17 Burst results for "Dr Patterson"

"dr patterson" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:42 min | 9 months ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on KOMO

"That's a win win, Huh? I'd say so. That's Humana. A more human way to healthcare. A plastic came out of Medicare advantage plans with prescription drug coverage or command standalone prescription drug plans. The chief says the officers saw no evidence of a crime and relayed the information to the FBI knew tonight. The deadliest serial killer in American history has died at the age of 80. Samuel Little was serving a life sentence. And died in a California hospital. Little confessed to killing 93 people, mostly women between 1970 in 2005. Investigators say dozens of the women were strangled to death. Little had several medical issues corner will determine what caused his death. Knew it. 11, a nurse is urging people to continue taking precautions. Even after getting vaccinated for covert 19. She tested positive for Corona virus a few days after getting the first dose of the Fizer vaccine. Ah 100 Guzman from our San Antonio sister station asked health experts about that risk. I heard about vaccine coming so super excited to get it. This nurse's case who will call Jane to protect her anonymity, like many frontline workers, was relieved to hear she'd be one of the first to get visors. Historic Covert 19 vaccine think that fortunate Do not get it. And then I got the vaccine that was like, Oh, my gosh. He's gonna make it to the second dose now and hopefully will be 95% effective Jane Wrister held for 10 months working directly with covert patients. On December 17th. She got the shot of hope. Unfortunately, December 26 I started I woke up with chills. And then I checked my temperature and had a low grade temp of 99.9. So as soon as I knew, I knew right away. I was like, Oh, no, I probably Contracted the Kobe. This table shows 39 covert cases were reported after 21,669 people got the first Does we turn to doctors at U. T held San Antonio who say this nurse's case is common? There's some people that have come down with co bid you know, after they got the vaccine, but that's not because they got the vaccine. Um, that's because Got exposed to covet, and they were not fully immune. Dr. Patterson says It could take anywhere between 10 to 12 days to be immune, but need both doses to be 95% Sure you can't Contract Cove in 19 would think that you can You can't get it Still, you're gonna get vaccinated. You get this one vaccine and you're good for the rest of time. You still have to social distance. You still have to wear your mask. Studies found. The Fizer vaccine is about 52% effective after that first dose and 95% effective seven days after the second dose. We are less than 25 hours away from bringing in 2021 tonight, the space it'll let up in that magenta color. The cameras Moving around a little bit to the reminding people not to show up at Seattle Center tomorrow night this year. The on leeway to see the new Year celebration is from home. There will be no fireworks. It is a virtual event you can watch on TV or online. This is a preview of what to expect. The city of Seattle put out a notice today, warning the public that all New Year's Eve events at Seattle Center are officially canceled in New York Times Square will look a lot like a ghost town compared to the normal celebrations. The iconic ball will still drop in times Square tomorrow night. Have a test run today, but revelers are asked to watch from home streets will be closed around Times Square and Ryan Seacrest is once again hosting the countdown was special guest performances. I think it's important that we do bring in fun, and we do bring in this theme of celebration and the steam of moving forward and moving on from from this year, and you can watch.

Jane Wrister Samuel Little Times Square San Antonio Humana FBI Seattle Center Seattle Ryan Seacrest Guzman California hospital New York Contract Cove Dr. Patterson U. T
"dr patterson" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

05:14 min | 10 months ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"Don't forget the code fifteen off. I want to finish the the wishing story for second. We're almost done all right. But it's interesting to me that part of the wishing and it's weird that it preceded the seventies when i'm about to describe which is in fuck it. We'll just make your genie or which you don't have to think it happens the genial make it happen for you right and the witch. There's there was a lot of gina bottle. Talk back then like you can make a member. I'm a lot of you can make things happen but the genie will make it happen for you. Just wish it the al and then it became sort of part of a narrative in the seventies. Right am. I am i right. So it started in the sixties. Kind of yeah well. I'm sure it's always been a part of our society but was fi well for now as i feel like. We're a lot more proactive. Like you go out and you go get some you know. There's no hang out by the railing right. Wait for someone to tears. So we've advance a little bit. That's good daniel thirty five connecticut. Hi i had a covert in march and i'm still suffering like waves of symptoms mostly shortness of breath and i was wondering dr drew. If you've heard of a long haulers have any rights. So you had you had proven covert. You actually have the test when you're sick and you had the you have the virus. Yes yes okay so long haulers you know a lot of it. It's Way more than we like to sort of. We wish it weren't this comment as a long haul. Long hauler means some persistent symptoms that seemed to drag on forever. Some of it is neurological fatigue. Sleepless in somebody's psychiatric depression. Even thought disturbances. A lot of it is coughing. Join eggs muscle aches this sort of thing. Dr patterson and your dr yogendra are during a lot of research on this and they are pulling together a group of long haulers in trying different interventions and. They're having lots of good effect that doesn't sustain. They're having trouble. Sustaining the effect so look wired g. e. r. a. again dra and dr patterson. Pat and dr. It's what you'll reuss patterson.

Dr patterson dr. It daniel connecticut Pat
"dr patterson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And we're going to hear part of that conversation. Now tell us about these doctors. Yes, well, Dr Arturo Holmes is a urology resident at SUNY Downstate Medical Center That's in Brooklyn. He actually wrote a recent op ed to David about his experiences as a black doctor, and then we were also joined by Dr Mary Louise Patterson. She's a retired pediatrician still on the clinical staff at while Cornell Medical College and I should say she was our families, that pediatrician that's how we tracked her down. So I started by asking Dr Patterson. We call her Dr P in our family about her four decades David working in New York City, starting back in 1969. And I asked her if there were many other black pediatricians practicing in New York City at that time. As far as I know, I was the only one below 120 history. There were African American physicians at Harlem Hospital where I did my first two years of hospital training, but otherwise in private practice, no Dr Holmes. Does this resonate with you at all as AH, Resident at SUNY Downstate. What's your experience as a black doctor in 2020? So I'm actually quite fortunate. As a urology resident at 20 downstate, I have the luxury of actually having several black attendings. In my program, depression of our university. Dr. Reilly is actually a blackmail position. As is our current program director. I can't say that it is something that You know, and the other black position is fortunate enough to say, But I can say that that that is something I have very thankful for. So that is something that must Dr Patterson give you cause to reflect on your own experience and perhaps take heart at the same time, Black doctors are still under represented. Is it fair to say that the absence of African American doctors contributes to the ongoing health emergencies of Black and brown New Yorkers. Oh, absolutely. And clearly, I think that African Americans in general still probably feel or comfortable with an African American physician than they would with a white physician. But that's not always the case. And I I don't know about Dr Holmes's experience, but mine was that they were African Americans who still believed that white doctors were better. Doctors were better trained doctors, So it's kind of slang both ways you could have Patients who were very happy to see you and clearly could relax and tell you about perhaps some of the home remedies that they had used prior to coming to see you knowing that they wouldn't be derided, right? Or, you know, ridiculed for for doing so. And then there were others who didn't want to see you. Dr Holmes. In what ways have patients or colleagues treated you differently as a black doctor. So for the most part nine times out of 10. When I interact with black patients, they're usually welcoming, but I have had experiences more often with the white patients on black Station. Where I walk into a room and Ah ah, patient will assume that I'm not a physician. I'm not qualified to be a physician because I'm black, you know, but after you sit down and talk with them Their perspective shift. So, Dr Holmes you recently wrote about your experience in an op ed for the Washington Post, titled I'm a Black Doctor. I wear my Scrubs everywhere now. Tell us why so the issue that just In our core are not issues that I typically talked about in a public setting. Um Or sometimes even at all. Did you tell police encounter? Why was stops late and I don't want way home from the hospital and Rather finding experience, especially in the context of you know all the things that we've been seeing happen when black individuals encounter law enforcement under circumstances. There's like four of them in the car, and I just remember Being addressed as though you know I was not where I should be, and I shouldn't have been driving around at night. Ultimately, they realised that with in scrubs I was able to leave safely. But I think about moments like we've seen recently with Jacob Blake and with George Floyd and I You wonderful, benign encountered could become deadly. Whoa! 01 is both saddened and maddened by hearing stories like that. Um No. I have not had an encounter with the police like Dr Holmes's describing not that other African American women have not, but I myself have not But you know when you leave the sanctity and the safety of your homes That that's a possibility. And Dr Homes in the mix of all that we've been talking about. How did you experience the pandemic? And did you find yourself acutely aware of The racial and class disparities of the pandemic. Or were you just too consumed with the work itself, which would certainly be understandable. So you know, it's very difficult not to see. Disparities that you already know about. I remember one We can call when I walked into the into the sea and Ah, you know, you saw folks on ventilators an emergency room and, you know, I just remembered kind of that heightened level. Vigilance and concerned and then just saying All these black and brown faces on on ventilators, barely making it through an emergency room. It was ah! It was very concerning Very concerning.

Dr Arturo Holmes Dr Mary Louise Patterson black Station SUNY Downstate Medical Center David Dr Homes SUNY Downstate New York City Harlem Hospital Brooklyn Cornell Medical College clinical staff Dr. Reilly program director Washington Post private practice Jacob Blake
"dr patterson" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

06:39 min | 1 year ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on The Story Collider

"So. It turns out that the houses lab not really allowed at all. It's it's an office. It has a comfy chair and the lines are drawn, but that's that's pretty much it. I I'm here because my grant Eric is writing a book about pseudoscience and false memories placebos and he's been running around having adventures because that's the kind of person he is. He's even managed to get himself cursed by Abruzzo. And I am the research assistant. So I'm doing what I'm good at which is reading papers. I'm digging into the scientific literature to understand. Is there any research behind all these incredible claims of how the brain works and how powerful it is. But I've spent at this point like six hours at the UAW original trauma center watching Eric. Go through a series of tests he's getting experimented on. And nothing has happened. I'm bored. and. It's important. I. Should be excited to be here because you know I've heard reports about how clinical hypnosis can do incredible things like burn victims who are just screaming in agonizing pain they get hypnotized bloom like the no pain they can scrub their wounds out. AM, but there's no patience here. It's just me watching and I'm watching him struggle and you know fidget and fail. and. All I can think is. I could do so much about like. Straw needed measure my brain I want the. I want to. Measure. Mid Science me up. But that's not my job. I don't get to participate in this trip I am just supposed to be observing recording. And and his boring. So we've been in this hypnosis session for more than half an hour at this point and Dr Patterson. Brings the session to a close brings Eric out of the hypnotic trance he'd put him into. And just as like well that really. Nothing happened Eric agrees he didn't feel anything and I'm thinking well, yeah, I know nothing happened I have half an hour of the world's boring videotape that I've been filming small-time and my arm hurts and I. I'm disappointed right because like I'm I'm here to see extraordinary things I had hoped. And I feel like a deeper sense of disappointment to like. I had worried that this was pseudoscience that it was bullshit. and. Maybe it was right. Lake Science doesn't happen if the experiments don't walk work while you're watching norm, right? Some hacking and thinking like while this was a waste of a day but then. Dr Powders. Pauses in looks at me and goes. What if we tried on lists? And I'm like. It is I'm so ready. Here, we go finally so. SWAP, places I sit in the comfy chair Dr Patterson starts talking to me and his very soothing hypnotic voice and I'm just because like. He's a serious researcher. He's a big shot right? He's faculty both in surgery and Psychology I WANNA impress him. And I also feel like I'm well in Lake well-equipped to impress him because I'm thinking about the time like I was bragging that I can drop my heart rate on demand and the guy at the bars like no, you can't like yes I can and he slapped his I watch on me and then dropped my heart rate on demanding gin and tonic out of that. So but. So Dr Patterson begins by saying that he's going to induce a hypnotic trance in me and that he may not notice anything at all that I might just it may seem like nothing at all is happening. What's important is that I feel relaxed. But he'll. He doubts that I will notice anything. But what he would like me to do is to notice if anything changes for me and I'm unthinking I'm alert I'm ready to notice I'm a scientist like this is what I do I notice things. Let's go. So Dr Patterson asked me to imagine a staircase and he says, as I count down the stairs. You'll step down that staircase in your mind and it will be easy and just notice yourself in how you're feeling and I'm thinking yeah. Yeah. Yeah I have a sleep APP that does exactly this like I've done my homework. Let's go. and. So Dr Patterson starts starts to count and he says I'm going to begin. One one step down, you're feeling relaxed to two steps down three. Three steps down notice that you feel calm and relaxed. That's good. I'm playing long like, okay. Cool. Waiting to for something to happen. I'm very relaxed and I don't want to interfere with this experiment so I'm not trying to judge it. But I'm like just checking in like Kenai I. Sensory systems working right I can hear the scratching of Eric's pen on the notebooks Mike Cool everything's. and Dr Patterson leads me deeper four four steps by steps deeper and deeper. And at this point, he asks me to take my right hand and raise it just to lift it off the arm of the chair and let it hover. An ancient space? And I'm not supposed to do anything within it. I'm not supposed to voluntarily control it, but he asked me to imagine a string connected to my wrist that attaches to a helium balloon and that my arm will feel perhaps very light as I relax. And I think. I know what's happening this. Is this is a tool in hypnosis it's supposed to it's a dissociated tool. Right? The idea is that both by suggesting to me that my hands not under my own control. That some other forces lifting it that that will deepen my own hypnotic chance but also it's a cue for the doctor. So he can tell if my hand is lifting that I'm deeper in trance, right? So.

Dr Patterson Eric Dr Powders Abruzzo research assistant Straw Lake Science UAW Lake well-equipped researcher scientist Kenai
"dr patterson" Discussed on Serial Killers

Serial Killers

08:26 min | 1 year ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on Serial Killers

"Graphic once the two were alone craft bounded the naked marine by his ankles. Wrists and neck with more restrained craft was free to torture him. Craft raped more scratching and biting his body leaving deep on his genitals. It seemed craft slowly escalated brutality. Through the night crowing more excited has he pushed his violent desires further and further. He ended the attack with a brutal beating clubbing. Moore's face repeatedly until the soldier finally died with. Moore's death and exhilarating craft added his latest victim to the scorecard. The Entry Read E. D. M. Moore's initials although this was craft second kill. It was filled with many firsts that Christmas night he got his first taste of torture and mutilation he relished having that kind of power over someone and would go on to do the same to every victim that followed craft may fit the description of a hedonistic serial killer according to criminologist Dr Scott. Bon hedonistic serial killers are thrill seekers who derive immense pleasure from their murderous exploits and from the torture and prolonged suffering of their victims so they typically kill slowly hedonistic killers revel in the pain of others though craft had gotten some satisfaction from his first murder. He realized that ritualistic torture and defiling. Victim's bodies made the thrilled that much more intense. The second murder also marked the beginning of craft trophy taking. He took polaroid's of more while he lay unconscious. After killing the young soldier he also took the only thing more treasured his Harmonica Nottingham. Trent University Psychologist Mark. Griffiths explained that for some murderers a key. Part of their enjoyment comes in taking trophies like photos or personal items from the victim having these objects in his possession reminded craft of his crimes and likely served does a stimulus to act out again. But of course the crowning piece of crafts twisted game was his makeshift scorecard. Without simple slip of paper he made killing into a sadistic sport after marking. Edm On his scorecard craft disposed of. Moore's body it didn't take long for it to be found on December. Twenty six one thousand nine hundred seventy two around one forty five. Am authorities received? A call from a shocked passer-by when the police arrived just off the side of the four or five freeway in Seal Beach. None of the officers were prepared for the gruesome scene. That awaited them. Moore's face had been so badly battered that he was unrecognizable. Detectives were only able to identify the body because he wore a jacket bearing a US Marine Corps Patch with his name stitched on it. He had no shoes on and only one sock. The other was found. Lodged in his rectum. Medical Examiners later concluded he died from the blunt force trauma to his face. The perpetrator had likely used a pipe. The toxicology report showed there were no drugs or alcohol in more system. This was a major difference from crafts. First victim the only thing. The two murders had in common was that their bodies had been thrown out of a moving vehicle. The clear brutality of Moore's death may do cats murder seem tame by comparison authorities would make the connection between them until years later instead they started at square one. After the discovery of Moore's body Orange County police zeroed in on his stomping grounds near Camp Pendleton due to the apparent rage of Moore's killer. Police were convinced. His murder was a crime of passion. People familiar with more all pointed police toward Charles Vines. His on again off again lover when two detectives showed up to trailer on December twenty sixth. It didn't seem like he was a person of interest or at least that's not the impression that binds got from their questioning. They said they only wanted to speak to the person who knew their victim best. They were trying to understand. What kind of Man Moore was and who he might have gotten mixed up with. During the interrogation authorities presented vines with a picture of an unnamed man a local hustler. They suspected was behind Morris. Killing finds told them he'd never seen the man before. Despite the lack of evidence police almost immediately focused on this unknown hustler. The wrong man entirely and they had trouble letting go of their incorrect assumptions. Randy Kraft it. Never made a blip on their radar instead for years. Police insisted that Wayne. Joseph Duquette and Edward Daniel. More were killed by someone close to them. These conclusions were almost entirely based on the victims sexuality and therefore high risk lifestyle their own biased views against the so-called gay killings prevented them from realizing a serial killer was at large and now that kraft had gotten away with murder twice. He was emboldened to lash out much more frequently. Crafts third victim known as John DOE. Sixteen was discovered less than two months later. On the morning of February sixth nineteen seventy-three the body had been dumped by the side of the Terminal Island freeway in the city of Wilmington a few miles north of long beach authorities noticed immediate similarities between Edward Daniel Moore and John Doe Sixteen who is simply listed as Wilmington n Kraft's scorecard although this new victim didn't exhibit the same disturbing level of torture as more. They were both strangled with a thin metal. Cable Likely Piano wire another similarity was found in the victim's rectum. Both corpses had a single sock stuffed inside which made police suspect they'd been killed by the same person they would soon learn that inserting objects into his victim's orifices and defiling. Their genitals was crafts signature. The Raw Sadism was baffling to detectives to try to get a better understanding of the unknown. Sadistic killer police consulted with doctor. Een Mansell Pattison a UC Irvine Psychiatrist Patterson wrote to them that the killer desires to be masculine and virile but does not feel masculine. He vicariously identifies with the beautiful masculine image of the victim sodomizing the victim of firms that he is a potent aggressive virile heterosexual male and makes the victim of female thus reinforcing the killers self image of masculinity. Dr Patterson argued that crafts sexual sadism was rooted in self hate. He temporarily felt better about himself when hurting those younger and better looking than him perhaps. It's no coincidence. That most of his victims fall within the same age group late teens to mid twenty s. They were attractive than predominantly white. Dr Patterson also warned investigators that the killer felt no remorse over his action. Therefore another attack was inevitable. Patterson's words were truly prophetic. The following year would be his most deadly by the end of nineteen. Seventy three. He'd add four more names to his scorecard. Thanks again for tuning in to serial killers. We'll be back Thursday with a new episode on Randy. Steven Kraft will cover the height of crafts sadistic murderers and the growing list of names on his scorecard for more information on Randy Steven Kraft amongst the many sources we used. We found angel of darkness..

E. D. M. Moore Craft murder Randy Steven Kraft Dr Patterson Steven Kraft polaroid US Marine Corps Edward Daniel Moore Nottingham Trent University Charles Vines Griffiths Seal Beach Orange County Wilmington n Kraft Dr Scott Psychologist Mark
"dr patterson" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

Ross Patterson Revolution!

12:02 min | 1 year ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

"One. Aw and marine that Amiga Year to look at fear but the the the cringes part of it is him jokingly doing it again jokingly doing it again pulling her in an arm around the neck and yeah when she looks at him boy so what happened is they did another video later and then she had to release a statement because there was so much boob way backlash backlash for Boob Way. Yeah and and just said were in a loving relationship you can watch us on. Facebook live to they have their own facebook live TV show. Then yeah no. I think they just go live on facebook. That must've been with. Oh Gotcha Gotcha Gotcha and the statement says you know you can see our love for each other. And that's exactly what every woman in a beaten relation sure and then she actually put out a video defending him but he is standing right next door with his arm around her wall. She's talking like kind of off to the side but like his arm is wrapped around. So it's like you don't even really see him but you you know he's there. She knows he's there. I mean more importantly go to control your right thing and be smart. So are we board in the quarantine and we're kind of looking looking for goop. What I would have had the same reaction on quarantine if would have gotten on. I don't know if this would have blown up the way that it did. If we weren't in quarantine in a very slow news cycle right so you know at the very best. He's a controlling at. The worst is abusive. I always look blaze one of those guys where it seems like. He's doing the wrong things at the wrong time. Have you ever seen him eat corn? You've ever seen boublil eating corn instead of thanks Jamie Google Michael Boo Blais eating corn and it will terrorize reminder or picture picture. She's going to Google. Michael boob lay eating corn. And pull that up and it'll shock your mind. It's it's as if he's taken down that Black Guy's Dick in in the means you know. Okay I mean it's it's the wrong way to eat corn. Yeah very very like from the tip down Luna meeting corn right there okay. I can't creepy stuffing his mouth. A huge cock. What does he have a hat on backwards? He's just jamming a fucking huge corn on the COB and his mouth like cock. Can't see that feel like living in my own. World. There we go yeah. You don't eat corn like that right. You don't know just taking Dick what he's doing so boublil eating corn thing for a while now he's elbowing his wife. Eating corn has been a thing for a while. Everybody knows about boobs eating corn I James. I can go down a laundry list of things that the folks at home need to pull up if you're bored during the quarantine you can you now Jamie. You can't pull this up because it's graphic but for you for those of you were home. We were bored. I think I've reached the end of the Internet's if you haven't seen blading corn boom you're welcome and then the other one is John Mayer pissing in the woods. Now he's got a fucking hammer on him and he's holding his Dick with two full hands like he's picking up a bass or a salmon that he just got out of the water out of a stream where you're just like Jesus Christ Mantha John Mayer pissing and he's got like this one of those Austin hats on you know the the Austin Texas hats. That's Kinda you surround. Hats all shits where I put it as I put it in all harambee video but I had to blur out his Dick for Dick's out for her on a Yemen he's got A. It's a right. Yeah Gentlemen Jars Penis. Yeah widely known. Oh you knew that. Yeah I did not so. What happened was when I was making that video. Ours is Google and celebrities with their dicks out. And that one kept popping up banging me in the face over and over again Shit but I could see andy. Cohen suck on Acoustic now. Yeah Yeah I could see John. Mary Pride you could also understand why he has the energy that he does big Dick Energy. You know John Maher's like very confident in his bullshit. He is and it's weird but he was not a lot of reason for him to be if you so she'll expressions when he's singing very shallow. It's very terry shovel. Yeah and he sings Remember Blair's friend on facts of life Blair's cousin High Blair. That's the look on the look on his face. He's got the permanent Blair's cousin from fax life on their. You know what I'm talking about. Yeah pull up. Blair's life now. No they all. They've mean this a million times of the two of them side by side so there's nothing really do but the point But she jamie's even laughing right now. it's one of those things where she is actually retarded. John Mayer when he's on stage plays like he's retarded it's weird. It's strange like he's stealing her moves on that and I feel bad for her. That's hurt. That was her thing on that. Show not his. That's John Mayer for you. Though the confidence he has he's like fuck it man. I'll just take a retarded persons face cash. You know trying to pass that off as my own no John. Their disability is not your fucking culture You know the BOOB LA and And Jon Erik. Same camp to me where it's like. There's a lot of confidence for like. They're pretty good. You know it now if they would have dropped like amazing album after amazing Alan lightman like prince a prince a Dave Matthews alike. You know these were like yeah. Of course your beloved you know an Eddie better you know what I mean at Waldo. Then you go like yeah for sure and then you could get away with maybe elbow on your wife in public on on facebook. Live where she's like well on the one hand we're getting great music on the other hand. Maybe beats his wife at all overlook that but it's because it's Boo Blade. That people are like fuck that? Guy. What is he doing here hovers. Yeah is he doing Sinatra covers? And he's horse. Rand is a very nice family man. That's his brand. So you could John Mayer Get Away. Get Away with elbowing a. Gal that he's with Shor Shor. It's on brand yeah I look. Alan Jackson was a family brand down yonder on. He's a fucking knock out his wife Hardcore where it was like. And we're talking like Kim. Bo sliced backyard type. Shit streets Miami like brutal down. I don't actually think Boob way beats his wife I just think it's It's a good reminder. I think we needed to remind BOOB. Lay a little bit of like. Hey Yeah like I know. You're just starting to go live but like bro Boob la. Here's a here's how it works. Boublil we go live every day and you will get backlash if you don't do something right. That's just like how it goes no matter what it is. You're opening yourself up. You're not in concert or in an interview on today. Show like this is live. So you're GONNA have to watch much yourself. Yeah and here's the thing if if you are going to control your wife and or beat her one you can't do it. Live on Cameron if you are if you WANNA really rope her in its middle belt loop back at the jeans and that's a Nice Yank that the public can't see you know is your arms behind her and that really keeper in line. You know what I'm saying you can just do old school. Isolating her from her friends and family giving her a a really crippling sense of insecurity verbal. All you know putting up circus mirrors in your bedroom and then single use does not leave marks man. No no not at all. Yeah Boublil what we're saying. You can't all your wife. Geocache. Just can't beat her on camera. Okay boob way you can eat corn like that if you wanna eat corn like it's like it's your fucking brothers. Dick. It is summer camp. That's fine manner. Don't do it in public behind closed doors. You know what I'm saying now. John Mayer on the other hand pissing like that. I was very forward of like Oh cool. Yeah you WanNa take a picture of me pissing hold on. Let me put my other hand underneath my Dick And then you can take that pick. You know what? I'm saying. Sure good for him. Good for him but BOOB You know better else. Everybody's coming after days Dr Phil. Oh what Dr Good Dr Phil Do. He's a real doctor right now. I think he's just changed his first name to Dr Can you knew that way? And then you can get away with that. I want that I also want to be the one who goes back and gives a commencement speech at my college and they give me an honorary doctorate after that. I make everyone call me. Dr Sure where I just interrupt everyone where it says. I'm sorry hates. It's Dr Patterson. Right right just called me. Ross. It is Dr Patterson. I'm a fucking doctor for a reason. You know what I'm saying like. Watch your tone. I'm a doctor GAM. So what is? He's taken a lot of heat. So Mr Phil Daily. Yeah so papa. Trump gets on last night and says hey man we're gonNA. We'RE GONNA Reopen America here. We're doing three phases and we'll go through that a little bit later on and he says you know look man. I don't know why were really concerned with the the corona virus when you know there's more people that are dying a year to car accidents drowning and They said he was wildly exaggerating. Fucking thing is numbers He says the economy is crashing around us. And they're doing that because people are dying of the corona virus. I get that but look the fact of the matter is we have people dying. Forty five thousand people year die from automobile accidents. Four hundred eighty thousand a year from cigarettes three hundred and sixty thousand a year from swimming pools. But we don't shut down the country for that and he's saying that you know because we're doing this the fallout is GonNa last for years. That people's lives are being destroyed. He's getting crushed for that why people say he's not a real doctor and then he's insensitive and all this other shit and I say Dr I believe in Dr Phil is actually a psychologist. Yes okay. So he's a real doctor.

John Mayer Facebook Dr Phil Jamie High Blair Michael boob Google Dick John Dr Patterson COB Austin John Maher Mary Pride Alan lightman Mr Phil Daily Shor Shor Texas
"dr patterson" Discussed on ANPT Vestibular Special Interest Group

ANPT Vestibular Special Interest Group

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on ANPT Vestibular Special Interest Group

"Becker jesse patterson received your ud hd from the university of nebraska in two thousand fourteen and two thousand and sixteen respectively while You know research was focused on sports related concussion. She is currently a senior audiology research associate at boys town. National research. Hospital in omaha nebraska. She spent half the week performing diagnostic mississippi and audiology services spacious across the life age six months and above. She sense her remaining time in research related activities within the similar and balanced research laboratory. The current line of research is focused on examining the effects of the loss in shows. Like to welcome dr bassett and dr patterson. Thank you for having a so to discussion We'll briefly review the anatomy of the.

Becker jesse patterson university of nebraska boys town omaha nebraska mississippi dr bassett dr patterson
"dr patterson" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

Ross Patterson Revolution!

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

"And then I don't have to deal with that ship. Maybe I can trade in like a speech. You know, like I talked to the graduates or the podcast is big enough where we both do and get some honorary doctorate degree want that I want to be called Dr Patterson and never going to one single medical class in my entire life. Nothing. I've never cut cut open a cadaver or anything like that. Like, I wanna be called doctor on a regular basis and then demand to do it. 'cause you know, that's what Bill Cosby. Oh, yeah. He made everybody calm Dr Bill. Cosby? And it was just like fuck you do a lot of other things too that they didn't want to do now. Listen. Yeah. The other thing about Ampex that makes it the problem is her daughter that she got in is such a little dumdum idiot asshole. So hot though, great. So just be a little dumdum haughty. Yeah. She's I think she's one point five million Instagram followers. Right. Which is probably already monetize. So she's fine. All ready. Just be dumb and hot in the world. You know what I'm saying? Why do you need to go to Yale? No, she was going to USC and the other thing. I don't I don't get about. That is why are you going to school and counting? Yeah. Why are you bribing your kids to get into school like Yale and Harvard on that shit? I underst-. Stand. Right cool. Congratulations USC fuck that book that you. I don't understand that at all right now. The Yale and Harvard all the Ivy league schools. Great. Congratulations for sure, you know, you're living your truth, and you find in your own whatever the opposite is of living your truth, but schools, totally get USC get fucked. Right. Why? Well, I think film Guth boomberg went there. You don't need films go anymore. You know, what your film is on your on your camera now four K, apple on your followers. You have more. Yeah. Whatever that's it. That's all it is. Anyways shapes. This was a blast. You're looking greats. How do the never I don't? I don't know what that little sweaters. But God, dammit, do I love it. It's a nice little happy day sweater is what it is a little what. Nice little happy days sweaters. What it is Jerry in the background. Yeah. You know that God damn guys ready to eat for Jessie Wiseman, aka the jails. I am Ross Patterson. This is the revolution. Good night. Everyone foot night losing. Losin?

USC Bill Cosby Ivy league schools Yale Ross Patterson Guth boomberg Harvard Jessie Wiseman Dr Bill Instagram Jerry apple four K
"dr patterson" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Eric Harley here, you know, Red Eye Radio is trucking's best source of news and information. And now, we're going the extra mile to bring you extra-special content information and news in our new podcast, dedicated to you the driver it's called red is extra mile, and it's for you, the owner operators your one stop shop for all things trucking from taking care of your rig to taking care of your health to new products and technology new regulations and new ways to stay focused on the road ahead. We'll tell stories bring in experts talk about current industry issues and discuss the things that matter to you. You can listen while you're driving. You can listen while you're not driving tune in on demand. The rent is extra mile a new trucking podcast from radio available on apple podcasts. Google podcasts Stitcher in Spotify. And of course, our website, redeye radio show dot com. Tune in on demand. The rent is extra. Mile from Red Eye Radio. Listen to Red Eye Radio on your Amazon echo every day. Anytime say Alexa, and naval the Red Eye Radio skill then anytime you want to listen say Alexa, open Red Eye Radio. And he is earn curling. I'm Gary McNamara. Eight six six ninety redeye in other news out there. I found this really interesting. The New York Times article students in rural America ask what is university without a history. Major. So I I saw that I went what is this about? And they talked about the the the university of Wisconsin Stevens point. That they're having money problems. And some long standing liberal arts degree including history. French and German would be eliminated. Why to remain solvent and relevant? They need to reinvent themselves. Tenured faculty members could lose their jobs, the university of Wisconsin Stevens point, Dr Patterson explained in a memo could no longer be all things to all people. Dr Patterson's plan came as Steven's point and many other public. Universities in rural America face a crisis such colleges have served as anchors for their regions educating generations of.

Red Eye Radio university of Wisconsin Alexa Dr Patterson America Eric Harley Gary McNamara The New York Times Google Spotify apple Steven Amazon
"dr patterson" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"But you are you have to be aware that you are definitely you're also making it impossible to make a movie without getting that one person. That's a in any movie, if there was ever a script that we wrote that was like if this one person isn't going to do it. It will not exist. That's pretty rough. I will say that most times we see an actress name listed pilot script, it wasn't because they really thought that went after it was going to do it is because it's a way of signaling. What's unique about the script its way of getting attention for the script because it gets on a list gets passed around the blacklists because everyone says, oh, it's really funny like this wild sex comedy with Wolford brim Li I it's that there's something about it. That makes people wanna pass it around. Yeah. That's interesting. And that may be in fact, that may be the point it's hard to know where this person's what are headed. But, but you know, that idea of if if it's the right name it's gonna make somebody more likely to pick it up. I think sadly, though, if if you if you're not going through traditional channels, like if you're not doing this through your lawyer or manager agent, the cold approach just is so rarely successful. I think I think you're right. Chris rights. I've introduced a doctor into my script who was a fairly important role. And I'm wondering what is the best way to write her action and dialogue, Wendy. Versus Dr Patterson her first seems working nominal and she asked wanna make characters collar by first name. So it'd be consistent. But is it confusing to go with her first name or does it lose respect? So you guys what is your basic guideline for a character named for Dr character? It says it's an important character. So but probably not the principal character. He I would say if it's not the principal character you use doctor because I feel that just is doing a lot of work for you. And the whether you call that character, Dr Johnson or Dr Wendy, or you know, what I mean like there is you can actually say something also Norton to to the writer that we continually know this person's a doctor. You know what I mean? So even if Dr when he comes over to your house late at night. It's like, oh, it's interesting because Dr Wendy, you know. Yeah, I would say in terms of the character Q like the character name above dialogue. It's weird to put the doctor there unless it's actually started part of the joke. A part of this reminding like, oh that person really is a doctor their characters in scripture. Will have like, you know, MRs van Owen, and I'll keep that MRs there because Vano and by itself, you might lose your gender. You might sort of forget like who that is. If that person hasn't shown up for a long time. It sounds like a police sergeant. So that's reasons why you might want to keep the MRs and every scripts different, but the decision to go with the characters first name versus her..

Dr Wendy Dr character Dr Patterson MRs van Owen principal Dr Johnson Vano Chris rights writer
"dr patterson" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"It's a very simple minded, she's are DJ p demonstrates Adersson DJ. The are a as dot com. And also we'd like to put a link to your podcasts. So help people to understand what I've just said. But also others are saying in order to connect them. We are more than happy to talk with people will be at the ability to show, you the clinical variation using a linked data. So we don't really wanna reveal to your medical staff. They really they can this yet. But you wanna know? Yes. I have that creation. We can show that to you. It's an honor. And a lot of times people will try to dismiss say, oh, well, that's all of our Medicare face. That does include everyone else, we say we have found over the ages that that can ration- shows up only your patients because the doctor does not little green dot on a Medicare patient will read up, right? And so the call the action here contract listeners is to step up to the plate. And remember why you got into this to begin with? And if you wanna take a look at what the folks at various are doing to get that objective data to make outcomes better. Facilities. Save some cash. They have a nonthreatening way of doing it by taking a look at different data sets. So take that call to action. Remember why you got into this? And just know that we're here for you. And so are they Dr Patterson? I just wanna say thank you so much for the opportunity for being on the show with us today. I think that the conversation we've had will create a ripple effect of positive change within the system and just wanna give you a big thanks for coming on. Thank you.

Medicare Dr Patterson
"dr patterson" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"And I think what we're going to have to see in America. If we survive in a system, which allows competition, which I believe which allows insurance, which I believe were lousy government insurance, which I believe you gotta start reading down that price for and the fact of matter is is a not for profit CEO. You should be doing that. That's why you have trustees over you because you have a trust in the fact that you are running a hospital for that community or for communities across US. And I think there's many of us why age in younger that went into it for that reason. They just sit back, you know, they're cop kills the end of the evening. Why did I I do this? And will I take that chance to why is young person aged choice to do? I think they'll make the right choice. That's a great piece of advice. Dr Patterson Wyatt to ask these folks the stakeholders that are at the helm of the ship. You know, why did you get into this and to get? Into that philosophical conversation because it's that deep thought of why you got in and why we're meeting these types of changes to really help them take the leap of faith so to speak. That's outstanding. Thank you for sharing that. And that'll be one that we definitely note in the show notes for the folks to come back and visit the beauty of of these shows is that it's a listen on demand. So if you enjoyed this interview than you can always come back and play again, it's just always Arab valuable for you in the archives. You'll always have access to doctors Patterson's words of wisdom here. So Dr Patterson, let's pretend that you. And I are building a medical leadership course on what it takes to be successful in medicine today, though, one oh one course or the ABC's of Dr Patterson is it going to be for the doctors for the administrators. It's going to be let's just call it for the healthcare any leader in healthcare that could be for either whatever you feel the important niche that we need to tackle should be. And so we'll write out the syllabus what we're gonna do is a brief lightning round..

Dr Patterson Dr Patterson Wyatt US CEO America ABC
"dr patterson" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"A good negotiator and find ways to compromise with your medical staff to make it a win win situation for your next event. And it's this idea of again going back to empower in the physician now in a time where they can share in the wealth that the hospital makes let's impound them. And at the same time empowerment comes of the con ability and measurement. And that's where various shines and helps make these decision making processes and behavior. Changing mechanisms work to improve outcomes, absolutely huge. I'd love. Check out the system sometime. It sounds fascinating. Maybe I could meet you in where where's the office in California? We have offices in our main office is in Palo Alto. Mets were IT department sits in our services, we of course, have have a book compliant servers, so we have servers with backups backups. So that's release it. We have office in San Diego, Chicago and Washington DC. So we don't have a main office mainly because we don't have a headquarters we basically share among those offs disease actives. And so actually what's interesting is the author Molin rock without the firm is so our chief medical officer in sits in the San Diego is that right? Has been in San Diego sometime. So Dr Patterson tell us a little bit more about an exciting project that various is working on. I know you mentioned a lot. And maybe you want to expand on one that you mentioned already, but what's an exciting focus or a project. I say to me because I've spent my whole life is a Dursun offer hospital not for profit hospital minister very large teaching hospital. You know, Cook County there were general I mean Gigante thoughts, and then I kind of a two hundred fifty bed hospitals in turnarounds for wellspring partners recently much too much fries. You know, sometimes as not for new you're not ready for someone walk up to you and say, you know, I'd like to try that. Yeah. The for profits are using us. And so I can't reveal their names course, they don't they want public, but we have several for profit hospitals. That are using our metrics you call on not only do they see the value in share it with a physician it also raises their stock rights. And so they can do something that is below the line. They can maybe not make a lot more money. So it's not a profit motivation. But it's the Bill to bring that value in that value to the sale of the institution or the sale of the company at a later date. And if you think about it that probably one of the toughest things for the large not for profit hospital systems is let's say, and I won't use Acis. Let's say a system the that they're gonna use your route organization, and they have. Three miles. It was small and they use it..

Mets San Diego Dr Patterson Palo Alto medical officer Cook County California Dursun Washington Chicago
"dr patterson" Discussed on Working Cows Podcast

Working Cows Podcast

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on Working Cows Podcast

"That was dr funston out of the university not brassica i think i did link to that study at working cows dot net slash eleven but all linked to that episode in the show notes page for this episode along with the ester tech and dr patterson study if i can track it down in so i just wanted to mention that going back to what you were just saying though it's more of a function of fleshing ability is at kind of what you're saying right because all the reproductive hormones are steroid hormones so there you know fat based and so as they as they get fatter and they're not spending so much time kind of growing all that skeletal frame you know that's when they're going to be cycling so and your targeting you know we're trying to target halford to be having at twenty four months so you're gonna be trying to breed you know the average of them at a fifteen months but some of them are going to be a little younger and some summer just coming they're going to come start cycling and start puberty a lot earlier than others sue back with like choosing heifers for who you're keeping sometimes those smaller heifers are the ones that you you didn't know that they're cycling by choosing by size or even wait because they're just going to be a more moderate smaller cow when they grow up so the easiest ways just give them the opportunity to become pregnant and then if it take you up on it you know they they get a chance at staying in the heard i don't wanna be the one telling that heffer whether or not she's a good heffer i want her to tell me by getting bread that you can if you wanna go and other step into like selecting heifers you can do reproductive tracts scoring and also pelvic measurements you can have your back calm and they can help the see if the reproductive tract is cycling you can fill with its follicles or corpus lucia on the ovaries that indicate that she cycling and so that's a that's a way to actually say okay i do know that you're cycling and then you can cut out the ones that are completely not ready and then you can save some money by not even synchronize in at breeding them in spending that money on them if you do the the fourteen days cedar synchronization you have to start at about thirty days ahead of your breeding but the the good thing about that is that at the time you're putting in the cedar insert you could be doing your reproductive tracts scoring and saying okay gas she's big enough she's big enough to start on the synchronisation you can do a pelvic measurement and you can call out the ones that have maybe a a very small or shaping pelvis that's going to indicate calving problems later and then the other good thing is that you can do your vaccination boosters at that time too because you're thirty days ahead breeding you're not gonna be interfering with with the the breeding the pregnancy by giving vaccines too close to your date in in one instance.

thirty days twenty four months fifteen months fourteen days
"dr patterson" Discussed on Working Cows Podcast

Working Cows Podcast

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on Working Cows Podcast

"They've they're gonna reach a certain percentage of mature body weight and then start putting on fat instead of growing up and so they're gonna start cycling and and coming into estrin the kind of rule of thumb that a lot of people have used for a lot of years is breed 'em at sixty five percent of their mature body weight and hopefully their calving at eighty five percent of the mature body weight for the first time but then there's some other studies i think it was dr funston that where they're developing heifers at a lot lower percentage of their mature body weight maybe fifty five percent and and the reason they're doing that is because they're not developing a minute be blocked there you know keeping him out on pasture or they're lower input feed and then they're breeding the heifers and the ones that get pregnant again other ones that stay and you have a lower pregnancy rate from that i i but you're getting those more mature offers that are just a little more efficient probably and so then the long term benefits is that you're not spending as much to develop those heifers and you're also calling out the ones that are already weak link i think sure you know we talked about that with dr patterson of the padlock ranch on working cows podcast episode eleven so that'll be linked at the show notes page this is good time as any to mention the show notes pages were great house dot net slash thirty eight you can find the links that we've talked about so far at working cows dot net slash thirty eight i think.

dr funston dr patterson eighty five percent fifty five percent sixty five percent
"dr patterson" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Never any sense that whatever language coco was using had been extended to other members of her gorilla family and when i think back on my three hours or whatever it was there with coco in dr patterson it was a remarkable experience but there's something to me personally just as a regular human not an animal specialist there was something a little bit wrong about so much work being put into teaching an animal to communicate in what is clearly not that animals first language and whatever level of success dr patterson and the volunteers had at giving cocoa some fluency in sign language and thus human language there's no question that that i don't mean to get religious about it that that wasn't what coco was put on the planet to us right for language you know it's funny if you're a reporter and you go do an animal store chances are your work might not be seen a super relevant to the new cycle you might get some iras from your colleagues coco is obviously different case i'm curious where did your interview with coco rank in terms of assignments and it's kind of long term impact on you you you can tell that i remember it pretty vividly and part of it is just among the interesting things i have been asked to do over the years one of the most interesting was being asked to go into interview guerrilla because that really was the nature i was not set out to do a story on primate language which is of course what i turned in because i over report everything was sent out to go into an interview with a gorilla and i remember my editors when i came back sighing deeply saying like okay is a story on primate language we'll go with it we wanted an interview with a talking gorilla but it i was moved and and perplexed by my mother had been a fairly serious student of linguistics i come from a multilingual family i've never learned asl but i've always been kind of fascinated by the things you can that deaf people and people who are fluent in a cell can communicate that cannot be community in the same way with spoken language so thinking about all of this while looking at this guerilla was very intense for me what would you say coco's legacy i would hope that coco's legacy would be to make us think about the nature of language the nature of communication do we really need to have verbs and so on be part of real language can language and species communication be just as fully realized by the kinds of emotional and visual cues that we all have with animals that we love so i guess i would really hope that what people would remember about coco is much less the controversy over whether communication constituted language then the love that she stimulated clearly in the people who were directly around her and in the people who saw her on the videos and you know mugging with robin williams with his glasses and all that stuff that's that's viral this week cynthia gordon is a writer with national geographic she met coco back in nineteen ninetyfive cynthia thanks so much being with us nice to be with you marco.

coco three hours
"dr patterson" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"dr patterson" Discussed on PRI's The World

"World let's take a few minutes now for a remembrance maybe you've heard of coco she was perhaps the world's most famous guerrilla a western lowland gorilla to be precise she was born forty six years ago at the san francisco zoo and she died this week peacefully inner sleep at the gorilla foundations preserve in california coco was famous for communicating in american sign language or asl it was said she knew over two thousand words and was able to converse with humans cynthia gorny who now writes for national geographic met cocoa back in nineteen eightyfive on assignment for the washington post cynthia thanks for being here what was that meeting like with coco was really strange marco i had never before and have never since been assigned to go interview gorilla and she lived with her longtime teacher and i guess trainer would be the right word doctor francine patterson and you know what can i tell you she was gorilla two hundred and sixty pounds i showed up with my notebook and pen as reporters do very unclear about what the opening question with a guerilla ought to be and she looked at me i would say suspiciously but i don't really know what suspicion looks like honestly in a gorilla and then she made a gesture kind of swiping her fist across her face and dr patterson looked really embarrassed and said cocoa and she looked at me and she said she just called you a toilet and that was the first and i will say last time i have been insulted by a gorilla she told me afterward that cocoa swears or cocoa swore rip cocoa there were some exchanges between you and cocoa that were kind of poignant will the x the point in exchanges were not actually between me and cocoa the reason for my visit in one thousand nine hundred five was that famously there had been a kitten in the cocoa dr patterson family and cocoa had apparently loved this kitten very much and the kitten had been hit by a car and killed and dr patterson and the volunteers who worked with koko head come to tell her that as dr patterson recalled to me during the interview she did not use any words for death or kill but she said all ball that was the name of the kitten had been hit by a car and we won't be seeing her anymore and part of the reason that this story got such widespread attention was that cook was reaction was very intense she was very quiet for a little and then she began a kind of hooting which is i gather guerrillas way of caning she was clearly in grief and everybody was crying and it was awful she was not exhibiting any signs of grief that i was aware of when i was there but you know i was not then an m not now a guerilla expert fine find have questioned how much coke is communication really came from her and how much it was kind of projected onto her by researchers perhaps by dr patterson what is your take on that well this is a big controversial area not just with guerrillas but with other primates generally there was a great deal of uneasiness about the claims that dr patterson was making for cocos level of communication which in her view included five hundred working signs of a cab see that dr patterson said she had observed of like a thousand working signs cocoa signing in ways that exhibited amusement grief boredom all kinds of emotions i would thinking about this a lot since coco died and anybody who has ever loved an intelligent animal knows things that the animal is communicating we know animals communicate grief so the arguments about cocoa and dr patterson were really arguments that were more linguistic what is the definition of language is coco really using what we think of is language or is she merely learning to mimic signs that dr patterson had taught her the principal criticisms leveled against the cocoa patterson work where that she didn't publish scientifically she didn't subject her work to peer review when i asked her about that in nineteen five she didn't deny that this was so but she basically just said i don't have time i'm taking care of this gorilla i'm running this foundation but it was also clear on some level this was an experiment that didn't quite go the way that scientists and i would venture to guess dr patterson had hoped it would and they were never able to get koko to reproduce so there was.

forty six years sixty pounds