the relenting..

brixton academy jim jeffries matt jim greenwich Caleb warren lara manchester Roy wrestling thomas hobbes jim jefferies immanuel kant sigmund freud andy al jim norton brooklyn norton anthony jessil
"dr peter" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

07:29 min | 4 months ago

"dr peter" Discussed on Probably Science

"Hello and welcome to probably science. My name's andy would i'm mckesson. Hey andy hello there your own name or was that a glitch the recording. I think there was a glitch in the recording. Here i just said. I met us in continuous commotion. I always have a glad that you are seeing your name with confidence. Now it's I don't want to brag. But i've also had to spell it soon. Enjoined up that's yes. Oh it's it's going very well have made good use of my lockdown twenty twenty productive year for all of us and you know who else has had a very productive year is our friend and returning guest professor. Peter mcgraw got this good to see this podcast off to such a smashing start. It doesn't matter if we start off this badly. Then it's just like there's no pressure it's going to be a better from here downhill. From whichever way is better. I think out of this lucas starts. I said this is npr. Level of slick us. I'm gonna make some background. Sounds to make you think that. I'm gonna street market in marakesh that'll give some gravitas. I think she. I think we should try going for like the radio lab type thing. Where even though we're reading the same multiple. I'm constantly surprised by what you're saying. They still didn't. I haven't listened a lot recently. But didn't the non jad host leave the show or not because i know his whole job is like listen. I'm just doddering disingenuous. Yeah it's still love the show but they do. They do a very good job over it. You know what it is is. It's the old infomercial trick. That's what it is. You can't be telling me that there's a way i can broil awhile i i. Yeah no way. It's got to be a better way. And that's that's all the way getting for our money not even close so long time distance to the show might remember pita grow from his previous book another. You work the humor code breaking out theory as to what makes people love. Arnold is funny. And why andy is funny. I have. I have the keys. I can talking and tell you why these guys are funny so that that book we got deep into your not over nine violation theory. That was a long time ago. But it's really fun to be back. So what have you been doing since we should also say that you all your your professional psychology. That's what the professor pot is from. Yeah more or less. I mean i have a phd in research psychology. I call myself nowadays behavioral economists because kind of more regular everyday people actually understand what that is. I actually teach business school these days. But yeah i mean this is one of the benefits and costs in my life as i do a lot of dabbling. Nothing spectacularly good. But i kind of do things sort of fair to good in a in a wide variety come. I'd replaces just said people understand what behavioral economy is more the psychology can. I put myself in the opposite camp and ask you what behavior economy economic ashes. Yeah certainly so he like. Annex is kind of like the intersection of microeconomics in psychological theory so essentially starting in the early. no i'd say the fifties and then more recently in the last you know twenty years or so. A bunch of sort of cycle psychologists have been taking the way that that economists think that we make decisions and judgments in the world and sprinkling and a heavy dose of. This is how we actually do it. And so you probably heard of things like loss aversion or the availability heuristic. These are kind of risks bias sees in a world that the economist have wrong. That is they think we're much too. Rational were much to calculate give. We're much to motivated to get the answer right and these psychologists have been have been sort of correcting the record so to speak and the behavioral economics is sort of finding its way into the into the business acumen the might as well just go into the two things years mentioned If i'm worried about loss aversion. If i'm right about this is the people Feel worse about losing something they already had been gaining something new. Yeah essentially so. The loss aversion is a specific version of what's called the negativity bias. So the negativities bai's essentially is that we as humans are more sensitive to bad things than good things. They demand more attention. They affect our emotions more. They affect our choices. More and loss aversion is a specific case of this with regard to to the idea of losing something regaining something an short it explains for example the status quo bias. Why it's so hard to make change in the world because anytime you decide to make a change. The loss of that change looms larger than the game and so as a result people need a lot more gains in order to to forward in life on. That's interesting because i know one of the simplest examples of version is people. Don't feel good if you give them ten dollars and then take five dollars away. Even though they've gained five bucks they're like well if it feels bad. Go through that yes. That's right so losing money just hurts a whole lot more than than winning money feels good. I mean there's obviously notable exceptions like vegas but in general especially with large dollar amounts. We are super super tuned into those those potential losses and then the issue of course. Is that the economists of the world. find this befuddling. Because loss aversion in the long run often leads us to make decisions. That are bad bad. For our being. For example it may inhibit risk taking and risk and reward are correlated or even just misapplying your brain power on things like just two weeks ago. I was trying to get some way to watch live. Primetime tv for reasons discussed the past. The podcast. And i signed up for youtube tv because it said it had a free trial and then as soon as i clicked okay. It said you've just been charged. Sixty five dollars. Because i guess. I'd done the free trial three years ago and forgot. Alert me to that. And i spent and i was instantly aware of the loss of of of this bias. When i'm like okay. I got to put this out of my head. I can probably get refunded if not it's sixty five dollars just one four days of jeopardy but yeah loomed in my mind win. Even though i was i was instantly aware of what was happening in my brain i could just turn it off by my awareness of it. It was so strange yes. And what's cool about you. Andy is i know you well enough to know how ultimately you are rational and you can correct your course which is what you just did. There was so wasted hours of thought. Probably like how. Am i going to call to get cold anyway and then also you probably. You would quite often spend spend hours on the phone to youtube and like researching this stuff and then realize oh i could be..

andy hello Peter mcgraw marakesh andy mckesson npr lucas Arnold bai vegas youtube Andy
First Shipments Of Pfizer's COVID-19 Vaccine To Be Delivered Monday

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:35 sec | 5 months ago

First Shipments Of Pfizer's COVID-19 Vaccine To Be Delivered Monday

"Preparing to ship out. Its covid nineteen vaccine on sunday after getting final. Fda approval the word. Is that the shipment of the vaccine will start leaving the dr morrow morning two point nine million doses will leave an equal amount. Have to stay behind in cold storage for that. Follow up dose but from research to roll out in terms of vaccines and getting it to the public. This process has been very rapid but all involve stress that doesn't mean corners were cut or that safety was compromised. Dr peter marr. Director of the center for biologics and research stressed. The vaccines are being made in a manner consistent with a high quality americans expect with their

Dr Morrow FDA Dr Peter Marr Center For Biologics And Resea
F.D.A. Clears Pfizer Vaccine, and Millions of Doses Will Be Shipped Right Away

Balance of Nature with Dr. Douglas Howard

00:32 sec | 5 months ago

F.D.A. Clears Pfizer Vaccine, and Millions of Doses Will Be Shipped Right Away

"Say five years new covered 19 vaccine could begin shipping out tomorrow with distribution across the country on Monday, 2.9 million doses will leave an equal amount have to stay behind in cold storage for that follow up dose 11 months from research to roll out in terms of vaccines and getting it to the public. This process has been very rapid, but all involves stress that doesn't mean corners were cut or that safety was compromised. Dr. Peter Marsh, the director of the Center for Biological Research Stress, the vaccines are being made in a manner consistent with the high quality Americans expect with their health care boxes.

Dr. Peter Marsh Center For Biological Research
Why some Black Americans are skeptical of a COVID-19 vaccine

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

03:56 min | 5 months ago

Why some Black Americans are skeptical of a COVID-19 vaccine

"How do you feel about the comeback team as my excellent even have my children american community. We must trust me because we do feel like the first they wanna test on and we're being experimental. We used to be mistreated. We use the ban experimental role and we used to be last any category when it comes to healthcare to words to start off here remember tuskegee public. Health officials are focused on countering distrust toward this vaccine particularly in black communities in our country. Michelle norris from the washington post puts the conundrum this way quote vaccine. Hesitancy from black americans is different from an anti vaxxers stance. It's not that black. Americans don't believe in vaccines. They don't trust a public health system that has in too many cases engaged in grievous harm by experimenting on black bodies without consent or ignoring the specific needs of black people here to talk about we. Welcome to our broadcast tonight. Dr peter hotels he's a vaccine scientists working with a team to develop a low cost cove at nineteen version for global distribution. He happens to serve as co director of the center for vaccine development at texas children's and he is the dean of the national school of tropical medicine at baylor college of medicine also with us tonight. The reverend walker. We are proud to say she started as did a number of us in local news notably as the first african-american weeknight news anchor in boston. And is now senior pastor at roxbury presbyterian. She's been at the center of an effort. Enlisting dr rao cheese help and others to build trust in the vaccine among members of her congregation and the larger city at large Dr houghton. Says i'd like to begin with you and your reaction to this. Fda authorization tonight well it certainly important news Critical first step towards backseat our way out of this epidemic. you know. We're hoping not to have to completely rely on biotechnology solutions but in the absence of a national cove nineteen strategy by. This white house backed us into a corner and now we pretty much have no other major tools now to halt the screaming epidemic. Where we're looking at two hundred thousand new cases a day in three thousand deaths per day. So we're in a dire situation in. Having this vaccine is going to be an absolutely critical tool. And i hope it's going to be the first of four or five ac scenes that will have in the coming months because i don't think we're going to be able to vaccinate the us population with these two marnie vaccines alone. So a major first step but a pretty long road ahead here here on time is of the essence of reverend walker. It's great to have you. I'm looking at pew. Research polling says sixty one percent of white americans are prepared to have the vaccine forty-two percent of black americans. I'm gonna make a sweeping assumption about all of our viewers. The folks smart enough to watch this hour every night. Know their history so we have established the fear and distrust. Tell us what you're hearing in your congregation. However some people are saying they wanna wait it out and see what's going to happen which gives me a little hope. This is a very tragic situation. If we don't take vaccine a lot of people as you have already pointed out simply do not trust systems a not just because of history but because of their daily experiences people who feel that they have been abused and they have been disrespected. They have been ignored by. Hospitals are in general. So you know getting that to change is not going to be an

Reverend Walker Michelle Norris Dr Peter Hotels Center For Vaccine Development National School Of Tropical Me Roxbury Presbyterian Dr Rao Cheese Dr Houghton The Washington Post Baylor College Of Medicine Texas Boston FDA White House PEW United States
"dr peter" Discussed on Your Brain at Work

Your Brain at Work

05:04 min | 6 months ago

"dr peter" Discussed on Your Brain at Work

"Neighborhood. Maybe even your family. But what about in your organization in within your team this widening chasm of right and left of what we think is right and wrong affects how we see understand and work with each other and often it leaves us looking across seemingly impassable barriers of suspicion and resentment so what can organizations and leaders do to stem this drift and bring people together. That's what we asked. Dr peter coleman a professor of psychology at columbia university who specializes in conflict and bridging deep divides. I'm gabriel bears and you're listening to your brain at work from the leadership institute. We continue to drive episodes from a weekly webinar series. The analyze been hosting every friday. This week our panel consists of analyze. Dr david rock dr camilla sip and professor coleman together. They discussed the history of polarization in america in the world. At large explore. The science of conflict in the brain and the outline the strategies organizations can employ to successfully bridge divides among their employees enjoy. Thanks.

Dr peter coleman dr camilla sip professor coleman Dr david rock professor of psychology leadership institute gabriel columbia university america
"dr peter" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

CATS Roundtable

05:35 min | 8 months ago

"dr peter" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

"Good Morning America. This is the CASS roundtable trunk Katzman TD's here, Sunday morning, and usually we have Dr Peter Meals with us our in house genius, and usually we talked about the virus but today speaking to Dr Me Halos. He's concerned about people driving electric is and he wants to talk about the morning talk to me for most how are you today morning John Good Morning, cats roundtable audience we had discussion last week, and I said that the American people should know about this that you were concerned that people driving electric cars there might be some medical issues What is that? Well, the concern is that you're driving. Under a giant electro magnetic field. When you're on a single motorcars, some of the newer electric cars actually have four individual motors that are generating electro, magnetic field and addition you have the battery and whenever you have electrical current, that's flowing through a a wire, you create an electromagnetic field. So in addition to the battery, there's also an on board computer, and in addition to that, there is Wi fi bluetooth. And when you think about it, a metal car is. Like. A faraday cage Faraday cage.

Dr Peter Meals Katzman Wi
"dr peter" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"dr peter" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"In New York and also to some extent in Detroit and other parts of the country in places like Texas or UTAH. Or you know you name. It was because we learned our lessons from New York and got on top of this early and implemented social distancing and we have to recognize that we remain just as vulnerable moving into the summer if we don't take aggressive measures to monitor this epidemic and do widespread testing and contact tracing otherwise we could reproduce the situation over and over again. I think what happened is because in certain parts of the country they did not see such a robust full-flowing epidemic. There's a sense of complacency built in and I hope that those individuals don't only learn Bhai suffering the same fate. We just don't WanNa see that. Thank you Dr Hotels. Thank you for all your work on this. And thanks for the update for my listeners. The most important job elected officials have is to keep us safe and the president is failing miserably at this. He's also trying to suppress the vote in November railing against safe and secure mail in voting. And the only way we can correct this is to vote him the fuck out of office so pleased today visit. Www DOT vote dot gov. Check your voter registration status. Make sure you're on. The voter rolls make a voting plan. Make sure your family and friends are registered and they have a voting plan because you see trump thinks he is powerful but we have so much more power than and it's time to use it. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by Alyssa Milano. That's me our associate producer has been Jackson editing and engineering by Natasha. Jacobs and music by Josh Cooke Alicia Eagle and my. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify. I tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. And if you like the show please rate review and spread the word sorry..

Bhai New York Alyssa Milano Detroit spotify Dr Hotels Texas Alicia Eagle president UTAH trump producer Josh Cooke executive Jacobs
"dr peter" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"dr peter" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Your place of employment is on top of this and they're doing regular testing and getting those people to self quarantine or isolate and then being able to trace all of the contacts. So you can do this on a regular basis and that's really important 'cause we've already seen especially in the mid west some huge plants with hundreds of PR infected those especially some of the meat processing plants and those kinds of things so this is going to be a known problem. And I'm concerned that the major message coming out of the White House press briefings and then not. From the governor's it's all about the economic recovery as though this thing has just gone away like a hurricane or a tornado and and sort of oblivious to the fact that this is just round one of what could be many rounds unless we figure this out. Okay I just want to switch gears for a second to talk about what's happening from a global perspective. What's happening around the world? So what's happening around the world to give you the quick answer is we don't know because as bad as testing has been in the you ask especially in places like Texas Shrinks Forty Nine. Who knows what's happening in Nigeria? Who knows what's happening in your name and the Bangladesh and in Bolivia Right? I mean there's just probably very little surveillance testing so we are hearing terrible reports for instance in Ecuador Guatemala Keel of bodies piling up on the streets. And imagine what it's going to be like when this virus racist through the crowded urban areas of Mumbai or Delhi or kind legos so there's a huge global health component. And that's why we're developing a global health vaccine. It's a low cost vaccine. That is not only going to be inexpensive but all so we can transfer the technology so it could be made locally so places like India and Brazil have their own capacity for making what commoner protein vaccine since. Rav's same technology is the one that Hepatitis B vaccine uses so this is going to be widely accessible. And I think that's going to be very important. And then we also need a strong and empowered World Health Organization. I mean the reason we need the. Who is not to protect us? So much in Europe and North America. We need it because that's the only thing we have for some of the low and middle income countries in Asia Africa and Latin American. So I'm really very troubled by these threats to cut off funding from the. Who you know. I try not to and now. You're a little more out there. I tried because in order to keep talking to all sides try to avoid direct criticism of the president or the White House and this is one of the few times I really felt it had to do it because we have to keep that funding going to. Who and we just explain to people why. That's so important if people don't know what. Who Does the World Health Organization which is headquartered in? Geneva is the major organization that assists countries with major health problems and health crises and global pandemics and infectious. Diseases is definitely in their lane and one of the major things that they're good at providing guidance to countries about how do the control how to implement treatment programs vaccination programs this is a critical function of the World Health Organization? And they run on a very modest budget to begin with. I think their biennial budget is about six billion dollars or roughly three billion dollars a year. Which is roughly about a four of the budget for the Centers for Disease Control so to govern the health of the entire world for budget one fourth of the Centers for Disease Control is pretty modest to begin with. And now you're GONNA to threaten to cut off funds from one of its major donors. I think at single largest donor which is the United States. And I'm really hoping that doesn't happen. So I've been having conversations with the leadership of the World Health Organization and hopefully can make some progress on that front but I know unless you've been so active with these international organizations mean. Look at all the great work. You've done with unison. For instance I just think that people don't understand the connection that we all have to each other and how something like the World Health Organization is so important and if you can't feel the compassion the empathy of why it's important for people in Angola Africa. Can you at least understand how important it is for? People here to be healthy and to have the knowledge that our health is dependent on their health. I think that's a great point you make and you're absolutely right. I mean what happens? Now if we have a massive epidemic in the countries of central Latin America in Central America Mexico. Ecuador I mean. Do people really think it's just not going to show up at our doorstep? I mean you can build the wall as high as you want but the farmers and you know I'd like to think we've learned that lesson and you know you could do all the work. You want to stop immigration or enact travel ban. It's not gonNA stop this virus and by slow it down a little bit but it's not gonNA stop it and so I agree even if you don't understand the importance of helping nations like Angola recognize how it's are on like something interesting..

World Health Organization Ecuador Centers for Disease Control Hepatitis B vaccine White House Angola Texas Rav Geneva Mumbai Nigeria Asia Latin America India United States Europe president Diseases
"dr peter" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

09:24 min | 1 year ago

"dr peter" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"A few weeks ago renowned Dr Vaccine Scientist and educator. Peter Hotels came on the show to answer some questions about the state of the corona virus. Since then we've seen the pandemic flood over America. Tens of thousands have died and hotspots continued to break out across the nation and yet president. Trump seems hell-bent on reopening the economy and attacking the science scientists and elected officials trying to save lives at every turn. Republican governors are already taking action to open businesses and recreation areas frothy mouthed protesters are endangering us all and we still have no effective treatment for the disease and so today. I've asked Dr Hotels back to update us on where things stand with the corona virus at home and around the world from instructing my administration to halt funding of the World Health Organization while review is conducted hours ago. There was easily a thousand people standing on the steps of the Capitol Shoulder to shoulder not wearing masks protesting the State House here to talk about how they want to reopen the economy. Scientists and doctors are warning of a possible second wave of Cova nineteen when that could happen and what it would look like are the biggest questions for our current president after starting the day calling for the liberation of three states that are observing his government guidelines dozens of people taking to the sand as city leaders there we opened beaches impart governors in some of the States. Hardest hit by the Colonel Virus said earlier. Sunday they need more help from the trump administration to ramp up testing. My Name is Dr Peter. Hotels and I believe that everybody in the United States deserve access to new drugs and therapies vaccines for cove in nineteen regardless of their ability to pay Arina. Sorry Dr Hotels. Thank you so much for joining us again. A lot has happened since last. We spoke some of it. Good and a lot of it bad. Can you just give us an overview about the status of the pandemic in America right now? Well of course the big over you for the US was this really horrible humanitarian tragedy in New York New Jersey Connecticut in the northeast. And we're still not nearly done. It's probably still going to go on for a few more weeks but I never thought we would see that level of the station in terms of death and admissions to the hospital in intensive care unit. And it's given me a real perspective on how things could go terribly wrong here in the United States so for me. Now it's all hands on deck and making certain that what happened in New York especially in places like Queens New York which you know I know you know very well would never happen again elsewhere in the US. Well I mean you call that a humanitarian crisis. Why do you identify it as that? Well it's the level of suffering that I'm seeing and it goes beyond you know it's not just the ticks of the number of deaths. I mean we're hearing about scores of schoolteachers. For instance getting sick and dying. And even you know there was an article that really broke my heart about the doormen New York. Yeah numbers of them have gotten sick and died and I went to medical school and Graduate School in New York at Cornell and Rockefeller. And you know you'd have a bad day in the lab and you just take a walk and the only people up at that hour would be guys standing in the doorway and on some evenings. They'd be your only friend and you'd have a little. You know nothing little informal chat with them and and that all those people are getting so sick and dying is really heartbreaking. So that the situation in New York and New Jersey and the thing that I'm really concerned about now is whether we really learned our lessons from New York and New Jersey. Why do I say that's so? For instance here in Texas. We saw what was happening in New York. We implemented social distancing early on really ahead of the virus so we never saw peak anything close to resembling what happened in New York and New Jersey. And that's been great. We've not had a huge number of admissions in the Texas Medical Center to the hospital the ICU we've got some. But it's definitely a manageable problem but now I think we're starting to hear from the governor that now they're anxious to open things up again right and relaxed social distancing even though a number of the epidemiologic models and I know the epidemiologic models are not perfect they have their flaws are basically saying for some states like Texas. We need to maintain that social distancing until June. One until we go back to containment vote and the problem is that the governor's in many parts of the south and the West. Just don't have the appetite for that. They're going to open things up earlier than June one. And maybe even by next week or the week afterwards and I understand the realities of closing down the economy. I understand the hardships that many people are facing that. They're not getting a paycheck and I understand the need to open segments of the economy. The piece that bothers me is that I'm not confident. We have the public health infrastructure. That's been put into place in order to manage what's going to be a new surge. We don't have places of business well set up to do testing a regular basis. We don't have the staff in place from public health agencies to do the contact tracing. We don't have syndrome surveillance activities in place so I'm very worried not so much for the next few weeks but I'm worried we're going to start to see a brand new round of searches that could even dwarf the ones. We've been seeing what happens starting over the summer. So I'm very worried and going on cable news a lot explaining this that come July and August if we don't have national plan in place not only around the economic recovery but linking at the public health we could even see unfolding situation. That's worse than we saw in March and now the first couple of weeks of April. Well the thing that I don't understand is has it. Peaked and with governors wanting to open up their states. Will there even be a single national peak or are we just going to keep peaking state by state and not get on the same page with this? And is it necessary to get on the same page? That's basically the worry right. The peak in New York according to the models is already happened a few days ago and one in Texas maybe in another week or so and then the numbers are starting to go down. The problem is we often forget. This is like the eye of a hurricane just because the first wave of the hurricane hit and you see the eye doesn't mean I go outside and play. It means the second part is coming so that part has to be considered and then not having a system in place to prevent a bigger resurgence in the summer of great concern. Because if you look at the models and yeah anybody can do this by the way. It's that's what I'm thinking about the models that they've set up in Seattle is anybody can go to just go to health data dot org and you can click on your state and see what's happening the models basically show a peak and then decline going all the way to August and don't really try to predict what's going to happen after that because they don't know what's going to happen in terms of relaxing social distancing by understand the urgency to relax social distancing. It's just that with out a plan in place for my during it. We're just asking for a huge problem. Potentially much bigger than the one. We've already faced in previous pandemics. We've seen like you said second. Waves that are even deadlier than the first wave. What do we need to do to prevent this from happening here? And Are we doing it? You know I'm a vaccine scientists and I'm not necessarily an epidemiologist but common sense in conversations I've had with the model are says unless we need now at every major city a fairly granular detailed plan in place that has the ability to do diagnostic testing at the workplace. Has the contact tracing has trump surveillance? So that as new cases start to pop up we can get on top of very early. Let me give you an example. Let's say I don't know? Pick your store target or Walmart. If you're an employee you one of those stores you now have to be looking over your shoulder your colleagues that your fellow employees does that person have. Kovin is without symptoms eight. Is that person to have it? You Never GonNa know. So you'RE GONNA be you're also going to be terrified about going back to work in many instances so you need to know that.

New York United States Texas Peter Hotels president America New Jersey Dr Vaccine Scientist Dr Hotels Trump Capitol Shoulder World Health Organization Cova State House Dr Peter Connecticut Texas Medical Center
"dr peter" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

The Joe Rogan Experience

12:20 min | 1 year ago

"dr peter" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

"That transmission is going out for several weeks only when a lot of ICU. Patients started hitting the door. So this is what happened in New Orleans is what happened is probably happening in Detroit mayor of Atlanta said you know all of a sudden we found all of these people show up in the eye in the ICU. So that's a nother lesson. Learned we really not only doing the the diagnostic testing. But the social distancing is really important and I've been on calls with the leadership of people in Houston. Because you know you're right it's it's it's hurting the economy and so many ways But you know if you WANNA prevent Houston from replicating the New Orleans experience. I've been saying to the to the mayor and everyone else in Houston. This is unfortunately what we're going to have to do in. The models are showing now Oregon Institute At at in Washington Seattle Washington called the Institute for Health Metrics and evaluation. And it's they've now been Looking at this they do all these amazing things to look at the Not only epidemic diseases but also chronic non communicable diseases diabetes and Heart Disease Mental Health issues. But they've been all hands on deck at this covert epidemic and they've just put it out on their website. It's health data dot Oregon. You go to the CO vid snipe side and what they're showing is that they anticipate the peak of this epidemic in the US is going to hit about the middle of April. So we're not even at the peak yet Answer another two weeks of this is going to continue to go up and in some places like in Texas is going to be delayed. It's probably going to be around around many second. And I think California was was around there as well so their numbers say it's going to be the next two months that are going to be the crunch time when it's going to start really going up and then as we move into later in. May It'll start to go down and may be really bottom out by by June. Of course again. It's a model. It's a new virus pathogen. But what I've been saying. Is You know the president yesterday or the day before said okay. I understand I said Easter. Now we're GONNA go to April thirtieth and my point is well April thirtieth. Things are still gonNA be peaking in parts of the country. Let's use April thirtieth as a time to reassess and then make a decision whether we go another month. Let's go a month at a time for now until we know where this is heading. How long can we go? I mean wh wh if you if let's take economics out of it what would you think if there was no concern whatsoever about economic loss and the damage to the economy? What would you recommend in terms of just from clearly just purely from medical perspective? Well the problem is from a medical and public health perspective. We don't really know where this virus is heading. Let's Figure doctor found. She said the virus makes the decisions. We don't make the decision so Although not entirely true because we can make. We can enact in intervention so Hopefully by the summer this is not going to be a huge problem. But but we don't know and then we also don't know if this thing's coming back so what did the out years look like is this does that even if it goes down this summer does it. Does it come back up again in the fall. Does it come back again early. What's that why would that happen? Why would it come back? Why would it? Why would it go away and then come back in the fall? Well a few things that are happening one. All the social distancing potentially could interrupt the transmission We use this number called the reproductive number which describes the number of people that get infected if a single individual has it so the number right now is between two and four depending on whose numbers you look at the ideas you bring that below one. By the social distancing. There's also the question of whether their seasonality to to this virus and again The skymark lipset. She has done some studies. Show that There there seems the virus. Infection doesn't seem to be as severe in areas that have higher temperatures in in greater humidity. It's a bit of a soft call. But maybe there's going to be some seasonality To this as well and then and so. Let's use an example of another seasonal virus influenza. Which of course in the winter then goes down in the summer months and never really disappears but it it it goes down but then in the southern hemisphere is the opposite so in the southern hemisphere peak. Flu Season is our summer their winter in places like Australia and then in the tropics. It's about the same all year round so we don't really understand seasonality. Potentially the virus could show starts showing a pattern like that and then the question is does come back year after year after year. Like flu does Or or an has show some kind of seasonality. These are all scenarios that are being looked at so for instance. Our our vaccine. If it's used in goes you know goes through all. The clinical testing hurdles probably is not going to be used for this twenty twenty epidemic. If it's used at all it's going to be used the out years If this virus starts to come back on a regular basis. Is there any other way to handle this in terms of Quarantining or social distancing like is there would there. Would it be possible to quarantine the people that are at most risk instead of the general population? Well well again. The problem gets to the fact that You know again there's this I. This is only among older Americans and people over the age of seventy diabetes hypertension but now we as a as the Centers for disease control has been reporting of. We've had this big flux of young adults getting very sick and in the ICU. So what point do you say pretty much? Everybody potentially rick then among the children. Even though the the children generally our children adolescents seem to do pretty well with this virus now we realize from studies coming out of China that was published in the Journal. Pediatrics put out by the American Academy Pediatric Thought. About ten percent of infants are getting very sick with this virus. Infants are at risk. So you start adding it up okay. Older people Those underlying diabetes hypertension younger adults and forty and fifty year olds as well and we're hearing all these stories on CNN and elsewhere about you know valued colleagues you know in their fifties and are kind of thing getting really sick or even even dying than infants after a while and it's just it's you can't you can't slice it that fine it's it. It becomes impossible to do it. Is it one of the things that's come up about? This is people are now aware. A people like myself for aware of the number of people that die every year in the United States from the flu. Which is staggering. It's a lot more than ever thought before I'm like. Do you know the numbers. So a seasonal flu is really bad. It's An varies year to year. Different variants of the flu so it usually goes between twelve and fifty thousand. People die every year of influenza and the vast majority of those by the way are not vaccinated so even in years where there is not a good match between the flu vaccine in the flow. It could still reduce your likelihood of hospitalization and Desam important message to get out the numbers here. Unfortunately looking worse I positive for second house. How does that work? How even if it's not matched up to this the correct seasonal flu? How does it prevent you from being hospitalised because it is partially protective? So if you imagine a virus that has all of these different pieces to it and And the and all the antibodies each reacting to a different piece of the virus and a perfect match all of the antibodies target the virus in a in a less than perfect match only some of the antibodies target the virus and therefore it's partially protective and have a partial effect and so on and so the the into now the numbers of the of Americans who are dying are all over the map. So if you if you believe the number saying that. They're between four and ten times. The number of Americans under US forget about Mary. Four to ten times cove. The SARS virus cove in nineteen is four to ten times more lethal than regular flu. So that'll keep you the bracket so if the minimum of twelve thousand from flew the minimum. That's GonNa die from cove. Nineteen around fifty thousand and at the High End Times. Ten could be between five hundred thousand. So that's where you're hearing those numbers from the White House press conference today saying maybe one hundred to two hundred thousand Americans could die. I think it's probably I I like the Institute for Health Metrics numbers that just came out. They say eighty four thousand. Americans will die in that peak season. Going from April may May and June and then but we don't know what will happen again in the the point is a lot of Americans are going to die I don't I'm hoping it doesn't get as high as two hundred thousand and again the model there is a really looking at this. The way those numbers that I gave you that estimate is this sort of simplistic version at. There's much more sophisticated models but again. They're models based on assumptions. But the new virus pathogen. It's hard to get off of the assumptions. Right at the point is many more people will die of this virus than even in a bad flu. Sees I think people are concerned that this is kind of setting a precedent and that this is going to be something that we have to do in the future. Is there a way to prevent something like this Full shutdown of the of the country to happen in the future. As you know we. You know we've got this incredible scientific infrastructure in America right the best research universities and institutes in the world and and I work at to them but Baylor College Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital and And now doing things with Texas A. and M. University and Baylor University as well and and rice and so the The the answer is this is why we have the budget to the thirty. Six billion dollars annually. We need to have a pipeline of technologies getting ready for this Epidemic we should have You know if we had you know all the funding we need it for Virus Vaccine Program. We would have had several cord of our respect scenes in clinical trials and potentially we could have combine them in a way to be ready to go now So having figuring out a way to support organizations that dull are that are looking at vaccines another countermeasures. Not In terms of products they can sell. That are going to help the help. The health security of the country. I think is is really important. So one of the books that I wrote is called blue marble health and it finds this unusual and we spoke a little bit about this last time. The unusual number of Illnesses from emerging infections like this one and poverty related neglected diseases. Actually in the G. Twenty countries the G. Twenty Connie's the twenty wealthiest economies especially the poor living in those actually for most of these diseases and the problem is the g twenty economies that are not stepping up to support these technologies. We still rely too much on the US and the UK and the European Union. We've got to do better with China and Brazil and some of these countries to help fund these global health technologies..

influenza United States ICU Houston Epidemic Institute for Health Metrics Texas New Orleans China flu vaccine Oregon Institute Heart Disease Mental Health California CNN Detroit president Atlanta
"dr peter" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

09:58 min | 1 year ago

"dr peter" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"In the past few days life has changed in America and around the world more than any of us likely could ever imagine. Entire cities are on lockdown restaurants and bars and schools are closed in an all out effort to combat the corona virus. It's scary it's confusing and it's been made worse by an incompetent response at the presidential level and that can make it hard to get good information so today in the special episode we have Dr Peter Hotels He is an esteemed vaccine scientists dean of the Baylor College School of Tropical Medicine and he joined us by phone to share clear accurate and helpful information about the situation. Please listen please stay safe and please stay home. Looks like by April theory when it gets a little warmer and miraculously goes half eleven cases. Only prepared we have the best people. In addition unshaken. People come where I leave shaking hands with people they WANNA shake they WANNA sale. Oh they WANNA hug you they WANNA KISS. You know so much about this. Maybe have a natural abilities should instead of running out of nowhere I actually came out of China which is keep new case during our shores we will be suspending all travel from Europe to the United States for the next thirty days at least full power of the federal government's into separate today. I am officially declaring a national emergency. Let the federal government said Hey. These are the guidelines the guidelines on schools or the guidelines on businesses guidelines on travel rather than having a scramble every local government state government. Trying to figure it out on its own. It makes no sense. Systems does not is not really geared to what we need right now. What you are asking. The BAT is a failing and it is a family. Let's admit I'm Peter says than I believe that. All of the world's population including the world's poorest people deserve the right access zoo essential medicines vaccines innovation. Sorry not sorry I just from a medical perspective. What makes this virus so different than some of the other viruses that circulate? Why is it so deadly? Well this is one of the interesting things about this corona virus. It's not the most lethal virus we've ever seen by a long shot right. It's nothing like Ebola. Kills Half of untreated people. Nor is it like needs those in terms of transmissibility that must transmissible be no but it's high enough both categories to give it this unique spin that we haven't seen from a lot of other viruses. Let me explain a little bit. So the virus itself overall is between five and twenty times more lethal than seasonal influenza. Which itself is a bad actor. And it's quite transmissible at two or three times more transmissible than flus. You've got something that's not quite as serious as the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic but it's starting to approach that but it only happens for certain age category so this is really interesting. It's highly contagious. And but there's a lot of people walking around with a that are not too sick to stay at home so they could spread it in the community. Let me contrast that was something else so if you look at the original SARS virus this new virus. You're calling it. Sars to the original one which came out in two thousand three. Was You know five or six times more deadly and more serious illness for everybody? So what happened was if you had that original SARS one virus in two thousand three. It's not like you were walking around going to target going to the shopping mall. You are sick. Any were better. You're in the hospital and that kind of kept you out of the community pretty quickly. This one is different than last year. One of those at risk groups and I'll tell you which those at risk groups are. You're walking around spreading the virus pretty widely in. That's why this thing has taken off so much in central China and in northern Italy and then in the US doing this as well but if you're lucky enough to belong to one of the three or four major at risk groups that's when you get very sick and half the go to the hospital for those combination of reasons it makes it a very serious national epidemic and also. I mean you know I don't want to politicize this but the president is giving guidelines and recommendations that I don't know vary from interview to interview right. I mean it's like every single time. We hear him speak. He's talking about something else some other guideline that contradicts the guideline before. So how can individuals be expected to know the right thing to do when they're getting totally conflicting information from our leadership when needed to be done? What still needs to be done is and I've said this in public. Few Times is what you need to do in. This kind of situation is ever have very honest discussion with the American people. Were you say you know? You don't say this is just the flu or a cold or this is contained. What you do is say. Look this is a serious pathogen. These are the three or four things. I'm most worried about you. Talk about older Americans especially those with underlying disabilities. You explain why you talk about healthcare providers. Now we have to -mergency room physicians in critical care this weekend. According to the New York Times and so these are two or three big populations that were worried about. And here's what we're GONNA do about and why we're GONNA do what we're doing and historically the American people responded to that very well at. It's just when you model the message and say you know in in an effort to reassure that language was used which tried to oversimplify minimized. It actually wound up making things much worse. I said you know if you had actually gone through the three or four things that you're worried about. Here's what we're doing about it. I think that in itself would have been stabilising and we might not have seen this volatility for instance in the stock market and everything else right well. One of the areas that were getting conflicting. Information from is about whether our children are at risk. So I just want to discuss that a little bit. You know on the one hand people are hearing that kids are not affected by the virus on the other hand. They're hearing that underlying conditions or risk factor. So you're the perfect person to ask this to you because you're also a pediatrician. And a vaccine scientists. What is your best advice for kids with underlying medical conditions or just? What is your advice for MOMS with kids that don't have underlying medical conditions so like a lot of questions that people have about this virus. I always start out with a qualification. Which is the first of all. It's a new virus. We're still at a steep learning curve. More we don't know than we do know. The evidence to date says the following that for reasons that we don't understand it looks like children. Adolescents are becoming infected with the virus. How much so we'll talk about But for some reason that we don't understand on average kids in adolescence are not getting nearly as sick as older individuals. And there's a lot of number theories including the fact that there's other circulating corona viruses among kids immunizing them. We really don't know what the basis that is. But the point is kids and adolescents are acquiring the infection. But we don't think they're getting nearly a sick and now there's always the outlier so every now and then you will have an eighteen nineteen year old. That gets very sick on a respirator with this virus but overall that's pretty rare. Then the next question comes okay. Well if they're getting infected with this virus how much they responsible for transmission in the community and that the scientific community seems a bit divided. So for instance the Centers for Disease Control came out with guidance saying that their models indicate at children are actually not responsible for much community transmission and therefore closing schools may not have a big difference one way or the other in terms of affecting community spread but others are not so sure so the problem gets into when you have a new virus and you worry about not having enough margin for error especially when you're not testing in the community you tend to veer towards more extreme measures than you might ordinarily do so. This gets the point at had we been doing testing like has been done in Korea that potentially we would have our arms around this a little better. But that's where we stand right now. I still can't find a test in California. Yeah I mean. Testing is still. We're not nearly where we need to be. I think we're slowly getting there but the problem is this. You know. We've delayed community testing so much that now. Unfortunately we have to recognize that we probably have not contain the virus..

Dr Peter Hotels federal government United States China SARS America Baylor College School of Tropi New York Times Europe flu Centers for Disease Control Few Times seasonal influenza president California Korea Italy
"dr peter" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"dr peter" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"We then spent some time. Talking about empathic atonement and the ways in which Peter or people who practice somatic experience and methods are able to really tune in to the people that they're working with drawing on really very subtle signs inside of the physical presentation of the body that allow them to make good choices inside of clinical space. Much of. This simply comes from practice but Peter also pointed to great mindfulness and observational techniques. That can be useful either in a clinical sudden or simply frankly in everyday life. When talking to France we went from there into a conversation focused on shame which Peter described as the eight hundred pound gorilla in the room. A lot of the time. People have a challenging time interacting with their trauma material. Because there's so much shame built up around it. We internalize our own oppression. We internalize that dismissive use of people around us and this could make it really hard to come to terms with the ways in which we truly were impacted by named of experiences and for me one of the most touching examples of this is looking at soldiers coming home from war experiencing. Ptsd you really can't describe a more tough minded valiant group of people than wartime veterans and even so these people are absolutely afflicted by the consequences of the experiences they suffered in those completely traumatic environments. So it's really not about how tough you are. It's not about keeping a stiff upper lip. Anyone can be affected by that. Shame and anyone can internalize those traumatic experiences and hold them in both the body and the mind. We closed with a brief conversation on what I described as little T. trauma versus big T. Trauma Big T. trauma being singular traumatic events or even a cycle of major traumatic events happening over a period of time. These are the things where if you describe them to somebody they would go. Oh yeah that was a big deal. These are some of the things that we think of as classically traumatic in nature and we contrasted them with little T. traumatic events. This has just the normal stress that occurs during everyday life either aloe static load building up over time things like being in a family with a slightly dismissive or void end or distant parent or things like being a minority ethnic child going to a majority ethnic school or negative experiences while at school with other kids that were processed into nature. These are everyday stresses but still significant ones that over time build up in the body and Peter shared a story that kind of subverted my framework that I offered a story of a person who had had a pretty normal event happened in their childhood pulling the tablecloth and causing dishes clatter to the floor and even though that was a pretty normal event that most people would not view as quote unquote traumatic nature. It had long term impacts on that individual's ability to relate to a certain kind of environment so even the little tease can in their own way. Be Big tease. If that cycle inside of the body is triggered before we close the show. I'd like to remind you one more time about our new patriot. Account you can go to patriots dot com slash being. Well podcast if you would like to support the show and receive a variety of benefits in return. If you've been enjoying the podcast we would really appreciate it. If you take moment to subscribe to it through the platform of your choice. Maybe you leave a rating positive review and also telephoned about it. If you can do that it really does help us out. It's one of the absolute best ways to support the podcast so until next time. Thanks for listening..

Peter France
"dr peter" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

08:41 min | 1 year ago

"dr peter" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Ooh and then just rest and notice. Any sensations feelings thoughts our inner images noticing them trying to needing to do anything but number just noticing them and then just notice what happens next next. So let's a exercise often do with a client at the beginning of it well at all different times often at the beginning of the session and I'll offered to do it with them but that's partly cheating there because I'm using that for myself as well. It's this whole idea when you shift something in the bottom up and things really can open up in our thought processes in our perceptions. That's a wonderful practice. Peter and just in response to that as a quick comment. I remember very distinctly. Being in my late teens early twenties I did not have any kind of acute traumatic experience in my childhood. That is of the kind that were talking of but you know I had a lot of accumulation of stress of various kinds and I remember the first couple of times that I started getting more in touch with by Interior and actually let it my body's for fully relax in a variety of different ways and often it would make me want to cry and I didn't really know why I wanted to cry just because I was relaxing my body but it really just shows the connection that you're speaking to between that for relaxing settling sensation and The body the God whatever it might be and the release of that emotional psycho emotional material with right you. Don't sometimes tears can be relief. You know you're letting go. Oh my Gosh I've been holding onto this often when I'm working with the person and on notice there is starting to moisten. I'll say something like if you could let your tears speak not you but let your tears speak. What might your tears want to say? And they would say something it could be. I'm so angry or I'm so sad or feel relief so it takes out of the head and that's why I give the guidance to let your tears speak and then that's a really beautiful practice for really for anyone as either thought experience or when talking with somebody so I want to close with a question that I've really been musing on a lot recently and I'm really curious about your take on it. We've mostly been talking about what I'll call capital t versions of trauma acute incidents that have that seizing effect on the body at trauma in wartime a physical abuse. Whatever it might be something that's been interesting me recently. Is this idea of lower case t versions of trauma not a single major incident but little things that accumulate over the course of alive whether it be kind of dismissive family environment trouble in school. The normal stresses that we go through and obviously big T. trauma is potent and horrible and very apparent in the space but sometimes the lower case t trauma you know. People don't really view it as problematic the same kind of way. I just have to wonder from your experience. What have you seen and working with those two different kinds of trauma and are there any differences there? It's interesting my doctoral. Dissertation in Berkeley Was Accumulated Stress Reserve capacity. And this dash es yes. These things can accumulate over time and when a person is in a situation as a child then even as an adult where. There's just this ongoing stress. Nothing really shows you call a T- a big trauma but it just the roads. A roads and accumulates and in a sense wears us down also is somewhat different. Something can happen. That you know just don't seem like that big thing for example. I am thinking one client that I work with and he would experience anxiety when he'd be invited out for dinner to a friend's house or even to arrest Iran but at the end. That was pretty. Didn't seem like an other anxieties but that was a clear trigger for him so we began to work on though it turns out went to an image a memory. Abbadi memory when he was about five years old. They would visiting a friend. Housewere Relatives House to the table was full of dishes and food. He's curious five year old and one of the corners from the from the table cost was hanging down. Of course he grabbed it and Poland and stuff came crashing down and they didn't scream at him but the startle and seeing their faces were they were startled. That just got locked in so again. Had the symptom which doesn't make any sense except if you know why it made sense again. Every time he would go into the restaurant into somebody's house that anxiety so he was back in like five year olds day. That's really fascinating just to opine for a second here. One of the things you really pointing to is the way in which we tend to dismiss or gloss over events in life that truly were impactful for us in a variety of different ways. That person may have never thought that that pulling the tablecloth moment was something that would have that kind of an impact on them long term. And if you're telling that story to somebody might seem like really a very small thing that you should have quote unquote just gotten over but if you're activating that fight or flight mechanism if the vagus nerve getting triggered if it's been held and clenched in the body in that fashion you know. It's kind of hard sometimes. Maybe for the body to tell the difference between that event and one that was more a truly life threatening and what really matters is whether that embodied experience is getting triggered whether it's by little tease or a big tease. Sometimes it's worth pointing out. We can also internalize the dismissal of other people toward our own negative experiences. How many times can person be told? Oh that really seemed like it. Wasn't that big of a deal or have somebody kind of laugh at off with them before they just start to think. Oh Yeah I should really think about that as being significant event in my life but as has been a theme throughout our conversation. It's the difference between top down and bottom up. You might top down and prevent like. Oh it's not that big a deal but bottom up. The body still might really be held in a in a cycle of closing and holden around at that event which is just a A really wonderful thing to point out something that's released reshaping in the moment. The way that I think about this kind of material so again Peter you know. Thank you so much for taking the time here. It was really wonderful having you with us today. Just lovely seeing the two of you really. So today. We had the pleasure of speaking with Dr Peter Levin. We began with Peter Story of waking the tiger and the experience that he had working closely with a client who has really gripped by the symptoms of trauma by using imagery that forced her body into release and movement. Peter really discovered a methodology for helping people move past the embodied symptoms of their traumatic experiences. A major feature of which is allowing the body to complete the response that was seized or held at the time that the trauma happened. The example that was given the story was a gas mask being put over somebody to knock them out in them struggling against the doctors that were holding them down. The body wasn't able to run away in that moment so by allowing it to complete that cycle of running that traumatic material can be released or lessened inside of.

Dr Peter Levin Peter Story Berkeley Iran Poland holden
"dr peter" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

09:09 min | 1 year ago

"dr peter" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"There was a line up the street and then around the corner and so I went to the people who own the house where I rented a little room as my office and I asked if I could bring people in and we had our first group session where we worked with some of these tools. How do you work with some difficult? Emotion or sensation occurs. Howdy reference it in your body. And how do you? When I called Penn Joey you move into just a little bit and then move out. Move into a just a little bit and then move out further so when a person has been fighting. Barra sensations for who knows sometimes their whole lives. It seems like it's going to be completely overwhelming. But if you help guide them just touching into those sensations Ananta coming back go internally little and then come back out in Oriente externally by those kinds of shifting somatic exercises semantic awareness exercises. The person then begins to move out of the trauma. They started to have new experience in their bodies and again. It's the new experiences that shift the person from trauma to awakening. Inflow has beautiful so peter on that I have two quick comments than a question so the first comment is that it has struck me when I very. I watched you work that you're the trauma whisper and what I mean by. That is that you speak the bodily language the non verbal language. And you're able to read it really really well and then help others understand it in parts of using Verte language. But you're really talking about a kind of language of trauma. That's very bodily expressive. It's a sensory motor language. And also you're very adept with syntax of that language its structure its sequencing its proper flow and I think that's also an opportunity for people in general both through getting formal training from you in your trainings in reading your books and also more generally do to kind of reflect on with the body is communicating with this intelligence but in non verbal ways exactly you know a roomy does the. Sufi poet said there is a language that doesn't use words listen observe. That's exactly right so then Annette in that kind of leads to my second comment your way. You just said there about listening. I WanNa make very explicit which hugh implied in somewhat said which is it's critically important to resource ourselves as we grapple with trauma including understandings or the skills of mindfulness. Let's say that allow us to pendulum. In or Penn Jillette in and then pendulum out really really important. Annals have resources of extra support such as therapists. Have People like you. So here's my question. Most of the people listening to this who have had either macro trauma you know. A single acute trauma or a lot of accumulation of micro traumas and in some case multiple macro traumas. Most of those people are not currently seeing a therapist and may well never see a therapist and yet there are certainly things they can do themselves that are within range and skillful and sufficiently resources themselves and so I went to see if you could speak to that a few takeaways for people in general civilians as it were for what they can do with themselves and in particular. I wonder if you want to speak to the topic of shame. Feelings of worthlessness damage. In so because that's such pervasive and unfortunate side effect as it were of being horribly mistreated. Yeah yeah shame. That's probably the eight hundred pound gorilla fits in the consulting room and it's something that really can kind of arrest the therapeutic process even with if not extreme trauma one of the things that I realized that I discovered is that in shame remember described Nancy running and then her heartbeat went to very low level. Well this way later learned to call. The Nepali Beta theory. That at a certain stage of development is around eighteen months to two years. The this is the first time the baby infant is now becoming a toddler and running all over the place and to pretend to be inflicting danger to itself and so the parent has to be able to say no and that stops whatever they're doing and it's feels harbor. It feels almost like death because it's a very similar physiology to what Nancy was exhibiting that escape and so again using the same basic principles of having to move the president move very very slowly into the shame posture moving very very subtly slowly increasing posture. Shane looking away looking down that collapsing the front of the body. But just a little teeny bit and then moving out of it very very slowly because again. It's the inner movement that's critic in night you can't. You can't just change your posture while change that feeling and this is someone. This is something a person could do themselves. Peter yes it is something but you know it's really was shame it's really important that there's somebody there the impact that gather. Who's just there who's present for you when you're doing that and often what happens when the person does this than they're able to really look at where the shame is coming from. I think it's really really critical to really understand what people can do by themselves. And also where there might be a limit. There are literally tens of millions of people who have symptoms like Nancy's so again people who have these conditions they have considerably higher level of trauma in their histories but also just having those kinds of symptoms can't itself extremely stressful and not being able to get a treatment or diagnosis. It'd be very stressful to people. But here's one exercise that people can do the idea here and we haven't really talked about the vagus nerve but the vagus nerve goes from the brain stem down in throughout the whole of the interior of the body. Vegas MEANS VAGABOND. Wanderer and particularly it goes to the organs of digestion. And what happens is when we see something horrible that a message goes down that nerve and by the way is the largest nerve in the body and it twists the gut step in the guts. Go but what was but his little known and the porges revivify this idea so we see something and we go Yak. That's a motor action. But then the sensory input sensory receptors in the guts send signals backed up eighty percent of that nerve backed up into the brain stem where it gets amplified and they get sent down again. So it's like start with some somebody being hit by a car you go in. That goes up to the brain stem amplifies in of God and again. That's how it gets stuck in the body. So I designed this little exercise within very particular sound vibrated down in those receptors in the gut. Singlet back up into the brain stem to say the threat is over. You can go now. So the idea is the taken easing photographs. And on the excavation making the sound blue as though it's coming from the belly and letting the breath in the sound go all the way and then just waiting for the new breast to come in on his sound filling ballet and then chest and then again who sound so demonstrated can anybody is of course. Welcome to join in. And you know if it feels intimidating or doesn't feel right for any reason than court don't do it or just listen to it often. That's enough to help the person shift a little bit out of a state of shutdown so we go easy breath easy program.

Nancy Peter Penn Joey Penn Jillette Barra Ananta Annette hugh Oriente Shane president Vegas
"dr peter" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

11:48 min | 1 year ago

"dr peter" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Hello and welcome to being well. I'm forrest handsome. I'm joined as usual by Dr Rick Hansen. So Dad how are you doing today? I'm good in. It is a pleasure and an honor to be able to talk with Peter here who I've admired enormously and learned a lot from myself. Oh that's fantastic. Yeah absolutely and as you just said. Today we have the pleasure of welcoming a truly world class expert on the subject of trauma to the show Dr Peter Levin so Doctor Levin has worked in the field of stress and trauma for over forty years and is the developer of somatic experiencing a body oriented clinical method. That's highly effective in dealing with the effects of overwhelm on our nervous system. He's received a lifetime achievement award from the United States Association for body psychotherapy and the honorary. Reese Davis Chair in child. Psychiatry Doctor Levin is also the author of the bestselling classic book on Trauma Waking The tiger. He's authored and Co authored several other fantastic books including healing trauma in an unspoken voice and trauma and memory. Our conversation today with Peter Focuses on his work with somatic experiencing and particularly what? It's been like for him to work with clients of different kinds and the practices that he's brought forward in that space particularly focuses on the body and the way in which the body interacts with and holds trauma. Although there's a lot of material and here that's aimed at practitioners and the therapeutic space I think that the episode is chock full of great advice for people trying to work through their old challenging experiences in a more self help kind of way particularly Peter. Give some great advice on empathic atonement and the ways in which we can become more aware of the inner worlds of other people as with all of our episodes that are related challenging experiences of different kinds. Please be kind here self listening here. This episode includes descriptions of specific traumatic events including particularly a couple of descriptions of wartime events. And if that material is difficult for you please take things slow. Go at your own pace and do whatever you need to do here. And of course as with all of our episodes related to trauma various kinds. There's certainly no judgment from us if you choose to skip this one before we get into our conversation with Peter. I wanted to mention a couple of things really quick. The first is that as you might know we're now unpatriotic if you'd like to receive a variety of benefits including the expanded show notes that I put together for this episode. You can go to Patriot dot com slash being well podcast and become a patron. It's a great way to support the show and receive a variety of benefits in return. Second Peter was actually travelling when we recorded this conversation and unfortunately his audio quality suffered a little bit as a result as a bit of an audio file myself. This is something that I'm actually really attentive to. And it's been a real focus of mine to improve the audio quality in general of our conversations with experts on the podcast. I just want you to know that it's something that I'm aware of and something that we're going to put some resources into in the future but for today's conversation I hope that you stick with it. It's really not that bad. And I think that Peter gives absolutely fantastic information during this episode. All right so it's time for our conversation with Peter so it's a real pleasure to have you here on the show today. Dr. How're you doing? It's good to be with you guys act to tell you I really. It brings me a lot of the see. The two of you together I think for a lot of people who've known rick for a long time. I think that it's it's funny to have this kind of interaction with the sort of face. But we're really looking forward to doing this. I'd like to start by kind of framing your work and talking about somatic experiencing for the people listening who might be just a little bit less familiar with that. So somatic experiencing draws some of its inspiration from observing nature specifically as we've talked about on the podcast before you can watch an animal in the wild and Dir a completely life threatening situation and then mere moments later returned to a very normal kind of functioning as zebra gets chased by By Lion it's running for its life and it manages to survive thirty minutes later. It's just kinda chilling eating the grass but humans don't really seem to do that quite so well. So why is that? And why somatic experiencing sort of a response to that. When I began to develop somatic experiencing that was in the bay early seventies late sixties there was no definition of trauma where there is today as ptsd that didn't arise until Nineteen eighty-one her. They're about so. I was both unfortunate and fortunate because I didn't know that trauma was a incurable brain disorder. At best could be managed. Had I known that I probably wouldn't have gone on? And you're putting air quotes around the phrase incurable brain disorder. They claim managed. Yeah that's right anyhow. I was beginning a mind body approach to stress at the time but as I continue to work with. He bumped a friend of mine. Who was a psychiatrist? He referred to women to me correct. Call Nancy and Nancy had been suffering from all kinds of physical conditions. Things we would. Now Call bye-bye Myalgia. Irritable Bowel Syndrome CHRONIC FATIGUE. Migraines severe PMS. She was also suffering from severe panic attacks and to the point where she really couldn't even leave the house to walk around the block without her husband being there living in a kind of Hell. Yeah in a in a prison really in a prison. They had gone from specialist to specialist Don from specialists specialists so she came in with her husband wide deer in the headlight. So I tried to reassure them and then I invited her in to the consultation room and I began to do the relaxation techniques that I had developed and she came in our heartbeat was about one hundred fifty. Beats a minute. I worked with those muscles to relax and my semi happiness. Her pulse started going down down down almost into a normal range but then just a fraction of a second or heart shot up higher even higher than when she came in. And so I said what Stupidest thing that anybody could say and that was Nancy. You must relax. You need to relax better heart rate than started going back down again and went down to again to seventy five to sixty five to fifty five anti turn Pale. She locked onto my eyes and said Dr. I'm dying I'm dying. Don't let me Die. Help me help me. I mean it's really. You know this happened in nineteen sixty nine and even when I tell it I get a little bit of tightening my chest I finish it moves through but I was really. I was at the moment I was. I was terrified. I didn't know what to do so then I saw an image at the far end of the consulting room. Tiger Crouch Gani ready to spring. Sorry is this an imagined image or you imagine him in okay. It's not like you had the painting on the wall. No no no no. This is a rose in your mind. He has a waking dream. You say a waking dream and so I said Nancy. There's a tiger is a tiger chasing you. Run Climb those rocks and escape and much to my amazement. After a short period of time legs started to shake and tremble starting to move as though she was laying down as though she were running and this one and then her body would shake and tremble waves things become icy cold and then warm. And there'd be spontaneous breath and the side girl went on for almost forty minute and towards the end there was only a very very gentle gentle hammering and her heartbeat had settle down than opened her eyes and she said to me. I'm Dr do you WanNa know what happened? He told me about the image of the tiger. And you instructed me to run. I couldn't run. My legs. Felt like lead like I was running in mud or underwater but when you encourage me You can do it. You can do it. You can do Nancy. I could start to feel my legs running and then I could feel my arms and hands as I was climbing climbing the Rock and then when I got to the top I looked down and I saw the Tiga. The image of the tiger disappeared and I saw the image of myself a picture of myself when I was four years old and I was being held down by doctors and nurses and given ether mask for a tonsillectomies and in a way I realize a few things that her body had wanted to run an escape for twenty years. She was about twenty four when I saw her but she was unable to because she was held down. But it's like now. She was being held down by the memory of what happened. Not a conscious. Memory it's what sometimes called the procedure or I body memory. So you're saying about animals. So at that time I was I was in graduate school at UC Berkeley in. I was doing my doctoral surgeon Department and we have a seminar that met every couple of weeks and I had remembered that a few weeks before Donna Wilson was talking about a little known phenomenon called tonic. Immobility and tonic immobility. If you take an animal and you voted so it can't move and you're not really frightening. You're just restraining. And it goes into the state called tonic mobility and the heartbeat goes very very low. There's almost no respiration you can barely see respiration but then the animal comes out of using a matter of minutes sometimes even seconds. When Nancy went into that state she didn't just come out of it. I mean it took a you know the guidance and took her to be able to move through. This tremendous amount of fear trauma and stress is not just something that happens in the brain that happens in the mind if something that happens in the body and into our experienced in the body changes until it changes they were always gripped by the trauma is acting as though it is present. But we're not able to be in the here and now because with where there and then so the body response can change experience in the body could change from helpless and.

Dr Peter Levin Nancy Dr Rick Hansen lifetime achievement award Reese Davis United States Association developer Donna Wilson ptsd Myalgia Tiger Crouch UC Berkeley Co Bowel Syndrome Immobility Don Dr. I
"dr peter" Discussed on Breaking the Underdog Curse

Breaking the Underdog Curse

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"dr peter" Discussed on Breaking the Underdog Curse

"Welcome to breaking the underdog curse for chiropractors. I'm your host, Dr dawn McDonald, author of the bestselling book the underdog curse, we give vita Listrik carb Rackers a chance to learn from the best around the world discovering how they overcame their challenges and achieve success in order for chiropractic to thrive in must have thriving chiropractors. Now, listen up it's time to crush the curse. Hello, everybody. And welcome to another episode of breaking the underdog curse this Dr. Dawn McDonald your host and today, I get to head out to Mississauga Ontario. And I get to interview Dr Peter ambler, who I've heard of for many many years, and I only just recently met him pry truth rears back at a wave at the wave. I think we kinda act ran into each other Dr Peter ambler, he graduated from Sam sec- in nineteen eighty five and he's been practicing Mississauga ever since and it will get into the rest of the story. But he's done tons of stuff. So he's been like on the college and regulatory he's been to D And speaking at D E, and he travels all around the world, and he helps inspires inspire chiropractors all over the place. Very fine Listrik, and I know his message is going to help a lot of us who are driving to work in our car listings, podcasts Guinness, jacked up the day. So welcome to the podcast Dr Peter thank fam-, Don. It's pleasure. That's great. So it's so funny because I've heard of you for so long, and then it was just great. To actually I think we just bumped into each other at the airport. I think it was the airport. Yeah. And I if I remember correctly, it was the airport, and then brandy had a sub in for somebody because somebody couldn't make the meeting. Yes. And and and so I heard her speak. She spoke before able even she she gave up fantastic caulk. And so that kind of inspired, man. And and then we got together after my talk and spent some time together and realize you got a woman common. Yeah. I still visual at all. Yeah. I know. And then there's the Osceola connections all the world. So this is the it's a tight knit community. And so it's nice to kind of connect out. And of course, brandies coming to speak at pure powerful here first weekend November. So this like Asoka moat probably the Wednesday right before that seminar, so fibber so people haven't richer, I know already sold out or close, but we haven't so people have time. And and we always do and it's a it's a beautiful event. And we're really excited a brand either. Because a we liked have female energy on the platform, if you believe in male female energy, I'm not sure that he do. That's another discussion. I believe in unconditional love, which doesn't know. Gender. But but we have a lot associates that come to the program. So we're really excited for brand. Ada not be able to stand up and share as CA as well. We need more CA still brand new stone. That's great. Well, I always like to start off. Now, you know at this point in your career. How long you've been practicing I so I graduated in nineteen eighty five and a week ago today. So what are we the twelve Koper fifth of nine hundred eighty five was the day hung out Michelle and open the doors might practice. I'm in the same office building servant for thirty three years and one week exactly when he will happy anniversary through three years when we thank you. Thank you. So how did this all start in the first place? How did how did Dr Peter get into chiropractic in the first place low? That's a great question. And I was I grew up in a small town in on tarot called Kitchener, and is in a all boys Catholic high school. And it was the end of grade eleven and I wasn't the most centered and focused individual you could say I'm gonna leave it at that. But I I, and I and I thought that I might. You know, wanna be a teacher and that would teach. Phys Ed and French because is good at French. And you know, I love sports. And so I have to be in the guide Sofit for various reasons at the end of end of the school year. And they were having a meeting about me. And anyway, I just happened to pick up a book, and it was this EMC course calendar, and I read the definition of chiropractic in something inside me said, this is what you're supposed to do with your life. And I remember it is if it was yesterday, and I said, okay. And in that moment, I decided I didn't know what chiropractic was nobody in my family hit ever been to a chiropractor. My sister was a nurse. We are a medical model family, and I was going to be a chiropractor. And and and the priests came out of the meeting, and I had a chat with them and committed the turn in new leaf and.

Dr Peter ambler Dr Peter Dr dawn McDonald brandy Mississauga Dr. Dawn McDonald Asoka Ontario Guinness Michelle Sofit EMC Sam sec Catholic high school D E Don thirty three years three years one week