15 Burst results for "Dr Nisha"

"dr nisha" Discussed on The South Florida Morning Show

The South Florida Morning Show

05:14 min | 3 weeks ago

"dr nisha" Discussed on The South Florida Morning Show

"To cover including other stories at eight thirty fifty. Wf tlc self-loading morning show. There's jammed his diener. A i the best argument of all if they were that effective. But there's also this so. I'm fascinated to see this. We're gonna have to see the replay one of the Fox doctors dr. Nisha watt who. I love she's really really good. She has a story about the combo. Cova d- flu shots coming. Kutu your world soon. What did we talk about it. I say predicted that. What did i say about next year. Get ready for it. And that's how they're going to get your kids. Take a flu shot. Get a cove. It'll just it'll just be included with everything post. It just added to the list. But what did you say. But was it israel the third shot. This is interesting because this could lead to all kinds of ramifications israel just yesterday really last night for us have now officially changed designation in the definition of fully vaccinated. Okay you're not fully vaccinated. Elizabeth had the booster shot. So now you've got somebody that's had two shots okay. Oh they're talking about visor. The event two shots and you considered fully vaccinated so are we gonna have the three shots super vaccinated people now looking down upon. Yeah the only two-thirds vaccinate people and as the third shock on a make me sick as the second one did god now and they've up the any used to be eight months now. It's six months after your last shot that you thought was going to be your last shot. Apparently not anymore and how many mysteries you're gonna have. We're going to have for the next twenty years where they're going there what happens. You're not fully vaccinated unless you've had the fifth booster shot. So the fifth booster shot. People will look down upon the fourth booster. Shot people and say we're going with this. I don't know it's kind of scary. How dare you walk around society with only four booster shots..

Nisha watt diener flu israel Fox Elizabeth
"dr nisha" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

07:39 min | 7 months ago

"dr nisha" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"The music. Everyone welcome back to one life. Radio this is bernadette with junior and dr winters continuing our broadcast live from dallas texas on iheartmedia as well as km in southern california. Okay so dr nisha. When you're on the show back. I believe it was september twenty eighteen. We talked about cannabis and cancer. What do you want people out there. Listening to know about cannabis and cancer holy cow. And i mean think about how much has changed since then. I mean we're two and a half liter and the research is exploding. I almost wish. I could do a back and listen to that. I should go. Listen to the archives. 'cause i'm imagining a lot has changed since then i mean i think back even in two thousand eighteen. There was still so much taboo. And today if you are basically in the cannabis camp you're really an outlier. I mean we've learned that much about its application in so many areas From seizures too immune modulation to pain to sleep supports mental emotional wellbeing We've also come a long way with our epigenetics. So so for instance. I'm going to be very transparent for me. I have these sip. Toothy nine star three epa genetic kick up that makes me a little walkers when he hd is involved so. I don't personally tolerate it. Well in fact it you hear stories about people going cray cray and landing in the er it probably had with me some point but for me good old. Pure cbd really is a lovely way to call my nervous system. I left to take it before a presentation etc. There's people like my husband for instance who has a very good functioning at the genetic piece and and his family of a lot of mental illness. A lot of bipolar. A lot of other chronic conditions. This is actually a medicine for him when he feels really out of sorts Of course my world is a cancer patients. I don't find anything as well when you know the patients genetics and you know the type of pain patterns. They have and you get to get a sense of what they're looking for like. Are they wind asleep. Are they wind is still function. You can get so personalized with the blends of thc. You know the forms of it like do you want high. Pine warms with more mentally stimulating or more mercy. Informs with more senator ted and pain. Managing we've come a long way so now we can use these. What they call chemo bars and get very very specific overlaid on our personal genetics. To know exactly. What's going to help us or hinder anywhere along the way we no longer have to get. You don't have to be the. Oh my gosh. Remember in the nineties at a party. I had this experience. Well now you actually can no time to know how to how you're going to respond and what will work for you. Yeah and it's so interesting. There's so much information out there. My gosh it's it's a it's it's so hard to sort through all of it. Is i so important that we're talking about this. I mean this is the future of our health in like i said so. Many people's lives are in the balance. Health is the most important thing that we possess okay. So what about the ketogenic diet. Let's talk about that well again. I think we talked about. This is probably a good year and a half ago or more as well and you know have been replaced using a metabolic flexibility approach which means when we're metabolic flexible. That after a good night's sleep but at least thirteen hours away from eating food. You should be showing trace. Keaton like all of what we're made me to do. Our body should actually go in and out of burning fat and sugar as needed. But we've all gotten stuck in this sugar burning state for the past hundred fifty or experiments that we've been in Living under And that being said is much more difficult now for people to achieve that flexibility. So i always ask people You know if you can go a whole night's sleep out anything but water If you don't if you can go for hours without eating you don't get shaky or henry with skipping a meal. Then you're probably a pretty good metabolic flexibility but studies show that over. Eighty eight percent of us are not right so that tells me that. A lot of people have a lot of exploration to do that. Being said is not metabolic flexible and when we aren't we also are higher risk factors for all kinds of conditions all kind of chronic illnesses but in cancer specifically the also. Don't respond to our standard of care therapies. As well so the key tones create a bit of an extra stressor to the cancer cell while in bolden and strengthening the healthy cells. So it's like a almost like a trojan horse that drives whatever treatment of choice. You're doing be it from standard of care or hybrid eric. Oxygen or even mistletoe. For that matter will hit. Its target much more effectively. When someone's in a state of this around metabolical metabolic state. Wow well you know what this morning i was. Just you know digging through my stuff. And just you know trying to get organized. I ran across And it's from it is from where the on it I can't find it. Let's see twenty fourteen. Dr twenty fourteen and it's called the intelligent optimistic a magazine that i picked up at in there. There was an article about steve newport. Mary newport i know you know the story. Oh we've we've talked about it on the air before so quickly. Let's take a minute and just talk about the genyk diet and alzheimer's yeah. My gosh between. Mary newport's work of a physician who basically stabilize her husband's very aggressive alzheimer's condition and kept him very stable and even improved upon his condition. For many many years before the disease really kinda did take over and consume him. She's got a very compelling story and history and started making a lot of people think about the use of the two thousand fourteen but it was even before that of its use in our logical disorders. I mean ketogenic diet was started to be used as a therapy for pediatric populations in the nineteen twenties for epilepsy. So we'd known is how good brain of act right so right. Why would you not just make that leap and try it. It's not gonna cause harm and boy howdy if someone has a brain injury. Brain tumor a secondary like to the brain. Alzheimer's dementia neurological symptoms of any kind. Especially things like i would be. I think it's malpractice at this point that we're not recommending a ketogenic diet for the population absolutely and Mary newport actually was on the show back a few years ago. And i remember the first conversations that i had with dr joey antonio The he is the co founder of the international society of sports nutrition and how he was the first one that really introduced me to the ketogenic diet One life radio was the first media source talking about it. Openly and the benefits of it as you know therapy for for things like alzheimer's and cancer and metabolic You know Disaster human body but yeah and the metabolic approach to cancer. So i'll i mean gosh. I could just talk for hours. Wouldn't that be nice so much to talk about. But i'm looking at the clock. We i'm looking at the clock and i gotta go to break but dr nation. Thank you so much for jumping on the air with us today. Everyone dr natio- winters you can find her at. Dr dot com have a great day and thanks again thanks. Everyone take care all right you too. Everyone check her out. Dr natio- dot com. We've got greg glazer coming up. He is the general counsel for the physicians for informed consent. Stay tuned you're listening to one life. Radio.

Mary newport steve newport Eighty eight percent september twenty eighteen today dr winters two and a half liter Keaton greg glazer southern california iheartmedia thirteen hours nisha first one first conversations junior nineties dallas texas dr year and a half ago
"dr nisha" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

08:07 min | 7 months ago

"dr nisha" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"It's thursday. It's almost friday fact easy. Anything interesting happened to you on the way into work this morning junior. I went to before i came in. I went to the airport to pick up my mother-in-law she's in town for the week and Yeah so picked. Her up brought her back to the house. And yes she. Just wait for the girls to get home from school and They have spring break next week. So they're going to get spent an entire week with with their grandma. How nice where does she live. He lives in florida and florida. tampa areas. right. That's where you garage. Yeah well you started in new jersey. Right was born in new jersey and then moved florida and then back to new jersey and back florida. Yeah the people on the east coast. They really like florida. They go back and forth. There's there's a big influx from northeast. Moving down in florida now. So yeah. I believe i tell you what the last the last month that i lived in. upstate new york. Which was my decision for saying. I can't do this anymore. I i've told the story on the air many many times but it was in january and it was Hundred eight inches of snow in one month. And you had to shovel your way out the front door literally and so And then to make matters worse so one hundred eight inches of snow of you can imagine what was on top of everybody's roofs and it was even difficult to get out and shovel your roof and so people who thinking what shovel your roof. That maybe didn't grow up Back east or anywhere where. There's a lot of snow. Yeah people have to shovel their roots. And so i rented at the time anyway. A big is. It came off the second floor and absolutely destroyed. My car died on the total that completely totaled at an icicle to get out. And that's and that's when. I said you know what i think. I'm gonna move where my parents were which was in texas so yeah. My parents moved to texas. While i was living in europe for almost two years and then i was so dumb god i just went to two to europe with no money really and just a boyfriend. That was living there at the time. And oh my gosh. The things we do when we're young right without thinking no regrets venture. Oh my gosh. What an education i got i really did And learn to speak german and so yeah so there's no better way to learn a language. Then you just you know dump yourself in the middle of that country get thrown in the pool and figure out how to swim high. Now i know oh my gosh. Well always great to open the show with junior. I love what we do here on one life radio and i think everyone out there listening is going to really like today's show. We have one of my favorite people coming up here in just a second dr natio- winners at the half. We have greg a glazer back. He is the general counsel for physicians for informed consent or pick a nonprofit organization opposed to maxine. Van dates are van dates mandates. The things that come out of your mouth on the radio right. Oh my gosh. By dr nathan winters. You're gonna love her. She's been on the show many many times. If it's your first now your first time listening doctor. Asia is a naturopathic. Integrative oncologists and a fellow of the american board of naturopathic oncology. She has been on a personal journey with cancer for almost twenty nine years and her quest to save her own life has transformed into a lifelong mission to support others on a similar journey. Dr travels the world helping colleagues master the metabolic approach to cancer so their patients can achieve better treatment outcomes. She is the co author of the book. The metabolic approach to cancer integrating deep nutrition. The ketogenic diet and nontoxic bio individualized therapies. she's a rockstar in this world. You guys you can find her at. Dr nation dot com. That's nasa a doctor. Dr show. Welcome back hello to drop a no or call right back okay. Caller right back. I you know i always have stuff ready. So you let me know when she's back and i'll stop. I might not even be able to get to it but you know i was. i've got two things one of my left hand one of my right. Which one should i do. My left or my right Let's go with my right hand. Okay so this is an from a from a blog. Called mama mia. And it's the seven things that people with healthy guts do every day and i think it's important to always remind myself the things that maybe i missing or you forget you know. Life is so busy at times but on the top of the list says take time with your food so it goes on to write that probably the most simple change was remembering to just slow down when it came to meal or even snacktime and so it's important that she there. Yes she's on. Okay all right thank you. I was butchering that today. I wasn't ready. But i'm kind of always ready but you know what i mean. I wanted to talk to dr nature. How you doing today. Dr nisha winters. Sorry about this. I don't know what happened was not a big deal it happens. It happens all the time and we are live so that makes it even more interesting people. People loving people love it. When you screw up. It makes them laugh so so everybody out there laughing. I hope you enjoyed it anyway. Go when're is real there. You go keeping it real here on the radio. Well you know you are one of the most real people i know and your experience of what you went through And transformed your own life and this lifelong mission after fighting cancer for almost twenty nine years are not fighting well keeping it at bay right and getting rid of get yes yes yes yes Okay so what we're talking about. Today is actually fascinating. I don't i know very little about this subject. And i kinda like that. I'm going into this pretty blind. So let's talk about this mistletoe. Therapy so many of us here. The word mistletoe. You know doctor and they have christmas. So one of the medical uses for mistletoe. I love questioning. And of course it's near dear to my heart This medicine has been around since ancient times Had been used at you as a whole plant extract for everything from cardiovascular disease to headaches to arthritis that in modern times since nineteen twenty if you can believe it it has been used as an adjutant cancer therapy in an injectable form of a very specifically harvested processed and formulated plant extract in the treatment of cancer. So we'd had it for just just celebrated hundred birthday as a cancer treatment. Really okay so we. We clearly don't do this in the us where what are some of the countries that they do this. And i'm thinking europe or china maybe right pretty much everywhere but us although led a little shoutout to the us The john hopkins just completed a phase one clinical trial. Which is the first done on soil in the united states on an is the application of the therapy for stage for solid tumor. Cancers dot should be published Soon so that's a big step forward. But if you're a patient with cancer living in europe depending on which country you're in between sixty upwards of eighty five percent of a patient with cancer will use this therapy at some time the apple how far behind we are over here in the us. Well we're not really far behind. We're just bought me for by the pharmaceutical copies. They own they own country All street got the trial donors. It was paid for by profit It was not funded by governments sanctions. So your point exactly. It wouldn't happen if People hadn't raised the funds to trial. Wow well i was gonna ask you how long doctors been using it but you already said this is a hundred years old okay so mistletoe you know everybody kind of knows or at least. I always put mistletoe in my house. At christmas i love it. I love hanging it over the door. I love you know catching my man and kissing up. Mistletoe.

europe texas florida new jersey january thursday one month Hundred eight inches sixty Today second floor friday next week china two united states christmas first last month nisha winters
"dr nisha" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

The Healing Place Podcast

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"dr nisha" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

"Of hope. Along with practical advice for your healing journey. Your host Terry Walbrook. Trauma Warrior Writer. Speaker Blogger. Therapy dog handler and founder of the same as fumbles of hope project. As a survivor and thrive over Terry's mission is to shine the light of hope into the world by interviewing insightful guests from across the globe. Please stay tuned at the end of today's interview as we honor our sponsors. The healing place podcast is a fiscally sponsored project of fractured atlas. Now. Here's your host. And Trauma Warrior. Terry well brought. Welcome everybody to the healing place podcast I'm your host Terry Walk and very excited to have with me today Dr Nisha. Manic did say right. Oh perfect aside. Such beautiful lame! It's just roll so yeah so here to talk to us today about some amazing stuff. That I'm excited to learn about power of attention integrative medicine. Her book, bridging science and spirit, the genius of William Ain't tillers physics in the promise of Information Medicine Information. Medicine I couldn't even read my own handwriting. Yes, so talk to us about. What it is, you do in the world. Kerry good to join you this morning. Hello, from California and well. Doctor by profession. And I'm a rheumatologist and a rheumatologist. As a physician that deals with chronic diseases mostly it's thought about as joints, but the more accurate way to think about rheumatology is that it is a disease or a specialty looking at disease of the immune system, so I deal with with people with systemic lupus, rheumatoid, arthritis, and other joint diseases, such as Kaoh to in osteoarthritis. So in a nutshell it's you know once I have a patient in my office. It's a it's a long term relationship. Okay, so that's been my career. You know medical doctor joining hospital systems until about ten years ago a and then I took a major change in the in the trajectory. Also. I have a few friends who battle autoimmune diseases themselves and Yet just what a what a struggle it can be because there's just not. A quote unquote. Correct in the in the. logical part of it, you know so in in medicine how we think about healing, or in fact you were You bring mind this early morning. Meditation have coffee and I really think about the day, and then I have twenty minutes of compete silence in I. Just sit there. On a chair this close my eyes breathe in and out and consider an in mostly now. The Meditation is very quiet, and a thought came today, and the thought was this. Medicine you know how we approach. Healing is that we deconstruct the human body. We make it into parts. We make into systems. We make it into anatomy, biochemistry physiology, and then we go even further into biochemistry and look at reactions in the cell, and we try to understand it, and then we reconstructed back to the whole, human and right away. You know when I was a medical student. This is beautiful I thought. Wow, you know. We're getting into the nuts and bolts of human human healing and humanity. What makes us whole? Any was completely misplaced. And in bridging science in spirit I actually write a letter to my younger self, because I thought that this rational way of thinking of constructing. Madison was the Holy Grail and I was wrong, I was wrong and I. Think.

Terry Terry Walbrook Terry Walk Information Medicine Informati founder Writer Manic Dr Nisha Kerry California William Ai Madison Kaoh
"dr nisha" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"dr nisha" Discussed on KCRW

"In part because those states opened up too quickly, and they relaxed way too much. Given how much virus they had in their community, and they lacked testing infrastructure. These two things really go hand in hand. How much more testing is really necessary? At a bare minimum. The Harvard researchers estimate that the US overall should double testing to about one million test today just to keep the virus at bay and, you know, get off this roller coaster the virus, seeming to be under control, but then erupting again, But even that much testing with that much Justin, thousands of people would still be getting infected, and hundreds would still be dying every day. So this new analysis as a new dimension to answer thiss question. How much testing would be enough to really beat back the virus and left the country safely start to reopen with out the virus flaring up again. Here's just she's jogging from Harvard. But we all really want is to suppress the martyrs to get the virus level so low But we don't have large numbers of people getting sick and dying and that we can open up our economy and have kids come back to school and have businesses reopen, even if it's not 100% of what it looked like before the pandemic. That's what we want. You know to finally really start to get life back to normal. Okay. So half a 1,000,000 tests for days where we're at now, one million per day would be pretty good. What is the ideal number that would get us to suppress the virus? Yes. So, according to this notice happened, analysis would be way more testing. We need 4.2 million tests per day, more than eight times what the U. S is doing now, but that would allow the US to cast a much wider net by doing Much more aggressive and strategic testing, you know, target places where outbreaks often start nursing homes, be packing factories, prisons catch people who don't have any symptoms, but still could be spreading the virus like teachers, students, and according to this analysis, the overwhelming majority of states aren't anywhere close to that. But that doesn't mean it's hopeless. In fact, four states already there for Mont Alaska, Y in Montana, West Virginia, and even one big state and a big outbreak, New Jersey are very close. Okay, Rob, Thanks for the update on the news. No problem, Steve. You bet. The Supreme Court handed a victory to abortion rights advocates. Yesterday the court struck down a Louisiana law that required doctors who perform abortions. Toe have hospital admitting privileges. What it means for Louisiana is that that states three remaining clinics, Khun stay open, but it also has implications all across the country. Here's NPR's Sarah McCammon. There's no requirement for doctors in Georgia who perform abortions to have hospital admitting privileges. But in Atlanta, Dr Nisha Verma was watching the case closely. We have a lot of patients that travel from Alabama as well from other parts of Georgia from Tennessee to get here to get their abortion care. Verma is an O. B G Y N and family planning fellow at Emory University. She says she fears new restrictions would force more clinics to close even though this case specifically related to the Louisiana having a lot of us were concerned about a fact throughout the south and in more conservative parts of the country. A recent report by the Guttmacher Institute identified 15 mostly Republican controlled states, including Georgia, which could be poised to pass or enforce similar restrictions if Louisiana's law were upheld. Elizabeth Nash is a state policy analyst with Guttmacher, which supports abortion rights. We're talking about you the South. We're talking about the Midwest. We're talking about the planes. These are the states that have been adopting the bulk of the abortion restrictions over the past 10 years. Nationals. The ruling will shape strategy in legislatures across the country for advocates on both sides of the abortion debate. The Louisiana law was what's known as a trap law for targeted restrictions on abortion providers. The Supreme Court overturned a similar Texas law in 2016 that also required hospital admitting privileges. Michele Goodwin is a law professor at the University of California, Irvine, she says after this ruling, lawmakers and conservative states will have to shift strategies and let's be clear Those attacks may come anyway. It's just that they won't be using this particular track law to try to further shackle women's ability to obtain an abortion. For opponents of abortion rights. The decision is a major blow to efforts to push forward with state laws restricting the procedure and chip away at the Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide in 1973. Anti abortion groups hoped the court would rule in their favor after two of President Trump's conservative nominees joined the bench. Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh. But Chief Justice John Roberts, a Republican appointee, surprised observers by casting the swing vote siding with liberal justices, just four years after he'd ruled to uphold the similar law from Texas. Marjorie Dannenfelser is president of the Susan B. Anthony list, which opposes abortion rights. She says she feels bitter disappointment with Roberts but shall continue to fight for new restrictions. The first Jeff is to elect a president who will name a Supreme Court justice that will tip the court to five before in our favor and will make more same decisions, this somewhat surprising win for abortion rights supporters who've been playing defense throughout the Trump administration. Set up an even more pitched battle over the issue heading into November. Sarah McCammon NPR news This is NPR news. At 7 42 This is Casey AR W News. I'm Matt Gillom. Bar owners in L. A San Diego and five other counties are not goingto work today. That's because bars, wineries and breweries that don't offer sit down dining have been told to close again due to the Coronas Corona virus, Serge Some bar owners say state of some bar.

Louisiana Supreme Court US Sarah McCammon Dr Nisha Verma Georgia Texas Chief Justice John Roberts Harvard NPR Midwest Justin President Trump Guttmacher Institute president Atlanta Mont Alaska Matt Gillom Alabama
"dr nisha" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"dr nisha" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Close to what we really need. More than 2/3 of state still aren't doing nearly enough testing to keep a new operates from erupting 32 states. No bye. Spotty enough new infections quickly enough to track their quarantine and test everyone else who might have caught the virus. You know, to see who needs to be isolated and stuff out any new flare ups. But and that's probably one big reason why we're seeing these big new searches in hospitals states across the South and West. None of the hospital states have been doing nearly enough testing. According to this analysis. Here's a She's John. He's at the Harvard Global Health Institute. The searches were seeing in large parts of the country are due. In part because those states opened up too quickly, and they relaxed way too much. Given how much virus they had in their community, and they lacked testing infrastructure. These two things really go hand in hand. How much more testing is really necessary? At a bare minimum. The Harvard researchers estimate that the US overall should double testing to about one million test today just to keep the virus at bay and, you know, get off this roller coaster the virus, seeming to be under control, but then erupting again, But even that much testing with that much Justin, thousands of people would still be getting infected, and hundreds would still be dying every day. So this new analysis as a new dimension to answer this question. How much testing would be enough to really beat back the virus and let the country safely start to reopen with out the virus flaring up again. Here's a she's jogging from Harvard. What we all really want is to suppress the others to get the virus level so low But we don't have large numbers of people getting sick and dying and that we can open up our economy and have kids come back to school and have businesses reopen, even if it's not 100% of what it looked like before the pandemic. That's what we want. You know, to finally really start to get life back to normal. Okay, so half a 1,000,000 tests for days where we're at now, one million per day would be pretty good. What is the ideal number that would get us to suppress the virus? Yes. So, according to this notice that the analysis will be way more testing. We need 4.2 million tests per day, more than eight times what the U. S is doing now, but that would allow the US to cast a much wider net by doing Much more aggressive and strategic casting, You know, target places where outbreaks often start nursing homes, repacking factories, prisons, catch people who don't have any symptoms, but still could be spreading the virus like teachers, students, and according to this analysis, the overwhelming majority of states aren't anywhere close to that. But that doesn't mean it's hopeless. In fact, four states already there Vermont, Alaska Y in Montana. West Virginia and even one big state that had big outbreak. New Jersey are very close. Okay, Rob, thanks for the update on the news. No problem, Steve. You bet. The Supreme Court handed a victory to abortion rights advocates. Yesterday the court struck down a Louisiana law that required doctors who perform abortions. Toe have hospital admitting privileges. What it means for Louisiana is that that states three remaining clinics, Khun stay open, but it also has implications all across the country. Here's NPR's Sarah McCammon. There's no requirement for doctors in Georgia who perform abortions to have hospital admitting privileges. But in Atlanta, Dr Nisha Verma was watching the case closely. We have a lot of patients that travel from Alabama as well from other parts of Georgia from Tennessee to get here to get their abortion care. Verma is an O. B G Y N and family planning fellow at Emory University. She says she fears new restrictions would force more clinics to close even though this case specifically related to the Louisiana having a lot of us were concerned about fact throughout the south and in more conservative parts of the country. A recent report by the Guttmacher Institute identified 15 mostly Republican controlled states, including Georgia, which could be poised to pass or enforce similar restrictions if Louisiana's law were upheld. Elizabeth Nash is a state policy analyst with Guttmacher, which supports abortion rights. We're talking about you the South. We're talking about the Midwest. We're talking about the planes. These are the states that have been adopting the bulk of the abortion restrictions over the past 10 years. Nationals. The ruling will shape strategy in legislatures across the country for advocates on both sides of the abortion debate. Louisiana law was what's known as a trap law for targeted restrictions on abortion providers. The Supreme Court overturned a similar Texas law in 2016 that also.

Louisiana Supreme Court Dr Nisha Verma US Georgia Harvard Global Health Institut Harvard New Jersey Midwest West Virginia Guttmacher Institute NPR Atlanta Texas Alabama Vermont Justin Rob Steve Emory University
"dr nisha" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"dr nisha" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King. And I'm Steve Inskeep. How much testing does the United States have now? And how much does it need to contain the pandemic? The number of new Corona virus cases has been rising sharply in some areas of this country. Public health experts say. We can change that, with more testing so that people can trace and isolate outbreaks. NPR and researchers at Harvard University went to analyze whether the U. S is meeting the need in our health correspondent Rob Stein has some new findings either. Rob Morning, Steve. Okay, so in your exclusive reporting are things any better with testing than they were? Yes, Carnivores. Tests are easier to get in some places. And last time, NPR and Harvard did this analysis. The U. S was doing less than 250,000 test today, and only nine states were doing the bare minimum amount of testing of the analysis estimated to be necessary to keep the fires under control. Two months later, Testing has doubled to about 500,000 test today. And according to our new analysis, the number of states now doing enough testing to keep the virus in check has increased from 9 to 18 plus Washington D. C. So that's progress. Although is that enough progress? Unfortunately, it's still not even close to what we really need. More than 2/3 of states still aren't doing nearly enough testing to keep a new operates from erupting 32 states. No by spotting enough new infections quickly enough to track their quarantine and test everyone else who might have caught the virus. You know, to see who needs to be isolated and stuff out any new flare ups. But and that's probably one big reason why we're seeing these big news surges in hospitals states across the South and West. None of the hospital states have been doing nearly enough testing. According to this analysis. Here's a She's Joe. He's at the Harvard Global Health Institute. The searches were seeing in large parts of the country are due. In part because those states opened up too quickly, and they relaxed way too much. Given how much virus they had in their community, and they lacked testing infrastructure. These two things really go hand in hand. How much more testing is really necessary? At a bare minimum. The Harvard researchers estimate that the US overall should double testing to about one million test today just to keep the virus at bay and, you know, get off this roller coaster the virus, you mean to be under control, but then erupting again, But even that much testing with that much Justin, thousands of people would still be getting infected, and hundreds would still be dying every day. So this new analysis as a new dimension to answer thiss question. How much testing would be enough to really beat back the virus and left the country safely start to reopen with out the virus flaring up again. Here's a she's jogging from Harvard, but we all really want is to suppress the virus to get the virus level so low But we don't have large numbers of people getting sick and dying and that we can open up our economy and have kids come back to school and have businesses reopen, even if it's not 100% of what it looked like before the pandemic. That's what we want, You know, to finally really start to get life back to normal. Okay, so half a 1,000,000 tests for days where we're at now, one million per day would be pretty good. What is the ideal number that would get us to suppress the virus? Yes. So, according to this notice that analysis we d way more testing we need 3.7 million Tests a day more than seven times with the U. S is doing now, But that would allow the US to cast a much wider net by doing much more aggressive and strategic testing your target places where outbreaks often start. Nursing homes, repacking factories, prisons, catch people who don't have any symptoms but still could be spreading the virus like teachers, students, and according to this analysis, the overwhelming majority of states aren't anywhere close to that. But that doesn't mean it's hopeless. In fact, four states already there for Mont Alaska, why in Montana, West Virginia, and even one big state and a big outbreak, New Jersey are very close. Okay, Rob. Thanks for the update on the news. No problem, Steve. You bet. The Supreme Court handed a victory to abortion rights advocates. Yesterday the court struck down a Louisiana law that required doctors who perform abortions. Toe have hospital admitting privileges. What it means for Louisiana is that that states three remaining clinics, Khun stay open, but it also has implications all across the country. Here's NPR's Sarah McCammon. There's no requirement for doctors in Georgia who perform abortions to have hospital admitting privileges. But in Atlanta, Dr Nisha Verma was watching the case closely. We have a lot of patients that travel from Alabama as well from other parts of Georgia from Tennessee to get here to get their abortion care. Verma is an O. B G Y N and family planning fellow at Emory University. She says she fears new restrictions would force more clinics to close even though this case specifically related to the Louisiana having a lot of us were concerned about fact throughout the south and in more conservative parts of the country. A recent report by the Guttmacher Institute identified 15 mostly Republican controlled states, including Georgia, which could be poised to pass or enforce similar restrictions if Louisiana's law were upheld. Elizabeth Nash is a state policy analyst with Guttmacher, which supports abortion rights. We're talking about you the South. We're talking about the Midwest. We're talking about the planes. These are the states that have been adopting the bulk of the abortion restrictions over the past 10 years. Nationals. The ruling will shape strategy in legislatures across the country for advocates on both sides of the abortion debate. The Louisiana law was what's known as a trap law for targeted restrictions on abortion providers. The Supreme Court overturned a similar Texas law in 2016 that also required hospital admitting privileges. Michele Goodwin is a law professor at the University of California, Irvine. She says. After this ruling, lawmakers and conservative states will have to shift strategies and let's be clear Those attacks may come anyway. It's just that they won't be using this particular tracked law to try to further shackle women's ability to obtain an abortion for opponents of abortion rights. The decision is a major blow to efforts to push forward with state laws restricting the procedure. And chip away at the Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide in 1973. Anti abortion groups hoped the court would rule in their favor after two of President Trump's conservative nominees joined the bench. Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh. But Chief Justice John Roberts, a Republican appointee, surprised observers by casting the swing vote siding with liberal justices, just four years after he'd ruled to uphold the similar law from Texas. Marjorie Dannenfelser is president of the Susan B. Anthony list, which opposes abortion rights. She says she feels bitter disappointment with Roberts but shall continue to fight for new restrictions. The first step is to elect a president who will name a Supreme Court justice that will tip the court five before in our favor and will make more saying decisions, this somewhat surprising win for abortion rights supporters who've been playing defense throughout the Trump administration. Sets up an even more pitched battle over the issue heading into November. Sarah McCammon NPR news.

United States Louisiana Supreme Court Steve Inskeep NPR Harvard University NPR News Sarah McCammon Georgia Dr Nisha Verma Texas Chief Justice John Roberts Noelle King Harvard Global Health Institut Rob Stein President Trump president Marjorie Dannenfelser Rob Morning
"dr nisha" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"dr nisha" Discussed on Science Friction

"Hello and welcome to sides friction it is the show exploring sides and culture. With Extra Spice Natasha Mitchell back with you and today we are looking for fakes. It was utterly disgusted of a surprise, I never had actually expected this to happen. And there's an irony here. Because half of my work is about how meaning and nuance, and in history gets MIS translated once it gets on the Internet and circulates in different ways here. It was happening to my very own work. So this story starts with a mixture and you I notice it. On the cover of a textbook, so the book is a sort of medieval encyclopedia, and has been translated recently into English by my colleague Elliot Mehanna. This is Dr Nisha fee as an historian from the University of California San, Diego. His thing is the culture and sites of the Ottoman Empire that vast state, which controlled over six hundred years much of Southeast Europe Western Asia and North Africa up. Until the twentieth century, it was centered around Istanbul and on the cover it of it is two men looking through telescopes. Telescopes one of them is pointing up at the night sky so here you have this traditional vision of men observing the cosmos through telescopes, they looking across a rich landscape from a kind of Belka Ni there on some sort of tower. Yeah, and there's a mood of them, so it's the time. Yeah, and it's drawn in this sort of traditional. Persian miniature style. Knees describing is sane depicting to turbaned astronomers at work sometime in the medieval era of the middle. East Persian miniatures of these small beautiful paintings of historical sayings, famous for their intricate detail and modern reproductions of them are sold in the busy markets of eastern to tourists in those, there seems to be an obsession with science, so some of these scenes are images that might be found in actual manuscripts for instance an image of circulatory system in the human body. People looking through a telescope people treating Toothache, a dentist operating on someone, a surgeon cutting open up a patient. Some of them are sexual, but they're often quite commonly linked to science. which is kind of curious because he's what you find. If you actually look at the historical record, I've looked through thousands of manuscripts myself out of every one thousand, two thousand, I find one with some illustration in it, and of those only a tiny fraction are actually depictions, of science. And there's a controversy or reason for why the story of Islamic Science is being sold to tourists in this way and I'll get back to that, but what about that? Miniature of the to astronomers will knee was about to use the book? It was on the cover of for a university course he teaches called science and Islam and something about it just didn't ring true. One is the telescope itself right? The telescope is something that was developed by Galileo and others in the seventeenth century. We have a lot of evidence of people using telescopes eighteenth century in the Middle East about I've never come across a picture of someone using it. And looking more closely again at the peak show me and noticed something else was odd. The style was a bit off. The colors were to write. The pigments were off. The way that this thing was drawn was not quite correct. So what I look for is the full picture when there wasn't cropped, and then once I saw. Two, more figures emerged in here. You have another man looking through a telescope, and then at the bottom of the picture you have the man with his hand on the globe, and writing a book with a quilt, and that quill set alarm bells off Fanie Ish via this for me with the little moment in which. I realize this is a fake because. People in the middle. East didn't write with quills a used to write with reed pens. Okay, that sounds like a very social day tile, but only and historians. I could pick up all be concerned about, and you might be thinking. But. This was a scholarly text, not the place for five weeks, and it's libel said it was a genuine miniature, asked in the East Ambuhl University Library. What we have here is a modern forgery masquerading as a mediaeval illustration as he describes it and the tourist markets are full of phase. They're very clearly fakes, so you know this isn't something that's fooled all sorts of experts here. But what happens is when they move onto the Internet. And how did they get onto the Internet? They get onto through these stock photo agencies stock foot inside. The one selling pictures to new sites to books all sorts of anytime. We need an image so there was this one particular photographer by the name of Janney Deldot, who is apparently pretty famous I found out for photographing pictures and museums, and he, according to the tag lines in these stock indices had photographed a large number of these fake miniatures and said that they were in the Stumble University library.

Middle East East Ambuhl University Library Elliot Mehanna University of California San Islamic Science Dr Nisha Southeast Europe Western Asia Istanbul Toothache University of Ottawa Europe Diego facebook Laurie giants forgery Janney Deldot North Africa Galileo Africa
"dr nisha" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"dr nisha" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

"We look at lifestyle as biological information that helps helps us control express our genes that literally our genetic expression is based on the food. We eat the air that we breathe the water that we're drinking and the thoughts that were thinking, and so you know that we have an impact on our health expression and today we have got a interview really powerful healing story that I think many of you. Guys are going to be inspired by and US really incredible information so I know you're gonNA. Love this, and so my guests is Alison Gannett and she specializes in customized oncology nutrition. She herself had a metastatic brain cancer right so And she actually used oncology nutrition of preventing conquer. Cancer also uses blood, chemistry, lab, testing, DNA, profiling, and history. When she was working with our clients, her heart and soul goes into our work, and she's created a program called conquer cancer with Kito Alison's twenty. Eight day DIY program video series. She also works with people one out one. She's a former world champion extreme skier in an award-winning climate change consultant. She and her husband grow and raise almost all their own. Own Food at the remote farm near Noah Colorado so alison welcome to the podcast, and for having me on failed to be here absolutely while you really interested in your story, and so I'd love to get started with that just Tom. What happened to you? Obviously here? You are world champion skier, heavily involved in climate change as an activist and and. What happened here? Well I mean. It was a crazy story. In two thousand, thirteen I started acting like kind of weird. I was having a hard time jumping off cliffs, and then one day I was cooking in my kitchen, and I was watching a pan catch on fire, and watching the flames go up to the ceiling. And my husband walked in. was like. What are you doing? In I was just thinking how crazy it was, and he was like. Okay, something's wrong. You know I have been acting very strangely, but this was kind of the icing on the cake, and so we rushed to the. And I had a brain tumor that took up almost two thirds of the space in my brain. And It was hard to imagine that I was walking and talking and building. Let alone. Being alive. As rush me into emergency surgery. Got Most of the tumor out, and luckily in my recovery, as I found Dr Nisha winters and started embarking on a Ketogenic of approach to you know comprehensive cancer, reversing the root causes. Obviously, it's way more than just diet. But that was kind of the foundational premises was getting into houses sin. Yup, and so, how long did it take you obviously hear your now. You're in remission, so this is two thousand. Thirteen's roughly seven years later. How long did it take you to really see results symptomatic, wise, and then also. Where you're getting, follow up our eyes or cat scans, or what sort of testing redoing? Ongoing work in progress. Dr Nation never even calls any of us in remission. It's kind of like you're just is like layers of Ananias as soon as you kill one layer off. He signed another layer another layer another layer. I'm still doing that I. still have a past pesticide nerve site, exposure revenue, eating organic fifty years, growing racing my own food but I'm still with these chemical environmental toxins that are still learning Audie, but what was interesting in two thousand thirteen. You know I had been Vegan Vegetarian, grown growing all my own food fire like even growing. Like that like? Exercising all the time being outdoors I mean I thought it was really healthy person, and then all of a sudden I was like this close debt, and then I find out that I have six point eight months to live if I do surgery, Chemo and radiation. And I didn't want to just like kind of barely survive, or you know really suffer through treatment. Luckily, my DNA profiling did not show that he were. Radiation would be very effective for my type of tumor. And so I decided to go on doctrinaire shot. Metabolic approach to cancer and reversing the root causes. It was very hard for me to switch from the Diet that I was eating to kind of embracing having two cups of fat a day. which you know I I know most people can relate to it seems. Even in college. I was taught in my nutrition classes. You know to miss my salad with a spray. Mr Olive oil I have been following the low. Paradigm I been exercising my brains out. I'm still battling with my way that always sudden I was told to eat to Cox fat nine cops, organic vegetables, small amounts of grass across finish proteins while caught series, it was a huge. Change? And I didn't really have a choice because my diagnosis terminal, so I just figured I had nothing to lose I might as well go for it. Changed Everything Because I track my blood work every month and I haven't tracking bloodwork every month for seven years. When, my blood work came back one month into the program of changing way I ate I couldn't believe it. The markers immediately reverse themselves three months later. It was like. A miracle six months later is when I really started. See changes on my skin's. It was at that point that things might poly cystic ovarian disease reversed itself. My seasonal allergies started to go away. My rheumatoid arthritis when away my breasts, fibroids went away I literally felt like. The Keita Genyk Diet was like Snake Oh. And in a good way though. It just seemed impossible take. All these conditions that had throughout my life I had chronic bladder infections, eastern sections on chronic bright, cried bronchitis, also, and all the stuff went away. Doctors have been telling me for years that none of these things were reversible so. was. Thinking that I was healthy, but really becoming healthy took the C. Word. To kind of realize that I need to rip the tape off the check engine light I think I had been in denial. Right at. I wasn't healthy. Yeah absolutely what bloodmarkers you're looking at. I look at about seventy different bloodmarkers every month and I looked at the CDC. Abidine we're looking at what factor, which is the segmentation rate or yes, our Latine hydrogenated. Also, hse key Margaret Heart disease. Than of course we're looking at all that diabetes markers because most cancer cells are like. Get other politic- pathways like. Wine. It's fasting insulin. ACID. than. We're also looking all the time. Related Markers were looking at all this stress. Markers or Even carbon dioxide, exultation less like how much stress is going on in the body. I could list them. We're looking at all. The anti of genesis markers like hopper five Brandon Jan.. Jassam. Absolutely, and so.

Cancer brain cancer Kito Alison Alison Gannett US Dr Nisha winters consultant ovarian disease Noah Colorado Dr Nation Audie Chemo Mr Olive Tom ACID. Margaret Heart bronchitis Abidine
"dr nisha" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

12:32 min | 1 year ago

"dr nisha" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Parenting politics social habits everyone in this country at some point in time has been a hypocrite maybe you smoke dope but if your kid is in the Beijing you find them smoking dope because they're not a major kick their **** maybe you're on the left side of the aisle and you hate big corporate stores that are driven out the mom and pops in your neighborhood but when they have good sales that's where you go to shop because it saves you money and help shore personal money situation I'm not judging you for that I know some people on the right who cringe cringe sometimes when our president tweets something even though they're conservatives and if you're on the left and you have a lot of cash and investments and you got voting issues in your hands of help may affect you when you're in your financial position in the world where your politics conflict with your bank account maybe hello what a point in America than on social media then if you don't agree with everything and that's why I started the show tonight here at CBS sports radio the way I did because right now on social media if you don't agree with everything that everyone stands for within a because then by god there's no way you can support that because the reason I say this issue is not about black lives matters because this is about human rights and equality for all minorities we engage in this got share cancel culture society that muddies the message because people take everything literally the slogan isn't only black lives matter they do matter in for those who've lived with and around racism and people who promoted they need that slogan drilled into their heads to know where we need to move towards to get this country where we need to get it to and that's where people like drew Brees and others have the ability to help shape the narrative and I'm gonna get to that drew Brees piece of business your father Greg show on CBS sports radio CBS sports radio dot com eight five five two one two four C. B. S. eight five five two one two four two two seven yeah I've been thinking about how really wanted to start the show tonight and it feels like it's by god you're on one side or the other and there's no way for any of us to be able to have any sort of discussion what so ever I'm sure that there are those who support black lives matter who would denounce the people who were looting and destructive and I'm sure they would also point out that there's a way to go in terms of the way African Americans treat each other because to some people in this country who are Caucasian who maybe grew up around someone who was talked something sixty years ago then unfortunately they are passing down to another generation because that's how they grew up everyone aged Peterson got into trouble with this kid and he grabbed the switch any with the kid and people said oh my god how could he do that someone did that to him and that's why there was a disconnect for that guy I argued that that was ignorance right in for for some people there's just a lot of ignorance out there that's why black lives matter as it is it can't just be a slogan it's got to be something they're really penetrates to people in this country but again it's not just about them and those within black lives matter and those like calling Capranica talked about systemic oppression and I've talked about it really as much as they can from a thirty thousand foot view I'll be honest with you Dr Nisha black lives matter hello I don't we needed in this country but I also disagree with the flyer that I saw they talked about it was in a certain city and I saw it online and it said that the first thing they wanted to do was the phone the police I can support their cause when I can disagree with parts of their calls when it seems like we can't do that right now it seems like they when someone like drew Brees who to me is what you want as a professional athlete as someone representing your organization in the community you know it was interesting the reaction to drew Brees in all of this because when we hear about listening trying to identify those who can help when we hear about talking and communicating to people when I look at drew Brees this is a guy whose foundation has distributed thirty five million dollars over the course of this over the life of the foundation he and his wife personally said they're going to donate five million dollars in New Orleans for people who were affected by covert nineteen and if you have been following covert nineteen did you know the break down and how it's affected minorities more in a lot of bigger cities New Orleans is one of those and when you dig in a little bit more and you see that this guy goes on the U. S. trips and things like that plus he's raised money outside his foundation I look at your breeze and I would've hoped did someone along the way we would have said to this guy's misguided enjoy the breeze was tone deaf in what he said now mind you if we were to go back to the beginning of the flag giving inter twined in this it was the initial quote from Colin Capra Nick they did lead to everybody going off the exit ramp on his real message and a lot of people got caught up in the NFL got caught up in the fence got caught up in it it became about the flag in the air but not about the message he was trying to send and now some four years later there's a okay this was the original intent of the message because now we look at protests I think a little differently they're good protests are necessary protests than there are people who ruin the message of protest that some in this country just gonna call mom to to say well the whole movements punk when it's not true that's why I mentioned the hypocrisy people on both sides are not entirely right they're not entirely wrong it's okay for me do not want police forces the funded in this country in my opinion it's okay for me to think that way and still supports what is going on in this country right now it doesn't feel that way I want to get back to drew Brees I was disappointed that there wasn't someone who said you know what this this is a good dude this is a guy who gives back this is someone who has shown he cares you know if you go back can you think of the timeline Jr breeze sign in Orleans in March of six Katrina hit that city in August of all five and as soon as you sign there he jumped in right away and started helping it wasn't Hey this was before I got here my I'm here there never was born when I went there and he jumped right in right away and I got a lot of respect a lot of time for people like that and if a part of the message that America needs to grab on to right now if a part of the messages we gotta communicate because that is what it really comes down to we have to learn to communicate we have to learn to talk we have to learn to realize that look there are parts of things within movements that I like and then there are certain things that I disagree with and I think there are people inside those particular movements whether it's on one side or the other that would be great but it's all we got to take the militant line it's got to be this way this is the way we have to do things these are our ideals and by god don't dare you think differently you're going to drive a hell of a lot of people who can actually think for themselves and aren't a bunch of sheep in zombies going down the left or right line then maybe you can get the Malcolm Jenkins of the world in true breeze of a world that would situations come up like this and you know this is a good guy with some stormy white supremacist TV jerk or something like that NFL players just hammered the guy then that's fine I guess for me I just wish there wasn't the kind of vitriol directed toward drew Brees because this is a guy that has helped this is a guy that can help and this is a guy who has shown he cares and in terms of the flag piece of all of this it it got wrapped into the larger narrative one calling Capper Nick knelt in did what he did because everyone interprets the flag differently and to me that's the way I took drew Brees's comments initially he is tone deaf for the whole military piece of it it's just it's whole Hey man you went way off the exit ramp on this one let's get you back on the exit ramp but Jr breezes family starts were getting death threats talked about people hammering him for being a racist come on now I think everybody knows that's untrue when you go back to how the message got distorted there are a lot of people in this country who interpret flag an anthem to mean something and it's up to everyone's interpretation I respect that when Colin Capra Nick said Hey this is what to me it stands for if he had said what he said and left out flag and anthem there would've been a chance that V. comments that he made afterwards would have gotten lost because then it became about having a job in NFL owners and things like that and I don't necessarily want to go back there but I guess what I want to get to is even within the world of athletes now all of a sudden this guy injure breezes been a leader forever who's done good things in the community now it's always good to win back the trust of his teammates at what point for someone like him is there a little bit of a sliding scale where someone should say to him Hey man here's why you're wrong and not drown him or to hold them under water and bring him back up I mean what happened to George Floyd is reprehensible what happened to George Ford was reprehensible it doesn't mean that every cop in America is like the guy who killed him it just doesn't how can we get to a point to where we can discuss things to me this is where Colin Capra Nick has to be involved I'd love to see drew Brees in on this I want lebron James I am hoping that people cross sports quite honestly I'm open date we get to a point to where the athletes have the power to shape the narrative more than anybody and you know why they have the eyes in the years of the year they have the eyes in the years of the young people who by the way are being taught inclusion when this forty five year old white guy went to Nicole in elementary school back and bought crack Pennsylvania when I was twelve years old they were teaching things like that we're not teaching these kinds of things we're hopefully raising different generations of people than we did even just ten years ago let alone twenty years ago and to think about what it was like for me in my formative years and the stuff that wasn't being taught that we know now you're like wow how well did we not see I think the athletes can help really Dr discussion discussion.

Beijing
"dr nisha" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

10:11 min | 1 year ago

"dr nisha" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Twenty five percent off if you use the name Tom for all your CBD products that really work now let's talk bill said he was there all weekend downtown and has observations on the rights he wasn't protesting a riding his firm was fixing up windows that were broken so let's talk to him and then I want your perspective on what you think of the writing of course this is still solving problems and answering questions and taking place at mark wants to talk about a jeep buying a jeep so bill I just would like to get a quick perspective from you now your business is is it a bit the window business or some other kind of business our property services work work okay property services so you were sent out by management companies to board up windows yeah that and we started out of boarding up single door broken windows or single feel windows that were broken down then the decision was made by a lot of companies will screw that was Florida boredom all up and that's what we started doing how we did twenty fifty sheets yesterday however not the mainland sixty falls out what do you think you said it was distressing what did you see welder all my stuff but most of all you're married no not used to seeing that we saw mainly young black use email in metal yeah twenty three year old running amok one group of fifteen or twenty people we got involved in rationing workaholic the man was at the next intersection to the last Indian style and I swear to god every twenty one those kids run up and down that street lane late into and pick them we got down there in time they left the guy lonely flagged down DVD how why were they why were they kick in this guy your call may come they were out of control running the markets what what we call it I guess yeah was it all white people like Tom was alluding to our most now he said he saw mostly young black people it will get more clearly black people that were causing problems there were a lot of white and the strangest thing happened when they're marked by action toward the capital a lot of the younger crowd mainly gross I would say we're dressed in flip flops were these ridiculous looking clothes like they were going to some sort of a club like they're going to the right parade and then about two hours later when we wrap it up they're all currently marching back locally most of my team was out there I was stuck down there however and luckily I had my truck between me I got all film that just so people could see what the hell is going on and and they were just rowdy coming back so I was glad to get out there and it was the first time I really felt actual peer were on these properties twenty four hours a day seven days a week on all areas of town and I was actually scared I mean I I I I do not carry a gun on properties and by Kerry I have pools golf course we have clawhammer saunas client case you know we had to around the nation we were doing work from two different groups and they were they were not black they're white and sources the mixture and about the whole situation should find a control down there hundred percent well thank you bill Preciado your comments Michael you have a comment go ahead Michael what you have a comment on that were you downtown I know I was knocked unconscious give a comment about I think you made a statement about disproportionate to the police brutality against certain group other groups to use black Hispanic whatever I don't think the crime statistics don't really care that out if you use what you have to adjust for which you have to really control for is the rate of violent crime committed by directories groups basically they're kind of interactions with serious interaction with law enforcement if you control for that you find is not the case I mean there's police brutality against all different groups if you're going to commit violent crime and I'm not saying this this situation was a violent crime you think the media just highlights when a black man is killed at the hands of white police R. well you're certainly give the Democratic Party is founded on this victimization thing and try their trust trying to stir up the masses you know these groups are that these groups have been run wild if you look at other places like Portland they they can destroy property without any consequences so this is this is the consequence of what happened all right thank you Michael three oh three seven one three talk three oh three seven one three eight two five five coming up we'll talk to check in with Larson tax relief about tax things coming up in all of the collections and what's going on with the IRS and with you and what you should be doing right now and then if you have any questions for them they can answer that on on filing and all that mark wants to talk about buying a jeep go ahead mark what's happening Hey Tom how are you I'm doing good three oh by the way our numbers three oh three seven one three talk seven one three eight two five five and you can get right through right now with help information referrals and by the way if you want to comment on the writing go ahead I'd love to hear your perspective mark go ahead so I don't have a comment on the writing I think it's it's crazy what's happening but I've called in and you help me out with a few things I just have a question about how I'm thinking about purchasing a jeep R. and I know you always they get it checked out and I'm gonna do that by is there anything specific that you would look for in a jeep but never owned one and you know timing chain things like that as well things I should know more than any other vehicle really but jeeps especially if kids own I'm young people own and they tend to abuse them a little more an off off roading I would really pay attention to the transmission actually have it checked I think by not just an all around we can't but then have the the the transmission checked out unless they're really good at at transmissions and then as with anything like you said timing belt and maintenance and you know to make sure everything's been kept up with the other thing with the jeep they tend to be overpriced and there's not much you can do about that if you really won't want their third sadly overpriced because of the desired they are such a popular car in I don't you know I I shouldn't say I don't know why I think they look pretty cool I liked I liked the way they look actually but man are they popular here and they tend to be a few grand over market I believe so if you can get a good deal try to get a good deal man because you're certainly not going to get more than normal when you trade it in you're gonna pay more but you're not going to get more so I understand okay so and it really the other thing mark with jeeps it is again to make sure that they they haven't been abuse because it's so easy now that means never using four wheel drive to I mean you got to make sure the four wheel drive even works some of these people don't even ever use four wheel drive they just have a jeep so and you want a jeep jeep as I call it right you're not talking about a a S. U. V. no not an S. U. V. a regular jeep I'm going from a little convertible and I want a jeep because it offers me that but it also has a backseat item for my daughter and and things like that so yeah you're right and and they're they're pretty good vehicles I mean you know that like I said there when I say pretty good like any car or or S. U. V. they're they're all good and bad but I just think in general they're just way over rated anyway Robert what is your comment Robert go ahead is this a new one on arrival yeah I was sad about hello yeah I got your Robert go ahead okay Tyler was repairing the windows was commenting about that there was a black standard all blacks started problems he said mostly he saw mostly the young black people yeah that's what he said right that's what I thought but I wasn't down there he also said the two issues they had were from white folks well yeah because there was a lot of folks down there confined you would just black that's true another three years I needed to mention was that photo shoppers updated their software ma'am and you have to delete all Goldberg before the new one work are you sure that the doesn't overwrite it I'm on the computer Dr Nisha just start all locally with Photoshop and the guy must have a verified fact he had pulled one back yet you meet all the old version and then start working on it download numbers because they were having a complex interesting I have I have that I have a lot of adobe stuff and I'm on a monthly plan I never update I mean it's kind of automatic that makes sense to you that's what I'm on where but I just I was kind of a contract twenty twenty first and I called him and told him that he did all the old style any downloads and in person and now it's working a little better so okay well thank you for that I appreciate that out three oh three seven one three talk seven one three eight two five five please hang on if you want to comment on the rights and then I want to ask a young black man's perspective as well and so I just I really what he's you know I I just want to use I know he's at home watching pardon what it what was he thinking I know what I was thinking I would truly like to know that and and I'm hoping and I'm you know I'm not I'm I'm looking for a gut reaction what was it I said I think I would be pissed I think I would be pissed because of being misrepresented unless of course I wasn't misrepresent we'll talk about that coming up.

Tom
"dr nisha" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"dr nisha" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"The Dave Ramsey show weekdays at one on WC geo was Reforma C. concierge delivery on like large retail pharmacies in chains Dr price is fully devoted to patient care multi goes back into convenient refills for multi sports and seeking medications to treat it like a patient not a customer Dr price to compete with Paul chains on price the convenience and low cost of mail order with the care of a pharmacist you can actually speak to free delivery everyday low prices just call six three oh two nine nine thirty nine hundred and doctor Michael transfer your scripts for you includes free north for delivery service just call six three oh two nine nine thirty nine hundred hi the queue here from the hard question telling you not to miss out on the best happy hour in Evanston at the farmhouse school under new ownership Tuesday through Thursday from three to six PM you can take advantage of five dollar drafts from sketchbook brewery five dollars select craft cocktails and a special five dollar happy hour menu and dollar fifty Miller high life Miller high life so don't miss it this is a really cool all reverse happy hour Friday and Saturday nights beginning at nine PM it's under new ownership it's even better than ever so make sure you stop by seven fifty Chicago Avenue and check out the pool tables and the arcade games up stairs by the way they have a brand new pizza menu and check out their best happy hour ever in any place in Evanston that's why we're going to see you there at the fire house grill Mike Jackson outdoors Sunday mornings eight to nine AM and smart talk WCG AM and FM reading your soul in your radio chef Jamie Gwen here studies show that children today consume at least three times the recommended daily limit of sugar and the culprits are not the usual suspects like candy soda and cookies because added sugar is everywhere and yogurt and bottled salad dressing and boxed mac and cheese and pre sliced bread so with all this sugar lurking how can you make quick easy flavorful low sugar meals that the whole family will love he'd half the sugar all the love the new book release that by the way is getting a ton of wonderful attention healthy food advocate doctor any ship Patel and award winning author Jennifer Tyler lead deed bunk the sugar mess and they're sharing practical insight and recipes for cutting your sugar intake Dr Nisha Patel is the associate professor of pediatrics at Stanford University and the leader of Stanford's pediatric sugar research program and she is here to answer all of your sweet queries very.

"dr nisha" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"dr nisha" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Miami begins tonight as the democrats who want to be president begin to stake their claims it's the first debate of the presidential election season half of the field taking the stage tonight a._b._c.'s aaron katersky with a preview with ten candidates on stage and more than double that in the race this debate is a chance for a breakout moment you got sixty seconds parameter you know it's not not a lot of time on new york one bill de blasio made clear he understood the stakes huge audience for me chance to make a first impression on the american people to blasio will share a stage with booker castro delaney gabbard inslee globus are aurore ryan and warren ten other democrats debate here thursday night aaron katersky a._b._c. news miami democratic pollster and strategist brad bannon will be watching i think elizabeth warren we'll have an advantage because she's the only one of the focal major candidates that's going to be on the night one panel and so she has a chance to dominate senator warrant on stage tonight these debates will be carried at nine o'clock eastern on n._b._c. m._s._n._b._c. as well as telemundo senate majority leader mitch mcconnell has agreed to call a vote on a bill to fund compensation for the victims of nine eleven first responders met with mcconnell and say he has a sense of urgency to make sure the fund never runs out of money yesterday's meeting came two weeks after comedian jon stewart called for congress or called out congress for its lack of action he said first responders did their job now it's time for capitol hill lawmakers to do there's seven oh seven get up off that couch new research says watching television could be the most harmful sedentary behavior out there and couch potatoes often have other bad habits watch television were more likely to be overweight smoke cigarettes and didn't exercise very much it's bad news dr nisha goldberg at n._y._u. langone health says watching more than four hours of t._v. a day can lead to heart disease and premature death that'll get you off the couch red sox win in the raindrops at fenway six three the final over the white sox red sox will look for sweep today it's afternoon baseball at fenway park hopefully in the sunshine and then the red sox are heading out of town a couple of days off as they head to london they are taking on the yankees in a weekend series overseas coming up it's seven oh eight let's head to the markets on wall street checkout business news from bloomberg here's andrew o.'day stock indexes referring with all time highs jeff unemployment is at its lowest level in a half century but many americans are not feeling it bank rate survey of more than one thousand consumers finds about forty percent believe the economy is not so good or poor and contrast is ample financial experts finds nine and ten rate the economy as good or excellent analysts say lower income americans are simply not doing as well as indicators suggest twenty eight percent of us have nothing not one dollar saved for a rainy day robots are on track to wipe out almost a tenth of the world's manufacturing jobs research from oxford economic says while automation should boost the economy as a whole is likely to create greater inequality as appointment losses or concentrated in certain industries and countries manufacturing could lose twenty million positions by twenty thirty some features up though that's futures rising thirteen nasdaq futures up fifty one andrew o.'day bloomberg business on w._b._z..

Miami president twenty eight percent forty percent sixty seconds four hours one dollar two weeks
"dr nisha" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

11:29 min | 2 years ago

"dr nisha" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"A beautiful beautiful looking bat. Eight six six to eight bat trademarks and logo used with permission by MLB and MLB. The. Sure. Part of the clothes stores. We haven't gotten to today lead things off have at it. I'm ben. Okay. DJ LeMay, Hugh is he's the leading off. He's playing second of Luke boy is playing I Gary Sanchez behind the dish Miguel do heart-hitting cleanup DA ching today. Clint Frazier back in the lineup. He's playing right field Gardner playing center. GO or shelhah is playing third Tiro Estrada. Playing short today. Glacier, Torres gets the night off and Tuchman playing left he says about the on the mound and king Felix on the mound for mayors who really is nowhere near himself for what it used to be. It's different over is different pitcher now. Yes. And he's not nearly as good. That's what we mean. Funny. Cassisi reinvented himself in a different kind of way. Then. Yeah. But I mean, he really hasn't. I mean, he's trying it's not working out. I was reading an article that up athletic is kind of interesting. What do you got you wanna lead off or since you just went twenty one to do? Go ahead. So for the game of thrones crowd out there. I love doing this. You don't even watch his show. Well, actually, that's not true because I am now through season one because I have been minimalized by the same thrones gang that is society. Dell was there been shamed? Got to be high. You got the little monsters. What are you guys? Call maggie. Awesome. People. Bullying bullies people who started this on this epic quest eight seasons ago. Right, right Mongol. We had the foresight to start off on this journey with the rest of society of early this, EPA quest and journey included. A stop at Starbucks. Right on the way to slay the king in less episode. At least what I've seen today. I didn't see it because with one really grew. And everything for me. This is not a spoiler. Yeah. There was. And one of the cuts a Starbucks Cup that somebody forgot to take off set. So it's in the shot. Oh, that's funny. All missing was the little plastic stopper. Topple. No one was Howard Schultz president. Pepsi. Medieval times, the problem. Well, they they were serving Starbucks. They were thrown out Watson's last night. Like, it was nothing. Hey, you know, when you're getting ready for the big epic battle need a lot. Right. I thought they had the big epic battle is another. There's another one coming. Yeah. When Stanley kind of pops up in every like Marvel's movie. Well, Starbucks up at every game of thrones is into to go back and find every episode. I watched season one so far. Okay. So a lot of things going on. I. The gore is not my thing. The gore is tough. I just I don't know. I enjoy I mean hilarious doing the same thing. I am he's into season two marash. I don't know how you feel about that. I just don't any it is a little excessive. Yeah. A little much blood splattering everywhere for no reason four reason. But still I almost want to be like you guys you you haven't even been through it yet. Physician to talk you. Him at ARIN life this. I mean, Dexter there's nothing, but blood everywhere that show. I mean, it was like at least goes no clean it up. The I know Carlin you watch berry. Yes. Last week's I didn't watch this week's episode because we got home late. But last week's episode was pretty that was as rough as ever been. But that was I think it was on purposes you pointed out after what was apparently a particularly violent game. It was funny. Anyway, you're throwing storks this. You know, your one of your your way, I'm done. I got into like the first episode of season to it. I just I don't care. I don't care again. If I wanted to know I'd go to medieval times. Time and place kind show. Now, I think it's kind of it's the last one before these Netflix shows to over the world where now we're we're a weekly thing might not play the same as well. I'll tell you what. Thing that we have together and kind of started John that may be now we've seen a bunch, and it's not as interesting start it. Now, not breaking bad breaking bad his deficit so much different. Yes. Better spartacus. Barth like Tony Curtis. How about this out of Staten Island, which is where we will be from tomorrow at the kettle black doing our NBA draft lottery party good karma party. They had actually this is some pretty good car by think for Staten Island. They named a district right after Wootton the Wu Tang district. Looks like it's right on Vanderbilt avenue, and yeah, right around Vanderbilt avenue, I wanna Tanga district license plate new social security numbers security number but guys were out reservoirs. Their Ray Kwan Capitana more of an honorary member in my opinion. But he was out there. And they were celebrated. It's awesome congratulates did that. Yes, listen. They are Staten Island. Good to have appreciation for them. They're still alive. I know we lost this fellow alive. A lot of times there by doing this whole nifty hustle thing. They wanna give them the flowers. They're you know, they were a movement. They were real thing. You know, he brought they brought fame to that borough. He'll show them respect that they deserve. Bart. What do you got? Well, I'm gonna go back to the most anger is football player. I ever played against Steve Smith Steve Smith is in the news again. But it's a good thing. He'll the Carolina Panthers relationship is really not a good one. You know, he's really. Because again, get them is gone. And you have new ownership now, they're doing the right thing. You know, he's the I battle hall of Famer he's gonna be in stride in hall pretty soon. And you know, they're going to put them in their ring of honor. So congratulations Steve Smith little angry, man. He better be a personal hall of Famer. He's not gonna be happy. He deserves he'll tell you about it. You think he might not show it like Teo? There was a guy that absolutely thought he was going to be a first ballot hall of Famer that didn't get voted in on the first ballot. And I happen to see him in the lobby of that day that he didn't get motored in. And he was in tears say, oh, it was. I can't say. As it. Tears and go to go valley was the recent. It was two thousand seven it was the first giant Super Bowl. The first one being against patriot with the Harry Carson. No, no, no. It was not a giant giant. He just happened to be in the lobby of that hotel. To give the Nichols cannot give you an incidence eventually get in. Yes, it's okay to cry bro. Yes. I'm not saying it's not crying over not getting in the first time Bill Parcells. Cross he was bawling like he's he's not cracking getting's crime. Because now, you know, that's like that's like winning hyphen, and that's like a medium million to million on the sign is right there. So he probably spent that money thing he's gonna get in. And that man was Ramsey Spartan. How about west gate, Las Vegas sports? Book the Super Bowl rather opened with the Knicks sixteen to one odds to win the title in twenty twenty. Sixteen to one twenty twenty. We don't know. Yeah. I think they're they're stretching it a bit. I don't know if west gate, I mean Vegas might but I twenty two one ready sixty to one sixteen to one. It's a little early. It's a little unless Jim Dolan's running west gate. Parents everywhere I'm looking at TV, and I'm looking at TV, and this may be funny. So woman tried to slide and Bryce Harper dams. No, he got that s- money, but it was his wife's account instead. Wow. Wonder why would say, yeah. Meet me here crater. Yes. At a message got the honest, man. Now wifey I saw that apparently told him told the person you probably should make sure who you're sending it to the next time. Not see Dr Nisha. She was hitting me here. She would play the whole roll like me setup. Like where at the four seasons. Walk and she's sitting on the bed with a club. Sitting there like like. True Lies header shoot outta hair. Slicked back. Invest lean on her face night night, Kevin fresh meadows. Kevin what's up and checking your husband's it's like wacko. State cat what? Yes. Good walk with everything. Thank you, everything goes well for you. That's most important. I just wanted to just a little quick thing on the horse thing. They used on voice in New York. I had to horses that actually one to two didn't and to say, they don't know is definitely wrong. They definitely how could you tell? How? It's the best. I can tell you. I'm not gonna check him read awards his mind cannot it. It's an attitude. It just the way they carry themselves. They are trained to beat the horse next of them. Okay. But can I just pose a theory to you is it possible that you are kind of transferring your own thoughts, and euphoria and happiness, and you're kind of putting it on the horse, even though the horses attitude may not have changed that possible. I possible. Yeah. I'm not gonna say it's not. But I would just say to you that just from looking at it to see the horse that lost like thirteen times in a row before retiring, he never happy day in his life more where the other hoisted did win one time Carina row. It just seemed like, you know, if in the step, and you know, whatever, I don't know. I'm sure your horse can look to. He won or not. I don't know. When you start the call with. Going to sit here and say, I can read a horse's mind. I think he kind of are saying that but you can't live on horses. So I can you know, it's like being it's like, you know, being a pet owner, you probably feel like you can reach news mind. There's nothing on that brain. I love her. She's not the brightest bulb elephant elephants. You know, they they know, you know, so full soulful eyes. I get it. I get. Yes. Think we put our our own stuff onto the horse. Yes. But in this case, I think you're both wrong horses. Absolutely. No, did that's one. Oh us. We've got another group. It's science. It's just science. Convincing ever that? That guy backed my claim. No verbal communication. No have to be able to talk and speak the same lame which understand fillings. Once again wanna remind you a week from tomorrow may fourteenth kennel black Stanton island. Of course, there's one in bay ridge as well that this'll be the one four fifteen four seventy in Staten Island. It is the NBA draft lottery party from seven to nine PM be there..

Starbucks Staten Island NBA MLB Steve Smith Tiro Estrada Clint Frazier Cassisi Gardner Dell Gary Sanchez Howard Schultz Torres DJ LeMay Luke Kevin Netflix Tuchman Bill Parcells
"dr nisha" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:10 min | 2 years ago

"dr nisha" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Joan Hamburg show, and it's a little complicated to try to stay healthy because we get a lot of conflicting medical information. Let's take a glance at aspirin because not only older adults. I work with a lot of young people. And I was surprised by how many of them here have been taking a low dose aspirin every day. Prophylactically some reasons for a heart attack prevent a stroke of family, history, whatever and that has been what people did for to reduce risks. It's changed as of just about a week ago. It's no longer recommended for older adults or necessary younger adults. Let me introduce you to Dr Nisha Goldberg who is one of the leading cardiologists in New York and director of the NYU Langone Joan h his center for women's health. How were you fine? How were you? John good. But spitting out. Yeah. I figured there'd be a lot of questions while I was sitting in the conference where they announced the new guidelines on aspirin and sure enough I got back to the office on Tuesday. And there were lots of messages regarding aspirin therapy. So let's talk about first what happened chain. Okay. All people who have heart disease have huts heart surgery like bypass surgery, then maybe may have been told that because they had atrial fibrillation and our younger and had an ablation that they should continue on aspirin. This guideline is for the new recommendations are parade for people who don't have heart disease and are at low risk for heart disease. So in in particular, aspirin is has been shown to have the greatest benefit in preventing further, heart disease, and people who already have it. But we studies show that people who have been at low risk and even moderate risk for heart disease may not get as much of a bump in benefit from taking an aspirin a day. So in particular, if you're seventy years old, and have, you know, normal blood pressure, and no heart disease, taking an aspirin won't don't won't help you to prevent heart attack. So should people taking it, which is almost every adult. I now. Should they stop? Or should they be weaned off gradually and? One more should clarify with their doctor. Why they're taking an aspirin. As recommended for. Well, no for, you know, for many of my patients, they may have cholesterol, build up in their arteries, but not have not yet had a heart attack or a stroke. And so I give them an aspirin because that's considered secondary prevention you're already have evidence of early disease. But if you're in the seventy and over group and don't have that the aspirin may not be necessary. But of course, I would always tell anyone listening that if they're on an aspirin and not sure to add to clarify that with their doctor, right? And for the young people who are taking because they have heart disease in their family. Whatever is that. Should they stop is that a good idea? How young they are thirties? So there has been no study to prove that taking an aspirin in your twenties thirties because you have fam-. History. But you personally are at otherwise low risk would benefit from that. Okay. That's interesting. But what happens Dr Goldberg, and I'm talking to Nisha Goldberg cardiologists and director of the John H Tisch center for women's health and NYU Langone. Months ago, not even long ago. We did a story on aspirin and how it wasn't that effective depending on your weight? That's right. And and they were there was additional research on that at the meeting at the American college of cardiology meeting, and it it may in fact be that, you know, aspirin therapy for people who need it. The most has to be adjusted in terms of dose based on weight, but they're still that's still trying to figure that out. So the weight may play. Play into whether or not aspirin is beneficial in certain groups of people, and Dr Goldberg does the cardiology community still think that cholesterol and blood pressure are culprits when it comes to the heart. Yeah. We haven't changed that John. But so what is the cholesterol story? Well, the cholesterol story shows that people, you know, who have elevated levels of LDL cholesterol are at high and low lowland steel are at higher risk for for a heart attack stroke, and certainly blood pressure. High blood pressure is a risk factor for heart attack stroke and also does direct damage to the heart muscle. And by thickening it. If it's not treated, right? So there's just so much stuff going on that people really don't know about. And what about the link, and there was a big medical story recently talking about the link between diabetes and Stanton's? Okay. So let's let's sort that out you, you don't necessarily got full blown diabetes. If you take a statin, it looks as if people who are at risk for elevated blood sugar that we can see that in people who were on Staten. So I want I want to also point out that we safely give statin therapy to patients who have diabetes, and they do. Well. They do well and we lower their risk for heart disease. So the benefit of taking the Staten outweighs any potential risk of elevating blood sugar. Duck Denisa Goldberg, thank you as always. Thank you or advice. Any information really important? We've gotten tons of calls on this. Because people are like what should I do? I know. And and here it is. And it could change again. Right. Right now, it is what it is Dr Goldberg at NYU Langone the center for women's health. I'm Joan Hamburg, and you're listening to WABC Rosenberg.

aspirin heart disease Dr Nisha Goldberg Joan Hamburg NYU Langone Langone Joan Denisa Goldberg Staten director John Nisha Goldberg diabetes American college of cardiology New York WABC Rosenberg John H Tisch center Stanton