6 Burst results for "Dr Nicole Bouvier"

"dr nicole bouvier" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:42 min | Last month

"dr nicole bouvier" Discussed on KCRW

"You know the best. The best statement was actually by the Wall Street Journal board, where they said the Biden spending those the wrong remedy for an economy that is growing. The best economic stimulus is to end the lockdown and accelerate the vaccine rollout. What will help American families more than anything is in the lockdown. Allow people to go back to work, allow their kids to go back to school in person that will change the economy. More than anything. I'm someone who I fought for increasing the child tax credit several years ago from 1000 to 2000. It's actually my legislation. But this this bill is is it's full of so many unnecessary items that don't go to help the working class look at the expense of the working class and senior citizens. Like I told you $36 billion cuts every year to Medicare Just because of passing this bill last question here, Let's look forward a little bit. The president has made it clear he wants to move on to an infrastructure bill. Next, we have been making cynical jokes about infrastructure bills for five or six years in Washington now He's made it clear he sincerely wants it to be bipartisan. What kind of infrastructure Bill? Would you and other Republicans support right now? Republicans want an infrastructure bill that's truly bipartisan. I mean, we know that our roads and bridges and ports and Locks and dams needs needs the assistance and I think we can get to a bipartisan approach as long as it doesn't turn into like a green new deal proposal that increases taxes on all Americans, so we'll talk to truly an infrastructure bill. We're about it. We're running that time, but we'll talk about that again with you soon. Missouri Republican Congressman Jason Smith thank you. More than half a million Americans have gotten an experimental treatment for covert 19. It's called convalescent Plasma. But a year into the pandemic, it is not clear who, if anyone actually benefits from it. That highlights the challenges Scientists have faced in studying covert drugs. NPR's science correspondent Richard Harris, reports on paper treatment with convalescent plasma makes good sense. The idea is to take blood plasma from people who have recovered from covered 19 and infuse it into people currently infected. And the bodies in that plasma in theory would help fight the virus. So based on that idea, Dr Nicole Bouvier at the icon School of medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York decided to give it a try last March. You know, we had this new disease that didn't have any Known therapies and convalescent plasma has been used in new epidemic and pandemic diseases. Like as recently as Ebola. She says she was the first doctor to get special permission from the Food and Drug Administration to use an experimental protocol. Was a huge commitment to line up people willing to donate plasma as well as to treat patients themselves. So it was a big production we ultimately screened over 70,000 people. And identified Brown 20,000, who had high antibody tigers, she treated more than 1400 patients right through New York's nightmare covert outbreak last spring. But all the while she had no idea whether the plasma really worked. Finally, a couple of weeks ago, she had seen enough data from carefully controlled studies and decided to stop offering the treatment. The straw that broke the camel's back was two very large court trials. Recovery in England and then Concord, which is a Canadian study, the scientists running those studies said they were giving up because they simply weren't seeing signs that it could be useful. But those studies focused on people sick enough to be in the hospital. Dr. Arturo Casa Devil at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health is one of the prime advocates for convalescent plasma. He says he thinks the treatment needs to be done sooner in the outpatient setting from the very beginning here at Hopkins. We set out to do our patient trials. Trials were set up in March. However, it took many months to get the money to do it, and a year later, they still don't have results. It is not just funding the entire U. S medical research system isn't set up to do what's needed, Dr Derek Angus at the University of Pittsburgh says in a pandemic. We need to evaluate new treatments at hundreds of hospitals in a matter of months, people might roll our eyes and say that's impossible. But that's largely what the United Kingdom has done. The UK study of convalescent Plasma, for example, ended up studying more than 10,000 patients to reach its conclusion. That was possible because Britain has a national health system, which not only provides treatment but can conduct research research in the United States is balkanized between universities, drug companies and funders, Angus says. We pride ourselves on having the very Federated independent system. But gosh bad is very hard to turn on a dying to solve national problems. To give Just one example a national network of emergency room. Physicians got federal funding to treat people with convalescent plasma. Their patients were sick enough to show up in the emergency room, but well enough to go home afterwards. We should have been able to get this done as quickly as they didn't UK, and it was just a much slower process to set up. Dr Kevin showman at Stanford was responsible for some of the logistics. They were a nightmare. I said, tongue and cheek at some point when we had five patients in our study that we had at least 500 people touch. A piece of paper for the five patients were group hurted, and that's the opposite in the UK that emergency room study, too, was just stopped after about 500 patients had been recruited. Because continuing it would have been few tile. This further cast doubt on the value of convalescent plasma, says Derrick Angus from pit. I don't see any point in offering plasma outside the clinical trial. Several are still ongoing, and there's still a chance that some of them could identify a group of patients treated at a particular time with a particular concentration of plasma who would benefit Dr Bouvier at Mount Sinai haven't given up on a completely if study comes along that identifies a population in whom convalescent plasma is useful. We will use it in that population and if it does appear to be useful for people who are early in the course of disease. That raises another question. Would plasma be better than the monoclonal antibody drugs already authorized for that purpose? Unfortunately, it could require another time consuming study to figure that out. Richard Harris. NPR NEWS This is NPR news. And on this Wednesday you are listening to KCRW. KCRW sponsors include Netflix, presenting the documentary Dick Johnson is dead. As her father nears the end of his life. Filmmaker Kirsten Johnson uses their families dark humor to.

Kirsten Johnson Richard Harris Derrick Angus Food and Drug Administration Nicole Bouvier Netflix five Arturo Casa Devil $36 billion March Angus New York United States five patients Johns Hopkins School of Public England six years NPR Republicans Derek Angus
"dr nicole bouvier" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:48 min | Last month

"dr nicole bouvier" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Americans have gotten an experimental treatment for covert 19. It's called convalescent Plasma. But a year into the pandemic, it is not clear who, if anyone actually benefits from it. And that highlights the challenges scientists have faced and studying covert drugs. NPR's science correspondent Richard Harris, reports on paper treatment with convalescent plasma makes good sense. The idea is to take blood plasma from people who have recovered from covered 19 and infuse it into people currently infected. In the bodies in that plasma in theory would help fight the virus. So based on that idea, Dr Nicole Bouvier at the icon School of medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York decided to give it a try last March. You know, we had this new disease that didn't have any Known therapies and convalescent plasma has been used in new epidemic and pandemic diseases. Like as recently as Ebola. She says she was the first doctor to get special permission from the Food and Drug Administration to use an experimental protocol. Was a huge commitment, the lineup people willing to donate plasma as well as to treat patients themselves. So it was a big production. We ultimately screened over 70,000 people and identified Around 20,000, who had high anybody. Tigers. She treated more than 1400 patients right through New York's nightmare covert outbreak last spring, But all the while she had no idea whether the plasma really worked. Finally, a couple of weeks ago, she had seen enough data from carefully controlled studies and decided to stop offering the treatment. The straw that broke the camel's back was two very large court trials recovery in England and then Concord, which is a Canadian study, the scientists running those studies said they were giving up because they simply weren't seeing signs that it could be useful. But those studies focused on people sick enough to be in the hospital. Dr. Arturo Casa Devil at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health is one of the prime advocates for convalescent plasma. He says he thinks the treatment needs to be done sooner in the outpatient setting from the very beginning here at Hopkins. We set out to do outpatient trials. Trials were set up in March. However, too many ones to get the money to do it, and a year later, they still don't have results. It is not just funding the entire U. S medical research system isn't set up to do what's needed, Dr Derek Angus at the University of Pittsburgh says in a pandemic. We need to evaluate new treatments at hundreds of hospitals in a matter of months, people might roll our eyes and say that's impossible. But that's largely what the United Kingdom has done. The UK study of convalescent Plasma, for example, ended up studying more than 10,000 patients to reach its conclusion. That was possible because Britain has a national health system, which not only provides treatment but can conduct research research in the United States is balkanized between universities, drug companies and funders, Angus says. We pride ourselves on having the very Federated independent system, but gosh that is very hard to turn on a dying to solve national problems. To give Just one example a national network of emergency room physicians got federal funding to treat people with convalescent plasma. Their patients were sick enough to show up in the emergency room, but well enough to go home afterwards. We should have been able to get this time assed quickly is they didn't U. K and It was just a much slower process to set up. Dr. Kevin showman at Stanford was responsible for some of the logistics and they were a nightmare. I said tongue and cheek at some point when we had five patients in our study. We had at least 500 people touch. A piece of paper for the five patients were group hurted, and that's the opposite in the UK that emergency room study, too, was just stopped after about 500 patients had been recruited. Because continuing it would have been few tile. This further cast doubt on the value of convalescent plasma, says Derrick Angus from pit. I don't see any point in offering plasma outside the clinical trial. Several are still ongoing, and there's still a chance that some of them could identify a group of patients treated at a particular time with a particular concentration of plasma who would benefit Dr Bouvier at Mount Sinai haven't given up on it completely. If study comes along that identifies a population in whom convalescent plasma is useful. We will use it in that population and if it does appear to be useful for people who are early in the course of disease. That raises another question. Would plasma be better than the monoclonal antibody drugs already authorized for that purpose? Unfortunately, it could require another time consuming study to figure that out. Richard Harris. NPR NEWS This is NPR NEWS. KQED NEWS with Brian Watt Coming up with 6 22 Joe with a lot of traffic.

Richard Harris Brian Watt Derrick Angus Food and Drug Administration England March Derek Angus Nicole Bouvier United States Arturo Casa Devil New York Kevin Angus five patients NPR last March more than 1400 patients University of Pittsburgh Stanford Bouvier
"dr nicole bouvier" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"dr nicole bouvier" Discussed on WTOP

"Ince's challenging times are ahead we will have lost a lot of people and in many ways the heroes with several companies now making masks and ventilators Mr trump says he believes there will be enough to cover the need I think we're going to be in very good shape as the administration hails a million samples tested for corona virus the president calls questions about the pace of testing and about as many statements shrugging off the virus threat snarky and nasty I'm very proud it's it's almost a miracle and it is the way it's all come together Steven Portnoy a CBS news Washington I'm seeing people die all around me that message from New York governor Andrew Cuomo as he appealed for more help from the federal government saying what he's seeing in his state could soon be seen all over the country CBS is a lease Preston you are now has thousands of confirmed cases and more than twelve hundred deaths the governor Andrew Cuomo has a warning for the rest of the country I don't care if you live in Kansas I don't care if you live in Texas there is no American that is in you the corona virus has hit nursing homes particularly hard victims families say the isolation compounds their grief the fact that I didn't get to say goodbye is still what's eating me up inside three out of every four Americans are now under a stay at home order at least pressed in CBS news New York patients who have been infected with the virus and have recovered could be key to fighting the disease as our Dr Jon LaPook reports one potential treatment uses the antibodies build up in the blood of patients who have survived kindergarten teacher Julie Feller a covert nineteen survivor has donated her blood to possibly be used in a similar transfusion in New York City I am one of the survivors it's a tough ride I got very lucky and it was a way that I could get back a lot of it's going to depend on you know the donor pool Dr Nicole Bouvier and her team at new York's Mount Sinai will soon be using the same treatment just performed in Houston Matthew McConaughey sharing this to his Instagram staying home is not a retreat most brave and aggressive weapon we have against.

Kansas Instagram Matthew McConaughey Mount Sinai Dr Nicole Bouvier New York City Julie Feller Dr Jon LaPook Texas Ince CBS federal government Andrew Cuomo Washington Steven Portnoy president Mr trump
"dr nicole bouvier" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"dr nicole bouvier" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Quick time out today to get a better shooting range four one oh three she chef ski over Rick Pitino the one seed Duke over two seed Kentucky research in late Nur one of the more despised yet appreciated players I would say his thirty for thirty awesome this thirty for thirty is incredible and I've interviewed later many times well maybe a little too tall but I've interviewed him more than once and every time I talk to Christian Laettner I like him more he is an interesting intelligence dept full sports personality grant hill the late Nur fake right dribbled once turned jumper bank one oh four one oh three the NCW tournaments just a moment just to check are there people just getting excited at some point this to all come back to normal right now there's a couple other sports things today March twenty eighth Michael Jeffrey Jordan I know you're shocked and bringing him up Jordan had it sixty nine points and eighteen rebounds against the Cleveland Cavaliers March twenty eight nineteen ninety he shot twenty three of thirty seven from the field twenty one of twenty three from the free throw line two of six from three point line you had six assists four steals and a block and then he returned from baseball in nineteen ninety five his fifth game back to be put up fifty five at Madison Square Garden which is making the it's literally everywhere today the game is being played live on Twitter it's on my television screen people are talking about it and allows him which I love all of it though you stepped away from basketball for seventeen months you came back in fifteen back in Madison Square Garden you put up fifty five points and then you are the sweetest sister bill Wennington for two hand dunk to win the game one thirteen one eleven Michael Jeffrey Jordan on this date March twenty eighth nineteen ninety five yeah I really I I I I I appreciate sports coming back in whatever way people are texting about the tortillas thank you there was one one news story that I wanted to bring to you tonight as we grapple and up here that I thought was very uplifting Curtis you got this one for me this was a this was a CBS report that I her earlier today and as we all have our fingers crossed or watching the news and we're looking for things that seem real and I mentioned Abbott laboratories a couple of times today with the testing that's coming which feels like a huge step in progress I thought this was an interesting report as well and I doctors are hopeful that a treatment for corona virus may already exist in the blood of patients who were once infected blood plasma up from those who have recovered can be a rich source of antibodies those are the proteins that help the immune system attacks the virus it's actually a century old treatment that could save lives here's our Dr Jon LaPook Julie thaler has recovered from cobit nineteen and her blood may be a lifesaver for others I kind of walk around feeling like superwoman I'm hoping that I can help people she feels like a superhero because your blood likely contains antibodies infection fighting proteins made by her immune system Dr Nicole Bouvier other colleagues at Mount Sinai in New York have developed a test to detect those antibodies to corona virus in the blood of recovering patients in general people are probably going to have highest antibody levels at like three to four weeks after the first the FDA has given them permission to take these antibodies which the immune system makes in order to attack the virus entrance use them into somebody hospitalized with covert nineteen why do you think this might work we have some idea actually from the nineteen eighteen influenza pandemic taking blood from one person and giving it to another actually may improve outcomes.

"dr nicole bouvier" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

09:15 min | 1 year ago

"dr nicole bouvier" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"On our brand new season of the story or podcast from NPR. You'll hear challenging conversations nations between friends family members in sometimes people who could have easily been enemies as they bridge divides and build connections. Where you'd least expect it? Episodes are available every Tuesday. We are back. You're listening to. It's been a minute from. NPR The show where we catch up on the week that was. I'm Sam Sanders. There's in studio with two great guests this weekend. Tough okay so you are. I'm Leyla father. I'm a journalist with the national desk. NPR covering racing. Identity Kirk Siegler. I'm also a reporter with the national desk alongside. Layla and I cover rural America and the West. You say it's a well rule I it's it's a tongue twister for me rural. Call lots of practice practice. Lots of practice Question for both of Ukraine. Leyla have you gotten your flu. Shot yet yes for the first time. Actually this year is the first year I've ever gotten a flu shot. You're probably going to get the flu. I know right. Actually sorry to be that guy but actually back but it's not quite true men. Have you gotten your flu shot. I did It was at the NPR wellness variables plug employees anyways. It's funny that you bring up the point that you made Kirk There are a lot of misconceptions about the flu and the flu. Shot and a colleague of ours. Recently set to dispel some of those myths talking about Mattie So-fi she is the host of NPR's Daily Science podcast shortwave. Brand new podcast. Really really good science news. It's fun They had an entire episode on the show. All about the flu recently. clarinet misconceptions and telling us. Why didn't that flu shot is the thing you have to do? So here's my chat with Mattie about the Flu Madison Fire. Hi Hello how are you. I'm excellent Sam. You had an entire episode about the flu recently. Recently on shortwave. You took questions from listeners and you had some experts help you answer those questions absolutely. Yeah I talked to a woman named Dr Nicole Bouvier. She's at the ICAHN School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and she not only researches the flu Sam she also treats patients I do. That's kind of like showing awful little bit. Well it's the best of both worlds. I I really liked patients. But I don't like waking up early. So lab is perfect for that so doctor Bouvier knows a lot about what the flu does to our bodies and how scientists are trying to kind of outsmart. Okay I don't know a lot about the flu Like my biggest question for he first and foremost is out of you. Know if you have the flu or just the cold. Yeah it's I mean it's a good question because a lot of the symptoms are really similar so the flu and the cold are caused by two completely completely different viruses But they both infect your respiratory tract so meaning they affect like your mouth your lungs your nose your throat in the cold pretty much only messes with you in that area but the flu on the other hand being the garbage virus that is doesn't stop respiratory track. Ill Messy right up Sam so with influenza so you get sort of what we call systemic symptoms which are things like fever. Lethargy not feeling like eating feeling like you get hit by a truck muscle lakes headaches that really with the common cold you tend not to get I mean I feel like I got hit by a drunk. You know at the end of every work week honestly Sam is worse than that. I'm GonNa tell you so the things she said. The fever is pretty key so not everybody who has the flu gets a fever but doctor told me that if she does see a patient with a fever and a cough during flu season. There's something like an eighty percent chance. That Person Persson has the flu cough fever together during flu. Season the flu. Oh yeah all right. How big is the flu? How many folks get every year? I always hear people dying from the I've never seen someone die. Yeah I mean I think that we forget just like how big of a deal. The flu is so last year. This is kind of a current estimate that might change but the CDC says that forty five million people got sick with the flu last season which is roughly the population of the entire state of California right and it gets a lot of people sick and about sixty one thousand people died last year for the flu. It was a really bad season. And you know the flu and the Monja consistently certainly are in the top ten causes of death in the United States so it is pretty serious. Okay so then the fix for this is more flu shots and I'm supposed to get did I got one this year. in your episode shortwave about the flu. You talked about how that flu shot and vaccine is made it involves eggs. Yeah yes Sam okay so nobody wants me to walk through the entire process of other vaccines. We would die here Sam of old age not the flu old age. I mean you you probably listening to me. Honestly I'm just going to say but but yes. The most common way we make flu vaccine starts with live viruses that are used to infect act act. It takes months. It's a process that's been used for probably about seventy years in a lot of scientists are actually trying to find better ways to make flu vaccines. It's all right. So let's get into some Misconceptions about the flu shot being and I hear this all the time from friends and family. While if I get the flu shot that I might get the flu. Yeah like people think the shot will give them the flu. I mean it's just it's not true so especially for the flu shot specifically when they do process process those eggs after the viruses grown up there are multiple steps of killing the virus in most cases they even bust that up and a tiny little bits and pieces and then kind of scoop the bits that are important for the vaccine so after all that processing is done. There's no live virus left in that flu shot. And even if there was Sam the flu shot goes in your arm influenza viruses are designed or optimized to infect your respiratory tract if you put them somewhere else they're not going to be able to grow the same way that they they are in your respiratory tract and you're not GonNa get the symptoms that you get a Ha- so you. There's no way you can get the flu from a flu. Shot Okay but even if I go through all this go to my doctor's doctor's office get their flu. Go through all the pain. I can still get the flu after the flu shot. Yeah so okay. Mattie was the use of this conversation uh-huh so getting the flu shot. Reduce your chance of getting the flu by about forty to sixty percent not enough when fluids pick the right strains but listen up Sam. It's not the design. This flu shot twice a year. The World Health Organization gets together a bunch of these scientists who share data from like influence surveillance sites throughout the entire world and decide like okay. These are the types of flu. We think are GONNA go round next flu season and then they develop that vaccine but even if you do get the Flu Sam and you've had your flu shot. That flu shot can make the flu less terrible in the people who still get flu despite having the flu shot it actually can make you less sick than you would have been if you didn't get the flu shot at all. You know if you were going to be in bed for three days you might be in bed for two days and time is money Sam. It is that's true and so that's mostly been shown in people that are really high risk for bad flu complications like ammonia. But Dr Bouvier told me it's probably true for just young unhealthy folks like you. Same Sanders healthy. I'm old entire and the last thing you know about the flu and the flu shot Sam that even if you are young and healthy and think like It's a hassle I. I'll be fine if I get the flu. You are the person that could be passing that virus under somebody for whom the flu could be really big deal like a new baby. You'RE GONNA meet Anna Christmas party or your grandmother. People like that. Those people who are at higher risk of complications. You don't WanNa be the one who then goes ahead and gives them the flu. You're not just protecting yourself. You're protecting other people who either can't get the vaccine themselves or for whatever reason they won't respond to it quite quite as well. Don't be that guy. Sam Okay. I believe her. I do last question for you. Matty have you ever had the flu. And if so what kind of patient is Mattie. What kind of sick persons Mattie? Well I get my flu shot every year. Sam Sometimes I yell immune system activate when they they really like what but I do that so I haven't gotten maybe like three years but I do remember being a dream patient very cooperative. Not Stubborn at all. I think I remember being described as graceful and kind. I'm a graduate. I get sick. I'm not sick I was about to say. act like this. podcast this is called shortwave listeners. Listen to it. Every day for Science and fund. All Right Sam appreciate you likewise thanks again to Mattie so fi host of one of NPR's newest podcast shortwave Stanford break now when we come back my favorite game who said that you are listening to. It's been a minute from NPR. Be Our deep.

flu vaccine influenza Sam NPR Mattie Sam Sanders Dr Nicole Bouvier Sam Okay respiratory tract Kirk Siegler reporter fever Layla Science and fund Ukraine CDC America World Health Organization
"dr nicole bouvier" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"dr nicole bouvier" Discussed on Short Wave

"To shortwave from NPR. Hey everybody matty Safai here with short reporter. Emily Qualms Heo so today. We we have a listener questions episode. I genuinely love trying to answer. All of your questions and this one is all about Influenza Aka the flu the flu infects a lot of people every year. It's hard to say just how many but according to the CDC's current estimate between thirty seven and forty three million people in the United States got infected last flu season while that's roughly the population of the entire state of California right and year after year. Here we have this battle with the flu and that's partially because there are a lot of flu viruses out there and they are constantly changing. So here's how that works when the flu makes little copies of itself which it does over and over really fast there can be mutations in their DNA that can kind of change the virus enough that our bodies can't recognize it anymore or a vaccine wreck scene doesn't work against it and that's one of the reasons why we have to get the flu vaccine every single year. There's constantly this changing of flu viruses irises. That render people over time susceptible to getting reinfected so it's sort of like evolution on a really fast scale. That's Dr Nicole Bouvier. She works at the ICAHN School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Dr Bouvier you treat patients but you also do research on the flu as well right I do. Oh that's kind of like showing off a little bit. Well it's the best of both worlds. I think I really liked patients but I don't like waking up early so the lab is perfect for that so today on the show. We'll be answering your questions about how to tell if you have the flu. What's up with the flu vaccine? And why you you shouldn't freak out if your arm hurts after getting the flu shot.

flu flu vaccine Dr Nicole Bouvier matty Safai NPR reporter CDC Emily ICAHN School of Medicine Mount Sinai United States California