20 Episode results for "Dr Neil"

#256: Dr. Neil Spector - LymeMind 2019 Conference

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

56:19 min | 11 months ago

#256: Dr. Neil Spector - LymeMind 2019 Conference

"Calling only juice jewelry. Join US every Thursday night tunes for the latest episode of Lime Into Radio Radio. Hello I'm your host McKay Rookie and this is episode number. Two hundred fifty six with the Mount Sinai Lime Conference Speaker. Dr Dr Neil Specter also commercial producer in the brains behind Lymon into Radio Aurora. Hello and in this episode. You'RE GONNA learn three main things. How understanding the regulation of infection in the body is how HIV was brought under control? And how it will be how lyme disease is brought under control. The ways lime disease interventions would benefit from the same precision drug engineering as they do in cancer research and the drug research. Neil Specter's involved often that starts with identifying the drugs that have the best chance of physically interacting with lime bacteria. Thanks Roy and a big shoutout to all you longtime lime Ninjas. You're the reason we have way more than half a million downloads Aurora. And I really appreciate you tuning in and we'd like to welcome all the new listeners out but they're welcome to lime Ninja radio. You are now officially a lime Ninja and as you know. Lime disease is an international problem. Each week we have listeners. Join you from all over the world this past week. We've had listeners. Join from Calgary to Coquitlam Canada so like listeners. There's from Canada. Canada represent this this week. Okay welcome Canada. We're glad to have you tuning in all right. We're tells a little bit more about Dr. Neil Specter Dr Specter's undiagnosed lyme disease damaged his heart so badly that he had to get a heart transplant. Intravenous antibiotics. Antibiotics finally brought the lime disease under control and Dr Specter now brings his expertise in treating cancer to developing lime treatments. Thanks Roy and here's Dr Specter's presentation at the two thousand Nineteen Li- mine conference Thank you it's A. It's a great pleasure to be here. I appreciate the invitation from Mount Mount Sinai certainly from data to the Coen Foundation This is my Ten year anniversary. A little past of my transplant On seventeen year journey from misdiagnosis of lyme disease and pretty severe case obviously lied card. IRAS and You know here I am thankfully well and not running marathons anymore. I tell the story that my wife told me. I've had my one body part replacement for my lifetime so I cut it down to half marathons so But I'm very grateful for my by diner. forgiving me this chance at second life so again. And when I'm GONNA show you and I'm gonNA focus on Our work Since I have a captive audience I figure I can show you some really exciting day which I hope. I hope you'll find exciting. We're certainly thrilled about the direction. We're heading the title of the talk is the state of the art Just very briefly. There's really several approaches and don't be talking more about rational drug design therapeutic strategies for tick borne diseases and actually really for any disease. And so one. And you'll hear about this later so I'm not gonNA talk about this. There's tremendous expertise. That'll discussed discussed I. Sulfur am I know. There's a lot of interest DABS on There's groups at Stanford at Hopkins at Northeastern Dr Hurwitz. They'll be talking. LACKNER will be. Ken Lack no talking So I'm I'm going to let the experts talk about this. But but there's a lot of work going into screening drugs are already approved. The FDA approved library advantage to that is if something's found the drugs already approved so I solve rammed zone you don't have to go through. FDA approval to take a drug. That's already so. That's a huge advantage. The downside is you've got a drug that has you could have warts quartz could have could have other issues And is often very difficult to optimize if you WANNA make better drug. It's difficult because you don't necessarily no the exact targets so people talk may talk about die. Sulfur I'm as being an inhibitor of a certain enzyme in the body but in point of fact there's a lot of activity activity that for him has the probably contributes to its clinical efficacy. Not just in lyme disease but in cancer and other diseases as well I'm going to be really focusing on molecular targeted therapies. And there's great examples in the field that I spent thirty years in oncology where we've really transform arm the treatment and I'm not gonNA say mission accomplished at by any means but we've certainly gotten away from relying on chemotherapy to the point where we have targeted targeted therapies Australia. One slide of the first Individual of drug that I developed for breast cancer. Pretty remarkable pill that you take And odd woman. You'll see the response that she had New Therapies everyone's seen the TV commercials. You know. I have lung cancer. I never thought I'd say my grandson graduate. Wait and here I am today. I go to clinic so I was in clinic on Thursday. I see people now with diseases. metastatic bladder cancer lung cancer. That in my lifetime. When I was training as a fellow in Boston twenty something years ago I never thought I'd be able to tell some with metastatic cancer that they'd have an opportunity to be cured and here? We are with the people who are walking around without getting chemotherapy. Who essentially I think are going to be cured of their metastatic disease And then the Infectious Disease World we have examples examples of that as well. HIV SO HIV is sharing. The second was really not controlled by taking drugs that are FDA approved it was controlled By understanding the regulation of the virus that causes HIV and developing what's now called heart therapy And many people now believe that. HIV is is completely controlled because people who take their medication religiously can have no viral load and therefore essentially may be a jury of their disease and hepatitis. C. is another example of rational drug design using scientific information to specifically target the hepatitis appetite. AC- virus there's no therapies. I think Bill Robinson will be talking about some exciting work from Stanford so I'm not going to dwell on that and then medicinal herbs and there's going to be talks today but what I want to talk about it. So here's the data again. I'm old enough to remember being an intern and resident medicine in the days Actually even the days before we knew it was HIV research to see drug addicts. Come in I was in Dallas so people have seen the Dallas buyers club. I I used to see people who come in from OAKLAWN Sick with lymph nodes fevers all sorts of weird infections that no one had seen for decades and and initially we had one drug. Azt and people would get better for a little while. And then they die of their opportunistic infections and we had to drugs and people would got better for six months longer and then die of their opportunistic infections and now again because of smart drug design and understanding genomic information that the science revealed. We have triple drug therapy. That essentially now controls the disease so this is the state and you can all of you. Who are here because in one way or another we're all affected by guerrilla BARTONELLA BBC All those bad B.'s This is the state of of cancer treatment and cancer. Evaluation patient comes in with a newly diagnosed cancer. They either have their tumor or blood. Blood samples sent for genomic profiling so look to see which mutations that Sumer expresses that may be amenable to the lists of targeted therapies therapies that are now FDA approved and now this new generation of immuno therapies that unleash the immune system to recognize. Kill Cancer Now you can in contrast this to where we are with lime disease right. We've got bad blood tests that people at least some people believe is the holy grail. You know if you don't have your I bands God forbid on Western blood but you have third degree heart block and Bell's palsy than your called idiopathic. I know I've said this before I don't have a slide but you do know radio. Oh Pathak stands for Stanford Idiot Dr Pathetic patient so Anyway only as a physician I feel like I said so. So this is how this is how we treat cancer. We don't do this blindly anymore We really try to tailor the therapy personalized therapy for the individual. So this was. This was a drug that I spent Doing a lot of the science behind we developed an oral therapy for women with what's called hurts hurts to breast cancer. It's about fifteen to twenty percent of breast cancer when I was training Years ago at the Dana Farber. This was a death sentence of women who had her breast cancer announced. There had about six to nine months with metastatic disease and even with early stage. The risk of recurrence was extraordinarily high. This is an oral therapy. This woman has what's called inflammatory breast cancer. You can see that. She's had a mastectomy. It's come back that's like having a third degree. Burn that that went all the way down her back eroding into her lung cavity and into her lungs she was on a morphine drip not only a short quality of life for inflammatory breast cancer sir. But it's a lousy quality of life. We put her on this pill once a day pill and literally within three weeks. She was out playing Golf I. I didn't actually believe the physician when he told me. This is a miracle therapy but it's a miracle because we figured out how to shut the lights out on the tumor Sela aw again. This happened by understanding the biology and taking advantage of the Achilles heel of these particular cancers and so the question is why. Can't we do this for beryllium for Bartonella for BBC. The answer is we can. And here's a potential roadmaps it. Here's a paper that was published in Nineteen Ninety seven so twenty two years ago. I haven't been to too many conferences in the lime disease. World where people I actually talked about the genomic roadmap for developing therapies so this was the genome that was published in this is essentially the pathways. He's in Berea where one can look and try to figure out. How can we kill these bugs without taking an atomic bomb and blowing up the body audie and do this in a smart way just as I showed you without rather than giving her chemotherapy giving her a pill that reveal the old the Achilles heel of that cancer and destroyed it? So this is what we've done so we've taken slightly different approach. We're not screening the FDA approved Library Library. We're developing new therapies based on scientific information. Now we've done this in a way and brought in collaborators. It turns out that there's a group at Argonne national lab outside Chicago who have the largest genomic database of Pro Kerry outs bacteria in the world and then their top ten list. This is Barack Obama and Bartonella which I thought was rather interesting because this lab is a department of Energy Lab and I thought it was interesting that the government has beryllium Bartonella Ella as part of their top ten in trying to collect information so for a disease that a lot of the government doesn't want to recognize as being important. It's important Gordon enough. That it's on their top ten list of getting all genomic information of the world to accumulate so we worked with this group and what we do. We have the technology and collaboration with a very good friend and colleague who I've worked with for thirteen years since I've been in two on the cancer side Tim. Hey Stud and I'll show you the picture of our eighteen later we have a way of capturing a part of the genome a part of the what we call the purdy on the proteins that are made in Borelli and Bartonella that happened to utilize ATP and other appearance And it turns out if we use this technology. That's about eighty to ninety percent of the drug targets and again this is an approach that has been successfully used in other diseases and cancer in metabolic disease so so we're not reinventing the wheel retaking successful lessons that have been learned elsewhere and now just simply sang. Can we do the smarter by treating folks with tick borne illnesses and so essentially we do. Is We take the bacteria And again when we identify target. We've we've gone to this huge genomic database because we don't want to just be treating one particular species or strain of BEREA WE WANNA be treating reading across the species and strains that are pathogenic same with Bartonella. I'm but we don't want to also be wiping out the normal microbiome and we certainly certainly don't want to be affecting host cell so we don't want to be affecting your heart your kidney your normal tissues and so this is a Gel. This is taking taking all the proteins and beryllium running out And then essentially saying what are the targets that are amenable. What are the protein targets with this technology? -nology this pure and binding technology. We have this huge list of proteins. We painstakingly do mass SPEC on every one of these to identify them and then we look and we try to glean information from the literature and from experts and say what are the ones that if we can successfully target are likely to kill these bugs. I'm just going to skip through. This is some of the technical aspects. We take each one of these targets. This is sort of laborious research although we have a tremendous team and we've got it down pretty quickly now almost like a biotech company. Even though we're in an academic institution we make recombinant proteins. We put the color. GFD Green fluorescent thirteen and we have with high throughput outside. We've got five thousand novel compounds. That could be drugs and we screen them to see which those five thousand compounds can target the particular protein target that we're interested in by the way the five thousand doesn't sound like like a lot but we can expand that based on the structure of those chemicals into hundreds of thousands of compounds very quickly and and so this is what we have so far so we have targets on the left DNA K.. Beryllium Beryllium. We've had a lot more in beryllium important. We're now working with at British Werthmann if you know him from the NC State School of Veterinary Medicine. Probably the leading expert on Bartonella And now we've got several new BARTONELLA targets And as of of our last live meeting on to say I think we have an exciting Bartonella target that. We're going to be able to do what I'm going to show you in a minute. We're doing with beryllium. So this is work that we've done again With Tim set of colleague. That'll introduce what I want to show you which we hope will end up being a beryllium scan so that you could go to your doctor and rather than saying how many bands on a Western blot or do you have positively. You can actually visualize the bacteria in your body so if you went into your doctor imagine you said I got pain in my left shoulder. I got chest pain and I think I was bitten by a tick rather than having all these questions. You could actually visualize it just like we do with cancer and see the bugs. This is really based again on lessons. That have been successfully translated from the bench into the clinic. So this is work. We had a large Defense Department grand for breast cancer where we developed a probe using human Heat shock protein ninety. It's very abundant protein. There happens to be a beryllium equivalent called ht PG high temperature protein G. It's a very important protein. In mammalian cells age. Just be ninety because it prevents damage protein from accumulating which if allowed to accumulate would kill the cells. Also it's it's a highly conserved evolutionary family of proteins that protects against environmental stresses or internal stresses cell. The damage protein. That would otherwise. Kill the cell so what we did. In this case as we took H. S. P. Ninety an inhibitor. We labeled it with a probe that could be visualized and in a sense you unfortunately lighting. You can't really see it but we could visualize tumor in these. He's mice growing human breast cancers over normal tissue. And so the idea of this is if a woman has mammography has an abnormality and only ten percent one of those turn out to really be cancer that rather than doing unnecessary biopsies unnecessary angst. That you could do scan that would discriminate between malignant normal tissue issue and also ideally identify areas. What we call minimal disease states that are hiding in the body? This is actually in the clinic now and so what we did. Is We targeted the beryllium form of. HSBC ninety again is called H. G. and to make a longer story short we looked for compounds in the library and also compounds that we already developed against the human form of HSP Ninety for Breast Cancer Hanser project looking for compounds that would identify beryllium But not the human form because again. If we're GONNA make a scan and a therapeutic we don't don't want this targeting human tissue and also selecting for compounds that don't that can discriminate between Berea and and the normal microbiome Casey Choline and so we found this compound. It's called one ninety six and a few others this normally twirls around. But I don't think I have the controls for it so these are just spiral so in the left. I call it the Hawaiian Islands. The one nine thousand eight so the probe for the beryllium proteins and again this targets a protein in Borelli very abundant in beryllium. Bergdorf Roy Moore it is across the species and strains so we're not targeting just five percent of people with lung. Disease were selecting targets in this case for imaging. But I'll show you how we're using it for therapeutic that will affect fact all of the species and strains so we went from beryllium growing culture to working with Monica embers the two lane And doing a mouse study where we infected the mice with beryllium. We waited three weeks and then we injected the probe and we wanted wanted to see whether it would identify gorilla in tissues and again the bluish is the ninety eight so he could see. Infected Animals There's cartilage from the ear which is where beryllium loves to hang out. There's also the joint to joint. You could see that using the one nine eight probe the bluish probe We could identify really a- These are just obviously localized Images and then we counter stain when we take take the tissue out with a beryllium antibody to make sure that what that probe is identifying as beryllium and in fact it does and now. We're doing in Vivo. Animal Demel studies where we're going to visualize in Vivo. Knows are ongoing as we speak to see if we could actually scan now this. This fluorescent probe is is not prime time for for the clinic because it does not get good depth in the body so we could scan and probably visualize cartilage infected cartilage or the joint but to get the heart and brain. This is not gonna be sufficient so what we will do is to make pet league from this to take this and making pet scan. Most people heard of a pet scan. Not your dog or cat. But essentially a pet scan for the most part is a scam that f. d. g. pad it's taken up by hyper metabolic tissues and can identify in my case where my profession has cancer but also also infection. It doesn't tell you though if if it lights up and you think you have an infection. What the underlying infectious agent is? It just tells you that there's an infection action this on the other hand as a pet scan would tell you that's beryllium infection. So now so that's great right so we wanted to develop a beryllium Stan. We also have some targets that we want to look out for Bartonella because unfortunately this particular target for whatever reason is is not in the genome of Bartonella and so we have to look at other particularly pro teams so in the cancer world so now people may have screened one with these drugs these HSP ninety inhibitors through the FDA approved library because there are several that have gone into the clinic and cancer and maybe found that by themselves mm selves. They don't do much to really because they don't their stress proteins. You have to do something to the cell to make them relevant you. Don't just give them to happily. Holy growing beryllium doesn't kill them. That's not the way it works doesn't do that to human selves either. So what we did is and again. This is based on the lessons. Sounds from cancer where people have taken targeted therapies. Rather just relying on the targeted therapies have hooked up poison or a toxin. So this is kind The magic bullet where you drive the toxin directly to the cancer and avoid normal tissues. This happens to be a drug called. T. DM one which is an anti her two antibody but the drug called by chancing which is a my totic poison This is in the clinic. It's transformed the treatment. Seven of The Area I've been working on her to breast cancer. So what happens is the antibody recognizes the tumor cells because the her two is more prevalent Expressed on tumor cells. It has little stars on there which the Montana it gets internalized in the tumor. It releases the my Tam San and kills the tumor cells but really does oh spare the normal tissue so this is FDA approved and we said why can't we take the same compound that is directing that imaging agent that I just showed you and hook something onto it that'll bring it into guerrilla that'll kill Berea and spare normal tissue. So what does Borelli. Okay what are the things that really hates one of the things that most cells hate radical oxygen species. You know it's interesting. We've gotten very accustomed to growing beryllium now. Beryllium hates oxygen. Even though it's not a complete anaerobic but it likes living in low oxygen tension. So if you you stress these bacteria I don't care whether they're in a exponential speyrer Keitel studied around bodies state with lots of oxygen radicals. It's it's a death sentence is I'm going to show you. So what did we cook that compound so we actually have a drug that has two parts. It's got the H. G. targeted therapy. The the part that selectively drives sit to beryllium. And I could tell you. The BARILLA's sucks that compound up like a vacuum cleaner so when we culture berea with with this compound we take the drug that get sucked in and we're very interested in how it gets sucked in transport or some other mechanism when we hook it turns out and FDA approved drug called Verte Portland poor friend as a die. A poor for and derivative that when activated by light simple red light six eighty wave laying generates lots of radical oxygen species and. It doesn't just. It's not a one to one. One molecule avert a poor friend generates one Radical molecule of radical oxygen. It is like a catalyst it churns out. I don't know how many but it's just churning turning out radical oxygen species so you got one molecule avert a poor for an end let alone thousands of molecules into Berea hit him. I'm with Red Light. You would expect it's going to kill those bacteria again. The beauty is is that what's targeting. The verdict poor friend the dye which is FDA the approved so it's FDA. Approved for hyper proliferative I issues. So wet macular degeneration Diabetic retinopathy. Of course now we have vegf inhibitors What would happen is the ophthalmologist would inject use assembly? And then shine red light in your eye and within a centrally destroy the overgrowth. Both of those Blood vessels that were bad normal. There are precautions. You don't want to necessarily inject this and go Sunday thing because it gets into all your tissues and you'll end up with third degree burns There are other toxicities too. Which is why we want to target this? It makes sense right to target those to where you want to go. which is beryllium and kill the bugs so Let me just go back. When can I go back? Okay so I just want to set this up to show you what I'm GonNa show you a movie of Berea in the lab There's GonNa be four conditions because it's going to go a fast and I can't stop him so there's going to be DMS which is the control? All of them are treated with red light so they're all treated with the same run. Light pulses of red light one the second pulses of red light six eighty. Same stuff you can get with an La Balsas of red light so DMS is the control. And you'll see lots of squiggly spira kids in their H S ten is the is the targeting drug by itself you'll see lots of viable guerrilla Verte poor fern earn by itself Verte porn at high concentrations in the presence of Red Light. Not necessarily by itself will kill. And you'll see that in the last this one you'll see which hopefully you'll see. The difference is the verdict. Poor friend dragged into the beryllium by the targeted therapy. So they're the best by itself off you see all the little squiggly things they look happy. They're doing okay. There's the H ten. They look happy. That's the H. S. P. H. E. Alarm. And here's the verdict forefront print. It definitely kills especially that concentration. But here's what happens when you drag it in and had them with the light. There's really nothing left. It's a complete waste land and let me just show you the data so the why accesses percent viability. This is back tighter glove. But we've done this. You can't find anything when we try to regrow these bacteria normal conditions so the again we grow the bacteria to stationary. We grow them to tend to the eighth eighth bacteria. So there are lots of bugs We then hit them so those are two compounds. H S to a one h us to the five to a one gets into mammalian cells. So that's not going to be a good candidate. H US to a five is beryllium specific and turns out to be incredibly credibly potent and then Verte poor for and alone all of these treated with red light and you could see the difference. The fifty is essentially the concentration -centration that requires to kill the bugs that's halfway between baseline and maximum killing so it's So it's fine to kill these. They re grow so if you treat them and then you wash them out and you put them back in good nice culture medium and you put them in the dark doc because you don't want them to be exposed to like just in case there's drug around do they grow. The answer is no. They're dead and in fact. Some of our died. That new thought might be viable are still dying. So the probably undergoing some what's called program cell death array pop toasties and you could see that on the bottom. That straight drop is the regrowth ninety nine animals. That's very very potent potent compound. We're talking about loan animal or concentrations that killed these bugs now. This is interesting so if you expose beryllium to the drug and you put them in the dark so you just WanNa see you. Don't WanNa kill them necessarily with the drug because again in the absence of red light it doesn't kill and now you say what if we wash them out so we expose them for twenty four hours forty eight hours in the dark and you can see. They're viable bowl in the dark. We wash the drug outs. We wash them extensively. So did they take it up and then can we kill them later. So we we incubate them in the dark. We wash out the drug multiple washes as best we can and then we expose them to the red light. And now they're actually even more sensitized. They were if you just treated him out right. So they're sucking the drug up. The August retained that defined. By the way we've done animal studies. It does not get into mammalian cells so that drug will go to Berea and do that to really not do that to your liver your kidneys or any other tissue. So what I would envision is it. We'll have a drug like two of five and we need to work out the conditions. We need to understand how much red light you need but where you would get an injection. By the way the red light with doxycycline does nothing so if you want to sit in front of a red light that's good but it's probably not gonNA do much on. Its own now you might ask. Okay Does Red Light get deep in your body. The answer's yes gets deep in your body and in fact. Here's a study from the mass general from spalding. Thank where the guy's got his nice little cap on their during studies for traumatic brain injury and stay so there's little led lights in there getting red light into the brain and they've if done these nice. I don't understand that strip tossed but the executive function improves in their finding pretty dramatic results in treating with red light therapy for PT stay and TBI. aww traumatic brain injury so red light penetrates deep into the body doesn't come out so you can't visualize if it gets into. So here's the platform we. We can attach a lot of different things. We could put chemotherapy. You can put a lot of different things and drag it in and we think we have a good target now for Bartonella as well so in summary. There's great data you're going to hear about. It's exciting repurposing. FDA approved drugs. We're doing it in a different way. We have a number of other targeted targeted therapies. which we think on on their own may actually deal a death knell to really important Ella This red light may be in combination with Stepson and other drugs may be the real hit that eliminates bacteria once and for all. Here's our team folks from you. Could see Steve Phillips behind the primate right Dana parish giving you a nice hug Monica embers working with Yang. Appreciate the work that he did with US team at Duke. Here's all the people again. We would not be able to do this without the Cowan Foundation. And I am right on so thank you very much. The influence of the Farsi. You could be one. Thank you so neil of very exciting the research that you're Doing can you tell us what comes next. And you know if you continue to have experimental success this you know for the people in the audience the answer. What does it actually take to go from basic bench research to actually drug in the clinic or the timelines where the steps right you know so I've been fortunate to have been involved in the development of to cancer drugs that went from the bench into the clinic and FDA approval the one for breast cancer and one for pediatric came here What a- The impediment that I see here is not necessarily mean? We'll optimize this we're doing what's called Crystal Graphic Structure Analysis BARILLA'S TV judy to try to make more potent compounds And understand you know how we can modify drugs have different properties. Perhaps I think the challenges and I'd be interested if people WANNA start tweeting and texting the thing is the FDA approval process. So as I mentioned that the advantage to doing. FDA approved drugs is you don't have to go through the process. You know if we you take this into animals so the next up for this animal studies talk studies And then we would work towards an investigational new drug application with the FDA. And then I think comes the hard part I think. The easy part is a science. The hard part is how do you get a drug approved for a disease state where the FDA doesn't recognize that there's a problem and so you know we would love to say we want to develop this in. Chronic Bernallio says Were another one for Bartonella But if there's no If if the government agency the FDA doesn't. I believe that there is an indication than we would probably either have to go into the acute setting and then you know it's like cancer right people do either start with metastatic disease work back. You have to go where the low hanging registration for as sort of speak yeah And then work your way forward. In this case we would have to consider What's the quickest way we could get this approved and then have it? It used off label even So you know. I think I'd be curious for a lot of the people out there who may have been involved in this but Again I think the science part the next step is animal studies mice. We're working with the monarch ambers. Because she's got a great primate model so to do primate it And then the what they call the requisite pre I in a talks pharmacokinetics You know the the The one advantage of Verte poor fron component is FDA approved the new part Is the targeting agent which isn't so mm-hmm so I would like to think that we could move quickly. It's it's everything is dependent upon resources money And that's just the way it is because these These studies go from bench to clinic become quite expensive because they have to be done under rigorous whether what they call good manufacturing practices it was good laboratory practices. You can't just go in your garage into an experiment and say we want that to be. FDA approved. I can't even do it in my lab and said I wanted to be up to prove they have to be done in laboratories that have rigorous standards so that when you present the package to the FDA say here's the data that supports in the use of this in berylliosis acute or chronic Bartonella that you're experimental design midst the rigorous rigorous standards and. So those have to be done and to do those in those laboratories across more money than during my Duke Laboratory and so assuming booming things go well but what. What are the timelines for? Actually getting this drug out. I mean we're talking in five years ten years fifteen years from where you are now going into animal models and then ultimately being accessible to individuals who are ill what does that look like so I think the so the first step. I'm answering the two parts. The first one is the the diagnostic if we make a pet ligon That goes in quickly right because that's a diagnostic that has a lower Hurdle to cross. It's going to be one injection. Their studies called Phase Zero Studies. Where you give much lower doses and not even do talks on those? I mean we can get into the semantics but you know if we could again If we could make a pedal again using compound we could be in the clinic in a year within a year. Doing testing the therapeutic so the advantage to that would be number one even. If it's a single injection we would have some safety data just with the targeting compound and we would also proof proof of concept that we could visualize really. I would say we're thrilled because you rarely get a hit like this. The on a I mean I've spent thirty years in cancer research and You know in fifteen years drug development You often painstakingly go through. You know bad experiment after experiment And so working. The people that I've worked with particularly Karol season. You know cancer. The researchers basic scientists when they saw this sort of data they were doing handsprings. And so I think that It's a good sign and they're very skeptical so they had no skin in the game of lime disease they were just pure biochemists cameras. Drug developers And so I think again. It's you know if we have the resources to do this we could be in the clinic in a short period of time. I mean within five years to three years yeah It all depends on how much researcher opt to drive and so outside of Resources than one of the primary barriers diagnostics fix it. which is it seem surprising in some ways to get to a new drug? You actually need new diagnostic and so and watching your talk. You know it was one of my reactions. was how cool would it be to be able to actually see the brilliant right. But it's actually becomes a mental Sort of us be like a companion onion diagnose which is The thing would happen cancer right. A companion diagnostic which in most cases and cancer turns out to be a mutation for drug that targets the butane the protein in work therapy for a particular phenotype of cancer So we could develop the you know penny diagnostic. You're right. The challenge is always the FDA requires the population an indication. You can't just say we want to treat everyone with chronic illness with us us You have to have something on the label You can you. You can do that with and you can do it with Lysol Ram because they're approved and you can just your doctor will prescribe it. You could take it. Yeah but for a new drug you need to have an indication. Yeah now it's interesting unfortunately no longer the FDA commissioner but a good friend of ned sharp losses the head of the NCI and was acting FDA commissioner For a period of time and I I still May. Actually we meet with them. He knows my story And just to talk with them about what he thinks. An approach would be to go to the But you're right I mean it's either you know if we went. After acute lyme disease it would probably be based on the gold standard of of two zero testing. Unfortunately but the the name of the game is get something out there are get it approved and then allow it to be used. Yeah so avi you work way upstream. for meal And I thought maybe it would be interesting for the folks here for you to talk about the drug -able genome and why it's important what it is and some of the work that you do on that is I think I should not undermine fine how much we don't know so there's still like even though we we can have those movies that we can see a whole organism was sell. We still don't know what's happening. Really inside of the molecular level and there is a big part of the genome the human genome as the the Baruah's genomes that we understand that there are proteins there and we can maybe trace one or two visually where they are what they do. But there are twenty thousand different Mortiz molecular species leaving those cells that we only have a very partial understanding of and how they work. So if you think about human cells the energy is trying to do they realize is that the FDA approved targets today they targeting five hundred proteins out of a twenty thirty thousand possible possible protein that they can target and from those five hundred proteins eighty percent of them the target either kind sees ion channels GP CR's so those are specific types of proteins that are those drugs combined to so within those families. There's hundreds of additional additional proteins that we know that are important but we don't have drunks for them. We don't understand really what they do. So Oh systematically we can now use computational and experimental methods to impute their function to associate with disease and then they enable discovery and going to new routes for drug discovery so this is the essence of the program. O'Brien Yep so and there's this there's a program that you work on that's called links and One of the one of the things is that surprising about this is that it seems that you may not need to know The target of drug in order to develop a new drug. And so can you talk about what this program is. How it's changed? People's viewpoint on the drug genome and some of the promising Outcomes that may come from that so so I think links is another type of Drug screen sort of like what showed with the five thousand small molecules. Try All of them in a screen. You you have baby a robot that can tell like can actually administrate the drug and then collected data to four tissue to sell tissue or cell or the guerrilla growing Borila see how the drug effect so you can test thousands of drugs but the nice sort sort of like the innovative things about thanks. Is that it after. The output is the is gene expression so you can see you what happens to the cells. The genome wide level so the expression of each gene is changing before and after the drug treatment and that creates it's a signature that you can then query against and then you can find novel novel. Drugs are doing it compared to what the FDA the approved drugs are doing so you can see that there are a lot of small molecules and drugs that are experimental right. Now that are doing very similar effects. Six to cells that they're approved drugs doing so those could be potentially Additional better drugs or individualized drugs that are very similar to the existing drugs. But now you open up All a greater repertoire of potential drugs that you can translate ads. They much quicker without really a worrying about the exactly what they do. Because those targets that we are identifying Usually are not the real truth because many of the successful drugs. They hit a lot of targets so they they are Even though we think and that we identify a gene that if you knock out you will get affected. The desired effect the drug itself would bind to multiple in multiple places. And we'll do some things that you don't expect that can lead to side effects so we need to sort all that stuff so we've got some questions from the audience here and I'm Gonna I like this I one which says What can line patient population? What can the line patient population do in terms of pushing the FDA to fast-track drugs that you develop like the Aids community did So far the lime community hasn't been had really an effective voice for doing this so I think this goes you easy question. Yeah yeah I I think that Doing you know what people have been. I think increasingly John that seems to be more effective which is speaking with a unified voice. You know the the AIDS Community really spoke with a unified voice. you know you look at the breast cancer community Speaks generally with a unified voice. You can imagine if somebody cut funding for breast cancer research. There'd be five million women wearing pink marching on DC which would have a profound impact so I think that again in an just one person And there are people out in the audience that I know are are really driving. You know legislative Healthcare reform warm. I think it just needs to be a continual. Talk to your congressman and talk to your senators those people really do have an impact on the FDA am the NIH yeah It's not just a nice thing to do is to talk to your your representatives The funding for those agency comes from Congress. So if there's pressure to be put on those agencies And it comes from your from Congress than from your Senator Remember Dan. I think that's I don't know that we can all go petition the FDA the new commissioner But I think working through in in a in a unified way Working to to influence. Legislators at the national level is is probably going to be an effective way to do those And I so you know I I just think that to me again. I'm just speaking from a personal standpoint. I see in meetings like those and other meetings I've been able. I've talked due to the tide seems to be turning in a favorable way It's not changing fast enough for a lot of people here but it is changing and I hope the change translates into You know being able to get drugs approved faster being able to get more money appropriate from the NIH for funding research Can I saw there was one question about how long your grownups. Yeah Oh yeah. There's a fake. You WanNa take that. There was a specific. This Excel So we've grown those. I must repeat the question so the question is is it. How long did we re grow the the treated Borolia Lia yeah So we've ground now for over two weeks and there's nothing rowing so okay. We feel pretty good. We've also by the way done. PURDY AMAC analysis analysis through it really destroys the whole the whole protein structure Barilla's so I don't expect that there's going to be surviving per sisters out of this an so I like this question. I think there there must be an investor in the audience Is there enough of a market to make a novel on drug financially viable and so. I think this is a good question for you. Because you're on a personal mission and so far I'm not sure you know how far how far ahead you're thinking thinking about you know viable business models other than curing the disease. But you know I went to a meeting a few years ago at Harvard was a genomic medicine. Meeting there was was A group of Mothers whose kids had an inherited metabolic. There will probably incidence of eight hundred five hundred kids a year on the world. Aerobic this disease. There was no company. They're actually a company who had a therapy. That was just sitting on a shelf because I didn't see market. These mothers purchase the drug bought and form their own company manufacturer. Now they're marketing it all right and so I'll be honest with you. Pfizer or Genentech doesn't want to develop it and I think we all need to have another meeting hang with some wealthy people and figure out how we can go and develop. I mean you know th the reality nowadays is route we could do right. And I think research now is increasingly being driven by advocates there are orphan disease as the Myeloma Foundation really worked together three or four new drugs approved. It wasn't a large Pharma. It was a group of people came together and said we need to do this and industry is not knowing it and so. That's why I think that we need to organize in a in a way that can make that can make it happen so I I don't know that companies companies are going to be interested in it. I think what would change if there was a good diagnostic and people recognized people meaning. CEO's of companies the The breadth of this problem. Yeah That there are more people even if you consider the traditional five bands the two-tier testing they're more newly diagnosed cases of lyme disease in the US than breast cancer. So you know to put it in perspective certainly more than HIV. So I think if people bull fully understood the impact the fact that this is not easy to diagnose easy to cure for everyone you know even if you take the conservative estimates estimates You know ten twenty. I mean Hopkins published thirty. Something percent of people had persistent chronic problems. Yeah a lot of people with you know a three hundred forty thousand a year you take twenty percent of those and not. Just accumulates year after year so So one more specific specific questions to some of the worst presented here can can this drug actually penetrate or go through biofilms have you tested so h H. G. is actually in biofilms so we think that it will actually target biofilms as well. Yeah I know that I love garlic is in the audience. Somewhere but There I mean we I would love to test this in models of biofilms But but H J is a part of the biofilm either secreted or as part of the different morphology or beryllium. Okay well let me in thanking our panelists here. It was wonderful talk and thank you. Avi The you know the method that Dr Specter actor is using with his research. It kind of reminds me of a talk about a University of Virginia Line Vaccine for dogs. It that kind of if you know making sure all the puzzle peach pieces match you know. That was what last year two years ago. At least we missed last year. So it's two years ago. Yeah Yeah Research is so intricate. It's so complicated. We get a little window into that world with Dr Specter's presentation tation the main takeaway message that I have from listening to him. Is some serious people doing serious research. And they're working on it and they're gonNA figure it out one of these days in the meantime there's a lot of other exciting things going on like the self rem and herbal antibiotics and all these other approaches is that are being used. There is hope there is help out there. There's some new tests that are coming online. Cornell has a new test that should be out in a year which I'm thrilled about and it's going to be able to detect proteins that shed from the Borelli. Ah No matter where it is and no matter what what form it is so if you have brilliant anywhere buried inside your body even might not show up on Antibody test right it or maybe we don't know whether it's actually active. This test will tell you whether or not you have relatives in your body so it is possible now in the near future to be able. We'll say yes. I am completely cleared lime disease. This test seems to be that accurate. So we'll see what happens as the reaches Goes to the testing phases. But there there are serious people and serious university's doing serious research and seriously exciting. Do you have any feedback suggestions. I guess really anything. Send an email to feedback at lime Ninja radio DOT COM. And if you had any cough drops police to please. If you like what we're doing here at lime newsradio hit the subscribe button that way. You won't miss an episode and if you really like what we're doing shared this podcast with a friend but if you really really like what we're doing being scroll to the bottom of your podcast APP and leave us at review. It helps us reach more people just like you we. Our goal is to have two reviews every month we've had to for November. It's almost halfway through December and we don't have a review yet so if you haven't left one please take two minutes right of review for us. We'd really really really appreciate it. And last as you longtime lyman inches. No this podcast will not be complete unless we left upped with the Lime Ninja effect of the day. Did you know Ninja. Jokes are not funny but we are all too afraid into not laugh Radio is a purely public broadcast and is not intended to be personalized medical advice for any individuals specific situation each individual's medical. The situation is unique and Lima beans. Radio upon Endo considered as Persian is medical advice on Ninja radio is not licensed render medical bite and should be considered simply the public opinion of Lime Ninja Radio. It's guests recommendations on specific treatment. Options are not intended to address any listeners. Particular medical situation as always contact contact your physician before considering any new treatment.

FDA cancer Disease breast cancer Berea Red Light Bartonella lyme disease Borelli inflammatory breast cancer US Dr Dr Neil Specter H. G. Bergdorf Roy Moore BBC Canada Ken Lack lyme Calgary lung cancer
132- Dr. Neil Kobrin, PhD - Ep.1

Wealth Transformation Podcast

26:45 min | 7 months ago

132- Dr. Neil Kobrin, PhD - Ep.1

"Are you so full of fear? You can't even talk about money and wealth. Dr Cheryl is showing you how to shift your mindfulness with your wealth relationship. Most people don't even like to talk about money from personal level. You can learn how to get past the fear and talk about money and wealth and free yourself to a healthy relationship no matter where you are in your life. Are you ready for some good changes? This really affects all areas of your life. It's time for the wealth. Transformation podcast. Now here's your host. Dr Cheryl Shire our special guests. This evening is Dr Neil Coburn. This is the first segment of our two part discussion with. Neil Dr Neil Coburn. Phd's a licensed clinical psychologist from UC Berkeley and his L. C. S. W. and M. F. T. with decades of experience in human transformation and emotional wellbeing. He is the author of the book emotional wellbeing embracing the gift of life and is the is the founder and president of the Academy of Mindful Psychology. He is an international workshop leader and in Mindfulness and emotional health shortly thereafter. He assumed the role of president and CEO of California Graduate School of Psychology. Dr Coburn Rebuilt and rejuvenated. The institution eventually merged school of American schools of psychology and national set of graduate schools of psychology. Dr Coburn actively continues to augment his knowledge of mindfulness and Buddhist psychology in addition to attending dozens of training throughout the US led by far most leaders in the subject area. He is a member of the spirit. Rock Meditation Centers saying Haw and continues to steady with world renowned teachers such as Jack Cornfield and other teachers counsel as well as distinguished visiting teachers. He has trained and facilitated workshops with Zen Master Gimpo Roshii training facilitators from all over the world in the big mind process. Doctor Dr Coburn plays an active role in the Academy of Mindful Psychology and Organization designed to provide education and training in mindfulness and psychology. He maintains a private clinical practice. In Marin California this is the first segment of our two part discussion with me. We'll come kneel well. I'm really happy that you have are joining us tonight. We have had several communications in passing in the media center. And you're a local media person and also author and I said you know it's time to have you on our show. Well it's about time so thank you thank you. I've pretty much already given your bio and background. But I know we dig a lot deeper and get into some more fun stuff of what you're doing and So I know you're from New York and so tell me about how you got into psychology. Well that's an interesting story. Actually I went to school in Brooklyn so I was raised in New York City and my freshman year. I was a business major because I didn't quite know what I was supposed to be doing. My father was an accountant and it was so unbelievably boring. I'm the people that were in this program. It's just like oh please take a breath. Have a pulse. I thought to myself where are there? Some dynamic people and we're all the pretty girls you know. Obviously that's a motivation. When you're you know freshman in college and it turned out. I took a psychology class and I was always oriented that way. Anyhow but that really. I've been a psychologist the my family's since I was two years old. I missed three and that whole deal but I just took to it and I was passionate about it and from the ADS. I figured out once twenty seven years of education it's a lot of years to my PhD and also gesture experiential education. As well as your all you can. You can take another thirty years. But that's as far as that's as far as we take care of that boy looking pretty good so no really. I've just always been very passionate about it. You know what makes us tick? And how is it feelings? Come up the way they come up. And why some people this way and other people that way and I've just I was a student of it all my life really so well. I can understand except that I went towards more of the financial part and probably because they got involved with my family's business but then I never felt there's always something missing but I knew that I was preparing myself. You are the whole time. I was prepared. I knew that. Why am I doing this boring stuff but I was also challenging my brain to get into the complicated stuff but preparing yourself just like you were. You've been preparing yourself for what you're doing. And you're an author now emotional wellbeing embracing the gift and I. I already blessed our viewers that a beautiful cover. Yes it is to that cover you know? Oh well tell us the story of that cover since we're talking about it. Well you know the book is titled Emotional Wellbeing Embracing the Gift of life and this is really a book about how miraculous life is and how so many of us just. We don't really value and appreciate what an incredible gift that is and the story is a story about the rarity of life and interestingly enough there was just a scientific study done two weeks ago. I put it on my website. Kademi mindful psychology for people. That are interested where they determined the probability of being born interesting. The probability of being whittled. That does that mean what it means is. It's astronomical the odds that any of us have ever been born and why I tell you this is all we all miracles absolutely and there's a story. I think it comes out of the Buddhist. Tradition could be the Hindu tradition and the story is of a blind sea turtle we are roaming an ocean the size of the universe and once every hundred years it's surfaces to the top and the rarity of birth is as if that turtle emerges through a ring bobbing on the top of the ocean. That's how unique and special life is the odds of that kind of event occurring. Send a metaphor or is that it's a metaphor of course. It's a metaphor. I thought what better depiction to really talk about this gift. And then of course. My son did the art. I have a twenty one year olds artist. That means a lot. Jay Brennan is fantastic. Yes yes so. How did you come up with? I know I- preempted this by saying I talk about wealth but if we don't have wealth and this is where the transformation comes in if we don't have wealth in relationships there really is to me. There's nothing else that matters when it really comes down to it so that's why I wanted to have you on. The show is because you know emotional wellbeing how you know how did how did you come up with that and also? I don't want to give you too many questions at once. But his like mindful psychology. So let's start at the hour so it's interesting you know if we don't have wealth in our relationships X Y and Z. I'll go one step further. If we don't have wealth in our relationship with ourselves then we have nothing absolutely. That's the first and foremost you know it. It's it's an inside job. Yeah that's what I like to say and you know I'm sure you've observed this in so many. All the way out there is that women are emerging in that and I mean all over the world. They're merging without relationship with themselves. And you know I it. You know it's like the pendulum. A pendulum is probably you know going swinging swinging swinging. And now it'll be nice because you know men also can become more used their feminine side to in this whole process. So it's very interesting definitely. I think there's a tremendous movement and frankly I'll say thank God for the Internet. You know I'm I line up just the opposite way when everybody's talking about you know all the potential pitfalls and they exist. The reality is the Internet ultimately connects the entire universe. I'll I'll get the mindful psychology in just a second. But I want to tell you story if you don't mind please. That's why you're here. So the tower babble Biblical story is very very interesting story. I don't know if you know it of some people do something. I don't know the details. Well basically what occurred? Is that the tribes in the middle of the desert. Were REALLY UPSET. Because they had a very arduous life you know dwelling in the desert is not an easy thing to do and they prayed and they prayed and prayed and they get very frustrated that their prayers are not answered so they did something that had never been done before. They came together and collectively. They decided they were going to build a tower way up into the heavens and they were going to climb this tower and at the top of the tower they were going to confront God face to face and basically say. Why aren't you listening to us? Why aren't you helping us? So they got together. They believed so they climb this tower. They built this tower. They spent years constructing this massive at and just as they were about to ascend into the heavens God appears in fury and he smashes the tower thousands and thousands of pieces question. Exactly how dare you question? And he said every piece of this tower will represent a different language. So you'll never be able to talk to one another again and do anything as outrageous as you've just. That's the story. Oh you should because how powerful is that story and now what we have now we have the Internet and you know what the Internet does. It allows me to talk to China. It allows my son to talk to Spain. It's connecting the world in a way where we have to understand. We're all interconnected this awesome them. It's an illusion and it's it's demonstration now if people can emotionally mentally spiritually and physically embrace that and appreciate that absolutely. I mean that's going to be the true revolution. Yes I'm in one Santa Cruz where part of this movement revolution. It's true. So thank you. I always give. Thanks all right. So but the mindful you know I know there's a lot of spiritual spiritual things in here and you look and but mindful psychology. So tell us how you started writing an article. The other day and this article was written two psychologists psychotherapists and it starts by saying we are not mindful so mindful psychology is an integration of a long spiritual practice notice. Mindfulness now twenty. Six hundred years basically comes from Buddhist philosophy with traditional psychology. And what I mean by traditional. I'm talking about Eastern and Western psychology. So one day in the shower came to me. It's time it's time that psychology becomes mindful. Now What's interesting about mindfulness? Mindfulness is about awareness. It's about higher consciousness. It's about stepping back and observing instead of reacting. It's about being fully present in the moment in a higher frequency in a higher frequency. Absolutely Cheryl this is it right. What's going on between us is all or is that could be going on. This moment is all we have back and my full. Psychology takes the teachings of mindfulness and it. Integrates it with neuroscience. I'm into mazing what we're learning and neuroscience and integrates. It will explain that just a little bit. I'm I'm going to break this down just a little bit. So so our viewers can maybe understand you know the neuroscience of the mindfulness. Okay so I'll tell you a very interesting dynamic this so much to say about neuroscience but I just give you I'll give you a little a little taste so years ago. They had in a lab that to monkeys monkeys were wired up because they were looking at their brain activity and took a peanut. They gave it to a monkey on a set here. Monkey a monkey started the peanut and they watched what was happening in the brain of that monkey. Well what they didn't anticipate was what was happening in the monkey that was watching the monkey. Eat the peanut. You know what was happening. Exactly the same level of activity. Now think about this. We've got one monkey watching another monkey. Eat The brain goes into whatever monkey absolutely monkey monkeys but the ramifications of this are staggering. Because what it says is what we attend to absolutely influences our brain how our brain functions into absolutely and you say intend to air intentions intentions. But I'm talking about what we attend what we see what we focus on effects the way our brain functions. It's very very powerful. You're going to watch. You're going to sit and watch. Cnn for twelve hours your brain is gonNA live. You know they'd be is the brain center for fear. And that's exactly what's GonNa get stimulated stimulates so would mindful. Psychology does is it takes the findings of neuroscience says. Well how do we apply that to psychology? Well let me ask you so. If a monkey's brain is stimulated by watching another monkey eat a peanut. What are the ramifications of something like that while how? `Bout that we WANNA pay attention. The things that are for us that are positive for us. Things that are expansive and not contracting things. That allow love and positivity as opposed to fear anger and hatred. Yes yes yes. Yes and that's why there's so much on TV. That is all fear and anchor. Bay saluted in in stupidity. Actually I watch ninety plus because I wanna not. I won't watch. I know that all these killings and everything going on these horrible things. But you know what I'm not GonNa put that in my psyche because we have to stay positive in order to keep spreading it absolutely and someone much wiser than me once said we must post sentinels at the Gateway of our mind. Yup It's absolutely true. Sentinel AS SOLDIER TECH. What comes to mind absolutely and we know. Now there's something that you probably aware of called Neuro plasticity. Those people these days have heard about it. When I went to graduate school I was taught that your brain is fixed meeting. It develops to a point and then it stops and you know it started. They said it was gone. When you were an adolescent then they changed and said now maybe early twenty s but your brain becomes fixed. And that's that nothing you can do. God bless Wonderful Deepak Chopra. Because I I've studied him for years I mean he's like my most one of my most favorite and listening to him you. Your mind is always expanding. Not only is your mind. Expanding your brain is constantly doing new cells constantly have an opportunity at any given moment to create new neural pathways. Yes right and don't you WanNa have positive pathways. Wouldn't you rather attend to things that will allow your life to be more fulfilling? My Gosh please. I wish we want to spread that to the rest of the world watching watching murder watching anger watching hatred. Now do no no it just. I have my my My Gate I have a gatekeeper. Whatever because I will not. I just walk away or anything like that because it's not it's I know. It's not healthy. So mindful psychologists denial or just going. You know what's going on so much not not knowing what's going on. Sister protect that precious because we have that press precious miraculous. Mind THAT WE MOSA visit. Don't use nor we trained to use it when not yet no not in schools now in in religious sitting kicks not in government and they're the biggest ones that need to change anyway. I won't go on. They're sitting in a classroom seven or eight years old and the teachers screaming Duchesne. Anybody teach you truly teach you how to pay attention. Hara focus all starts in wrong. Well it does start at home. And whether you call it meditation or contemplation you take an eight-year-old and sit them down for five minutes three minutes and teach them how to focus. Focus is a fantastic thing for comms the body by the way and may share a little. I was teaching with my daughter's kindergarten class and I was one of the other teachers and there was one little boy that I just. He melted my heart and he was a crack baby so one of the one of the practices that I would have him do is sit in the chair. We did this for five minutes. I tried to get him to do it for ten minutes. It didn't quite work ten minutes. Got Him and I had him read the alphabet but just focused but it I and and I mean the he was so happy. It's when he when he finished that five minutes and I would keep you know a kept getting more and more and I thought this is wonderful. I mean for us as human beings. That's why I meditate every day medicate. But it's interesting you know. Read the alphabet. I mean reading. The alphabet is no different than having a mantra mantras. Just an opportunity to focus. I mean you know Classic Meditation. Your focus on your breath first of all breathing is the best thing for us. And you know what you're gonNA love this. That's in every one of your chapters. It starts out at the very end. Nobody teaches us how to breathe. You think it's natural. You're a woman. Is it natural. Have a baby how natural nobody can. We had forty hours alert. We breathe through chest a chest contracts us. It puts us in our sympathetic nervous system. Which is a tension filled nervous system as opposed to our para sympathetic nervous system which puts the brakes on anxiety puts the brakes on tension. We need to breathe through a diaphragm. We need to expand our stomachs and take the air in. Hold it and then release it. She's not about some foreign concept and philosophy about meditation. This is breath in life's breath it's daily. It's actually a minute when you think about a moment experience like you do getting dressed you know taking a bath or taking a shower eating. It's the same thing as paying attention again. Paying attention to the breath to whatever we have meditate. Kimberly find ways to move us into a centered. Place I used to use a candle candles when I first started You know I needed to somethin'. Because to me. Candle represented God's fire. You know what is turning. You know it's wash right you know. It's God's spirit universe. That's how did that happen. So that's what I used to focus on. I haven't done that for a while because I have other views many different kinds. But it's so important and then to be able to block out the negative junk that's going on out there especially now you know. Think about this think about life hundred years ago years is nothing nothing so in. My Grandmother was absolutely having joy day. Actually but just think about the amount of stimulation that existed in a single day. One hundred years ago now. I just one hundred years ago compared to now my goodness you can't even I mean it's overwhelming with bombarded and bring has to deal with that. Yeah what it does is it it rattles us in in. I can see how people can go. Shut down some level because they can't handle that stimulation that over but there again when you have that meditative way of blocking out the negative stuff. It makes it all these absolutely. You don't even have to be able to take a walk in. Yeah about some meditation. It's a horse. Is sending ocean watching the ocean? I mean that's you know that's being in nature smelling flower a committing yourself from on a daily basis to be as fully present as possible waking up in the morning and saying. I am going to pay attention today. Thank you for being here. Plus you finish sharing all your. We hope you enjoyed today's episode of transformation. We encourage you to apply the Information. You've learned with our wise guest to make your life better and make good changes. We appreciate you more than you know for being a part of our podcast when you were moved or motivated please let us know how the show influenced your life by emailing at Dr Cheryl dot wealth transformation gmail.com for a free consultation with Dr Cheryl to see how she can benefit you. Further please visit Cheryl Shire DOT COM or call. Four one five two four six six eight one as a gift you can get doctor. Cheryl's Book Wealth Transformation Integrity Integrity Integrity for only the cost of postage of seven dollars. Ninety five cents until next time feel healthy and happy in your wealth no matter where you are in your life.

Dr Cheryl Dr Neil Coburn Academy of Mindful Psychology Academy of Mindful Psychology school of American schools of Dr Cheryl Shire California Graduate School of president and CEO founder and president Dr Coburn US Emotional Wellbeing sympathetic nervous system Rock Meditation Centers Marin California
#291 Dr. Neil Riordan

First Class Fatherhood

33:54 min | 10 months ago

#291 Dr. Neil Riordan

"Now the lace welcome to first glass fatherhood. Welcome everybody episode to ninety one of the PODCAST. I am happy as always to be here with you. Think if the stopping you buy if this is your first time listening to podcasts. Please get over there in Baghdad. Subscribe Button you do not want to miss on the action. That's coming your way right here on. I last fatherhood all right. DADS I hope. Everybody enjoyed their holiday. Season had a merry Christmas and a happy New Year. I have got an awesome guests for you guys to kick off two thousand twenty here on. I followed Dr there. Neil reardon is a pioneer an expert in the field of stem cell research and I know that every parent at some point leading up to the birth of their child. They are asked whether or not they would like to pay to store stored the umbilical cord blood or tissue. Dr Neil reardon is the perfect explained the difference between the two and the importance of it. All it's really an honor to have him on the podcast with me today. He is the best selling author of stem cell. Therapy a rising tide and you may have even heard them on Joe. Rogan's podcast along with Mel Gibson. Dr Reardon we'll be here with me in just a few minutes so please lease stick around for the interview Wednesday on the podcast will be our first warrior Wednesday edition of Two Thousand Twenty retired Delta Force operator and New York Times bestselling author. Brian Taylor will join me here. He just penned a new Pike Logan Thriller titled Hunter Killer Which Hits The bookstores tomorrow. Next week I'm going to be joined by another. WWE SUPERSTAR SCAR BACK in September. I had titus O'Neil next week I will have Adam Copeland better known by his ring. Name Edge. He'll join me next week. Make sure you lock it. Infinite and twenty twenty guys. It's just GONNA be a big year for first class. Fatherhood is I am working hard to scale things up. Please be sure you following me on Instagram at Alec Underscore Lace over on twitter at Alex. Check out my website. first-class First Class FATHERHOOD DOT COM and currently uploading some content to youtube. So please let me would've subscribe over there. I cannot say thank you enough to all of your listeners out there who have continued to support me. Please help me spread the word about this podcast. That every father in your neighborhood or in your contact list let them know about the show. That is celebrating fatherhood and family life. Fatherhood Rocks Family L. E. value is rule and every day is father's Day right here with me and I'm going to be right back with Dr Neal reared in place and you're listening to First-class Fatherhood And dads are you tired of taking supplements that never deliver will read con. One was created to ensure that you get real hard core products that deliver real results trusted by four time world's strongest man. Brian Shaw and founded by supplement entrepreneur. Aaron Singer men read Con One is crushing the industry. You have to try their maury bars which are packed full of nutritious food sources that will replenish your system when you need it most and they taste so good. You're todd will think they're eating a candy bar but we're talking to wholefood meal replacement and right now. I play father who listeners can and save twenty percent on their entire order from red con one simply use the Promo Code father at the checkout. So let's go. Dad's for the highest state of readiness. Choose Red Con one visit visit. Read CON ONE DOT COM. Use the Promo Code Father and save twenty percents joining me now first class Father Dr Reardon First Fatherhood Thank you Alec happened. Would it be here all right. Let's start right here. How many kids do you have? And how old are they have four and thirty three. Let's see three thirty twenty eight and twenty five three girls and the twenty eight year old boy and well ladies and men. Now I guess they're they're all grown and out driving in the world so yeah very cool exact opposite of you there. I have Four myself and I have three boys and then we got the girl on the end. So Oh you got to finish. Then that was it. I mean We didn't get around four. We'd have five by now but we We put a stop to it there. Oh Gotcha gotcha graduate PODCAST. A couple of them here Just thought he'd saw Dana White Out in Vegas I. I was just out there for a medical conference. Get Him to fight so that was kind of fun. Yeah very cool after Dana invited me to come need them at. UFC she and Madison Square Garden. You have forty four so we had a chance to hang out with them. There is really great guy. Great Father I play a guy all the way around. Yeah Yeah What type of what type of sports activities for the kids into growing up well with my oldest was into was into cross country and my My my son was into kind of everything but more more into guitar and that sort of thing and My youngest was a swimmer. Wimmer and My second one oldest plays off all together which you know that's great. That's more fun for the parents. I think it is for kids but We'll get this little bit of that. Thing is though they're all really super good students. So they're self motivated but you know they. They actually worked very hard in school and they've done they've done quite well because of it and I'm very lucky to have self-motivated heads the other. Maybe don't have the same self-motivation automation and I know. They struggle with trying to get their kids studying that sort of thing but mine all just sort of did on their own and like my oldest daughter actually insists. That's it she she. We were moving to England and she found She found a boarding school herself. She wanted to go to boarding school so anyway they're all. It's pretty well traveled and and They're all educated and out on their own and thankfully daddy got raised. When you know they get a lot of schools Yeah good stuff if you could please just take a minute here to hit my listeners with a little bit about your background what you do well my the main deal now. I've been an entrepreneur for twenty years. I worked at a cancer research lab for fourteen years. I saw some opportunities there that of some treatment auctions that I wanted to watch some of the some of the property the some of the intellectual property that we had had done that created out of our research work there and so I started my own my own business twenty years ago and self therapy I do drink self service coach therapy to cancer vaccine and Then from out of that we have some series of patents on on isolation and growing SIM cells because because that was kind of the starting material and so because of that I got into stem cell world. And I think that's where I spend most of my time is in Panama. Anima we have We've we've been Panama now for thirteen years. We have a we have a fifteen thousand foot manufacturing Laboratory there. We have a an eight thousand square foot medical. We see about two hundred to two hundred fifty patients every month from pretty much all over the world but you know price seventy percent from the the. US and Canada and the restroom elsewhere. We see a lot of athletes We've done a recent years we we finished the clinical trial Using these umbilical cord. They're called themselves but really not thinkable cells and the the nomenclature is changing. I don't want to confuse as the audience but for lack of a better term. We'll just call them. Ms's and these cells we get them from live healthy bursts from from consenting. Mothers tested They're they're heavily tested and screened and we multiply them in the laboratory and then they're frozen down for us and so we just finished a clinical the trial and autism and that was published in May last year Prior to that we finished a clinical trial on multiple sclerosis us and that was published. Maybe eighteen months ago We currently we have a trial in rheumatoid arthritis that we're doing So that's that's that that's most of my time I have. I have four companies. But they're all kind of similar in the regenerative medicine space so we have a company in the US signature biologics where we manufacturer factor after birth products for doctors to use Mostly surgeons and wound care that sort of thing so I'm pretty much a one hundred percent and regenerative medicine for the last at least thirteen years or so so it's incredible what you do and thank God we have someone like you. That's involved in this and you know one of the things Doctor about parents are F at some point leading up to the delivery of their child if they want to store the the core blood or the umbilical cord tissue. That's that stuff can get pretty expensive. How important is that? What's the difference between the two well Alex And on the cord blood. That's those those. The cord blood contains the themselves for example. If you you're part of a bone marrow transplant right if somebody has cancer and they walking doses of chemotherapy and radiation. You can salvage the bone marrow because when you're giving those big doses of things to kill the cancer you kill the bone marrow. Oh stem cells as well. So those are the cells that make all your blood components and if you don't replace those with a matched You know with the match either bone marrow or order the blood from a biblical cord. which has those cells in it? Then you'll die from the treatment so That the I think the odds of using using math in a lifetime or something around between one and two thousand and one in ten million So it it economically. You know if if there's no economic if it's not an economic hardship then it seems like a reasonable thing to do. If if it's if it's the difference between making your house payment or not I wouldn't I wouldn't do that for sure Then the for the the tissue issue it's the tissue contains the cells that I worked with the MS's and I think they are going to be a lot of clinical applications coming coming up and again if it's not an economic hardship I would I would do that For sure as store the tissue I mean I wish I had my to be honest with you I wish I had mine Biblical gorge issue to make as many cells as I want you know for the rest of my life So and you know I'm in. I'm in a position to do that. Because Corona Laboratory and then the company I have companies in Panama where. It's legal to do that and I think only things are going to open up here. I don't to be honest with you. I can't predict the future. How long that's going to take? I think we'll probably get an first. Mse Cell Therapy approved here. Maybe in three to five years but it'll be limited so that's a long answer. The short answer is if it's not if it's not economically too onerous for you to do it then it's an insurance policy and there may be some great stuff that you can do with yourself and your kids heels later down the road. Yeah very well said and let me bring this back at you. About how old were you Neil when you became a father and how to becoming a dad kind of change your perspective on life. Oh Oh boy well I think it was twenty seven And it's pretty much changed everything you know you. Just I don't think anybody can prepare for uh-huh or are you can tell you all you want but until your actual father is the change that happens is something you can't predict It's certainly truly changed all of my Focus on my from you know for myself and my wife to to you know there's little one that's GonNa take care of and So it didn't change change everything and then have changed everything. Another state everything I can. I can tell you all you know. All four of them are they're they're they're all super smart and super like self motivated but also super different. They're all very very different from each other and That's been fun and challenging to you know just just to watch them grow and then you know. It's so exciting exciting to see them. They have their careers. And they're they're they're doing that. You know I think as a parent you know if if they if they're able to go off and do their own thing And the you know a good member society you've done a good job and so I'm pretty happy with how this all turned out and And they never go away. I you know I mean they're gonNA kill her forever for for younger parents out there you know. I don't know my my father. I think that generation nation was sort of more. You know pretty hands off I don't recall ever asking me my father for anything. After the age of seventeen I graduated my school and I paid for my own college. Did you know I worked my way through school and all that night But my but you know I kinda I kinda overcompensated for my kids. And I was willing to pay for their pay for their their educations but only to a point you know And and anyway there's still the you know I'm happy. I'm happy that we lived in several different places because they I think you learn so much watch and and you can be your. The Flexibility of your brain improves dramatically. If you visit different countries and for example I my youngest daughter we lived. She lived in five different countries before high school. So a lot of exposure and she's she's probably the biggest traveler is he went to school and Saint Andrews so she was over in in Europe and says they will travel a lot and then she finished up in London but So I think you know I just I love hanging out with them and And and seeing how they grow and how they think and Anyway that thing that I've never done I think is is having kids so and and hopefully raise them in a way that they're there continue to be productive and wonderful people. Yeah well said Dhaka A and you know one of the things that I talked about when I know. You're an entrepreneur yourself. I'M GONNA have a lot of these high fine entrepreneurs on the show here. I mean my oldest is only thirteen. So he'll be hitting high school next year and that we start early conversations about college and from what I'm seeing right now Ah The way the kids are getting buried in the college debt. And they're they're majoring in minor things seemingly seemingly How do you feel about the whole college? I mean obviously if you're going to be something doctor or one of the stem You know focuses. It seems seems like it's necessary but College necessary in your opinion for children are kids to succeed in. Today's world I think we need a lot fewer kids in college to be honest with you. I mean the. There's a in my generation of a lot of my friends didn't go to university at all and then I. Did you know hooker crooked eventually. You know what I mean but I started. I went to college for a year. I was expensive and I and I you know how to work to pay for it and then I went off and I worked In the oilfield you know to earn money so I don't think there's anything wrong with that that I think you learn a whole bunch. I I learned a whole lot more from life certainly than I ever did from college and and I think there's there's plenty things that people can do with alcohol. I think if you can afford it and it's you know I I I can tell you. I'm really happy. None of my kids I went to Nyu and studied art history. I can tell you that I that I wouldn't have paid for it because I don't know I don't know how they're gonNa make a living doing that. But yeah there are there are there are a lot of these wacky majors for sure that I hear about Let me ask you let me ask you about your book here. Stem cell therapy here rising tide. What was the genesis of the book? The book about all right guys many of you have hit me up saying that you would like to start your own podcast than I am telling you right now. Anchor is the easiest way to get this done number one. It's free. I have never paid a dime to publish any of my podcasts. And their creation tools. Allow you to record and edit right from your phone or your computer anchored those all the distribution as well so it can be heard on spotify apple podcast and many more also you can make money with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need to make a podcast in one place. What are you waiting for? Download the free anchor APP today or go to anchor dot. FM to get started. Uh Hey DADS. Are you looking to boost your energy level. strikeforce energy has got you covered with a strikeforce energy packet. You can turn any beverage into an energy drink. Their original energy packets contain no sugar no calories just an explosion of energy and flavor added to any beverage. strikeforce energy is veteran owned and all their products are made right here in the United United States co founded by Navy Seal Sean Matson strikeforce energy blows away the energy drink competition right now. I bother who listeners can save fifty percent off their purchase by visiting strikeforce energy dot com and using the Promo Code Fatherhood strikeforce energy turns any beverage into energy drink get yours today. STRIKEFORCE ENERGY DOT COM Promo Code. Fatherhood let me ask you. Let me ask you about your book here. Your stem cell therapy. A rising tide. What was the genesis of the book? And what does the book about. S- well the book is It's it's kind of temporal. It alerts when I started. You know like how I got started in the whole thing but during the tumor immunology things and making the cancer vaccines and then So it's it's it's a bit memorial orest in the beginning but each chapter laid out to each chapter about each condition is laid out so that it can stand alone. For example. There's the chapter on. Autism is chapter on Rheumatoid Arthritis Multiple Sclerosis heart failure lung diseases and laid out. So that's My biggest motivation for the book was I I have conversations with people all the time and and it seemed like I had the same conversation over and over and over again and I thought it. Wouldn't it be wonderful if I gave some resource. And they could you know all this stuff but that would be at the tip of their fingertips they can read it and then we can have have a really good conversation afterwards. So that was my biggest That that was the biggest reason for writing a book. And I tell you the best thing I've ever done for from you know just from a business standpoint because people they once they read the book they get it written for late public's written for eight grades You know they're the two words you have to learn to get through it. All the rest of the words are just normal normal binoculars and And it is I I have raving fans who by you know by one hundred bucks at a time and handed out to their friends because they see this technology as being transformative and I certainly do. I think that these cells have capacity to reduce human suffering the vastly and We're were you know we're in the infancy of it. I've been doing it for twenty years but we're we're still in the infancy of the of the you know the world there there. There's a there's a approved approved product in in South Korea. There's a product in Canada one in New Zealand and and now a couple of in Japan so there yet they're yet to be a an approved product in the US. But I think once you once that happens the economics I think so not just the cells but the cell to sell products the things that the cells secrete will ultimately replace a vast majority of the pharmaceutical industry and So it's an exciting time to be here and I love seeing all the results and and you know every time we go to Panama. It's it's story after story because you know last year over two thousand people and you know I I only meet a very small percentage of them but when I do it's always very gratifying and a lot of a lot of them. Got There because of the book. They got there because the book they got there because because they watched Joe Rogan. You Know Mel Gibson on Joe Rogan with me and And and and then and then they bought the book. So it's to me. It's it's great because it imports. Little every it's just my group that I put down my truth. Clinics Truth are the research truth and People are able to to grasp it and I had a UFC fighter. Call me the other day and and wanted to talk about treatment. I said Hey once read the book first and then you know you read the book and then we had a very intelligent conversation now. We know what we want to see what he wants to do. So that's main main reason for the buck. Yeah very cool. Yeah and it's awesome that you put it in a simple form there because today it seems like The order of the day is to come up with the the catchy headline and people don't even read the story anymore. So I know that. But there's there's some pushback against the whole stem cell research and everything what why is such Opposition is it from big pharmaceutical companies. What does the odd position that you face mostly doing all this well so the early opposition was from misunderstanding? because stem cells back on George Bush He basically banned further federal funding on embryonic themselves cells that were outside of this scope that they identified that had already been that's already been created and so everybody thought stem cells man and you know dead baby or you know or or an embryo that could become a human well these so I think we're over that now Uh We you know. In two thousand fifteen we tried to get a bill introduced into the Texas legislature about adult stem cells. Because he's fallen a category that adult stem cells. A baby is born healthy and you know mom delivered the after birth which is normally going in the trash or in into you know to incineration that is collected. And that's what we used to know. Baby is harmed so I think the early early push back was all about the IMBRIANI steps. You had the you know the most of most of the you know the Catholic church was against bath the Baptist against most most religious people really against the loss of life. There is no loss of life here in fact the Catholic Church supports this research So we've gotten over that hurdle I think the the public consciousness has changed so that that is no longer an issue and we actually got a law passed in Texas that its it. Basically makes everything that we do in Panama legal do in Texas. Unfortunately we still have a federal law that that that is over that and We made some amendments to that that bill this year this year and it was it was again. It's still on the books in Texas but it's against federal law and nobody wants to be the first one to do it against federal law. Because you know I'm not gonNA as a business man I'm not gonNA. That's a bunch of money and manufacturing facility that's going to be potentially hacked up by the you know by the sets for some reason you know. So that's that's that's the deal and there's got a Lotta money on the other side you know. Hey if the the the the anti rheumatic drugs are fourteen billion dollars a year. And if it's my fourteen billion dollars might not be happy about some Other option you know so And I think I my prediction is all all these these biologic animal. No matter the cost fifteen thousand dollars shot every month. We'll we'll go to zero. You know there was a big clinical study of room service rightous where they use these excels and and you probably heard of like I'm not gonNA mention the name but these drugs that they're they're antibodies to two molecules. The Mo- mostly eighteen up right. So this crisis factor kinda general of the immune system and it kind of keeps it keeps the inflammation going and so they they make antibody this season you if you just watch. TV for twenty four hour period to see all these ads and the the top selling drugs in the world are are the this class of drugs. Watch anti rheumatic and Anyway I trial using this Using these cells reduced one single infusion reduced use that that bad that bad actor the Tanf Alpha by fifty percent and the second infusion dropped another twenty five percent and then made all the subjects asymmetric and that persisted for this study was only eight months long but we have faces now. That are eight years out who they're treated one time and they never have go back on any any Drugs so that's the trial that were finishing up right now in in Panama is for the RIM tourists right. So you know it's only only human nature that there's an economic the economic pushback against When you're making a ton of money and you have a ton of money you're GONNA you're not gonna be too thrilled about the next thing thing that will that will reduce your revenues by law? So yeah this one is incredibly important. What you're doing? It's just amazing that you know you're passionate about what you're doing and you're a helping you know countless lives and continue to do so for many years to come and we got this one more question about you as a father have you what type of I know it takes a lot of discipline to do what you do for a living. So what type of disciplinarian were you as a dad but the kids growing up your spanker timeout. How'd you Kinda handle discipline No I never was a spanker of it was a time out deal and You know just but I like the bigger is better than the stick to you know so there we set up goals for them to for for certain milestones and they would get rewarded. I think that that always works better for me and And the honestly. I don't think I was that much of a disciplinarian. Just you know if they acted it up or something then But yeah there I said I was super lucky or as them being self starters because I I can't imagine I have a really good friend of mine. His his son in schools you know just does not thrive and I am and I know that she spends an inordinate amount of time trying motivate them and I never had that challenge so I don't know what I'd do in that case but and very cool and what. My my father was not. My father was very much against any sort of corporal punishment. Even though so it's funny because my father would never spank and he he. My father was a psychiatrist and he was very anti spanking but yet we went to school in my day and we got the hell beat out for teachers or gym teachers. Yeah so now. I guess that's all band but when when I was at school that was still a part of the deal and and nobody ever said a word and now I think you couldn't even look at a kid funny without getting written up or something so yeah isn't real very true very true. What type of goals are planning to happen here? As far as you have any other books documentaries doc entries into making. What's what what kind of goals for the future here Well you know. I'm just putting my head down and getting clinical trials done is the main thing waste. We just built out a new Because we've been completely full without any advertising for the last five years and and we've been we have a waiting list so we built a new faith out a new space out in a very large four hundred million dollars hospital complex. That's a and it's the grand opening next month. We have a twelve thousand square foot space over there and we plan on doing a lot more in this fine world because the So that they the basically you need you need certain facilities. If you're going to be injecting fine so we got some studies set up for that and spine pain back pain lower. We're back pain neck pain. It's such a huge problem that we've never been in that space and we're GONNA start getting into that space clinically dente Panama and then here in the US. Yes I have a company that You know we figured out this this. We figured out a way to manufacturer sells so one of the big problems with with Going through any regulatory in like FDA or any regulatory bodies is that. There's the the when you when you take umbilical cord and you go through. Let's say enough cells to treat three hundred people and then you take another bill for corddry grow up three hundred people. Then you have a new drug for every three hundred people. And they don't like that so one thing that we've developed my my skunkworks lab in Dallas is sell way too. I select cells else that can grow we so far. We've grown enough cells to treat the entire planets so we can then go to clinical trials. It's the same drug for for all parts of the trial and once it gets approved. It's the same drugs. There's no difference between them. The agency called the heterogenous. They have a drug. That's not exactly the same so with what's this with one of these cell lines which were were testing a lot right now. One I'm these sellers will be up to go from you. Know clinical trial all the way to therapeutics with it. And so that's my goal in the next five years is to you're GONNA have to get a product approved in the US and get a lot wider low broader use And I don't plan on writing another book now. I do plan on Updating the rising tide with new stuff here in another couple years okay very cool. Yeah I'M GONNA drop a link to the rising retired and the and the description of today's podcast episode. I think it would be beneficial to all parents and just tax the link and then pick it up and read last thing. I WanNa hit you with your doctor. Ask all the data on the PODCAST. What type of advice do you happen that new dad or for not about to be father? WHO's out there listening? Just get ready Buddy Well I don't know I think I probably biggest advice is to go with the flow because if it's the overthinking it's that that got me in trouble trying to over think something so Go with the flow and and and And hopefully your wife breastfeeds because man. That's the best thing a father can have right there that gift. Yeah all right well said my mom was a big Breast cancer not breastfeeding she. She literally wrote the book on Human Lactation. It's called human lactation by Jan Weird and so we were breastfeeding family and and thankfully my wife was breastfeed her That's your that's your health out but It just go with the flow and and enjoy it. I love the message. He's been an honor for me. I gotta say Dr Neil Reardon. You are firstly his father all the way. Thank you so much time on first-class Fatherhood Alex real appreciate it. Take care back to wrap things up here on. I gotTA give a special. Thank you once again to Dr Neil reardon for giving me a few minutes of his time here was such an honor police at me up on twitter guys or dropping it on instagram disagree. Let me know what you thought about. Today's podcast always love to read the feedback. Lock in for Wednesday. I'll be dropping episode to ninety two on you guys with first-class Father New York Times bestselling author and combat veteran. Brad Taylor who's got a new book dropping tomorrow. Don't miss out on that next week as I said. WWe superstar edge will be here. Follow me on instagram. To find out all the upcoming coming guest announcements. That's all I got for you guys today. I'm Alex Lace. Thank you for listening to. I wouldn't please remember guys. We are not babysitters we our fathers. And we're not just fathers we are first class fathers Or half truths and so uh jokes. I Open Gosh.

Panama US Dr Neil reardon Joe Rogan instagram Mel Gibson strikeforce twitter UFC Dana White Alex Lace Texas WWE Adam Copeland Canada
Get your vegetables

The Good News Podcast

07:32 min | 1 year ago

Get your vegetables

"I'm calling your host of the good news podcasts. And I'm Neil the other host the good news podcast is your source for good news. Fun stories, auditory, delight and sonic joy. We're bringing all of those goodness to you from the cards against humanity studios in Chicago. I'm gonna give you some good news about fruits and vegetables. Are you ready? I love for its and vegetables vegetarian. Humble brag. So I'm gonna give you some good scientific news about it grip the fruits and vegetables. So, you know, this, I know this a fruits and vegetables are good for our body, right? Healthy for the body, Colleen said that she did. She ran her hand down, like the profile of her body, Vanna white. There's more good news about fruits and vegetables. So Dr Neil ocean name. I know. I know it's my name plus a cooler name. It's good. So Dr Neil, ocean of the university of Leeds in England has been doing studies on fruits and vegetables, and the benefit that they can give to our actual mental health, so not only physical health through his studies, he has proven or at least hypothesizing with a lot of evidence that eating more fruits and vegetables can help our mental health and one of the studies biggest findings is if you add just one extra portion of fruits and vegetables to your daily routine, the effects that it has on our mental wellbeing, and our mental wellbeing is about eight extra days of walking month. Whoa. Yeah. So. I hear that. I think my mental wellbeing is probably like stress unhappiness related shares. I would love to have eight eight extra days. Would you say eight days of walking a month? Full days, an extra ten minutes. Okay. Great. Like a like a walk around the block exactly. Eight times that's perfect, I guess I can't speak for everybody. But for me if I am physical and I'm taking or doing some sort of exercise. I just feel more at peace, mentally feel like a bit more centered. And, you know, the world doesn't seem so like chaotic to me. So if I can do that with vegetables. Let's do it. Where's that broccoli? Hard pass on the broccoli. I like an eggplant. I love, you know what I love brussel sprouts. It's funny you say these specific vegetables. Because in my head, I was only imagining raw. So I was thinking, like a big old carrot. I'm well, you know, they say the more raw vegetable the more nutrients are going Adrian packed. So if you can do it raw do it, right. I mean, that's how I eat my disgusting. Wow. That's how I my eggplant. You do not he. Right. Right. You do not. Come on, like an apple. No. You don't be serious. You ever been? Have you ever been in my house? Yes. Well, there's, there's eggplant carcasses everywhere you don't eat raw egg plant. So as to Terry in, what do you what do you like vegetable wise? I easy. I mean, how do you not like a fruit, but vegetables is what I would say. They're actually, I know this is going to sound crazy, but I think they're probably more fruits. I don't like than there are vegetables. Like I mean, I, I couldn't I'm not super interested in an orange or clementine or a peach, or nectarine like stone for its don't do it for me things with peels. I don't like grapefruit peel them or is it the there's too much Piff you know, like you've really got a chop down on a piece of clementine, and then I'm like, do. I spit it out, or do I eat it? Even the white part. Yeah. Like the meat after you've gotten kind of the good stuff out. Just eat the whole thing. Yeah, that's awful. Okay, how we have we been hoodwinked? By the citrus. I love being in these conversations with you. 'cause it's just like how, how did this happen? I've never heard anybody laid that their complaint. How is it not everyone's compiled like this big old piece of orange? Yeah. And then in your mouth, you have this like Phillies stringy like condom of. Put it like that. It's awful. And we're just expected to just eat it say, okay, you're watermelon. Apple pear pairs are send me to pair Ville, baby on the trade. I'm writing the pair train. Choo, Choo, grapes all aboard. Grips are fan. I think grapes, are sweeter than they are flavorful. Yeah. So I feel like I don't know what I'm eating. I think I'm pickier about Fritz than I am vegetables. You'd be hard pressed to feed me vegetable. I wouldn't be interested in sweet potato love us. We need all day long, Brussels sprouts are so flipping good. They're so good. I like aubergine. What is that? I think it's zucchini. Harry co Veyre green beans. Can you think of that you think I wouldn't? I don't know if you I feel like this, these are pretty these are either you love them, or you don't peppers. I'm not a huge pepper person like a pepper. I did a pepper like an apple. I did. I did an onion like an apple okay? All right. That's a topic of conversation in my house, as how much raw onion, I will eat. Wait. Is that something you actually do, like you'll you wouldn't like pull the skin of an onion, and just eat it? But if I'm shopping up onions. Cauliflower love it. I like Colorado romanesque. Oh, what? What is that? It's like the more spiral shaped version of California. It's like kind of inbetween cauliflower and broccoli. It's so cool. It looks really, really neat. I know that kale is kinda hip. And I like Cal goes grant all kinds of Cal dragon Cal. I like lettuce lettuce like butter lettuce. Thanks for listening. Do you have good news? Awesome. Or maybe you wanna tell us a joke or idea. That's amazing. Email us at good news at cards against humanity dot com or leave his voice mail. Seven seven three two one seven zero one five six. You can also tweet us at the good news pod. And if you love the good news podcast review us on itunes, we'd appreciate it. Most of our music is my Paddington bear. Same place. Same time. Tomorrow.

apple Dr Neil Dr Neil ocean Vanna white Cal Colleen Chicago Choo university of Leeds Phillies Brussels Adrian Colorado romanesque England Terry Fritz California Ville ten minutes
Eat Your Veggies, Repeat

The Good News Podcast

07:32 min | 11 months ago

Eat Your Veggies, Repeat

"I'm calling your host of the good news podcast. The other host the good news podcast is your source for Good News Fun Stories Auditory Delight and Sonic Joy. We're bringing all of this goodness to you from the cards against humanity studios in Chicago I'm GonNa give you some good news about fruits and vegetables. Are you ready. I love fruits and vegetables vegetarian. Oh Humble Brag So I'm GonNa give you some good scientific news about it. Grip the fruits and vegetables. So you know this. I know this a fruits and vegetables are good for our body healthy for the body when in Colleen said that she sort of she ran her hand down like the profile of her body Vanna White. There's more good news about fruits and vegetables so Dr Neil Ocean ice name. I know I know it's my name plus a cooler shame. It's good so Dr. Neil Ocean of the University of Leeds in England has been doing studies on fruits and vegetables and the benefit they can give to our actual mental house so not only are physical health through his studies. He has proven or at least hypothesizing with a lot of evidence that eating more fruits and vegetables can help our mental health and one of the biggest findings is if you add just one extra portion of fruits and and vegetables to your daily routine. The effects that it has on our mental wellbeing on our mental wellbeing is about eight extra days of walking a month. Whoa yeah so when I hear that I think my mental wellbeing is probably like stress unhappiness related shares? I would love to have eight eight extra extra days. Would you say eight days of walking a month full days an extra like ten minutes okay. Great like a like like a walk around the block eight times. That's perfect. I guess I can't speak for everybody but for me if I am physical and I'm taking a walk or doing doing some sort of exercise I just feel more at peace mentally I feel like a bit more centered and things you know. The world doesn't seem so chaotic to me. So if I can you do that with vegetables. Okay let's do it all right. Where's that Broccoli hard pass on the Broccoli? I like an eggplant. I love you know what I live. Brussels sprouts I. It's funny you say these specific vegetables because in my head I was only imagining in raw so I was thinking like a big old carrot. I'm well you know. They say the more raw vegetable. The more nutrients are going right atrium packed. So if you can do it rod do it right. I mean that's how I eat my disgusting. Wow that's how I mean my eggplant. You do not do not Komo on like an apple no you. Don't be serious you ever been. Have you ever been in my house. Yes well there's there's eggplant carcasses everywhere everywhere. You don't eat raw egg plant so as a vegetarian what do you. What do you like vegetables? Fruits are easy. I mean how do you not like a fruit. Yeah but vegetable is where I would say there are actually. I know this is going to sound crazy but I think they're probably more fruits. I don't like then there are vegetables like I mean I couldn't i. I'm not super interested in an orange or Clementine or a peach or nectarine like I stone for its. Don't do a ton for me things with peels. I don't like Grapefruit Peel Gilbert or is it the. There's too much pith you know. Like you've really got chomp down on a piece of Clementine and then I'm like do I spit it out. ordway eat it l.. Leaving the white part. Yeah like the meat. After you've gotten kind of the good stuff out. Just eat the whole thing. Yeah sounds that's awful. Okay how have we we have we been hoodwinked by the citrus. I love being in these conversations with you because it's just like how. How did this happen? And I've never heard anybody laid that be their complaint. How is it not everyone's compiling you eat like this big old piece of Orange Orange? Yeah and then in your mouth you have this like film e stringy like a condom of old orange in your and when you put it like that. It's awful and we're just expected to just eat it up. Say Okay. So you're a watermelon apple pear. Oh pairs art mark. Send Me To pair Ville Baby. On Fair I'm writing it the pair train Choo Choo Grapes. All aboard grips are survey. I think grapes are sweeter than they are flavorful. Yeah so I feel like I don't know what I'm eating. I think I'm pickier about it. Fruits and vegetables. You'd be hard pressed to feed me vegetable. I wouldn't be interested in a sweet potato loves. We need all day long. Brussels sprouts are so flipping. Good they're so good. I like Aubergine. What is that? I think it's Zucchini. Harry covert green beans. Can you think of one that you think I wouldn't eat. I don't know if you I feel like this. These are pretty these are either. You love them are you. Don't peppers I'm not a huge pepper person. I'll like a pepper. I did a pepper like an apple. I did yeah well. I'd I'd eat an onion like an apple. WHOA okay all right? That's a topic of conversation in my house. As how much raw onion I will wait. Wait is that you actually do like. You'll like pull the skin of an onion and just eat it. But if I'm chopping up onions take cauliflower love it I like color romanesque. Oh what what is that. It's like the the more spiral shaped version of cauliflower kind of inbetween cauliflower and Broccoli. It's so oh cool. Looks Really Really Neat. I know that Kale is Kinda hip. And I like cal. Girls Greg. All kinds of CAL dragon kill. I like lettuce. Let us let s like butter lettuce. Thanks for listening. Do you have good news. Awesome or maybe WanNa tell a joke or idea. That's amazing. Email us at good news at cards against humanity DOT COM or. Leave us a voicemail seven seven three two one seven zero one five six you can also tweet us at the good news pod and if you love the good news podcast review us on itunes. We'd appreciate it. Most of our music is by putting their same place. Same Time Tomorrow Laura.

apple Brussels Broccoli Dr Neil Ocean Vanna White right atrium Dr. Neil Ocean University of Leeds Colleen Chicago England Komo ordway Ville Baby Greg Harry Kale ten minutes eight days
EAT your VEGGIES

The Good News Podcast

07:32 min | 1 year ago

EAT your VEGGIES

"I'm calling your host of the good news podcasts. And I'm Neil. The other host. The good news podcast is your source for good news, fun stories auditory, delight and sonic joy. We're bringing all of those goodness to you from the cards against humanity studios in Chicago. I'm gonna give you some good news about fruits and vegetables. Are you ready? I love for its and vegetables vegetarian. Humble brag. So I'm gonna give you some good scientific news about it grip the fruits and vegetables. So you know this. I know this a fruits and vegetables are good for our body. Right healthy for the body. Colleen said that she did. She ran her hand down like the profile of her body Vanna white. There's more good news about fruits and vegetables. So Dr Neil ocean name. I know I know it's my name plus a cooler name. It's good. So Dr Neil ocean of the university of Leeds in England has been doing studies on fruits and vegetables and the benefit that they can give to our actual mental health. So not only are physical health through his studies. He has proven or at least hypothesizing with a lot of evidence that eating more fruits and vegetables can help our mental health and one of the studies biggest findings is if you add just one extra portion of fruits and vegetables to your daily routine the effects that it has on our mental wellbeing and our mental wellbeing is about eight extra days of walking month. Whoa. Yeah. So. I hear that. I think my mental wellbeing is probably like stress unhappiness related shares. I would love to have eight eight extra days would you say eight days of walking a month full days, an extra ten minutes. Okay. Great. Like a like a walk around the block exactly eight times. That's perfect. I guess I can't speak for everybody. But for me, if I am physical, and I'm taking a walk or doing some sort of exercise. I just feel more at peace mentally feel like a bit more centered. And you know, the world doesn't seem so like chaotic to me. So if I can do that with vegetables. Let's do it. Where's that broccoli? Hard pass on the broccoli. I like an eggplant. I love you know, what I love brussel sprouts. It's funny. You say these specific vegetables because in my head, I was only imagining raw. So I was thinking like a big old carrot. I'm you know, they say the more raw vegetable the more nutrients Adrian packed. So if you can do it rod do it. Right. I mean, that's how I eat my disgusting. Wow. That's how I my eggplant. You do not he right, right. You do not come on like an apple. No. You don't be serious. You ever been have you ever been in my house? Yes. Well, there's there's eggplant carcasses everywhere. You don't eat raw egg plant. So as vegetarian what do you? What do you like vegetables is I easy? I mean, how do you not like a fruit? But vegetables is what I would say, they're actually I know this is going to sound crazy. But I think they're probably more fruits. I don't like than there are vegetables. Like, I mean, I I couldn't I'm not super interested in an orange or clementine or a peach or nectarine like stone for its don't do it for me things with peels. I don't like grapefruit. You don't to peel them. Or is it the there's too much Piff? You know, like you've really got a chomp down on a piece of clementine. And then I'm like do. I spit it out or do. I eat it even the white part. Yeah. Like the meat after you've gotten kind of the good stuff out. Just eat the whole thing. Yeah. That's awful. Okay. How we have we been hoodwinked? By the citrus, and I love being in these conversations with you. 'cause it's just like how how did this happen? I've never heard anybody that be there complained. How is it? Not everyone's compiled like this big old piece of orange. Yeah. And in your mouth, you have this like Phillies stringy like condom of. Words in your mouth when you put it like that it's awful, and we're just expected to just eat it say, you're watermelon. Apple pear pairs are send me to pair Ville baby on the payer. I'm writing the pair train Choo Choo, grapes. All aboard grips are fan. I think grapes are sweeter than they are flavorful. Yeah. So I feel like I don't know what I'm eating. I think I'm pickier about fruits and vegetables, you'd be hard pressed to feed me vegetable, I wouldn't be interested in sweet potato love us. We need all day long Brussels sprouts are so flipping good. They're so good. I like aubergine. What is that? I think it's zucchini. Harry, Kover green beans. Can you think of that? You think I wouldn't? I don't know if you I feel like this. These are pretty these are either you love them or you don't peppers. I'm not a huge pepper person like pepper. I did a pepper like an apple. I did. I did an onion like an apple. Okay. All right. That's a topic of conversation in my house as how much raw onion. I will eat wait is that something you actually do like you'll you wouldn't like pull the skin of an onion and just eat it. But if I'm chopping up onions. Cauliflower love it. I like Colorado romanesque. Oh, what what is that? It's like the more spiral shaped version of California. It's like kind of inbetween cauliflower and broccoli. It's so cool. It looks really really neat. I know that kale is kinda hip, and I like Cal goes grant, all kinds of Cal dragon. Cal I like lettuce lettuce like butter lettuce. Thanks for listening. Do you have good news? Awesome. Or maybe you wanna tell us a joke or idea? That's amazing Email us at good news at cards against humanity dot com, or leave his voice mail seven seven three two one seven zero one five six you can also tweet us at the good news pod. And if you love the good news podcast review us on itunes. We'd appreciate it. Most of our music is my putting there same place. Same time. Tomorrow.

apple Dr Neil ocean Colleen Choo Choo Chicago Cal university of Leeds Phillies Brussels Adrian Colorado romanesque England California Harry Ville ten minutes eight days
Clinical Podcast: Think Before You 310 | Dr. Neil Sheth

Evidence In Motion Clinical

23:17 min | 1 year ago

Clinical Podcast: Think Before You 310 | Dr. Neil Sheth

"Welcome to the. AM clinical podcast. Your host Dr John. Childs and Dr Mark Sheppard Shepherd. We'll be bringing you interviews with cutting edge forward thinking physical therapy clinicians and leaders the goal to further your knowledge base and bridge the gap of of what was to. What are you ready? Let's go welcome to another edition of the I.. M. Clinical podcast. My name is John Childs and and joined by my co host. Dr Mark Sheppard as always days and we are privileged to have on the show of physical therapist who works actually with us at Texas physical. Therapy specialist Dr Neil. Sheth Neil completed completed the sports residency back in two thousand seventeen or so and really brings a unique perspective to all things certainly physical. Oh therapy but particularly related to strength training and so. We're really looking forward to having Neil on the show neil welcome to the clinical podcast. Thank you guys for having having them really excited so neil to get US kicked off if you would just give us a brief bit about your background maybe where you went to. PT School and sort of how you got into sort of the path that you're on now. Okay so I went to school in Philadelphia at the University of the sciences. It was a direct program so I actually didn't have to do the. Gre Three in reapply. I was just sixers don which is exciting. After that I was really well by my second year I really wanted to do. A sports. Resin team started looking looking around what I could apply to. and Luckily I am sports residency in Georgetown which XP was open and they took me on and finish that in twenty seventeen after the exam in March twenty eighteen. And now I'm down in San Antonio with one of our sports clinics where I get to mentor. The incoming residents now do a lot of teaching with that. Neil thanks for that background if you would talk a little bit about your perspective on strength with training and sort of where you think strength training sort of fits if you will and where the sort of the state of strength training I asked the question because you know oh manual therapy was sort of the decade of the two thousands and maybe overemphasize perhaps relative to strength training and it seems like the pendulum maybe swinging the other direction. Now where like all everyone talks about is like cross fit and those sorts of things. And it's like it's gone the other way so I'm just curious is like what's your perspective on strength training and what's the state of it within the profession. He adds though this really excited about. If I get to fired up just calm me down if you guys need need but again on tirades in the clinic all the time but as ours when I think I actually think that this is the biggest area that we need to improve on as a profession. Kind of like what you send John Worth starting to swing in the other way. I definitely sealed up but I think a lot of issues are that Patients are under loaded and under dosed as far as strength training principles and a lot of people. Just don't implement proper. Strengthening like thera bands are good to start with his initial seen in acute injuries. But after that initial phase there needs to be a shift to load it and having some awaits actually being put on these patients in. I could see that this so boxes. Something Neil that many people probably will resonate with and you. You know it's interesting because when you're in clinic you see you know thera bands everywhere at you know different types awaits that are usually hand weights right. If you go I went to the everyday. Outpatient clinic are even one within the hospital. It's kind of like those are the staples but you don't really see anything that can actually load people. You the heavyweights and it always kind of bugged me in two different ways one is like why is that the case too is I wasn't really comfortable understanding ending how to load people with squat racks or different types of bar. Waiting things landmine stuff like that. That took some time after I graduate sweet so when you talk about you know where the state of strength training or are really the prescription of exercises like where do you feel like. We miss the mark doc when it comes to these types of things so definitely go with the Swat rack being so at when during residency in Georgetown and even at us or as lane location. I I actually bought thought squat racks for both of those the Knicks in order to low deebo in a when I was little headed that about it but he got the point of it uh but then he was really from the beginning where in school and highly had maybe an hour a week for half a semester of going over any any strength and conditioning related things and that. Just trustees us into the clinic three graduate and we're still doing those eysenck three he by ten therapy and everything similar movements everything. Everyone gets the same cookie cutter approach and there needs to be a shift to that loading being an challenging the patient with actual weights and Neva bodyweight movements is fine but there are just not enough to have any tissue up tation Shen prevent long-term injury in. I think that also comes back to us practising what we preach. I liked to Charles Myself personally in the gym and with other colleagues of mine as far as Hauer thinking about exercise dosage. How a training myself in it leaks into how I treat? Patients Asia's Neil. Could you expand on this a little bit like you give in clinical example of like how you are implementing proper dosage. This is general as it relates to. Let's say strengthening someone's quadriceps muscle if they're coming in for let's say anterior knee pain like how does that look from your perspective when you're dosing dosing. Is it okay that provide a case about actually have a really good one for nepean young So with this. He's like a thirty three year. Old Male in the navy is all him a year after he fell on his knee and has had an tierney pain. Ever since and through the medical carousel paracel he was just prescribed straight leg. Raises and Claude sets for a whole year a whole year. That Yup and he's never done anything else using unlike multiple providers that have changed anything else. So let me stop you there. So you're telling me. Has He seen the physical therapist before this time he saw one. Yeah Yeah Oh man for a short time that kills me to know that the two exercises were still kind of on his radar but anyway. That's crazy yeah so he had no audio to do and he is in the navy he was off duty getting ready to go back to think Iraq Many leaves at the end of this month so he can squat lower than maybe like fifty degrees of neath luncheon. He tries running he kinda Gallup's because he doesn't want to bend that knee so I'm getting some of this very avoid. We didn't an week in doing things that he needs to do with him. I we do something called the Quad Index and we have a makeshift shift version with a hand held item. OMETER cheap way to do it but it works that so there's research out there especially for post. The minimum criteria needed to running is actually eight weeks and eighty percent index. So we use that. Eighty percent is our measurement to start any metrics or impact work. He we started at a at thirty percent. Thirty eight or twenty seven something like that and yeah really really low. So where I started with him outside of the cloud. Odd Settings settings. Good right especially on your continuum it's good for activation in the new progressive straight leg raises for your control and then after that you again to strength endurance endurance. He'd Kinda like that stair stepping progression over him we used. We started off a lot because of his pain with movement. We start a lot with Jafar Ayar flourished and just loading him with bodyweight movement squats split lunges straight leg raise and then eventually eventually shifts to adding weight to all those movements and making sure on his scale on what I do. A lot of patients is and use the rate of preserved exertion. So if it's something I really want them and the challenge you had told me I want it eight plus nine hundred ten anywhere in that range and if it's not there for them we just keep increasing until it's a heavy enough weight where they're actually pushing themselves not just going through the movement. That's interesting meal like so you're telling me that you're using the R.. P. To actually actually understand the reps and potentially sets for which you does your patients is that kind of how you're using yes so with the RPG round like eighty plus. It's usually definitely more my strength side or even power so I the schemes typically x amount of sets for anywhere between two to five Canadian. Six wraps her up and then if I want to get a little bit later on there are definitely increased volume for movement pattern. That were working. Oh that's cool so you know to me it would make sense. That may not be the same number going back to your statement about the three sets at ten Dan. You know that you kinda see everybody's flow chart you know potentially So yours look a bit messy. If this was documented. They're not clean. Three by ten three by tens is something I get so upset about in the clinics and we even have a table that we all work on an I wrote are actually one of my residents wrote. Think before you buy I ten has to me if everything on your flow sheet is three by ten to me. It's lazy programming. Your there's no intent behind find what you're prescribing and my floggings are definitely messy every day. There's I don't write all the way on the left side. I don't know how your flu she'd looks on the left column elements of Big Open Blank. Were most people just write back through size and then it just carries on through that entire life of that flashy for me. I leave that that left side blanket. I write in each for specific day. What I'm working on with my plan is which exercise are going to help achieve that goal and definitely the numbers are very off kilter? There's some people who do like a four by seven five three or five. I even play a lot with strength and conditioning in the clinic to every minute on the minute at a certain load of do Amr APPs so definitely. The flu sheets varied day all over the place. There's intent behind the entire goal. Now is a great discussion and you know as you talk about like this case for example you know number one. I hope you consider perhaps publishing it if you're able to do that. So the researcher in me can't not suggest that so it's thing you can share and on that note what sort of of resources the you lean on whether it be journal articles are the particular authors that you follow when it comes to all things you know how to train patients and athletes in evidence informed sorts of ways. What are the resources that are your go to? I'm definitely big on social media. I follow a lot of physical therapists percent. Strength and conditioning coaches. Some of the big ones as far as in the P. T. Rome that put out a lot of content. Is Dan Laurenz or Eric. Mira or even Mike Reimann on those people I follow. That always have a good tweeter instagram post about it. Even John Rawson has really good things breath. I also have my strength and conditioning Certification so I do rely on the NFC as website as far as articles that are coming out and Alikhan challenge different athletic populations in the clinic. So those are my big ones even J. O. S. P. T. R. J. P. T. are a good example if those that are APD members and then on that note that same train of thought you know. I know you provide a lot of mentorship to residents. So what sort of structure do you have them reading articles on a regular basis. Are You doing journal clubs or you know what's the contemporary way that you really help mentor mentor. Your residents to keep up with the latest knowledge is their email subscription. I'm just trying to think about you know the tools that you know. Residents in clinicians clinician can use to keep up with the evidence for us the way it's structured is. We have rounds on Tuesdays and Fridays like a clinic wide teaching where one one person one of the staff there. History will teach and sometimes the resin. Sometimes it's us so we'll get some of that they're also provide a lot of articles that I come across and I'll just forwarded forwarded them and say hey. Tell me what you think read this and also the big thing that I do a lot which I actually for my mentor during residency is l.. Grab their While they're in clinic and I'm questioning. Why this why that make sure there's intense just not the rebuy ten just because it's an easy number so something we'd early on in the residency is kind of I mentioned before that stepwise progression so if you draw stairs on a piece of paper it's is five steps? The bottom line will be activation if you can turn on the muscle that year intending to then control is the next one on this. This step which is can you turn on while going through a prescribed or set range of motion after that then it gets into strengthening and where can they turn it on and control it through a range of motion with A load and then at that point eight unions a strength and conditioning principles principals where it's creative in eighty percent. RPM sets anywhere reps between for less than twelve after that on your stepwise progression. It goes gender and so on and so then you start incorporating the time under tension component and for development there and the residents. They understand that step and they can visualize. It was easy to teach off that for us. I love that structure their Neil. You know it's always good to have you know a foundation to build off of like you said you know the intent behind the exercise to me is so important Martin because you're just going through a flow sheet just because he can doesn't mean it needs to be done and really over the years challenge myself I self to be able to look at an exercise and say you know what are my goals with this. Am I trying to go for motor control or am I trying to actually look at Playa Lyon metric strengthen training you know what is it in my trying to get back in. I always try to think about how that relates back to the patient's goals in with this in mind and you know as I've mentored fellows in this type of domain. What are some of the questions are challenging your resonance with that you know maybe for the listener could start to almost no cell challenge like what are your top two Kinda like questions that you use challenge a residence African on how I really liked that one and top to be hard definitely the easiest question I asked them when? I'm looking at the Y.. Y This exercise. What's the goal all of the sizes? Are you going for Quad. Strength that you're going for loading that tendon in a certain range of motion and so on the other question would be what exercises can get this patient to get better when our functional Asterik is their goal in like I get back into which movement patterns that you need to work which muscles need to be addressed in a specific range of motion. Even that can get into the rabbit hole about technique and form because there are a lot of side rant a lot of times I see gre squatter box squats where you're Russian angle are kind of where your TV is in relation to the rest of the body. It's what you would call the negative gene angle where it's leaned back in that Claude that needs barely bending and this nor doors e budgets mainly planner flex movement. And when you see that. There's no loading to that. Antea chain in any way. And when you you ask a patient when you do that for three ten for however long you do it and then go on to have him. Try An actual squat. They don't have the strength for and people are surprised. Surprised that they don't have the strength. But when you look back at the things you are working on. They weren't there to build them into that movement pattern. Sorry I I know how. The ran on the sideline think amassing by residents. Neil one question I had you mentioned Blood flow restriction. Therapy a little bit earlier. So I'd I'd be curious to hear your perspective on be Afar and what is application is. Is it the latest fad. That's going to go away or do you think this is something that's going to be the mainstream to continue to have an impact on Rehab. So I love the BEF are. I think it's awesome is definitely not comfortable. I don't know if you guys have ever tried it. Try Hi is one of the worst experiences you can have In new this for our listeners who may not be familiar with the Afar do you mind just kind of describing the application location and how it as far as blur section. So you're including in attendance. Oh legs or arms in the ideas your type. Two muscle pipers the one year for strength and power there mainly anaerobic muscles so the exclusion provided by that cuff creatine environment. Because there's no blood flow. Oh prison environment you just activate those muscle fibers a lot quicker bursar going through the normal pattern of type one type two eggs or type two B and going in that pattern you can just go right to those type two fibers in tennis. Get the type. One in what research has shown is that people can get the same strength benefits as you would with the eighty percent. One Rep Max Movement as you can with Bihar when you're at twenty to thirty percent so it's definitely really exciting to us is with those acute injuries or conditions where maybe that tendon or ligament. That must've just not ready to be loaded heavily in. That's what's kind of application I use it in. Is that acute phase where like that. Haitian I mentioned where move painful. The blood flow restriction is. He's definitely got me. Where or him where he needed to get? And get us out of that. Fear Avoidance and pain three range after a certain point. That is something I also kind of discharge away from and move onto actual loading. I'm sure on the actual research about it. The research search about it regarding tendon health so the big issue with if someone reuse steroids. And what I think the Afar is that you don't load the tendon heavy enough you'll get the muscle strength gains but that tendon that connects to the muscle is not getting enough load as well. So that's why shift to Actual load in movements like a barbell squatter deadliest or anything like that. Additionally with the B Afar there is some research that shows a Hazo in Jesus affect so it could be just because that is so uncomfortable but a lot of painful movements and become pain-free and it's really exciting to get people people to see them. Oh I can squad full depth. Now is no knee pain or Hick and lift my arm or overhead price. And there's no pain so that's really exciting. What I like to use it for awesome? Thank you for that perspective. There kneel on you know. There's a lot of things that we kind of covered here when it comes to strength training where you know you talk about a foundation nations to look towards intent behind your exercise and then even you know looking at the tools that we can use to assess for for strengthening talk about quantity next and how that klay a role in your prescription using F. R. as long as you know other types of Exercise equipment beyond. Just you know the Therre band so as we look at closing up our conversation here kind of want you to look futuristic. Here what is the one thing you think he can do. Better with strength training like if you could could click your hand around it densify the one thing we need to be looking towards. What is that if definitely loading actual loading the patient Dan? A guy even have an eighty five year old lady who had a tk and she's doing twenty five pound blocks squads so loading is the one thing that people or physical therapists need to challenge themselves more within the clinic. Even if you are still three by ten bandwagon it has to be eh three by ten but with the load where it would. RPI that challenge and it's just not three by ten. Because I'm busy. I need to get my notes dawn. I got another patient Asian here it has to be load in in ten love that Neil thanks again for kind of reiterating that piece kind of showing the context on how loading loading is so important within our context and that we need to do a really good job of staying on top of that so we appreciate you coming on her podcast chatting with both myself. I'm John and we look forward to hopefully get back on to discuss. Maybe some of these topics a bit further in the future. Thanks him love that. Thank you guys for having me. Thanks for joining us now. Man It is so essential that we challenge ourselves to have intent in sound reasoning when loading our patients and as he could see from our discussions. Here Neil really brought up some great points highlighting these principles and hopefully does resonated with you. I know it did for me personally. And I can't think after this type of episode any any more clearly that it is so essential for us to optimally lower patients and to think before we three by ten tab as always thanks for listening to another episode of the clinical podcasts. You're listening to the EM clinical podcast with Dr John Childs and Dr Mark Sheppard for more information on the podcast ask guests and the latest physical therapy visit. WWW DOT evidence in motion dot com slash blog. If you like this episode be sure to subscribe like rate and review on your fevered. PODCAST directory

Sheth Neil Dan Laurenz Dr John Childs Dr John Dr Mark Sheppard Georgetown Afar knee pain Claude Philadelphia US Texas sixers Asia John Worth PT School Knicks quadriceps muscle
The GFS of the Future...Could it be EPIC?

Weather Geeks

39:49 min | 1 year ago

The GFS of the Future...Could it be EPIC?

"Urologists look at a handful of different models when making their forecast and odds are you've heard of at least two of them the S, and European model the s or American model has been under some scrutiny in the community as it tends to be less accurate than the European model. One of the rain, rain reasons for this accuracy deficiency is how much money is the American government wanting to put into the s model to make it better. My guest today has an epic proposal on how we can make this happen, Dr Neil. Jacobs is the acting head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration or Noah, and he is already had his hands in the creation and improvement of weather modeling systems. So he's going to be talking about that today and taking that experience to the White House, Dr Jacobs. Thank you for joining us on the weather geeks podcast. Thank you. So you're currently the acting head of Noah and the assistant secretary of commerce for the environmental observation and prediction within the agency. Tell sa- bit about. What, what that role involves and how'd you come about landing in that spot? So the assistant secretary position for environmental observation, and prediction, primarily deals with as title says observation and prediction, and it ranges from, you know, satellites to incite you observations. Or what we call conventional observations numerical, weather prediction short range, long range, climate all the modeling, you would think deals with a lot of HP see and then all the research associated with that, as far as the acting head. In addition to my normal duties, a lot of things dealing with the fisheries and ocean service as well. Yes. You, you, you really are playing a key role in a vital role in the guess what? We call the wet end dry fide of the newer world in terms of. The weather and climate aspects, but also fisheries and ocean observations and so forth. So ah daunting task now, many fans of weather geeks may remember that you were on the weather geeks, TV show, discussing panasonic's weather model. Dr Jacobs is the former chief atmospheric scientists at Panasonic weather solutions, and he also chaired an American meteorological society AMS forecast improvement group. So Dr Jacobs, certainly knows the world of weather modeling. He's also served on a World Meteorological Organization, aircraft based observing system, teen so we are talking to someone that though he's really an administrative role. Now, he knows the nuts and bolts of modeling and observations. I want to jump right in, because one of the things that I hear quite a bit about, as someone in the enterprise of weather from weather, throughs, iast on Twitter is the whole European model versus the American model to bait. This has been a long battle between forecasters thuesday. Etc. Let's just talk about it for a second while reliable model. I think people don't get the, the G F S is still a world-class model. What is your take on where the American model stands as compared to the European model now and what you see going forward the next zero to five years? Well, it's it a lot of it depends on how you do the verification, typically most global models are verified using five hundred mil anomaly, correlation. And that's just correlating how well the model predicts of high low pressures as compared to the standard atmosphere. Where we really see the European model. Pull ahead of the rest of the global modeling centers is, is primarily related to their data simulation capability, which is four dimensional, variation, assimilation which is a little bit more sophisticated than than what we're doing right now. We're doing basically what we call forty on. Samba. Variation simulation without getting too technical. It's, it's not quite as complex. And I think that's largely where you see the difference as well as quality control of the data which is sort of embedded in the data simulation system, itself, the dynamics and physics in the model are, are are fairly good. There's, there's work, we need to do on the G F S on the physics side. We are in the process of, of great in the dynamic court to the finite volume cube sphere, which is going to be the biggest upgrade, we've done to the to the dynamic course it's the nineteen eighties. Someone listening to the podcast and e whether there are weather enthusiasts a weather professional or just someone that likes whether in tunes in, they might be asking, why why is the US sort of doing this sort of, in your own words, sort of less sophisticated? If you will assimilation technique what, how would you answer? 'cause I get that question a lot. How would you answer that question? Why, why is there a different paradigm here in the US? Do we have to Noah being we didn't? There's no have to think about other things just in buying big computers and Thatta lights, etc. Yeah, we do. I mean, no itself is, is an enormous agency. We've got twelve thousand fulltime employees and, and probably two to three times as many contractors a lot of people don't realize that no actually has its own law enforcement agency for the fisheries regulation side, as well as a uniform service side. So, you know, while it's really hard to compare budgets because it's not apples to apples when it actually comes to the production, suite debt that insect runs for their models. The national weather service runs, all sorts of models from the S, which is our flagship global model to the high resolution, rapid refresh, and we've got several different models that we run for various reasons, whereas European center really only focuses on their medium range forecast model and it's on samba lls. That said the difference between the forty in Vara simulation system, which is what we use in the forty VAR system, which is what the European center uses is a lot of compute true of four dimensional variation assimilation is incredibly computational expensive. And so it demands tremendous amount of computing, capacity the beauty of the forty on samba bar is that you can achieve almost a comparable result with much, less computing. And so it does come back to compute resources on. That's on the operational the production side on the research side. The European centre has about five times as much compute for research, do operations whereas with the no it's roughly the ratios roughly one of one, but that said we have a tremendous amount of research that we do that, that they don't do. So again, it's, it's really an apples and oranges. Comparison, and I wanna make sure I amplify this some because I get in this discussion with people across the spectrum as well. That's something that's important. It's not that the US is so much sleeping at the wheel. It's just that it isn't it isn't apples and oranges comparison because thankfully, the national weather service and no are also invest in upgraded. Geosynchronous weather, satellite technology goes system that we have the JPS this, the new Dua polarization, radar system and the weather service forecast offices, so you just don't buy big fast computers that we know we need big fast computers and you certainly by them. It's a much more leverage budget scenario. And I think it's important that people understand that now having said that Neil, do you agree that there are times, and I think this is important. There are times where the G F, S model outperforms the European model is, I think people that particular people follow closely don't understand. It's not that the S is always losing to the European Mazda. Correct. No. The. Yeah. That, that you're exactly correct. The GIF S's has outperformed the European model numerous occasions. There were several events last winter with nor'easters where, where the G F S perform very well. And, you know, the F E three which is which is soon to be coming. Online opperations is performing quite well too. So, you know, when, when I said earlier about the actual statistical anomaly correlation scores that we some over time, those, those sort of wash out the big events, and there are several cases where you'll see the S outperform the European center but on average you see 'em. WF still has better scores and hap -solutely. And I don't want to give the impression here that the we, we know that on average, the European model is still considered this sort of sort of what everyone's chasing, if you will believe the UK, met, office model is also, perhaps second or in the top two or three as well. Which gets me to the, the new upgrade now there, there have been activities to upgrade the to go to a new system. I know that they were recently some delays, there were some complaints. In the community, you're running, I guess the old and the newer system in parallel, and people were able to evaluate it and I understand that they were some issues in, in some types of events, no events and others. That people reporting in some users talk to us a little bit about that. And where are we going forward? So there was we've been running to EFI three g f s in parallel, or for over a year and we noticed actually thanks to some savvy folks in the community. So this. This actually is, is one reason why we really want to go in the direction of having a community model because, you know, it was the user community that actually pointed out the air and the snow depth variable. So there was an air in how the, the, the snow totals were accumulated through the microphysics and the F E three and it was out, putting essentially aronie ass-, high values of snow. It would it would if basically anywhere in the vertical column if there was precipitation, and anyone level was atr below zero it would total columnists. No. Which, you know, is, as you know, as, as an atmospheric scientist, it could be grabble could be rain. It's, it's not uncommon to have, you know, sleep that melts into water. So we were getting these very high snow totals simultaneously. We were seen a cold bias, which was on. Related to the snow depth variable but probably somehow played a role in exacerbating the results what had happened was there was there was a bug in an upgrade that we did to, to some of the radiation. And what happened was the model is sensually tuned with, with the bug in it. So that was found and corrected. But then that required course retuning and re-testing, so a lot of that happened right on the heels of the shutdown. And after a lot of going through the code making sure everything was. Right. We've just now started the thirty day test, which we had originally announced a couple of months ago. And, you know, if everything checks out we'll we'll look into go live probably sometime in June with that. And that, that's an important piece of news. We're taping this in the first week or so of may. And so. This is really important using. And I know it's information that no, as just now starting to put out. So for people that want to know what the status of the Jeff F, three is that that's, that's it straight from the acting, head of, of Noah were there, other sort of those were sort of the main issues that, that you saw with the Jeff F E three in those parallel runs where their areas where you were seeing improvement or above, and beyond the s the GM says. There's, there's a lot of areas improvement. So, you know, the F E three was was typically outperforming the G F S on on track on intensity. In fact, last year, the EFI three G F, S outperform, the European centre on, on the intensity of predicting tropical cyclones. So there's there's, there's gonna be some, some pretty significant improvements. I don't know that it'll be, you know, as impressive of overall skill scores as we would expect to see when we upgrade, the data simulation, again, this is we're only upgrading the dynamic core. And while that's a big part of the model we need to do work on the data simulation, as well as the physics and those, those were working on those actively right now, those upgrades becoming the next year to. The Weather Channel is partnering with lands in to give you a chance to win some amazing gear three lucky winners will receive the new ultimate rain jacket that the Weather Channel meteorologist will be wearing during the upcoming hurricane season. So what are you waiting for? Enter for your chance to win at we love weather dot TV slash land in that we love whether dot TV slash land. And we are back on the weather. Geeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia, and I'm talking with Dr Neil Jacobs, who is the acting, head of Noah and the assistant secretary of commerce for environmental observation and prediction. He's formerly of the Panasonic weather solutions group as well. And I want to pick his brain on sort of the public private activities in these areas of bit later in the podcast. Let me just give you a little of Dr Jacob's background. He has a bachelor's degree in mathematics and physics from the university of South Carolina, and a masters and PHD atmospheric sciences, from the North Carolina State university, and he's a very well respected colleague. I know I was pleased to see when his name was put in put forward here in the Noah lead ministration roles I was quite quite thrilled to see that. And I'm glad still glad to see that as well. I wanna talk about the assimilation a lot of people may not know exactly what simulation is big fancy word. But it really involves sort of updating and. Model information with new information comes in, and I know that the European models and their American models very much depend on our satellite data other people satellite data and other observation capabilities as well. I, I know you're involved in WMO's, aircraft based observation systems expert, teen talk to us a bit about the importance of observations to weather modeling, and then I want to transition, a bit later into a discussion of the earth prediction innovation center epic, but we'll get there. But before we leave the simulation eerie talk about the imports of operations to modeling. So observe Asians are, are essentially everything and not only it's, you know, a numerical, weather prediction is an initial value problem. So it really depends on how accurate and you can capture the current state of the atmosphere. And typically, the way it works is use you re initialized and run a set of algorithms in and. An interval of time. So let's say we rerun our weather model every six hours. And what we do is we will take the six our forecast from the previous run. And we know we're six hours into the future, so it's not right. But it's probably fairly close. And then what we do is, we take that file, and we modify based on millions of observations, that are taken of the current state of the atmosphere, whether they're balloons, or aircraft data or satellite data, and, and that process of, modifying what we call the I guess, with observations to come up with what we call the analysis, or the or the start file, is the most critical step of modeling because there's an infinite number of ways to get it wrong. And really only one way to get it. Right. And it's you know it's kind of like cooking basically bettering greedy. You know, better, the dish is going to be. And if we do a really good job of building that start file correctly than the AGA rhythms can more accurately predict what the weather's going to be in the future. You know, that's a really good summary of the process. I wanna read something to you into the audience, and then we'll transition to a discussion of the epic center recently you testified before the house committee on science space and technology subcommittee on environment to outline Noah's four point five billion dollar budget requests for twenty twenty and now in that test Mony one of the highest priority goals was to reduce the impact of extreme weather, and water vents to save lives and property through the implementation of the weather research and forecasting innovation act that also fine. That's what knows charter to do. And we know that there was a very important piece of legislation sign the weather research, and forecasting innovation act think Lear two ago and the Trump administration's twenty twenty proposed budget for Noah dozen clued support for something called the earth prediction innovation center, epic, tell us about what your goals are. Epic and what it actually is. So, so epic is, is essentially a way to, to manage a community development programme for the modeling system. So we're required by law through the weather act to make our model code available to the community. But the, the issue of that is the code right now. The G F S code EFI, three G F S. It's hard coded for Noah's machines. So if we put it on an FTP side and someone downloads, they're really not going to be able to run it. So what I wanted to do was have a way to sort of crowd source model code development, you know, sort of like in car did with the war model. You know, is there a way that we can get this code into the hands of, you know, PI's imposed oxen PHD's universities or even in the hands of industry so that they could do collaborative development on the code? And it actually solves several different problems that we were dealing with internally at the same time, the primary one was, we had to port the code over to various compute architectures that the community has access to primarily commercial cloud vendors. So running this code in the cloud is reality. Now, we can run the entire F E three g f s from observe ASICs to put in the cloud. Now not all clouds created equal, we're talking high-performance computing architecture for cloud, so that, that I think was was one achievement that we wanted to accomplish with with epic. But it also gets us access to a lot of these individuals that normally wouldn't have access to do development work on our code. So one of these shoes we were running into internally was that a lot of external developers or. Contractors, or even professors on sabbatical would have to we really long time to get security clearances to log into our machines. And that's just a paperwork process that we had little control over and the way around. That was actually to just move the code development outside of our machines into, to the commercial cloud. Now are there are there any security risk associated with doing that there are? And so that, you know, anytime we do development work external to, to outside of Noah's firewalls. We have to set up a very robust, what we call secure ingest capability because we're bringing in code from outside, and, you know, we don't know who's been touching enter doing development work on it, but having a very robust secure. Ingest is a much easier problem to solve than getting external individuals axe. S to log into machines. Yeah, I could I could see that. So again, and you heard Dr Jacobs mentioned the Warf model in the war phys as an example of this sort of community modeling framework approach, if you will. I mean, I I've used the Warf model in some of my research at the university of Georgia, their versions of the war for running operationally in research capacity, you may have heard of something called the H war. I mean now I certainly can see the strengths of that. And you certainly mentioned some of the sort of potential pitfalls or weaknesses of this community framework as well. A question that I have if you do have, you know, academe IX or industry, or post doc, sort of tinkering around with the. Is there going to be of a funding model set up to support this will there, be grants from Noah, the weather service to allow people to do this? Or is this just, you know, I've got some free time. Let me see where I can tinker around with that. All the above. So there's, there's an internal aspect to epic for our internal research needs. And then there's the external development so epic is largely going to be a research to operate code management and vetting process, where anyone is, is encouraged to, to submit enhancements improvements or upgrades to the modeling code, and run it through what we call the research to operate funnel, which is a series of, of gates and checks that, you know, we look at the code we look at some initial results. And but it's got to have an operational outcome in mind. In other words, if someone provides an enhancement that improves the microphysics capabilities by five percent, but it increases the run time by three hundred percent. You know it's. It's probably not gonna make it through the funnel because it's got this, this has got to have an operational in game. There's, there's a process in place for code management, as well. You know, most likely something similar to get hub, where they'll be version control because we can't just have, you know, essentially the wild west of software development and they'll be parallel run. So this is the beauty of the cloud both internal and external is you can set up as many parallel runs as you want. Right now, the issue we have on the research side, which, I mentioned earlier with the one to one research to operations compute ratio is that we are limited by finite number of compute nodes to do research, so Noah, scientists have to line up, you know, they queue up in order and one person can't conduct their research runs until someone else's runs or finished and would with the cloud you by basically by the node hours. So whether you're, you're buying, you know, ten knows for thousand hours or thousand notes for ten hours, it's roughly the same cost, but the differences you thousand nodes at ten hours, you finish the research a lot quicker. So the idea is, if you have a lot of parallel experiments, assuming the results of one experiment. Don't depend on another one. You can conduct all these experiments at the same time. And we are back on the weather podcast. Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia, and I'm speaking with the acting, head of Noah and Noah is the parent agency of the national weather service for all of you out there that are listening from weather perspective. Noah does so much more. Dr Jacobs, one of the things I want to kind of pivot the discussion to now and kind of goes back to some of your roots a little bit is because you're the former chief atmospheric scientists at Panasonic weather solutions. There are a host of private entities companies Panasonic IBM and others that are running their own models now and you certainly were pioneer in that Panasonic. Tell us about the landscape of the public, private partnership between the federal government and companies and the whole weather enterprise. And let's talk. Let's kind of dive into that a little bit because there there some this. Yes, this needs to happen. We this is a no brainer. We need to have, but then there are others say, well, no, I think that needs to be. A federal public good the so-called modeling and weather service, and capabilities. So just give me the lay of the landscape from your perspective. Well, so there's I would say, I would divide private industry up in into to, to tears. You know, you've got your your front end users in your back in users. So there's, there's what I would. Call value add industry, which has been around for, for many years, the Weather Channel, I guess, and even some of these companies that do specific forecast, right? There's, there's tremendous industry that's been built up on on using Noah and national weather service, data and information to generate products and services for niche markets. And that is tremendous industry right now, part of the weather enterprise. But then there's a smaller. I would say much more complex component to the industry, which is the front end and those would be the private companies that would provide either data services or information to Noah and the national weather service to help further our mission. And then in some cases, there's companies that do both they, they provide, you know, support data and such on the front end, and then as well as you know, operate as value add on the back end the value add industries fairly straightforward. They largely repackage output and resell it to niche markets. The front end industry is a little bit different. There's, you know, the software side and the hardware side when it comes to compute you know, we rely a lot on private industry. The software engineers some model developers, including what I was doing when I was Panasonic. And then, of course, the hardware manufacturers the manufacturing, the interconnects the chips the processors that compute that we use as well as various commercial cloud vendors, and their various architectures that we use for compute storage. And then there's the what I would consider very upstream would be the private companies that are providing data and this could be aircraft data. We were exploring using various private satellite, data feeds and this is an interesting paradigm shift for Noah, where we're actually instead of deploying and managing the observing systems. Ourself, we're buying data as scripture service. So, but there, there are some and I'm not sort of conveying, my own opinions here on this. I'm just trying to represented someone that's been a sort of a person that knows our community. There are some that say there's a danger in that in that, you know, profit margin could start to out. Way, public good and protection of, of live and property. How, how do you counter that, that that criticism from some in the community? Well so really what we want to do the way we avoid that situation and that could be a very real situation is we want to make sure that we don't find ourselves. No. In the national weather service in a competitive situation with the value add industry on the back end. So we, we've made it very clear that our mission is to protect life and property. You know, we're not doing forecasts for financial markets or or other things if we started doing something like that the private industry would instantly view us as a competitor in the industry and treat us like a competitor. And when you're buying data as a subscription service to populate your models on the front end. It's not out of the question to have industry if there's a company running a sophisticated weather model of their own. To try to exclusive rights to that information to essentially handicap, their business competitors of which we could be one. So my goal was to make sure that we never found ourselves in a competitive situation on the back end market that way we weren't viewed as a competitor, and we could have access to the information that we needed on the front end to further mission of protecting from property. Okay. That's, that's a really good way of looking at I did want to raise them, because I know that, that is of concern to some. And so this is, you know, one of the things, I've, I've observed over the last ten years is a bit more of a play nice perspective between the private sector and the public sector, but I, I can remember times, I'm old enough than you've been around as well with old enough to remember when this, this was pretty contentious territory. And they're still some issues that need to be ironed out, but from your perspective to you in from an EMS perspective as well. Do you think that? We've kind of turned the corner on, on how to do this from public private venture within the weather enterprise. I think so, you know, I remember back when the fair weather report came out, I think it was two thousand four thousand five. And that was the point of that was to sort of define the swim lanes of, you know, where the weather service operated versus where, you know industry would operate and one of the things that, that I've had a lot of positive feedback from on the industry side, is that we have actively been going out, when, when we talk about our impact based decision support services, which is sort of how we do support on the back end telling industry various markets that we would not, you know, provide services for because, you know, industry needs clarity. Their investors need to know. Is this going to be a sustainable business and the lasting industry wants to do is invest in, in a certain market. And then have, you know, the national weather service come in and provide products and services for free and just put them out of business. So we've made it very clear where we where we would operate more. Importantly, where we won't operate and that defines the market opportunity for industry. Do you see a role for for the private sector? This is a tricky topic. You know, throw it out there. If you don't wanna touch just let me know. But do you see a role for private industry in issuing warnings or forecasts like in that in that type of timeframe? I mean, that's, that's that is a tricky question. I would, you know, if when it comes to protecting life and property. I really feel like you need a single thar Tatum source because the only thing worse than not issuing a warning is having to competing warnings that, just, you know, that confuses people in creates more problems. Now, you know most of the private industry companies that I've worked with do issue, warnings very clear about these warnings, or for, you know, niche markets, you know, special customers, and they also do a really good job of redistributing the warnings that we produce, you know, and they make very clear that it's, it's this is an official national weather service warning, you know, so the public knows you know who it's coming from, and I think that's important. Yeah. And that's the reason I asked the question because I can I can see a logic where we're going to see a little bit more of these sort of niche warnings. And I am. This is just my opinion. I am of the opinion that I and I think echo, this, that we need a single Arteta voice on these some of these warnings that come for hurricane warnings tornado warnings from SBC or HP. So I wanna get your thoughts on, on another aspect of the prediction, weather prediction, and whether warning process. No, the weather service is going towards impact the decisions and impact based decisions and so forth. And that requires a good deal of understanding sort of the social sciences of how people respond to this. More technical information where where do you see things headed in terms of the, the modeling, whether warning communication world of no in that regard really in the direction of social sciences? So this was something that, that has fascinated me to really learn over the last several years, because coming from a model. Background. I was always just focused on improving the forecast skill improving the modeling, you know, if we could make the model better, we would save more lives and the models are getting better, and what we realized was that, you know, we can improve the skill of the model but we're at a point now where we really have to work on the social science aspect of how we convey this information to the public because humans aren't necessarily rational creatures, and it really depends on how we convey the information you know, if if we give someone enough lead time for warrant for tornado warning, we're always trying to increase lead time. But there's a lot of social science studies out there that show if you give someone a lot of lead time, they might not immediately take cover. You know, they may go get in their car and drive to the school to try to get their kid out of school or something. And that, you know, exposes them to tremendous amount of risk. You know, the other thing is how do we convey impacts of? Landfall in hurricanes Florence was a great example. You know, everyone saw that it was being downgraded from four to three to two and they hear know you know, it's being downgraded, and so they're less inclined to, to evacuate, and what we were trying to convey to the public was, you know, look, we realize the winds are going to be downgraded from four to two, but the storm's gonna sit over the Carolinas for three days and dump three feet of rain. And if you look at where a lot of the loss of life was, it was flooding related and it wasn't just flooding related. It was fatalities of people in their cars. You know. And we always hear this turn around don't drown and you can't say it enough. But people still don't adhere to pretty straightforward warnings. You know, it's water that actually really has the highest toll of with land falling hurricanes. You know. So how we convey this message. Edge to the public is extremely critical, and that's where the social science component fits into the watches and warnings. I, I agree completely with you. And I'm glad to hear that you're have been briefed or kind of up to speed on that because I think that's where the new frontier we'll, we'll certainly have some new areas of improvement with modeling and Fateh lights radar. But I think the real frontier in my view is in sort of understanding, how people consume this information, we're about to wrap up this discussion with Dr Neil Jacobs acting head of. No, but before I do. I mean, I'm always very cognizant of the people of the national weather service. And no. And I know that both you and add Admiral Gallia dad have served in various capacities. While you've been at Noah in this time where where there's no permanent Noah administrator at this point. But now you all have been serving able able, and I let me just say, on behalf of the weather community Neil Jacobs, very capable individual as was Admiral Gallia debt before that. So they agency certainly get hands. And doing its thing professional people at all levels in the agency. How how's the national weather service in terms of staffing, are I asked this because I wanna know you know, are, are the offices, it seems like there's been a lot of hiring actually in the weather service. So are we moving to a point where most of our forecast offices are, are healthy, and staffed up, we, we're definitely headed in the right direction? This the, the F why eighteen was the first year since two thousand eleven that hiring outpaced attrition we did take a hit during the shutdown primarily because the shutdown occurred at the end of the year. And typically a lot of people that they're going to retire will retire at the end of the year. So we had a lot of folks that were retiring that we were unable to fill those positions because the shutdown spanned across you know, the the change in the year there. So we're, we're still in the process of. Digging out of that hole. But we're at roughly ninety one and a half percent. So that's that's you know that's definitely headed in the right direction. So I'm quite pleased with that. I agree. I'm gonna give you the last word as the acting, head of Noah Dr Jacobs. What just what would you say to those weather enthusiasts weather geeks? The American public as as, as we exit out in this last one or two minutes. Just, you know, I'm tremendously proud of this agency the people here. They really care about what they do. They're they're phenomenal to work with, and it's truly an honor and a privilege to have is operatives to work with team, such great public servants. And I think we'll have to end it there. I wanna thank you for joining us on both now the TV version of whether geeks and now the weather geeks podcast as well. We really have enjoyed having you in. You're welcome back anytime. Thank you. And I am Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. Thank you, all for listening to the weather geeks podcast. Make sure you tell your friends about it, and make sure you subscribe as well. So you don't miss new episodes come along. We're tunes on Stitcher and all podcast outlets. And also, you can find trying to lead up whether dot TV thinking once again today.

Noah dozen Dr Neil Jacobs university of Georgia National Oceanic and Atmospher panasonic Weather Channel Dr Marshall shepherd acting head Dr Neil World Meteorological Organizat assistant secretary European center American government Twitter US HP AMS sa White House university of South Carolina
133- Dr. Neil Kobrin, PhD and Dr. Cheryl

Wealth Transformation Podcast

26:56 min | 7 months ago

133- Dr. Neil Kobrin, PhD and Dr. Cheryl

"Are you so full of fear? You can't even talk about money and wealth. Dr Cheryl is showing you. How shift your mindfulness with your wealth relationship? Most people don't even like to talk about money from a personal level. You can learn how to get past the fear and talk about money and wealth and free yourself to a healthy relationship no matter where you are in your life. Are you ready for some good changes? This really affects all areas of your life. It's time for the wealth. Transformation podcast. Now here's your host. Dr Cheryl Shire our special guests. This evening is Dr Neil Coburn Doctor Neo Coburn. Phd's licensed clinical psychologist from UC Berkeley and his L. C. S. W. and M. F. T. with decades of experience in human transformation and emotional wellbeing. He is the author of the book emotional wellbeing embracing the gift of life and is the is the founder and president of the Academy of Mindful Psychology. He is an international workshop leader and in Mindfulness and emotional health shortly thereafter. He assumed the role of president and CEO of California Graduate School of Psychology. Dr Coburn Revolt and rejuvenated. The institution eventually merged the School of American schools of psychology and national set of graduate schools of psychology. Dr Coburn actively continues to augment his knowledge of mindfulness and Buddhist psychology in addition to attending dozens of trainings throughout the US led by foremost leaders in the subject area. He is a member of the spirit. Rock Meditation Centers saying Haw and continues to steady with world renowned teachers such as Jack Cornfield and other teachers counsel as well as distinguished visiting teachers. He has trained and facilitated workshops with Zen Master Gimpo Rosie training facilitators from all over the world in the big mind process. Dr Coburn plays an active role in the Academy of Mindful Psychology and Organization designed to provide education and training in mindfulness and psychology. He maintains a private clinical practice. In Marin California. This is the second segment of our two part discussion with. Neil Coburn any you know that's being in nature smelling flower you committing yourself from on a daily basis to be as fully present as possible waking up in the morning saying. I am better pay attention today. I'm GonNa pay attention to myself. I'M GONNA pay attention to my body. I'm going to pay attention to the world in a way where I can focus because this whole thing about multitask doesn't work. We all do it but it's just not as effective as if we really pay. Attention is focused. I mean that's just like you know focusing on on the show you know that's all I focused on. I'm always getting new guests and I'm researching and I'm reading and and more it's going I mean that's because I know that's what my passion and my purposes I when I start looking outside and it's like it's not working now get back on focus get back on focus and if if people can it takes discipline takes tremendous and people are. This is what. I've tried teaching my child. I have one daughter self-disciplined because that's what it takes US discipline. Maybe that's I wish. I often thought we should come up with a better word than discipline. Discipline seem so negative. Because you know you're you'RE GONNA get in trouble for has announced disciplined how commitment. Well it is a commitment. It's a commitment to being healthy. All what you talk about healthy. So unmindful psychology. We also introduced health and wellness. Oh my goodness I mean it is first of all I mean. Not The bore your viewers. You know we're we're one of. It's not the fattest country in the world. Especially in the silent diabetes to is an epidemic. And it's very indulgence. Because diabetes diction diabetes to is linked very very positively with Alzheimer's Alzheimer's. Become an absolute about you and I was a kid. I actually didn't know a single. I grew up in a neighborhood in Queens Middle Village. I love Middle Village where there were octogenarians all over the place. I didn't know a single eight year old that had dementia. Now you show me a family that has not been touched by Alzheimer's dementia. My grandmother had I know Alzheimer's I mean no dementia. It wasn't quite you know but I think it was because she lost her husband. She wasn't rooting depression. You know there was a lot. She used to walk. She's eight right but you know she wasn't well but it's funny. She ate rights. So part of this. Mindful psychology is health and wellness. Now it's learning really what we need to be eating. But it's not just eating and it's not just exercising sleeping. Oh my goodness. That's a big one league one. We need to sleep. I mean we have. Our country doesn't sleep. Yeah it's crazy. It's neurotic absolutely Roddick. You know what happens when we sleep? Yeah how about something called Mile? A Nation Mile Nation simply means that the way our system is built to transmit information is through these lines that mylan carries the information the electrical and chemical impulses that goes from one spot to the other spot in your brain throughout your system. Myla NATION TAKES PLACE DURING SLEEP. Lack of mile a nation slows everything down. We have learning deficits we have cognitive deficits not to mention. How does it affect us? Emotional exactly physically. I mean all of it. That's why I love when I I've focused on sleeping when I have wonderful dreams and I can wake up and I can ride him down I. That's what I do. I use my dreams as messages. How interesting that when we have a two year. Old who accessed? What are we saying? I never snapped today. Thank the we say with a forty year old. Never what changed nothing because we also have that little child inside still need seven or eight hours worth sleep? I remember ice from bill on five and a half. I was like this is crazy when I got finally got educated myself enough so I seven between seven and eight for sure and when I can get eight. Wow what about the hydration? Oh my gosh yeah we. Oh cheers cheers and more general rule. Drink half your body weight in ounces of water a day so what? I've tried to do with mindful. Psychology is really integrate all of these areas high traditional psychology in eastern psychology mindfulness neuroscience health and wellness and of course consciousness and spirituality. You know I love to say it. I'm not the originator of this. We are not human beings having a spiritual experience we are spiritual beings have a human experience so impact the way you live this precious life of ours this miracle I know and it is a miracle and I have to say that from my whole being because I was an rh baby. So as soon as I do you know what you tell me And they cha- they have an anti serum of the year. I was born which is thank God. But when your father's positive positive and your mother's negative our age factor after the second baby. I'm the third. The blood is soon as the courts. Cut The blood goes bad so I'm basically was dying. My blood was dying when they took her away from me so I had to have a blood transfusion so I guess. Maybe that's why I can do what I do and I've been through so many challenges because I I've already gone through that I on her life and and human beings you know because it's I've already been through that death experience even though even at birth. I mean it's taken me years to get to really fully integrated and understand that fee. It's so interesting Cheryl to me. It's very similar and that is I shouldn't even be here. I don't know how it was that I was born my story also the youngest third and I have two siblings eight and ten years older than I am both of which were handicapped so my sister was severely. Handicapped your cerebral palsy. And what's interesting about the story? Is that my parents. Although she was born premature lead I dunno three and a half pounds. Think about this. She's seventy years old now too long time ago. They didn't know that she had cerebral palsy. Until my mother was pregnant with my brother. Wow right so my brothers porn two years apart and just as my sister who's turning four years old is about to undergo a series of operations. That's GONNA last ten years to see if she can walk. My brother contracts polio wound. My mother tells the story of walking into the bedroom watching their son dragging her by his body across the floor and having no idea what's going call the doctrine those days they came to the house he told my mother Millie. Sorry to tell you this. But he's got polio. So now my parents have a crippled cerebral palsy. Child in a crippled polio. Child so what I say is how was I ever born and I mean that and I asked Videotapes I was not an accident. My mother had the fortitude and persistence. Bring me here and you know just is what you've said about your birth. That's guided me on. I just I never take that for granted and I feel obligation. I feel a commitment to give to. Well I feel the same way because I need to Actually it gets me emotional. Because it's like I need to be to give and help people get to that spot there that miracle spot that we all have inside of me emotion to sit here and cry because my two precious you know and we all have our gift to give we forget we forget. Yeah that's why you gotta you gotta close out all their garbage in when I say we forget. Look I don't care what orientation you are the more athletic but it doesn't matter to me but this idea of awakening it's because we forget we forget what a miracle is the more we can embrace it. That's why we have to keep being reminded on my show. I always say the beginning in my end because we have to be reminded because we're stubborn human beings fact. That's my next book started. What are you going to call it? The stubborn human being no love it. So I'm trying to get more educated than you the neuroscience. I'll tell you with stubborn but the reality is with fear based stubbornness yeah. I mean. It's interesting. I've been a psychologist for a long time. I have a private practice. I've worked with lots of people. I first of all believe with tribal in nature. You know I've often said I'll ask you. So what's the difference between a lion and a tiger? I love asking people. This question right on the spot strides. That's what everybody says. Yeah but a lion and entire. They're they're actually different. A little bit different temperaments. They're completely different. Yes and they they don't they don't breathe the same way as well. I mean it depends on educated. You are about about each animal. Hikers are solitary beings was that mean they live alone a male tiger if he encounters a male offspring talking about his red. He'll kill him. Yeah lions very social. They live in prides. They have a very sophisticated social network. So when people ask me they say you know. What's the problem? I was too many people out there in the world. Living Tiger live that meant to be living must not forget the elephant. Because I just you know we have Martin Perl. Matter is on in in our Sam Sam base here and he is pro elephants and there was a wonderful on. This is why love facebook. Because I've seen more wonderful videos with animals with people and humor and everything and there was one and it just made me cry actually because there was an older elephant and the mother had died and this other elephant came and they they were both crying and they see you could see and it was like wow I mean this is what that's the humanity that story and the militate. Whatever you WANNA call it. That is the humanity. The Story of the elephant group that came in traveled a thousand miles because the person who founded the reservation that they were living on died and they knew it and they can talk for miles mind. What Avid Chapter in this book? By the way call the Dumbo fact. Talk about elephants right. Now there's a story for you sure you WanNa talk about something interesting. You know Dumbo. This beloved I loved it one of my all time favorite. Disney classics Dumbo. But if you look at what? Dumbo is about few look at the humiliation. If you look at the racism by the way you know and the discrimination I won't go through the whole story but I love read it anyway. Let's see it's great shop? Dumbo effects you talk about elephants. So yeah so. In mindful psychology. We try to incorporate all of that. We try to incorporate spirituality in graduate school. I was told the two things. You can't talk about talk about politics. Don't talk about religion. Give me a break. You know worry. Tally is not reliable. That's spirituality is not religion. How could you not really explore? What a person's orientation to spirituality is about it doesn't matter feud NAS TAPER ATHEIST. It's a relevant relevant. Is that the nature of the relationship that somebody maintains with that and that higher frequency that is beyond the physical being. Let's let's talk about conscious that come from exactly I can't Elaine. Nobody knows where it comes from. But I stayed still comes from the yourself. The Higher Beam God's universe with whatever you WANNA call it. I like to think about it as if we're one large human and tenor ten. That's right wages. Paulin in that consciousness. No different than your TV set is pulling those images. Everyone of US. Open to what we are to be open to out. That's right too and there again. That's where that gift comes through to us. When you're open to that spiritual being that you are and that I am and my crew. My Wonderful Dream Team are the we all have that. Every one of us has a miracle I like when you talk about openness because I like to think about it look either. GonNa live in love. Or you're GONNA LIVE IN FEAR. Either you're gonNA live in an expensive environment emotionally or you can live in a contracting environment emotionally and you can change your life. You know thinking about one of these guys. Absolute one thought can change. You can walk around right after this interview right after you watch this and you can say to yourself with this contracting experience. I had was this an expansive experience. Just and of course expansive means that involves love and connection and positively contraction is about anger. Fear you can feel it can feel simply. Hold your fist like this and yell. No it see how it feels. Yeah and I you know when opening I got involved. Twenty five plus years ago With a church I won't name it but You know and the mindfulness that I got. That's when I learned. I remember walking through my house and I was started. Say think a negative thought and I screamed out stop because I stopped myself right then I that was became. My habitual thing is because you've you. It takes the mental awareness and discipline commitment as you say to change that and you can. Anybody can do it. Anybody everybody can do it. I talk about stopping the book. F Stop T- take a breath. Oh just observe. What's going on and then P. PROCEED. We have to get out of automatic pilot. We can't simply be reactive being step back. Take a breath before you react as the change your perspective about what's happening and also we know with fear. Milly my experiences. The only way you know be aware of the fair but you gotta walk through. You've gotta you're mentally need to walk through it and then you can go and I know for me. It's been this is why I'm doing what I'm doing with money I've had issues and yet I walked through and I had four levels of fear that I had to get through to get where I'm going and I got it so you know. Thank you higher power. Thank you God. Whatever you know but I did it you know. The first chapter of the book talks about what I call the catch and I would just like to spend a minute because it's exactly what you're talking about so it's interesting this miracle we have right so you look in the in the Bible you look genesis you know and you know God created humankind on the six day and said you know you're the best I have. You are the greatest creation. Go out have dominion over all the fish in the entire planet. You know have a great time but there's a catch. You don't really read this in the Bible and the catch. It can end at any moment any given away about that. Have a great time anyhow. And that's what we live with. We live with this tepe seated. Fear that at any given moment it could be over completely influences. How we are in the world now. If you go into a mindfulness place you recognize that. Everything is in permanent. There's no such thing as permanent doesn't exist one thing that I do want embrace. What you're saying is that you've got to feel it from your heart. Absolutely no it right from your heart not only from your mind but your heart that connection. That's what's that spiritual connection because of you know and there again you know. There's a little bit of a difference between the male female thing but I mean need to feel it. You need to feel women need to steal it. You know because we're made that little little differently. Not that different really. We all have to feel it but we have to fail it and know it. I mean I think you asked me about psychology. I mean frankly I feel like I've been blessed because since my earliest memories I always believe with pure energy we will always be. We have always been The body but that's it's wedding gift you had in your family. You should come over to my house for dinner and then tell me what if I had serious members give gift. It's given you to be able to expand yourself with having. I'm sure it wasn't easy. It wasn't easy with the Woody Allens whatever his most famous movie great everybody but not and so I m being new to me. The most important thing is just being grateful. Grateful for this moment being grateful for what you have and especially when it comes to money. Be Grateful for what you have. Because if you're not gonNA be grateful for what you have now even if it's a penny or six or ten dollars how are you really going to be able to handle ten million dollars? I give the viewers one simply sometimes running one simple little thing they can do please. I was GONNA ask you but you every morning when you wake up simply say today. I'm going to pick one thing. Just one thing that. I'm grateful for every night when you go to bed just say. I'm grateful for X. I don't care if it's that First Cup of coffee and it will change your life if you do that every day. Every simple thing to do it's integrating with your your habits that you do ever just like just like sleeping suck brushing absolutely. That's all make a commitment. Thank you and thank you for making that commitment same yet because it's so important the important thing for a human beings as a mental human being emotional thank you leave so what everybody check out my website. Academy of Mindful Psychology. Because there's a lot of information post regularly they are and it's really interesting now. So you're in for my plug that's it we'll get all your information. Cheryl. This is the light. It's come by so quickly so much. Just keep doing what you're doing because the world needs it. I know and I used bumps than I'm and I realized that I'm not doing this by myself. I'm doing this alone I have. I'm just I'm just looking forward to what's expanding. What's what's coming about your other channel channel. I know it's very exciting. I'm excited for you and thank you for being here. Plus you've been sharing all your wonderful information. We hope you join today's episode of wealth. Transformation we encourage you to apply the Information. You've learned with our wise guests to make your life better and make good changes. We appreciate you more than you know for being a part of our podcast when you were moved or motivated please let us know how the show influenced your life. I emailing at Dr Cheryl Dot Wealth Transformation at g mail DOT COM for a free consultation with Dr Cheryl to see how she can benefit you. Further please visit Cheryl Shire DOT COM or call. Four one five two four six six eight eight one as a gift. You can get Doctor. Cheryl's booked wealth transformation integrity integrity integrity for only the cost of postage of seven dollars. Ninety five cents until next time feel healthy and happy in your well no matter where you are in your life.

Dr Cheryl US Academy of Mindful Psychology Dumbo Alzheimer Doctor Neo Coburn Academy of Mindful Psychology Dr Cheryl Shire School of American schools of Dr Coburn Neil Coburn polio Dr Neil Coburn California Graduate School of president and CEO founder and president Marin California Middle Village
The Mountain Goats - Cadaver Sniffing Dog

Song Exploder

26:16 min | 1 year ago

The Mountain Goats - Cadaver Sniffing Dog

"You're listening to song explorer where musicians take apart their songs and piece by piece tell the story of how they remained. My name is tau win. Song. Explode or is brought to you by progressive one of the country's leading providers of auto insurance with progressive name your price tool. You say what kind of coverage you're looking for? And how much you want to pay and progressive will show you options that fit within your budget, use the name your price, tool and start an online, quote today at progressive dot com, price and coverage match limited by state law. John, Dr Neil has been writing and recording songs as the mountain goats since nineteen ninety one. He's released seventeen studio albums, and also written two books of fiction in April twenty nineteen the mountain goats released the album in league with dragons, and in this episode gender. Neil breaks down Assam ferment called cadaver sniffing dog will hear his original demo and then here how the song evolved at Blackbird studios in Nashville with the help of John's ban. Some incredible session musicians and producer Owen. Palate, also stick around after the song to hear more from John in our new segment instrumental. My name is John, Dr Neil, I am the singer from the mountain goats. I keep little notebooks. They're not that much bigger than the credit card, and I've been carrying those around for over ten years, the nobody has grocery lists, and it has not take if I'm watching a movie, but there's one page that just has song titles. I just write them. When I get an idea and could ever sipping dog had been around for a while. I think it probably came at an airport airports, rather a lot, and they have drug sniffer dogs and allowed to pet them, and it sucks because you wanna give a little pet let him know doing a good job. They have to wear little yellow jackets, that say like drug sniffing dog or something like that. And I had crime stuff in my brain. So I had the title and I'm reasonably certain that it was Christmas day. And I just started riffing with a guitar to three and. The way that I write usually is, I'll be playing a riff, and I will just sort of ad-lib align and go from there. And if the song is going to have that title, I was like you know, crime scene. We'll be the obvious place. The spy. So I had the riff, I had a couple of, and then I put down the guitar, and I sit there with my pen notebook asking myself, what happens next that makes narrative sense to ask myself, who's, who's voices this, who's speaking woke is, is a crime scene investigator. Some kind of a detective. Detective's -tective, right. Was he describing, then I write a couple of in the same meter. On the Sandler several station. Everybody just your expectation. And we're back and forth like that between the notebook and the tar asking myself questions that allow the rhyme to further explication the line just before it. The speaker is looking at a scene of utter devastation. He's inviting the investigation to continue at assisting. There must be dead bodies in here. That's how bad things are there can be no question that if there's anyone in here they're dead. And I am interested in what it's like to be that speaker would have feels like to inhabit that speakers skin for three minutes is a theatrical experience, essentially. Rookies trying to keep the. But the damage is too. Sometimes the cortex a long time, but I knew I liked the phrase too much not to absolutely put it to work in the chorus. What a great thing to say. I wanted to sing at a bunch of times. I had the idea for the vocal harmony also. And I really enjoy getting elaborate with the backing vocals garage men. And I remember it was nearing dinnertime and both kids are swarming me, but I kind of liked the way that the tempo the pace of the song reflects that I'm trying to get the idea finish as quickly as I can. So this is one of the songs unless I tell you what it's about, you're not going to know. Right. We're looking at a rec room bodies that are hardly recognizable where you have to bring in a dog to determine where the body is in the first place. There's nothing in that, that can telegraph to you. That what I'm thinking about is a relationship where there's nothing left to save. It's a collapsing relationship song. But it's also in the guise of Anwar of detective crime scene moment, that's the metaphor and you could take the story at face value. But my assumption is that there will be some listeners who will Intuit that who will go. This song is actually about a relationship in which none of the motivating quality that brought these people together survives. This is a person checking for signs of life in something that is visibly dead. And that's always been one of the saddest things to think of for me is like when relationships collapse a thing that used to seem worth preserving no longer. Seems worth saving too. One Ribaud th parties. And if that's true for one party. It's necessarily true for both parties. It's just that one has the wrong idea about it. And that to me is a scene of great pathos my parents, divorced. When I was five and my world cracked open when that happened. It was very you know, I remember the moment they told me the first time I became aware that people separate romantically. It was a catastrophic moment for me, personally, it was just horrifying to me, because I had never thought of it before that it was like when you're five you don't think we'll maybe one day you won't live with one of these people. You don't that wasn't on the table for me. And, and so, I think, you know, I always return to that, and so me and my band, Matt Douglas, John Lewis to repeater Hughes and Owen pallet producing met at Blackbird that we track this when I in the session because I wanted to make sure we got it, right. So the setup is John and Peter drummer and bassist are out in the big room with a baffle between the. The rhythm section is very deeply in the pocket on this try it is locked in. Oh, and was really encouraging us to underplay a lot. So he went with something like crowd rock chords, the drums, and the bass play- exactly what they play and they play it in a line. And me a matter playing the exact same acoustic guitar part. Often we write something he plays try and dress it up a little bit plays. Whereas you couldn't but it sounds so nice to just like have own gonna play less. Let the song be itself. We can add more stuff later. As you get much more motoric style basics, which actually give you the freedom to turn the next layer into whatever you want. We tracked by ourselves for the first two or maybe three days. And that's when the other musicians came in and did other stuff. There was Thomas Gill, who's such a great musician. I do not remember which electric he was playing. But I have this pedal it's by company called farm, and it's a distortion pedal. It's an overdrive and the reason it's called farm is the guy who makes him as a farmer, and he sells these pedals to help pay for, like grain and stuff to keep the farm going, and he advertised one as Jerry Garcia, seventy eight tones. I am the target market for this pedal thought that has really is you have a specific dead tour who's tones. You're trying to emulate. And it's pre eighty one then I am with you. So I said Thomas try this pedal, and he did. And he liked it, as well as I did the sound of it is real nice. And then I said, well, you know, I've always thought we'd have a guitar solo here, and I want to play guitar solos desperately, but I am not a good nephews issue to actually properly solo. And so we handed guitars, Thomas and let him loose. Qatar solo you can be basically playing scales over the changes. But another thing you can do is have something to express the aggression of the song to elaborate on the lyric or to take the sentiment of the lyric to a place that language can't take it to buy it self, which is what I think Thomas does in this one that he just takes the violence inherent in the scene and takes it to this sort of no wave downtown. New York early. Eighties kind of place. He's rhythmic. But this kind of choppy, we were all going nice. The thing is fun about having people play soul is in the studio is everybody else gets to sit back and be an all of the other musician. And that is so fun. This is our second album at Blackbird in Nashville, and one of the big reasons to record there is if you want to hire session, musicians to play on your record, you will have them in any degree you want, and you can have them in half an hour. And I knew that I was gonna wanna hire Bailey. He and his dudes are the guys doing the actual backing vocals and session, musicians are the true stars of this industry in my view. They can do anything every last one of those four guys are better singers, than me by incomprehensible orders of magnitude, and it's very hard to learn how to go, you know. That's good. But if you did something, a little different because they're so good that you wanted to say yes, to everything they do, but I had already written the part on this one. And so we sat around listen to the demo and he said, so do you want. Is that what you want to see us? That's what I want. But I want us to sing in four part. I think mine was in three part harmony on the demo and so he stands there in the tracking room with his. Guys, and he goes, okay? So bringing the who wants to. I'll take that one, try this bringing the diver note, there's a unison there. They looked at me and he goes, do you mind unison? Do you wanna harmony, and I say, well, I want what you think sounds good. I'll try unison. So again, idea together. Then they all go and stand in front of the mics, and what they did is they took what I wrote and made it three D bringing. Stiffling. You should see what it's like, in the tracking room, when Robert has guys show up to sing is like everybody just sits back and just revels in the pure pleasure of music. These guys they say on Garth Brooks records, right? And to have them singing. My somewhat strange lyrics is really fun. It's so great to be taking something that is strange and occupies a sort of strange space musically and then treat it the same way that you would treat something that had more commercial potential bringing. Sniffing dog with my vocals. My instructions were to not emotes and younger women. No, no. I must express my feelings. And so, but no, if you trade that desire to be expressive in the service of the song, you get it back doubled, if you actually serve the song instead of asking the song to serve, you emotionally hustle up the spy who STAN. We'll see of anyone's left up there. It's probably my purest metaphor song ever in that. I never offer any indication that it's a metaphor. I'm the last guy to find the metaphor in somebody else's song because I'm taken in by details. But also, my strength is a writer is like I have so much interest in the details that if I have a governing metaphor, I can make it pretty real, because I can populate it with all these little things happening at the edges. Wait till you come up on this mall in back. And even then. I don't need to erode about it. I can just tell you, what I saw the physical details seem to me sufficient to communicate anything else that the scene might need to communicate. And I can assume that if I give you a good enough description of what I saw that the emotional reality, or the spiritual reality underneath, it will become manifest veterans on their hands. Nobody's ready for days like the. I think the speaker here is egotist. This is the funny thing when I start analyzing my own lyrics, I'm generally fairly critical. If the writer, it's like to me, the solution to this problem is right in front of his face. He's should start thinking about things other than his own reactions. This song, it was one of the ones I had flagged for strings because Owen, pallet rights, string arrangements, in place, we did pre-production on a fair bit of this stuff, and he did guide tracks on a mini mode in the control room just to indicate what the string parts were going to be. I think he liked. And so he kept them anymore in. Have gotten away with, with me earlier is like the sounds cool. Maybe keep it later always been very much about. Think about your decision first, then play it, right. And with this record let Owen actually produce and make decisions like late on this thing. And then later save you know, it sounds kind of cool. Let's keep it, it was so awesome that I wanna do it this way from here on out, writing the songs, relinquishing control, handing them to a friend. I know well to Owen and say now tell me what you hear in these songs you tell us how to play them. It was really liberating for me the strings were on day six or seven and I wanted to get tattoo. So I booked a tattoo because I thought you know, it'll be better if I'm not around to give input Leto into his whole thing. He has some people he works with in Macedonia. A full Symphony Orchestra. He wrote charts by himself up in Canada, where lives and that he had sent them to them, and they learn them in rehearse them. And then they hook up via Skype and is fully conducted live orchestra. So I went and I got a tattoo of crab holding pair. Glasses in tribute to the time I was holding two year old in the ocean. And then a wave came and knocked by glasses off. And we joked crab had taken my glasses. I did that during the string tracking. So when I got back Peter was like, oh, my God. Dude, it was the greatest. Cried. I just I cried. My first ideas about music were about symphony orchestras when I was five I wanted to be a conductor. It's such a high form of music to be able to hear an Somboon all at once in your head and doing arrangement like his done, and then it's such an accomplishment to even play in an orchestra that to be able to subsume your own talents into the service of the broader vision is what makes orchestra music, so beautiful is that like, it's an expression of human cooperation. As a lead singer type as a guy who both benefits from an is burdened by his sort of native, egocentrism, people generally j just to talk up, my feelings about stuff like that to me is no longer, interesting, much more interested in the other musicians work, you know, there's some songwriters who insist that they told every musician every note, what to play on the record and I believe, none of them. I don't believe any of that music is the story of people making something together that out grows all of them, it is bigger than them, and of which they should all be all. And now here's Cadaver-sniffing dog by the mountain goats in its entirety. And after the song, we'll hear more from John. Hustle of this. James seen for several station. Everybody adjust your expectation. Straight hair, blood and rain. Fragments. He's trying to keep the airway. But the damage is too severe. Bring in. Bring in the kid. Bringing. Armie crawlers down. Ashford. Veterans. Nobody's ready. Even then. Survivors. The the. Bring in the other. Bring in. Bringin. Visit sung exploded dot net. For more information on the mountain goats, you'll also find a link to buy or stream the song, coming up more, John, Dr Neil for our new segment called instrumental. Hey, this is Russia cash, and I want to tell you about another music podcast free to check out in addition asong explode her. It's a music documentary show from KCRW called loss notes in the second season of loss notes music journalist, Jessica hopper under some of the greatest music stories, never told you can learn about the pioneering since musician composers, Suzanne chigney, and the women behind David Bowie's favorite rock band fanny and how powers two thousand six of them. The greatest may have saved one fans life. Find loss notes wherever you listen to podcasts. In our segment instrumental we ask artists about the tools that shape how they write play and think about music. Here's more with John, Dr Neal is there an instrument you have. It's been really important to you. There's Hawaiian guitar and this is the most important instrument in the mountain goes development. So it has a place of honor for me. So I was working at metropolitan state hospital in Norwalk. I was paying off a court Bill owed City, California, lot of money, but it was also living employee housing reit employee housing was already very cheap and then periodically like, once a year. The union wouldn't see eye to eye with the state, and we'd be out of contract. And then my rent, we have to go back to whatever the rent had been prior to the first contracts, how that word. But so for several months, year my rent would be like thirty one dollars on the studio apartment in a very old building on the grounds. Ospel. So is paying down this court Bill, but living on fairly cheap rent and I didn't have any expenses. I wasn't married. So when a patient, I would go shopping might means they're modest would buy tapes, and at the shopping center, there was the instruments store in. There was not a lot of foot traffic in the store that had probably been strip mall for as long as it had been there, which probably would have been the early seventies. And this is the mid nineties in California. So, so he was just crammed ceiling the floor with instruments like new KEMA. Guitar from Korea, seventy one dollars bought one of those, those are actually the that's the Atari here on the first tape. But the other untarred even the first day Hawaiian guitar that was up on a shelf. And I asked if I could see it and didn't trust anybody could try using about buying. It will. Yeah. Yes. As okay. Well, here is, that's a nice one, and I want it noisy about it as I wondered, what makes it Hawaiian. It's busy a slide guitar but in the Kucic slide. Right. So the. Raised high enough that you can use a bottleneck grow proper slide to core you to coordinate moves this line of down. Right. But it was a whole new magic rule of sound for me. And I was writing poetry at the time it was doing the mountain goats, but had extra money about this fifty dollars. Tar, and then I figured out soon to accord, so I could play one four five in a blues profession and do something I didn't have any lyrics. So I grabbed a poem that I had been working on called going to Alaska and just sang it over civil progression that became the first defacto amount. So. Is a great me to our live in the air. From the. You can hear in that track how I don't have the four and five. Memorize there's dots to tell you when you go. But I don't know what I'm doing. This went on the ever saw play on the first two tapes. And then I had sort of moved on, but it is the origin story guitars. The one I bought by this tar white here. And I wouldn't be sitting here today. If I had made that rash decision. Sung. It's was created and is executive produced by Ritchie case here way. This episode was produced an ended in by Christian. Koons Carlos Lerma made the artwork which you can see on the song, splitter website. Song exploiters the proud member radio topa from PR ex a collective of fiercely independent podcasts, you can learn about all of our shows that radio topa dot FM. You can also find song splitter on Facebook, Instagram. Twitter at song explorer, and you can find me at tau. Get stay down. My name is tau win. Thanks for listening. Radio. Ex.

John Lewis Owen Dr Neil Nashville tau Thomas Gill investigator producer Intuit Jerry Garcia Blackbird studios Garth Brooks Alaska Facebook Twitter Assam Sandler writer
Bytemarks Caf: Telehealth for Pets

Bytemarks Cafe

28:51 min | 2 months ago

Bytemarks Caf: Telehealth for Pets

"It's August Fifth Twenty, twenty a welcome to the new reality of Bite Marks cafe where we serve you the first flight of today's science, technology and innovation. I'm Bert Lum, I stop, we will have Katie Rea- Chang. She's the director of Communications and Public Affairs over at the Chamber of Commerce and she's here to tell us about the virtual job fair coming up called what is hiring, and then we'll be joined by Dr. Geno. Wallace and Dr, she's a doctor of. Veterinarian Medicine, and of course, she's with Tele Pets.com. We got. Dr Neil. Chowhan and he's an MD at we prescribe, and of course, we'll talk about telemedicine for both humans and pets. But now I WANNA walk. Katie Chang. He's again the Director of communications over the Chamber of Commerce and they've got a virtual job fair coming up called Hawaii is hiring walk to the show Katie ever. Thanks so much for having me. Now, this is interesting because. As, we are all you know sort of social distancing and using tools like zoom. Job Fair, which obviously you know there's a there's. A situation here in a way where there's a lot of unemployed and you know you'd like to see if there's ways of matching them up with potential employers but it's hard to physically all get together in the Convention Center or at the NBC. So this, this virtual job fairs kind of interesting concept. Tell me a little bit about it. Sure. So our first virtual job fair is on August twelfth. I'm neck elite from from eight thirty am to noon, and it's Oliver trouble free for job seekers and it will feature several different things from speakers from India to Microsoft to connecting directly to fourteen different employers and resume building as well, and you know we just really wanted to make sure that we're. We're able to meet a need chambers have to pivot just like. So many of our small business members are and our education and workforce development team has really done great work and ensuring that we could really help what job seekers connect with jobs that are out there. Now, you said something about a fourteen, the told me some of those names again. I. So we have everyone from the banks American savings thing. To healthcare positions and Home Depot, and these are positions across the state. So it's not just on Oahu on, we really want to make sure that neighbor island job seekers able to participate as well. Do you have a sense as to? how many jobs are out there and and You know what could potentially be filled by the the people that participate I mean, what's the? What's the numbers? Are we talking about hundreds of jobs? What's it look like? Sure. So for example, home, depot has ninety positions that they're hiring for nine, hundred, ninety, nine, zero, nine, zero, one, our employers. And you know through our broader who is hiring site and effort on their over thirteen jobs. Thirteen thousand jobs I'm sorry in Hawaii that US posted in last thirty days. It's great. So told me a little bit about the platform that you folks are using. Sure. So we're using virtual software hauled hyphen and it's similar to him in which people will be able to have see each other over video on talk to each other and you'll be able to do different things. For example, our speakers on stage. So everyone can go on and watch the age and watch her secrets from indeed and Microsoft, and we also have sixty senator, jerk, he'll Khloe. And or you can choose to go into a networking room with an employer and ten people at a time. We'll be able to meet with an employer. See them an apply directly from the and platform. Are. You can choose to go and resume building room that will have to people at a time and actually get basically one on one advice on building your resume. Oh. That's great. So do you suggest that people actually start? The Job Fair at eight thirty so that. It's old, it's all sort of A. It's not eastern concerned. It's all synchronous. So you have to go win the actual event is taking place. Yeah, absolutely. So our speakers that are GONNA be on stage will be throughout the morning. So we definitely encourage everyone to stay for the whole morning. All the speakers and in between the speakers we built in times to go talk to employers would your resume building? And then so then people can actually what do interviews during during this job? So I'm very company, but each company will have representatives there that works directly in HR that If they're not doing interviews, they'll tell people how to apply and tell people about the oprah open positions and then. Then, of course, there's there's the after the job fair interaction between the employer and the potential employee. S. So they'll be able to go onto a site to apply right I'm hopping. That's also why we encourage everyone. We wanted to provide more opportunities than just meeting with employers, and we encourage everyone to do the professional development because it focuses on how to apply for jobs and the job market during Copa specifically. handling things like video interviews are different things that people might not have you know to deal with before that. We're all having children in this name. No, that's great. That's great. So Do. You get any kind of stats after the event. You know maybe I know it's not gonNA be hired immediately. So how will you can keep track of the? You know the actual results of people getting jobs. So definitely follow up with our employer partners that we're working with to make sure that that there are a great results in that were able to share those results We have nearly two hundred people registered already. but there's still a week left so and it's totally free. So we encourage people, you know maybe looking for a job or just even looking to upscale to learn about the resources that we have and listen to acres, and what was be the capacity, I, mean, you have two, hundred me, what could you accommodate? So we could accommodate on the platform itself up to one hundred, thousand participants. Obviously, you know we'll make sure that. If there if we have a capacity. That, we are able to still serve everyone in a way that connects them with employers are looking for. Okay, that sounds great. So tell me again work and people sign up to to join the. Virtual. Job Fair. So you can sign up at www dot Hawaii's hiring dot com and Hawaii spelt out and then again it's on, it's on Wednesday August twelfth, which is next week, Wednesday and what it starts at eight thirty and goes all the way to wartime thirty until noon. Very good. So I'll put that up on our show knows thanks Katie for joining us. Thanks so much for having me. I appreciate it, and of course, we'll take a short break and when we return, we'll be joined by Dr Jenna. Wallis. From telepaths, DOT COM and Dr Neil Joanne from we prescribe and we'll talk about telemedicine. This is bite marks cafe. Support for Bite Marks cafe comes from the HP, our local talk show fund, which helps Hawaii public radio, sustain, and grow its locally produced talk shows Mahalo to contributor Hawaii naturopathic. Retreat? Center. We'll come back to bite marks cafe, and of course I'm happy to welcome Dr Jenna Wallis, who's a veterinarian over at Tele, pets.com, and Dr New Neil Chowhan. WHO's an MD at we prescribe. Welcome to bite marks. Cafe. Thank you. Thanks for having US now? Let's start with Let's start with the Neil 'cause. I know that. There's a relationship between pets and we prescribe. So kinda give us the big picture and how these pieces fit together. So we prescribe was gonNA original platform where we see patients humans for a variety of health conditions. General health measures what people would typically go and see that PCP or go to an urgent care for. And more recently, we decided to also launch Tele Pets, which is a veterinary concern We kind of wanted to try and help out community out the best way we could and I think it just made sense for us to be able to have the option and offer that in terms of being able to she pets especially around this pandemic. No that's great. An End, Neil. Tell me a little bit about I. Mean. You've you've had a long history in in telemedicine and you're telling me before the show that that You've you've got a lot of long patients in in London or Europe. And that you know that. I think them to the tune of like fifteen thousand. So that's that's a lot of patients that you're. You're actually seeing. A lot of experience with medicine that you can probably tell from accent from England and I started doing telemedicine when it was still kind of a relatively new concept and I still to this day do see patients in England in. Europe. for. Telemedicine comfortable -tations, and it was that experience in the number of patients that I've seen in different places that are both as the idea of this service and bringing it to Hawaii. So we have a very unique can the demographic? Geographical Location, some of the difficulties in terms of access to healthcare, and so Even before the Kobe pandemic, we knew there was a a big need for said this like this and especially and then. You know the virtual care here to stay concluding health access healthcare for patients. So would you would you say that? The. percent of patients that you do or see via. Tele, medicine tele. Telehealth is what? What's what is the percentage versus let's see in office. Yeah I. Definitely Changed Recently, I would say you know especially, we've probably seen a thirty to forty percent increase in patient volume since can. Overall you know in terms of different resources and worldwide I. Think it's it's significant in terms of the number of people using. Virtual health consultations. So I I, take it. Then prior to the pandemic, you're actually seeing patients in in your office. And then when it did hit then telemedicine became. Much, more a preferred delivery mechanism. Yeah I'd say virtual consultations were already popular the kind of before code and I think that convenience the ability to speak clinician from anywhere where the comfort of your own home using your computer or your phone Destiny is is convenient for people, but we definitely did see a surge in terms of people wanting to use. He's also a remote consultation with. Now, generally, you know with with the tele. Pets. Did is the platform that you're using Just a sort of a replication of the platform that we prescribe uses some heart is was an easy easy sort of duplication of of the platform functionality. Yes and no are I had to detain different questionnaires. Each species. So you know the question that I would ask about adults would be different than a cat and things such as age, and whether it's been neutered or spayed, or birds, or so all the questions are gonna be different for each species. So we have to come up with a questionnaire for Yeezy and then oftentimes because pets can't tell us what is wrong or where it hurts. You know a lot of information we gather as either from the history taking, and then on ninety percent of it is from the physical exam and so with out having this physical exam, the questioning is extremely important and those small details are really important to you. It's similar to the human. But but it is. It is different. And, of course, we have like different differential diagnoses, but it's it's similar but different in its own way through the Kushner does a questionnaire take place during the consultant. Does that sum is that something that the the owner will go through and then they'll go onto the the telemedicine platform. So, they sign on and then they complete the questions and then prior to the appointment, a few minutes partee consultation. I will reviews it the the the questionnaire, and then then it will get to see and then and then I'll see the client afterwards But there are certain things that you know if the patient is having a difficulty or something, they don't get past the questionnaire. That's the automatic. You go to the ER telemedicine appropriate. You may need more more care. So it depends on on the times and dumbs But yeah, they fill it out prior and then I can read a little bit about the patient, but and that way I'm well prepared for consultation And Neil. When when using the system? What is it? What is based on? I, mean, if you were to be be showing this to somebody face to face what would be, what would we be looking at? Are we looking at a computer and and just the program or what is what? What constitutes this telemedicine system? So it's It's talked proprietary platform where you can design and build. Tens of the patient facing us. We try to make it as easy and seamless as possible. Essentially you. Re prescribed website. You would then pick on a condition that you need help with, and we have essentially smart question is that GonNa collecting can of pets in an inflammation also looking out for any worrying signs symptoms that would warrant them more urgent or physical assessment and patient would go through those questions, and then they would be able to schedule an appointment for their video consultation with a clinician. Clinician, and so we have know safety is paramount here. So once those questions going to fill it out, that's reviewed by what we have is a clinical coordinator that's helping the patient get through kind of hostess if they need some helpful guidance and then it's reviewed by the commission prior to the consultation. So you'll happens very quickly, but there's lots of promises that ensure that it's GonNa say. And on the on the patient side, what is it that they need in order to interact with your system? When you say video, are they obviously, they have to have a a camera laptop. I mean, what do they need to be set up with? It's pretty much any smart device, a phone. A LAPTOP COMPUTER OR tablet Any of those things would suffice to be able to do a video consultation on the platform. And what now with some of the legislation changes around the pandemic, we are able to offer phone consultations to right now, I'd say we have. Fifty percents, tons of people that want to video consultation versus the telephone consultation. And and? Do the the I. Guess. The claims are they are the a little different for one versus the other. In terms of. We pretty standardized from our and so what we do is provide patients with a invoice they all the notes that survive front facing. What that means is the patient sees all of that in terms of the diagnosis history intaking. Differential diagnosis and the plan. It's all written in a way that's very clear and able to understand by the patients, and so they they have that copy of their consultation notes as can invoice in terms of The consolidation that's that's undertaken if they need to submit that for any sort of claim. It sounds like your practice was sort of designed from the ground up around telemedicine. Is that correct? Yeah. So we we started as I, tell you how a company? So we started off with these. Since tree thing coming ailments, the edging kept PCP, type issues and we've expand from this. So we've been we've now can launched mental health services able to see therapist as well as pediatrics looking off their children. And one of the. Things that I think is really helped. The community has been A. Track Kovic screening and testing. So. Assess patients in terms of screening questionnaire, and then range testing the same day results come back within twenty four. I'm actually curious when I think you've sort of spent a good amount of time in England and and built a you know been built a a patient clientele there, and then moving moving to Hawaii I'm kind of curious what it took to develop. You know a clientele here in Hawaii and and what it took to I. Guess you know, build the confidence that the the the service could be delivered via via telehealth because you know it's people are coming into the doctor's office. Right? So anyway I WANNA hold that thought hold that thought this a teaser. We'll be right back after this is sort break to continue our conversation with Dr. Jennifer Wallace and Dr Neil. Chowan we're talking about telemedicine. This is bite, marks cafe. Support for market cafe comes from the HP, our local talk show fund, which helps Hawaii public radio sustain, and grow its locally produced. Talk Shows Mahalo to contributors, Shaman University, and Hastings, and plead well a communication company. Welcome back. This is bite marks cafe I'm Bert Lung, and if you're just joining us, we're talking to Dr Jenna. Wallis. From Tila Pets.com, and Dr Neil Charles Chowhan from we prescribe in, of course, right before the break you know it's very interesting that. Most of the doctors of course I. Ever again, counter are from the ground up there. They're pretty much in the office taking patients at their at their Physician Office and in in your case Neil, you've really designed the business around telehealth from from the ground up and I, and right before the break we were talking about. coming in to Hawaii I. Think you've been here maybe five six years. How how was it in terms of building that clientele with telemedicine as the baseline. Yeah. Say We've been very fortunate to. Prescribe with just over a year ago and with that experience and information that I have from. Europe and UK work and telling medicine. You know we felt very comfortable knowing. This is an area of medicine that is going this huge need for it, and then we kinda delving into Hawaii and. Unique geography and how healthcare infrastructure is when we knew it'd be a good needs for this, a really good way of increasing of access healthcare. We stopped it off like I mentioned. We we started off with in common healthcare conditions that people would typically see that PCP or go to nogent. And you know we've had a lot of dimond intensive. realizing that like the convenience that can ask that accessibility to the service and safety of that. We have a lot of conditions pretty over twenty clinicians. Now, all local board certified clinicians and variety of fields. So we have internal medicine specialist. I mean physicians some pediatricians. The pediatrics service that we just launched and psychologists help from the mental health says behavioral health. says. Oh, that's that's great and and All the all the services for the most part covered by covered by insurance. It's it's We have a fee for service. So it's fifty dollars consultation, but people are gonNA give an invoice and their consultation notes that they are able to submit to their insurance. or or claiming and and with. With the the pets version of. Telemedicine. What are the typical kinds of conditions you would be would be taken care of using using telemedicine. So they would they're there for the most. Pretty. Basic, Skin conditions which can actually be very complicated in a pet. Store will especially Hawaii because we have such so much moisture here. we a lot of skin conditions. And then you know, free prevention. To go out in the middle of this dependence, just for a free tech prevention or Just, or just advice about dog food things like that, and so I think. That was in a very remote location and there is limited, but in the clinic south there you know one pharmacy nearby. So in the meantime until he kicked his path to to a vast, you know I was able to call something into the one pharmacy. So it's it's It it we do know that there are limitations to. Tell Him. On. community I mean and like I said a lot of our our our diagnosis made with our hands. Him But there are plenty of things we can help say somebody Their clinic is closed any prescription for their pets, heart medications, which are really important and refill Then they can provide the medical records and I. Into lows or go with whatever they need, what, what would you would you describe? How would you describe what would be the most interesting or perhaps Challenging telehealth consult for a pet. What. Was your most interesting kind of? I, interesting So I don't always passing. Tell tell us. Whether we're on a clinic or not always call in always wanted advice. Even when you're in your clinic right I would have to say and recently sort of on another island had some avalon minimum San. They couldn't get I couldn't get to see you right away So that was one interesting for the call I'm had pretty recently what? Was it. Tortoise. A tortoise. That's why I thought. I heard you see. Yeah. But there's there's when it if they are. Do. have to rest my Are there are limitations I won't. The good thing. I think that Tele Med can provide is oftentimes pet owners are where he can take their pets in or they don't think needs to be seen and we end up. We end up with with patients or say how long is this going on two months, three months and you're like, wow. So hopefully cut, why didn't tell them? They can come in and we can say, Hey, that actually needs to see. Or? Maybe. Not See. So many cornick conditions because people are able to call in and you know we can advise them like here. You can do this for now, but you need to be seen So it really can help encourage people to go into. These better care and and help triage. You know a lot of a lot of onerous. Quests nothing happens between eight and five right everything happens after five. Light and. You know they bring their their peasants trojans to. Bring your. Bring their pets in and and. Fiction probably weeded or. Or only got you know stunned by be and whatever, and we just need to Benadryl but So it it can help. Also with triaging, really say you know the. Dog spayed and she's vomiting I'm GonNa, tell that owner you bring the pet and now You don't wait. So it can actually even help save your pets No Jen. Are you are you kind of One of the you know sort of leading edge of venereal that are doing telemedicine or how how much have veteran venereal adopted or embraced telemedicine? So. in the nation right now, prior to there's wasn't necessarily friend upon It's it's been. If the veterinarian and the client news limitations again, Then it it has been starting to become embrace And and What's happening is then we've been practicing like telemedicine. Every day. I mean I don't know how many times sitting at my desk or working on a patient and you know random person or client calls and Hey, my dogs marlene see in my dog has do. What should I do? And so often. Whether we've seen Kleiner not, we're constantly giving advice worth find myself. I've twenty four call backs a day, and I'm talking because they're quite. So we're always been doing telemedicine We just it. Nobody's actually made it into business if that makes sense but it's a hard topic, people, some people are against it, but I don't think anybody displaying even Kubek would argue against it. clinics are extremely busy right now. We thought that I personally thought that we would have worse. Goodness knows help people at home. They're paying more attention to their patch. They're seeing problems that they haven't seen because they've been busy with the hustle and bustle and so on. People are talking about pets right now and people are paying attention of attention to your pets and different things so great. So general work if people find out more about Tele Pets. They can go to the website but Paul Pets Dot Com and it is spelled A. P. E. T. S. dot com great and and Neil Working People find out more about we. Prescribe. So that would be www dot. WE PRESCRIBE DOT com. Very good. Of course, Dr Jenna, Wallace's the veterinarian over at Tele Pets Dot com, and it's a division of we prescribe and Dr Neil Childhood is the MD over Ed we prescribe, and of course, we want to thank you both for joining us today. and. Thank you for listening to bite marks cafe. Join US next week when we will talk about five G. Technology and connecting rule communities. If you miss any part of this addition, you can find the podcast of tonight show on Bite Marks, cafe. Dot. Org, and if you have any comments or suggestions feel free to email me at bite marks at dot com, you can also find me on twitter. I'm at. Bite. Marks. Are Engineer is David Chong. You can catch us on each pure one, every Wednesday or anytime via the HP, our APP, I tunes, Google play and Stitcher. You stay awesome and stay safe. We'll see you next week on another additional bite marks Caffeine.

Hawaii Dr Neil Charles Chowhan Dr Jenna Katie Rea- Chang HP MD Dr. Jennifer Wallace Dr Jenna Wallis Bite Marks Dr Neil Microsoft director of Communications and Europe Neil Convention Center England Home Depot Veterinarian Medicine Bite Marks Paul Pets Dot Com
Dr. Neil Ralston, Professor of Journalism

WOW! I want to take that class!

07:12 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Neil Ralston, Professor of Journalism

"The. Everybody and welcome shoe allow I would take that class. Yes. Wildcard day. We are. Super excited are third episode. Heredity, keep believe already. Wow. And we are so excited to have Dr Neil Ralston join us today. Professor in journalism. Thank you. I really enjoy coming over today and seeing what it's like to talk about our classes. Yes. Well, thank you for taking the time. And, and the and the purpose of our podcast before I forget is, we have so many wonderful classes here at Lynn university, so many wonderful professors, and we wanna take our to learn from each other. See what we're doing in our classes, the instructional strategies that we're using and we can't wait to learn today. Yes. So to, to start what are you a little bit about your background and kind of what, what brought you here to Lynnwood university? Just. All right. I'll try to keep it short. But I, I worked as a journalist or reporter editor and photographer for more than ten years at various newspapers around the country, and then I started teaching at a what's now called Truman state university. That was where I got my bachelor's degree. And after I started teaching there, I decided to go ahead and get a PHD university, Missouri. And since then, I've been teaching for twenty years, or so, I came to Linden would about five years ago, after I'd been teaching at western Kentucky university in bowling green, Kentucky. Yeah, it is. It's it's a beautiful area there. But I decided to come back to Missouri, where I grew up, I grew up in the state up near Hannibal, Mark Twain countries. And, and we decided to take a job here at Linden would wonderful. So, yes. Yeah. Just get into it because, you know, what really makes your class, a wow, experience or your students, I dunno shoots would would always call it a while. It is an experience or they can't be really the center and the focus of most journalism classes at their hands on and over the years. Those, those hands on classes have gotten different names experiential learning, I think, what is what is the term high impact guesses? Hence the term now and those of us who are internally always kinda smile when people talk about those terms because we've been doing this for a long, long time. And our students have to be able to not only do the things practice skills and journalism, but they have to produce content shared and sharing the content. Whether it's on in the newspaper, online, or in a broadcast is part of the learning experience. If they do something that nobody ever hears listens to, they don't get the feedback. They. That, that so important to their learning. And we've so we've sort of been working on this hands on thing for, for quite a while, and frankly journalism program that doesn't have a lot of experiential or hands on experiences frankly, wouldn't probably wouldn't be worth very much share. My I undergraduate degree. I was actually broadcasting and them minor and oh, gosh. Those were the days then you had records, right? And, and you would be in the radio studio. Right. And you were spinning those records while you were doing a a bit. You know what I'm saying? I'm learning how to tease the radio. Yeah. Audience. I loved that. It was both scary and really useful. But yeah, there's, there's a scary element to that as well. TV tama. Yes. Scary. All right. Spe- so many wonderful conversations happening in your classroom and regarding journalism in the importance of news. During this day and age. And in the importance of your, your students role in that job and their future positions. We talk about that all the time we have entire classes on that. So sometimes the teachers teachers have to remember that. We've only got so much time to deliver all the content that we can't spend Oliver time talking about this thing. But you're right. There are a lot of there are a lot of good discussions about that. That's a great point. So we have to try to balance both what we plan to do in class. And what we end up doing in class talking about the day's news or the days of its students students today, the don't pay attention to news, like we would like them to not the kind of news that we often would like them to pay attention to, but they, they do pay attention to news. That's important to them. And just the other day when I was talking to students about what had been happening in the day. One student brought up the our Kelly interviewed the recent recently occurred. They were very, very excited about that. So. So like I said, it's. A teacher sort of has to understand that what we think is important is always what they think is important. We have to try to adapt to that. That's great point of the student's perspective of, it's not always what the professors perspective is and making that apply to your lesson. But also understanding what the student's perspective as I think that's important. You educate your. Wow. Experience and experiential learning, which is so important. And that, that is what journalists have teachers, I would, if you could talk, specifically to the instructional strategies that you use in your classroom, maybe even specific examples of what you're doing with your students in the classroom, that can maybe even transferred to other other classrooms, or just going to tell us exactly what you're doing with your student couple examples, I guess, because we're always thinking about experiential learning. It's so ingrained in what we do that, sometimes, even when we do typical classroom exercises. We tend to find some sort of feedback loop that we, we have with the students, for example the other day. I signed my students to create their own checklists.

Missouri Dr Neil Ralston Lynn university Truman state university Linden western Kentucky university Professor Lynnwood university Linden Mark Twain Kentucky Hannibal reporter Oliver Kelly editor twenty years five years
Highway Hi-Fi: Desert Island Recordings - The Coroner's Gambit by the Mountain Goats

Rock N Roll Archaeology

1:05:07 hr | 5 months ago

Highway Hi-Fi: Desert Island Recordings - The Coroner's Gambit by the Mountain Goats

"It onto the highway. Hi Fi podcast where we go track by track through the underbelly of music history using research in Trivia to locate the roots of our obsession with vinyl records Joe And I'm Ryan and congratulations. You have found the Internet's finest podcast for songs that were abandoned because you got sick on a bus. We are going to continue our ongoing series of a desert island recordings albums that were made written conceived recorded in isolation. But before we do that. We're GONNA start with a little bit of Trivia. You didn't tell me their trivia surprise so joe Yes Ryan last I to you said you consider yourself a Superfan of the mountain goats. Is that correct? I have been known to be banned in been Super Way. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA put this this fan hood the fandom this fan ammonium to the test do you consider yourself a superfan of the mountain goats. I think okay. If we're going to scale ten being like the stories you hear about obsessive people following him around and you know stalking him in one being like I like him. I'd say I'm probably a solid five or six okay. I've never gone into his garbage to get his children's or his or his wife's diapers at all. So that's like a mountain goats three right. Okay we're GONNA put to the test today. This Trivia is called game shows touch our lives. I scoured the Internet defined as many of the songs that the mountain goats have includes extra Glenn songs unreleased songs live songs. And I'M GONNA ask you to name a number of a certain amount of songs and you have to get that number within two either way to below or two above all right so for example. You are aware of the going to songs correct. I believe I am okay so if I were to say how. Many of the going to songs was were the mountain goats going to a country. What would be your guess? My guess would be nine. Oh just missed. The actual answer is twelve and he went to Lebanon twice next question again with the going to how many times to go to a foreign city or province. Thirty one nine times nine times. Okay okay this is going to go really. How many times did he go to a? Us State states are there again I think somewhere around fifty I would say. Thirteen close nine nine. Oh man just missing. How many American cities was he going to for fifteen American cities? What in the world while we're GONNA knock you down a page on the mound goats scale. Apparently you're the WHO put me on that scale where you're the one who said you don't go through his diapers so all right right. How many standard bidder love songs? Are there five all right? We will give you points for that. The correct answer is seven. There is a standard bitter love song number eight but number three appears to be missing. Nobody knows what happened to number three. Okay how many songs have Alpha in the title or some variation of Alpha so. You're not counting the Tallahassee songs or the C- America Right Nope nope twenty nine sixteen just sixteen jeep. What is it with Tallahassee? And what is it with all twenty nine exactly with awful? Yeah I was. Oh Wow okay so I was actually getting pretty okay. I have no idea all right. He likes to do songs for certain people or entities. So how many songs for does he have seventeen? Wow great job. Eighteen eighteen. Get the point on that one. How many orange balls of does he have four four orange balls of efforts to get the point? You gotTa tell me what what they are. Orange Ball of hate orange bowl of love orange ball of. I don't remember the others orange ball of peace orange ball of pain okay. I still think I should get the point because you add something onto my quiz my rules. Sorry I got it before you even finish the question. I think that should be good. All right how. Many songs mentioned milk or ice cream in the title or in the lyrics or both in the title. These are all titles civilians in the lyrics callous. He's a Foodie. I will say six good seven seven. Could you the point on that all right and finally last question song? Titles that mentioned yams or potatoes three dead on three way to go. You are superfan. I feel pretty good about that. Pretty good by the end. So how many if you had to guess knowing kind of the numbers I gave you. How many total going to songs did you think there were sixty nine ish like in the case now forty six forty six total okay? Okay I thought he did pretty good as those kind of hard. A was pretty rough but I feel like I recovered. Well Yep okay. So let's kind of sneak out of that and get into the actual discussion. Today everybody's talking me I don't care where only the They have been talking about a journey into the interior. They know the dangers and yet they have already decided upon it. No one can talk them out of it. It is clear that their minds are made up. Their knapsacks are packed. Their guides have been chosen. They remained cool. Two suggestions they smile. Enigmatic smiles they no longer answer questions that was originally written by author. Carol Amtch Willer from her short story being the stereotypes strangers from distance shores. I only know this because it's printed on the B side label of an album. That I own coroner's gambit by the mountain goats in two thousand one. I found myself living in gloomy. Railroad apartment in a story acquaint for anyone unfamiliar with railroad or Shotgun Apartments there long oppressively narrow rooms with no hallway that look somewhat similar to an actual passenger train car. The rooms are all lined up in a row and offer no privacy in the back of this particular. One was my roommate's bedroom and the only way out of that room was to walk through my room which led to the living room and finally to the kitchen the bathroom clearly an afterthought was right off the kitchen and had a door that opened just enough to squeeze through provided you're limber enough to be able to step over the side of the toilet to actually get all the way in when I moved there. I knew one person but that relationship had grown foul and destructive long before my arrival I had various temp jobs while living there but rarely any leftover income when that was available. I spent it on Yoko Ono. Box sets and giant bottles of cheap wine and sometimes food it was mostly debacle that I- ignorantly entered into because assuming for the eighth or ninth time that changing my environment would change my outlook and fortune. Instead I spent far too many nights line on the floor with my headphones on listening to my records making mix tapes and then passing out once September of that year rolled around my temp job came crashing down. Literally the agency itself was in Lower Manhattan and then all of a sudden it wasn't it was reduced to scorched earth. Finished to do lists and seared char. My days then melted into extensions of my nights. But I only listen to one record over and over my last few months. Living there coroner's gambit by the mountain goats. I didn't know the story behind the making of the album until much later and it's providence just enhances. Its resonance with me now. The mountain goats released coroner's Gambit. In two thousand three years after their previous album. Full Force. Galesburg. This might not sound like an incredibly long break between records but some perspective might help. Explain why this time is important. In one ninety-one one the mountain goats released their first album. A cassette only release titled Taboo. Six the homecoming from that album through one thousand nine hundred seven. They had a total of twenty one releases of various types. Cassette only CD only seven inch singles split singles twelve and cheese full length albums in those twenty one releases were a hundred eight songs. Though in nineteen ninety eight there are only four songs on one twelve inch in nineteen ninety nine zero. What caused this period of seeming inactivity to trying to figure this out we need to go back to the mid to late seventies? Gender Neo was nine or ten years old and already infatuated with music and the controversial sounds being made by bands like the sex pistols down. The street from him lived an older kid named Jay Albert. Who isn't a Devaux? Iggy pop and David Bowie and he was just starting to get into punk. Is becoming a real force? Albert's friend was Roger Painter and the two of them were neighborhood Weirdos. Punks and pranksters were alien. Like but also probably intriguing. Roger Albert went on to form the band Christian death with Roger now calling himself Roz Williams Williams was a well read performance artist musician. Whose INFORMED BY THE LAKE. Suv RHUMBA. Bottelier MMA greet and the Dada Movement there. Neil and Williams became friends sharing a level books music film and History of Abuse Addiction. Kristen death is one of the most influential goth bands of the nineteen eighties despite hating to be pigeonholed is merely goff. Their work has inspired a lot of what's been created. Since in the realms of Goth Punk Post punk metal cabaret and beyond their live shows were spawned from Roxy Music. Alice Cooper David. Bowie peaks seen through the Lens of John Carpenter. The sounds they made were elegantly. Abrasive horrifying and sometimes awkwardly campy as best defined by their nineteen eighty. Two debut album only theatre of pain. Here's a clip of the song spiritual cramp from that album so of Kabul Dow Williams left Christian death in nineteen eighty-five to pursue different strains of music art and heroin. He disappeared from the scene for a while resurfacing years later and moved from project to project with bands as well as solo albums while always struggling with addiction which he talked about in detail on his nineteen ninety five spoken word release. Horse's mouth on on that belt tied twisting arms that nothing but contempt. Jukka your loss of bodily functions and all sense of dignity. You are no longer human slobbering baby. Tom went events towering pilot shit. This is the reduction to jungle babblings. My only it was around nineteen ninety that Williams and Dr Neal had their final conversation. Whatever it may have been about ended in a fight with Williams allegedly trying to choke Dr Neil on April first nineteen ninety eight Roz Williams hanged himself in the bedroom of his apartment in L. A. And halfway across the country the mountain goats stopped releasing. Music Dernie. Owner's wife were living in Colo Iowa Time. The town has a population of eight hundred sixty eight and lies twenty seven miles east of Ames Iowa behind the House that Dr Neal was living in was a small shack where he recorded the songs. That would make up much of coroner's gambit using his now famous and recently unretired Panasonic Rx left five hundred boombox. His original intent with the album was released. Two copies the copy that would be see only would be the boombox recorded copy while the copy released on vinyl only would have a full ban behind him obviously that never happened the idea of scrapped after recording some songs with Simon joyner and his backing band in a studio though songs were Elijah but Boone horseradish erode onions and Alfons. Mambo wants those recorded. Dr Neal was too happy with them to have split from the others so he combined the releases into one single version mixing band and boombox songs. The album has a few songs that don't sound much different in style from what had come previously with even his Alpha couple making an appearance that couple for the uninitiated has been featured in mound goat songs since the very beginning and the album. Tallahassee is all about them so that Alpha couple is man. You more recently looked this information than I did for your quiz but there are an awful lot of songs almost all of them. Have the Word Alpha somewhere in the title. Which makes them easier to find. I guess except for those that are on Tallahassee because every song is one of them on Talahassee as well as see America Right. The came out at the same time. So those aren't titled. With Alpha but they are about that couple. Each song is from the viewpoint of one of the two in the couple and I think the stories about people who used to love each other madly and now they don't if you've heard no children at any point you'll know kind of exactly how strained and this relationship is at this point and they start in La and they kind of drive all the way across to Tallahassee. They have very little money while money. They have is spent on getting cheap motel rooms and cheap booze. Do you remember the website that was set up for Tallahassee? I don't know is like a house. It was like the Alpha couple's house. I'll never forget this and I don't remember why I remember morning anything. But if you clicked on this note by a bottle it was written from the Liquor store owner. And he's like. Hey I don't WANNA lose my best customers but I think he him. I WANNA take it easy. Maybe switched to beer and wine liquor or something like that and it was like kind of really sad on US note. It was almost like a novel. This whole process of Alpha couple decaying and falling into the state and ending in the city was just such a long drawn out process that actually mirrored life in like how that stuff can take so much time and it's not a straight path. It's it's winding. There's there's lots of moments along the way that can be funny and that can be sweet but at end it's spiraling towards its eventual end. Yes like with each new song. They've they're bottoming out even further. Yeah so what's the deal with Alfons? Mambo this dumb. I think from the notes that I found. Alfonse Mabus a play on Alfonso Mango. So I don't know enough about the Alfonso Mango to know how clever that is. I guess I doesn't upon kind of depend on both parts of it being kind of equally known and I think my own just so simple and generally for simple people like myself and he is much more. High Brow is getting now. Say That's opponent can get behind right there. John Come on if we would've been more on our podcast game would research these mangoes and had some to sample during this during the session. So it could truly understand. We normally do more with our research. We eat what the artist eight end talked about. Yes typically yeah all the time I wore blue jeans and a white t shirt for than Nebraska one. Because that's what springsteen war. I did it for two weeks. I lived at a church for two weeks for the a couple of junkies one. I released seventeen albums for the Jandak. So getting back to the coroner's gambit one of the stories that he's talked about as as he was taking the bus from Iowa to Omaha Record Simon Joyner. He felt real sick on the bus and he thinks that that his performance a little bit with the band and he came in with that idea of getting a whole basically a whole album or whole version of the album. And it just didn't happen which you know if you're not feeling very well it's it's hard to get get anything on but those songs he he did record definitely with the band definitely have different feel they fit but the feel you know beyond the sound of having more instrumentation and stuff is is a little bit different. It is and it's strange. How fluid it still ends up sounding on the album absolutely other parts of the quite different from those Omaha recordings. Those are what we're going to go ahead and call for this episode. The one track shack recordings Allah link wray even with some clear differences between the songs. The album is much more cohesive than any previous mountain goats release. First and foremost it's sadder and it contains murkier songs dealing with anguish and mourning and journeys through those concerns the protagonist of those songs process learn to continue using interior means and the record according to Dr Neil. And almost anyone who's listened to it is about death and terminal places. The album opens up with a clip of bessie Smith singing haunted house blues. Which really sets up the listener with the idea of being confined and ill at ease. A The album was originally titled Jab Jab. Which has everybody knows is a Caribbean word for someone wearing a devil costume meets Alphonso Mangoes. Probably and the album was supposed to begin with a song called Tampa but it ended up being cut from the final release because it was a little too dark wind combined with songs like family happiness. The song was about finding a body buried in the snow. You blame you you do. And I found that in the top wrestler taken up by yard cutting little a song on the album about coming to terms with living with death is shadow song gender. Neil addressed this once in a brief monologue before playing the song in two thousand twelve. He said my friend Ross was thirty five when he hung himself and he is at this place. The is a special place for me. It took me a couple of years to sort through. It feels like to have a guy who you've lost touch with but who you are close to once checkout lettuce fire get there before a glow fiber earning. This is a song for you where you are island. Garden Song is according to Dr Neil in two thousand twelve a song about the need for isolation and the possibility of finding something in there that you didn't know you need it. This quote from Dr Neal may have its origins in the story quoted at the beginning of this talk in Carol M Schuler Story being mysterious strangers from distance shores. A group of tourists are on an undisclosed journey to an indeterminate interior. And from that story the quote that is about a page after the one that is printed on the side to the label of the album says each one hopes though. He is hardly aware of it that he will find his heart's desire and better yet. Find something totally unexpected. He didn't even know he yearned for Alan. Janice all way I will be is words. For kindling a garden and gone saw. My Garden grow bluejays and cardinals. Another song that is clearly about death and another in the mountain. Goats came in with baseball references. But in this song death is an escape. A scene from someone left behind the title of the Song is in quotation marks and the only mountain goat song that is. We think when asked about this. The rarely intentionally inscrutable. Dr Neal says the answer is actually really simple. But I'm going to pay tribute to my late friend. Ross by not telling Ross's band Christian death had album whose title was in quotes ashes and his answer regarding the those quotation marks was one of the West satisfying answers. I've ever been given about anything. This world gotta round. In contrast the title track used the same escape from the mind of the confined. The shift is from thinking a person left beauty behind to person who's been lured by the enigmatic glamour raise is insane turn and I think with these three or four songs that are most definitely about Roz Williams one of the most. Poignant things about them is that they don't have the same perspective. There's this perspective of the person who's been left behind. There's one that feels like island garden song feels like it's been written from roses perspective. It seems like there's at least an effort to fully capture the complexity of dealing with this deaf. Because not only do you. Have it being a suicide which you know you have a victim of a perpetrator in the same person? But it's also dealing with the perspective that you've lost contact and you haven't talked to this person and it's just not a simple thing and I can't imagine I mean. I'm not a songwriter. But I can't imagine how difficult it would be fully evoke all the emotions that go with that complex issue. In addition to that I think it also sort of reaches out to people who have opinions about what suicide is an they react in how they react to it and I think he's able to capture those ideas and make it something that people can relate to. It's a very special talent or skill he has. There's no judgment in what he writes in when you're writing with the emotional weight that he writes with in the topics that are things people struggle with for lifetimes to put that in context without judgment is amazing and critical and important. And I think that's why a lot of people were late trick mirrors attract that I have yet to see mentioned as an additional Roz song but instead is about the relationship between Seneca and Nero or appears to be the song may have been originally titled Senator Strict Mirror and Seneca was a Roman philosopher who is most studied for his thoughts and writings on stoicism. From what little we know Seneca had a pretty crazy life. He was exiled to Corsica by Caligula. Because he was having an affair with Caligula Sister Seneca was then the tutor of Nero and one of his closest advisors as Niro came to power when things started getting really bad he begs narrow to allow him to retire but that request was never granted and as Nero gained more and more power came more and more corrupt and Lubi an assassination conspiracy called the pizzonia conspiracy formed and on the day of the planned. Assassination word of it reached Nero. Seneca was forced to commit suicide as one of the alleged conspirators Niro's most well-known onslaught. Was that of the Christians. It's bring it home here with. He loved Christian death above all else. Good one a lot of readers. Think that much of Seneca's writing which is often about morals and relationships and feelings is autobiographical but what he's employing is. What Dr Neil employs as well and what? We've talked about a lot already. They create works that apply to the audience to strip the author as much as possible from the ideas and feelings conveyed within. This is something that deal does as well as almost any other songwriter. The song feel like they were written about you specifically when they're on point and they're on point often fourteen years ago tonight. Washington through the garden killing everything inside I led by west of I saw the source. Lewis anger inside no one around them. The rise in time able from his down to his feet grinds bitter sugars. Sweden but well run through the streets of Rome and only one of the most endearing qualities of the mountain. Goats are the thematic heartstrings. Impossibly complex amounts of allusions included in His Music C. Chose Minor dissertation on Seneca for the entirety of albums including the cover sleeve liner notes labels music even his own writing about the record and still desire to toil over interpretation as if it were a stone but in grave with an alien math that you'll never be smart enough to decipher. Sometimes I approach his records like it was a house of leaves. Like book need to reorient my experience. Turn it upside down her sideways or flip back and forth from word to song to sound artwork fruitlessly. I look for connections. That may not be there. It can be maddening and it could be lovely certainly it makes the breadth of his Hanan Infinitely listenable. Who's Elijah and where's he coming from? What does an Incense Factory in Nineteen Thirties? Calcutta have to do with insurance fraud and coping with grief why Slavic dances and widely in rhymes the bread crumbs. I do find lead me down paths traversed before love death longing beyond the aforementioned Alpha couple and the long running going to song travelogues which are conspicuously absent from the record Dr Constantly peppers into his catalog songs about gardens. Food and whether on coroner's gambit these old chestnuts are there providing a comforting grounding along with Dr Neil's honest letter to his friend but the theme on the record that stands out the most unreal. Listening is the lyrics about radio waves. No fewer than six songs mentioned radio and radio adjacent technology shortwave am transistor stereos and cassettes however. This isn't clear and fun radio that you danced doing a living room or crews a strip in a convertible with your headband on this isn't steely Dan's FM or Castello. Radio or even the modern lovers roadrunner. Now this is late night. Radio that barely contained traces of songs amongst the Sea of static. It is the desperate attempt to tune to a song that is trapped between the much more powerful. Am signals of the Evangelical Preacher and Rush Limbaugh? Newsradio it is that barely formed sound that requires imagination and interpretation to recreate the song in your mind and this idea of staticky. Low Power Radio makes perfect sense in the context of reflecting upon a friend that was lost forever after being lost temporarily an album. Long examination of how you can never fully remember someone who has gone no matter how hard you try. This not first materializes in the opening track Jaipur which replaced the Tampa track. We played earlier but is equally furious and intense. The song and the album starts with the seemingly innocuous line about a sweet tooth craving I was having visions of sugar pastries cooked up and clarified butter. However the caloric tone of singing sent shivers down the spines of the listeners. As if a warning that this could get bad by the time Dr Neil screeching about himself being the hard to find station on the am band in the land. Mine hidden in the sand. The Poor Panasonic is pushed to the limits of drainage as the tape. Distorts PULSES CRACKLES? Grief is not mutually exclusive from anger nor beauty from tarnish station J insulin. Long Dr Neal is talked about how? Jaipur was about an unpleasant homecoming. That concept is immediately flipped on its ear with the Second Track. Elisha which ostensibly is about another homecoming. Perhaps returning from prison stint gorgeous and whispered with a string arrangement that complements the otherworldliness of his singing. We can't think of a mountain goat song that sounds quite like it before or since nor another recorded with him. Having a cold set the table. Three extra places. One me one for your one for God. The incense burn in every room. Fill the fullness of time in the empty tomb field future new. I'm coming home Coming home family. Happiness has an immediate and intense rhythm. That feels like it could snap at any minute. Dr Neal's lyrics threats are seemingly precursors for what you would write in his sort of hits. No children with lines like I hope the stars don't even come out tonight. I hope we both freeze to death. Explaining the Song Darnell says that is a song about a couple of car like many of his songs but with a ghostly entity that constantly feeds on mutual hatred in his words. This song is about people who have chosen whatever? The opposite of victory is a theme that would be fully realized in two years on Tallahassee. Oh by the way. The radio to non in this song as well weather forecasts predicting highs in the low teens climate. Look at the there will be. No divorce was written for Dr Neal's wife. In one of his classic slanted Love Songs. That are simultaneously endearing sweet. Well feeling lost hopeless. Dr Neal says it's among his favorites on the record. The amount and depth of emotion that is evoked by him from a scene of watching lover. Breathe while listening to an old man sitting on. The radio is incredible. Specially since it's just totally creepy. When I do it now. I hate when you do that to me. You saw that live link. The wind began to will and you gather Behind you're like God is going to catch you about the pony tail than the old boys crackled through the static. I felt young and the hair stood on the back of mine rising from the gray the final track on the record. We were patriots. Elucidate some of the imagery on the cover. The song starts with the protagonist listening to divorce. Jacques on an army of shortwave radios on a warm Calcutta Day. So you know just like a regular Tuesday. Jock was Czech composer from the eighteen. Hundreds noted for bringing folks sounds like salon dances into Vanek masterworks and while this pleasantly surreal scenes seems like a meek and mild ending especially with a an accompanying Bright Banjo the overall bleakness of the record crashes in on the self as you realize that the man is listening to these multitudes radios to forget what he hasn't yet lost and he will listen and wait seemingly forever on transistor radio. Show line on On coroner's gambit is a combination of lost years. Exactly what happened in that time is unknown? And that's the power of lost years in people who are studied and idolized by others. You can assume hang on clues scour for factoid but only that person who experienced the years is not lost knows the truth of it. It's their truth. After coroner's Gambit Darnell released two of his most popular and Enduring Records the boombox Swan Song of all hail West Texas and the first shot of a new full sound era in Tallahassee. He is returned to his normal prolific output not at the levels of the earliest years but with a constant yield of nicely accentuated records. He's toured in made legions of fans who see him as a sort of humble spokesman for the disenchanted literati. He has written novels that are worthy standalone art but still carry some of the hero worship. Wait he's done an honest and funny podcast where he spent hours talking about his music and his perspectives. That somehow makes you like him even more like the opposite of Lou Reed. Imagine that podcast. He communicates with fans and is one of the more accessible and interesting musicians in the world. Everyone who loves music loves him as a person more. We all feel like he's our friend. We all feel like he would be troubled by our own personal demise. And who knows he he might be last month April twenty twenty as the world slowly shutdown? Dr Neil dusted off the boombox to record again trying to help himself in his bandmates weather. The storm of lost income postponed tour. Dr Neil took a little less than two weeks to commit the fantastic album songs for Pierre. Chevanton to tape the album sold out three separate one thousand cassette pressings in minutes. It's been well publicized and even cause the mountain goats to land on the billboard top two hundred probably the first ever charting album about a French historical perspective on the Pagan Defeat at the hands of Christianity. Unless that's what? The Eagles greatest hits volume two actually about all the accolades are well-deserved. He hasn't lost a step with his personal home. Recordings however these songs were broadcast live over youtube stream by scores of adoring fans not recorded in backyard shack in rural Iowa. Twenty years can change a lot of things as a listener and a fan. There was a moment. When I knew that our sensibilities were growing apart didn't deteriorate with enmity like the Alpha couple. The drifting apart of the relationship was joyless. The new release brought back convergence. I'd assumed would never come again. And it emboldened me to know that there. Our journey forked. The goal is still the same occasionally. We are forced to return to things that we thought were lost. Or maybe we thought we'd put past us. Sometimes it's a painful reminder. Sometimes it's delightful reunion either way. It is full of possibilities. If there's anything we've been taught during this trying time and a fact that's reiterated by the mountain goats it is that not all is created equally explore different sorts of isolation with this series. You know from physical isolation to kind of emotional isolation to forced isolation where you know to protect yourself. This one's a little bit different because even though I do think. This record was a moment of isolation in a very otherwise very prolific in public career. I do think the album has become so much to us. It's kind of become an emblem for dealing with troubling times in dealing with and and getting past feeling alone. It's almost become hopeful. Even in the how kind of dark really is when you listen to the whole record. It's been a pretty important part of my life since it came out. And maybe short of like some of the Lou reed episodes. This is probably an artist that we both kind of feel so personally attached to and so. It's sort of a different sort of episode. You know usually we're learning about it and we're we're kind of surprised at the discovery instead of this new thing with the mountain goats. It's it's not that at all. It's surprising to learn the context of it and how that context interacted with our own feelings about it. Because I mean I didn't know any of this about it. I kind of knew it as his death. Album is album about losing somebody knowing the full story and how it was recorded and how it was this trying experience where you know it seemed like it took him a long time to get what he wanted on that record and I think you told me and don't know we've mentioned this. This is the album where he says he starts to kind of feel like figured it all out and where he you know. He sort of started doing what he wanted to do yet. It came up in multiple interviews. Where he said that's kind of the the line where came into his own and Wasn't practicing anymore. It's a great record. And it will say sort of tangentially researching the Ross William Guy and not that not being styled music. I know much about. He seems like a really Kinda interesting guy. Yeah certainly a dark story. But I've kind of enjoyed learning about him. I guess that would be that kind of new discovery. Thing we talk about is like it's it's been interesting for me to kind of know about that connection and start to learn a little bit about him and what he did and we will post links to all of the places that we used as sources. There are a lot of them but it was especially for me. The annotated mountain goats site we will put information up about that and as well as the podcast. I mentioned some other places where we found interviews so all of that will be in our show notes mountain goats like one of the only bands. Maybe along with like Bob Dylan the pogues where you need like a a companion site could help you get all the references as as your pound's Cantos or something you can't read it on something unique. He needs some extra books to help you figure out what's going on at out. That happens to me with like Charles M Schulz things right while you WANNA play a couple of tracks sure. Let's do it. I'M GONNA start first with my song. This is the extra glens with a song called going to Lubbock nor that on a day out. Outta gas wear burn stall hoops. Basketball them back in stood there by the wrong side. The clear sky an ancient story through certain detail is there was a now along the skull out burn in bride and his Barman. Lay The skull down gently in the In sonner don't extend That was going to Lubbock by the extra glands and the extra glens are John. Dr Neil and another guy named Franklin Bruno Franklin. Bruno was in a band. Nothing painted blue when he is a constant companion of Dr Neal and they did the extra Glenn's for a long time and then they released a record record as the extra lens but Franklin. Bruno is a great songwriter in his own. Right and nothing painted. Blue has some amazing amazing songs and I recommend checking them out but this is this is a great fund song. It was from seven inch on Harriet records. That came out all the way back in Nineteen ninety-three so real early real early into their careers and it's just a song about driving out in the middle of Texas and digging up a skull and put that score on the back of your car except sound so nice and sweet. We're trying to play. Maybe a couple John darnell sounds that maybe some people hadn't heard and this is one that if you hadn't heard and you like the old boombox stuff. This is a song. That's a real treat and check out some of the Franklin Bruno stuff that's ally I got introduced to the mountain. Goats was because of a shrimp compilation called abridged perversion. That had Franklin Bruno Song on it called. Clean Needle which I think is one of the greatest songs ever and I would recommend anybody going out and checking that out or finding that compilation specifically there's mountain goats extra Glenn's Lou Barlow and Franklin Bruno on there as well as others. It's it's really. The whole thing is really good so I was. I WanNa get you sued or anything but I was trying to find that song just to to it this week when we were trying to think of songs to play in so I came across a youtube video by a certain person I know the music is just a normal video except the pictures. Go with video artist pictures of kind of normal looking food. Tv dinners and Mac and cheese and stuff the care the cameras slowly pans into each one. The videos just like forty five different plates with this song. Clean needle playing great. Sounds like a pretty great video. Oh Yeah yeah some some visionary of the Music Video industry. I'm sure sounds edgy. There's one it's like sows berry steak or stroke off this. I remember I probably still have a loose somewhere. Am I cooked it? I'm glad to eat. It sounds very good. It's almost Turkey loaf good. How many gender neo have say south burying them to at least for the next song? I'm going to play something off of Twelve inch that we mentioned so at the beginning of that talk with we went over the releases that the mountain go tad from nineteen ninety one to nineteen ninety seven and then we mentioned one release in nineteen ninety eight. The only thing he released it contained four songs. It was a twelve inch record and it was called New Asian cinema and the song. We are going to play next his from that. And it's called Nahra Colloquia nine one five on that screen and them along said contain. I got cinnamon card. Oh God ninety this little dogs on All right that was Nora Kaluga. I'm sure I'm mispronouncing that off of new Asian cinema which was the only thing the mountain goats released in. Nineteen Ninety eight and it came on the Yoyo records label. And I don't remember when I got it probably around then when it came out I'm sure and it is a song that I played not only because it came out in ninety eight and we had talked about that but also because it talks about radio's again he doesn't stray far. From radio's too often. It also talks about Jakarta. Cabbages French. Toast runs the corners gambit of the mountain goat tropes sort of. It's a really wonderful song. I think all four songs on that twelve inch are really great and if you go through the annotated notes or mountain goat notes on that. Song just put a link. It's worth hearing officer. Nobody wants to hear me. Go in any further on things like Seneca but it is. It's really fun to read that stuff. All the things he sort of dropped in there about things that you don't even notice that are there but they become really integral to the song once you do. Do you know when it came out in nineteen ninety eight so I don't know exactly win. It was released in ninety eight but the record itself is pretty cool. The side a and put a picture up there of this but the picture silly on the site because it's just a blank white label like a bootleg but side B is etching which I always love and there's writing in their pictures. It's really wonderful. I don't know if I can capture all of the pictures on there but I'll try and on this twelve inch gender Neal's wife Plays Banjo and she also plays Banjo on one. Silver Jews Record Look Mountain Lookout C. Which I had no idea about until I started doing research for this. I love that album. I never even noticed it all right. Well we hope you enjoyed our Episode on the Coroner's Gambit. We definitely enjoyed researching and talking about. And we've Joan. I probably reminisced more talking in thinking about this than we have on any episode. I can think of just because we do have so many memories wrapped up especially about when we first met. So it's been it's been good. We want to say. Thank you to our Our podcast network Pantheon. They had some big news. Some of the some of the podcast are going the first the first ever hd podcast they're working with Neil Young Audio people so that's that's a real cool thing. Don't worry we're still going to be recording. The Panasonic boombox so and still get our normal fidelity but We're just no H. We need it sometimes are barely like a lower case. D. Or D. minus so check out other great music. Podcast at Pantheon and as always please please please go out and support artists Go buy a record go by mountain goats record. I tell you to go by that tape but I think it's sold out. I don't know if they're going to do another pressing or not. They sold out really fast. And I will tell you to go get coroner's gambit but the Vinyl version of that is pretty expensive it is. We didn't even talk about what records we have. I just if there are fans listening. I feel bad because I was lucky. Does to start listening and buying in the mid nineties so I got very lucky. I mean they didn't put out very many like he didn't press many he o- of corners gambit of any of them. I don't know what the run was on. Any of them doesn't seem like there are many of them. It doesn't and this was on absolutely kosher records. It's not a label that would have put out. A ton of records looks like on discs limited edition with a thousand copies of Corner Scam. Okay and that record came out with like a tissue outer sleeve around the jacket pretty cool and it's a great record. It's on white vinyl and it sounds good. It sounds really good as I've listened to that thing hundreds of times but the lots of the newer mountain goats records are still impress on vinyl so As as much as we put him on a pedestal. I'm sure he would appreciate any and all business you could get them and having tallahassee is a fantastic record you know. Sunset trees good. I mean all has new stuff is like Joe said maybe not. We don't love it as much as we love the boombox stuff. But that's not because it's not good. It's just 'cause we have different memories in different attachments to it. That new one. Pr Shelving is new. One's great fantastic. And even if I don't feel like I connect is quite in the same way as with the boombox stuff and a couple of after that I still have every single everytime he puts out an album light pre-order it. I will always support everything he does. He's he's great and worth it but if you know go out and get something record stores really need help artis really need help so please please if you can I know everybody's hurting a little bit. But if you can't please go out and support them. Keep the music that we love going and check us out on social media. We are on twitter and Instagram. And Our Name on both of those is highway. Hi Fi pod Ron facebook. We have an email address. Email us anything you want or any. Requests are just chat or email addresses highway. Hi Fi podcast. Add gmail.com right. Well we appreciate you. Listen and reach out. We'd love to hear from you. Got Any other ideas for good isolation records. We'd love to hear him and we will see next time. A unless that's what thriller it was actually about unless that's what goodbye. Yellow brick road was actually about. Unless that's what MEATLOAF's bat out of Hell was actually about unless that's what Taylor was. Nineteen eighty-nine nine was actually about unless that's what green days was actually about. Hi Everyone beer-drinking Babes. I'm Ashley Man Nagy. And we're from rock candy podcast. Every week we bring you a story from the world of music while drinking thematic beers. Did you ever wonder how much Charles Manson inspired the music? You love today. Did you know that joy division and new order are virtually the same band? Are you aware of how we're Tesha really is like how she had sex with a ghost? Do you also not understand what post Malone is. Because we don't well we got you covered behind. The music isn't around anymore. But we're here to pick up the slack and feel a little drunker so go ahead and look for rocky podcast on Apple. Podcasts spotify Google play stitcher tune in wherever you're catcher pods and with that party on kids tardy on.

Dr Neal Dr Neil Tallahassee Ross William Guy joe Yes Ryan Iowa Simon joyner Elijah Mambo Roz Williams Glenn Roz Williams Williams Iowa Seneca Lou Reed stalking Franklin Bruno Sister Seneca Tampa
Apex Predators

A Scary Home Companion

46:47 min | 2 months ago

Apex Predators

"The In every eco-system, there is a food chain. Plants feed on earth and water herbivores feed on plants carnivores feed on herb of ores. At the top of the food chain. Sits the Apex Predator. Creature. With no enemies no weaknesses the beast that preys upon all with impunity. Feasting on the other predators. And this is not restricted to the Animal Kingdom Ladies and gentlemen we to. Have our own predators. Mass murderers, serial killers, mad men, and lunatic women. Colts. Shadowy. Organizations. And yet. They are not the top of their own holy food chain. It turns out. that. Even the most malevolent forces in the world have their apex predators. Drinking whiskey in the kitchen. Telling scary stories around the fire. Music monsters and mayhem Keller's cannibals and cults. Fearful fiction and furious fact tall tales and terrible truths. This Is a scary home companion. In the late afternoon Miami was damp. Muggy. And Loud? An older man left the market holding a paper sack under one Har. You wore sandals with black socks. A half unbuttoned Hawaiian shirt over a sopping wet wife-beater. A blended right in. In this neighborhood, which was mostly retirees. But. Although he might have looked like anyone else. He was not. Any one else. He lived under a different name now. But his real name was Dr Neil Wallis. Noted anthropologist lecturer and author. Who One day slaughtered his entire family and started a new life as an occult serial killer called the Herro specs. He walked back to his apartment. Silently evaluating everyone that he saw. He would look at their soft bellies. Think about the treasures inside. The Harrow spects. Spent years. Killing people in the most vile way imaginable. He had been hunted and caught. He had been caged and studied. He had been released and watched. Many more years passed. And then A few months ago he had been given a new lease, a new purpose, a newly revitalized calling. The priest with the red hands. A man who at one time walked on the side of angels a man who at one time had captured the Herro specs. This man. Had come to him with glorious offer. An offer which brought him here to Miami to this small humble apartment. where he had been making connections talking to new. Friends. Setting plans. And traps. And all the while having the most wonderful dreams. He was part of a family now. Network. The priest was building something bigger than all of them. Down to the corner and so the front of his apartment building. Across the street was a car that he recognized. A dark sedan with tinted windows with two suited agents sitting inside of it. The DRO had somehow found out. He was here. They had sent people around every. So often every few days to survey him. The priest had told him not to worry. Pretend you don't see them Neil. Let them think they have you unaware that gives you the power. You wander past them. Seemingly Unaware and the sixty three year old man. made his way up the stairs. He. Stood in front of his apartment door for a couple minutes. Looking back and forth. Making sure that no one had followed him up. Finally. He felt comfortable enough to unlock the deadbolt and enter. He went into the kitchen to put his groceries into the fridge. When he turned around. He saw a man in an eye patch. Sitting on a chair in the middle of the room. Dr Neil Wallis. Closed. Casket Jack said his victim. I assume you know who I Herro specs. eyeballed. Rack. Now now Jack asked. You can come and sit down on this chair and we can talk. Or? I can beat the ever loving shit out of you and then sit you on this chair and we talk. Why don't we play Nice? The older man sat in the metal framed dining room chair. His hands. Dammit, they were trembling he. He knew. This was coming. This was part of the plan, but still he couldn't stop shaking. Jack had a gun, but he held at his side he didn't. Aim at the man as he knelt down beside him and. Carefully. Cuffed him to the frame of the chair. Four sets of handcuffs to for each arm. When the Heru specs had been secured. Jack set his gun down on the counter next. To the machete. You pulled a matching chair from the dining room table over into the kitchen sat in front of the Harrow specs. He didn't talk not I. Just. Stared at the man taking a man. Jack was. Motionless no twitching fidget in ticks quirks like he was. Carved from stone as he stared into the eyes of his pray. I'm, not. One of them you know. The Harrow specs said. One of WHO The emissaries I'm not an emissary. Oh Jack. nodded. See I, got the impression that you weren't. You have a Sadness about you don't you. Long Hungry. Long denied. STARVING FOR IT I've actually been seeing this a lot of late. They. String, you will law. That's what they do. For you they've been dangling a carrot for how long? Twenty years. And Look at you. You're nothing. Harrow spects looked. At the floor. You're right. I'm nothing I. I don't know anything I. I can't tell you anything. Well. We'll see about that. Jack got to his feet. What are you calling yourself these days Jerry Green, is that right? I knew Jerry wants. I killed. Jack picked up the machete. Neil. I'm going to ask you some questions and. I need to be sure that I get honest answers. So if you lie to me. Or make me unhappy in any way at all. I Going to chop off your arm. Right here at the wrist. See what I did hear. And he pointed to the cuffs. A set around. I securing hand. And a second set further up just above the elbow and locked in. So tightly that they were cutting off the circulation to the fingers. Tight enough to act as sort of ternate. Herro specs struggled in his seat polling yanking but. Handcuffs hold fast. Jack stood in front oven let. Neil tire himself out. And then he said. Just to show you that I'm not kidding. I'm going to cut off one of your arms. Right now. And then. and. Then he did just that. Although. Neil. Wallis was a slightly built man within arm's. Still took three solid wax of the machete take his left hand off at the wrist. A machete is not an efficient tool for limb removal. You See. But then again, that was the point. The handcuffs did their job remarkably well, staunching the blood flow more than Jack had expected. He took his seat again. Facing this hail week man. Howard we find. Rourke. How do I find the priest? He got instant honesty. I. Don't know. I swear to God I, don't know. Is usually by the water, I can tell I can hear it when he calls me. But I only talked to him on the phone haven't seen him in months. I. Only saw him the one time. Jack staring at him. Is, one I blinked. Only rarely. I, believe you Neil. Who Have you met here and don't act like you don't know what I mean. Who? I. I met the boy rourke sends the boy or handsome. Nick. When he has a note for me. last week, I picked up a woman from the airport from Atlanta. Karen her name was. I met with the painter and the Games men and. I saw the book men once. I didn't I didn't meet him. I saw him. And he told Jack the name of the Marina. Jack pressed him for more information and. It all felt genuine. But. None of it was very useful for anything other than deep background. The older man. Kept stealing looks at the front door. Jack asked him. Are you waiting for someone to save you? Because no one is coming to save you. Those agents out front don't care about you. Rourke doesn't care about you. This new family you think you have. They're just using you to draw me out. They're not going to save you. They're giving you to me, right. You get that. You're a sacrifice at my altar. You have nothing to tell me. That's why they gave you to me. You have nothing. You don't matter not to them. Not to anyone. Those bickering butchers you spent so long trying to appease. Don't even know who you are. I am the only one who gives a damn about you all. And I am going to make sure. The legacy you end up with. Is Not the one you wanted. Not The one that you worked so long for. twirled machete. Something Weird happened at the corner of his mouth that. Might have been a SMIRK. Might have been. You raised the blade chop off the other hand of the Herro specs. And the older man held up his chin indignant. You won't break me Jack. I don't need to break you kneel. I'm more than happy to just chop off your other hand and present your worthless courts to the world as a tribute. To hand collector. You. Will ultimately be remembered as a worshiper of Martin rose who you mother Fucker Neil Wallace almost overturn the chair jerking his body forward. Jack had been searching for nerve and boy howdy had he found it? That son of a bitch jumped the line. He never served. Not like me. He never went to the fucking island before he never touched the dweller in the rock. He jumped the line and he took my reward. Jack said. You're. Not Ghastly. One. You're not an emissary. You'd never even had your own Colt. Did you you're really? Nothing. This time. It only took two strokes to chop off Neal's hand at the wrist. Once again he didn't bleed as much as he should have but this time around he had less blood to lose. Pale and gaunt. The HERRO specs Leaned forward in his chair. Lamp and unconscious. In spiraling towards extinction. Jack took his seat. And watch the old man die. As he was washing his hands and rinsing off the machete in the kitchen sink. The House phone started to ring. And there was no doubt at all in his mind. that it was for him. He hits the Speaker Button with the handle of the machete. Hello Jack. Do you know who this is. Although, they had never spoken before. Jack knew exactly who it was. The man formerly known as Frank Rourke. who had been reborn. As the priest with the red hand. Love. Joe. Some three hours earlier. Jack had walked past those two DRO agents sitting in the dark sedan. On his way into the apartment building. The female agent, the passenger seat immediately made a call to her superior. The one eyed man just arrived she said. Supervisor put her on hold and made a call to his superior who in turn made a call to supervising agent for the cell. Kevin Kolja. Special Agent Kevin Kolja spoke with the field agents personally. Direct communication and elimination of extra links on the chain were keystone of DRO field operations. Everything was need to know. The other supervisors were cut off so that Kolja could get the sit rep from source. When the female agent finished. Cogez said noted agent. I needed to maintain your cover. Watching, contact me directly with. No matter what happens do not intervene. You Watch. And you report to me and me alone? Are we clear Kolja took a different phone from the back of his desk. This was a high tech burner of sorts. A disposable encryption device and scrambler only capable of calling one person. He pressed the Green Button and he waited. It rang for three minutes. But eventually. She answered. Lila Ambrose. Special Agent Kolja she said. I trust you have what I want. Yes ma'am he said. He is in Miami. He's found the Herro specs. And he gave her the address. Keep. Your people away. No matter what she snapped she hung up on. Coach support himself a drink. Talking, to her always gave him the shakes. Lila hung up the phone and had one of her men bring her another dedicated line. Lila was the head of her organization. Of course she was the bankroll the visionary, the power, the driving force. She was the boss of bosses. And no one of any sense would dare say otherwise. But while Lilo was the warlord. sadie Jane was the sword. Her Junkyard dog her and force her executioner. Albeit a well mannered one. Sadie, answered her phone quickly. Yes Miss Ambrose. Are you back. Yes ma'am we just landed. I need you in Miami. It's Jack. SADIE scrunched up one corner of her mouth a little bit concerned in somehow. Lila heard that change of expression. She asked you know who closed Casket Jack is right. Yes ma'am, we were actually just discussing him on the flight. How fast can you to Miami? Three hours tops. sadie. This is priority one. Yes ma'am I understand. I want him alive Sadie, I want him with us. Everything else is secondary. Yes ma'am I understand. Don't give me that shit young lady. This is not another search and destroy. You had your fun. This is an extraction I need you to find. Jack. sadie. Manny, Cortes in Oregon cray left the private airstrip in an unmarked bulletproof panel. Van. With Florida law enforcement plates. In the last twelve hours they had collectively. killed well over a hundred men and they were all dog tired. But orders were orders. Manny took the wheel cray had shotgun Sadie road towed in the middle of the back. While the other to clean guns, sharp knives on the drive into Miami. Manny fiddled with the radio and tried to find some soul music. None of them talked about what was really on their minds The fact that within the last hour. The long black veil and Lila had both given them the same command. Find. Jack Jack Hung up the phone. They hadn't spoken long and in fact. Jack. Hadn't spoken a single word. The, priests said. Did you enjoy your gift. He was a peace offering I'm sure you understand. If you go through his brain pan as I know you always do. You will not find anything amiss. because. I can't give you too valuable a gift, kanae. What you seek is price beyond riches. But I can give it to you. After a fashion. I can give her to you jack. You and Becky. Sweet supple screaming Becky. You can be reunited. Together again. Just follow boy. There was a knock at the door. A young boy waited in the hallway outside for. Who couldn't have been more than nine maybe ten. He was missing most of his teeth. Flashed mouth full of Shiny Pink Empty Gums. Without word, the boy walked away. Jack followed. Down the steps across the street past the DRO agents. Towards the water. sadie had the dropper two blocks off well behind the DRO agents. She knew that they had been ordered to watch not intervene but she also knew that she wasn't supposed to know that. So she had to act like she didn't see them while keeping an eye on. She snapped her gum. She walked and twirled her finger in the corner of her wig. Constantly. Looking down at her cell phone not to actually check at the screen was dark. She was just using the reflection to make sure the agents were staying in place. She almost bumped into Jack as he left the building. He was following kid. She rolled her eyes and side and said excuse you. And kept walking down the sidewalk. Jack followed boy across the street. She didn't break stride nor did she looked back She called the boys in the van and made sure that they had is on Jack? Manny was staying with the van craves going out on foot. So now, they contract Jack from three different vantage points. This was an extraction, not a kidnapping. Based on the trail of carnage in desecrated corpses, he had left in his wake. Jack was not a man that they wanted to try and duct. Less. Absolutely. Necessary. When out of sight of the agents sadie finally doubled back cut through side alley she told the boys to keep following. To Watch Jack. But to wait until, she could assess the situation personally. Cray came through her earpiece. sadie. You are GONNA WANNA. See this. In a small park. Overlooking series of both houses on the shore of the bay. The priest with Red Hands Savarona. Park Bench, and took in all the wonderful sights and sounds around him. So many happy families so many children playing. He watched them play. Although. He had all the memories of IRA done which. And could feel. Taste the ugly residue of his predilections. Decreased, had no such hunger. It was not that he value the lives of children anymore than other human life. He just did not crave them. In that particular colonel fashion. He did love the teeth though her that he couldn't shake for some reason. He took an all toyed tin from his breast pocket. And shook out a child's tooth into the palm of his hand. dropped it into his mouth. Gently started to suck on it. Now, of course, the boy was different. The boy was a keepsake from his first night in this new life. Done, which had taken that boy with ill intent. But the priest had seen a greater purpose in the child. To make him useful. To make him an emissary. All the others that depre- shepherded were allowed. No such shortcuts. He had given Dr Mesh a book full of secrets to start him down the dark path. For Rory Silk It was the cursed painting of the ravenous warn. Others. got a visit or letter or a phone call. The priest could not hold their hands. That was not how it should work. He needed show them the way to point them in the right direction. And if they reached the dark path than they would find the priest waiting for them with open arms. Red. Hands. A leader a profit. Herald. A. Breed of emissary for the ghastly ones. He needed ACOLYTES. Loyal foot soldiers and so this foul priest had gone out into the world. To seek out the broken. The lonely those plagued with dangerously morbid curiosity. And he activated them. He pointed them towards their destinies. In recent decades. The enemies of the nightmare people had grown in strength in organization in communication they were fighting back in ways humanity had never before been capable. The Evil Chaos Marshall by IRA done which. Was Legendary. Decades worth of horror in service to the end of days, hundreds upon hundreds recruited to the dark path. Thousands upon thousands of victims. But his days were done. And not just because of the death of the human shell, the meat suit named Ira Don witch, but called by any other names. But because. It was time. For his antiquated methods to die. Rourke. had new approach one badly needed because their numbers had not been this thin week and marginalized in centuries. The religious kill squad, cold nemesis. had depleted, their earthbound powerbase. Far More than anyone knew. In the span. Of. Three years. Cardinal Hume with the help of Lila Ambrose his paramilitary order had been the scourge of colts around the globe La Thousands of bodies in their wake. But evil could never truly be expunged. Although Nemesis came damn close. There was also the DRO who'd been studying the emissaries for some time in performing their own wicked experiments along the way. And now. Lila that Judas that turncoat was growing in power and strength and building her whole life around destroying the end of days. The priest couldn't settle for just striking their enemies down. This time that would not be enough. He needed to build new ghastly empire. Starting with a group of loyal acolytes. Like the boy in the Heru specs. And the others here in the park with him. The priest. So Jack ever the park Sir walking across the grass. And he got to his feet to greet him. Jack was carrying a bag. There was no doubt a gun in that bag but. That didn't matter. He wouldn't use it. He wouldn't dare use it. Not with what the priest had planned. He looked at all of his people in turn. The scarred homeless woman by the Boat House. The mop haired. Rory. Silk. Painting. Characters. The role player Dr, Mesh A-nond playing Botchy Ball with some seniors Kareem, Lee, and a second woman who is also wearing a surgical mask talking with a group of special needs kids in wheelchairs. Jack didn't know who they were. You stood in front of the priest. WHO EXTENDED HIS HAND Jack didn't shake it. Jack. I think it's time. We had talk. Now normally. This is where I would thank you for listening to another episode of Scary Home Companion. And then plug my social media accounts ask you to subscribe and review and support the Patriots on all of which you should do by the way. But I'm not going to go through that Brigham unroll this time not yet. because. This tale is only half told. and. The explosive conclusion is ready. When you are. This episode was edited and mixed by the producer with red hands. And featured music by Dark Sun with sidestep done Jin. A blood red thing rides. Samuel Koren's feel recording of Tibetan monks. MODY lemon with Predator. River, Colt shadow out of time. Chelsea Oxen Dine with the theme. Well. Go listen to part to. What. Are you waiting for? mind.

Jack Jack Dr Neil Wallis Miami Lila Ambrose emissary sadie Jane Scary Home Companion Rourke Colts Manny Animal Kingdom Ladies Keller lecturer Frank Rourke. Kevin Kolja Boat House Neil tire Neil Wallace
199 - Live at the Hammersmith Apollo in London

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

1:25:53 hr | 11 months ago

199 - Live at the Hammersmith Apollo in London

"This is exactly right The wonderful I kinda like this sex lighting about you. Currently uh-huh well it's haunting ghoulish what we're all about. How are you guys? Is Everything good. We're so excited to be back here. This is where we were last time. You and Our Name Right which we miss changes have been made calls have been made us have been removed. We did probably the most rock and roll thing. We've ever done tonight. Which ages drive up in one of those vans and take a left through our own lying to drive in Pretty Rad? It was it was either that or it was just people that had been kind of kicked off the sidewalk. And we're forced to go down that way. We're not interested in one way at all but I chose to see it as a kind of rolling stone situation. Thank serving already said that. Yeah this is the second to last show of our UK and Ireland tour. Yes we know now. Those are two different dance us. Two days in mind Yoder just decided to quit so I went to the Tk Maxx and got the good shit. Shit sorry I don't understand that I'm from America where we call it. T J man. That's the stupidest fucking like boot and trunk. I'm fine with TJ Maxx. T K maxes. Come on some. I'm one on one side of the Atlantic or the other pick pick pick a different thing in pick a blake ten different letters what happened to tk Maxx. I bought some shape. Wear I forgot that. Yeah and it's this weird kind of where it's like like the the boobs are cut out knee like because they don't want to flatten your boobs. Yeah there's like you just WanNa flat and this part this part so I kind of looked like wearing macabre wearing a holster. That's dirty do you think that cutout boobs are GonNa make you perform differently. and kind of like Bull Durham. Or when he's wearing women's underwear he's a good pitcher. Well they're like let's not. Let's not flatten these out. Because this is is what she's got she's got to work with what's caught him on out. What about your address? Mijo Migiro so it just has some pockets. That's no big deal. The Jesus from one segment was like microbiomes can drop out of your pocket. You'RE GONNA have to pay this theater ten thousand sterling. I have to show you a photo. Okay so we're staying at this hotel that it's really old. It used to be you like school and it used to also be an insane asylum. So it's definitely fucking haunted. Shirts called the Broadmoor Arms Hotel. They definitely haunted and been out for a walk last night. Got Home kind of late and like the holidays are really small. And it's really dim and you just keep turning these days. There's urchins in the corner saying please please Massimo so definitely haunted. We're I'M GONNA see ghosts now and so we turn a corner. I and this is what I see. It was terrifying I. Ah I literally. It's like he was waiting for us. That's the way it was so startling. adorable what's his name. I don't know he wouldn't tell me really that's not a talking dog Henry. He's got his own sweet plaque. It was so happy to see what it was like. Could you please you speak quite China. Have my midnight T- well I also have the picture I heard okay. I'm nervous. There's rumors going around so Georgia likes to sleep on planes planes trains and automobiles as we all know I can take a map anywhere. It's great she's into she's I wear. She's but I guess on in this last flight that we took from Dublin to London. No I know what it's going to be chief left her eyewear somewhere. 'cause I turn to see see what she was doing. I was like on the isle over. I turned and looked in. This is what I saw oo. It was never been I really bad. I'm sorry I actually Texter said I'm going to just show a picture of you tonight. Do you want me to run it by you. First because it and then she went bad and I was like Oh yeah I wouldn't ask ask if you're like Oh cute and hot. I'd be like guess. What too bad? You're out of this decision making process but I was like is it okay. Vince gave me his meaning Pretend not to see me. Like for all the Americans and the audience doesn't she look like one character from fat Albert. I hate that okay so sorry so sorry. It wasn't a Gotcha photo. It's before photo but it. Can you believe we have a lazy Susan Cocktail Table Tonight now. We won't know whose stories are who. ooh I hate that. I'll check both. I'll check both. I stayed in my hotel room. I'm all day long because my hotel room looks like a little apartment from the Victorian Times except for all the phones and TV's and stuff and I basically sat by the window with like a shawl around my shoulders writing with a quill. It was. It's so exciting. It's so exciting this. I'm like what's outside. We have a T. K.. Maxwell who gives a fuck. I'm staying in here where the fantasy lives. It's so nice. Oh this is my favorite murder. That's true crime. PODCAST Garin kilkare. This is Georgia hard hard star. Sit Down Okay. Oh wait a bath man and take home thank you do. ooh Okay. This this is very high. I think it goes down a little careful. Is this part game show L. Part true crime. Live podcast Oh dear. God Wobbly Taller than you. Now come down here. I can't find that it's MM-HMM THEY COME on down this way we won't or do it won't be very far there. You go sit naturally this is like some fucking Beatrix Potter like Mrs Verbal Wobbles. PODCASTS got it. I want US closer to the table but I refuse to get up out Jones. We don't have time to reset. We have to get into this okay. It's time for the speech. Tell them most of you know the speech at this point. It's kind of there. There's there's really no point. Except for the fact that a handful of you insist upon bringing outsiders please listen to this thing I love. Now I'm not interested is in true crime. Do it anyway okay. I guess that'll be the kind of evening we're going to have so you're the people I'm talking to. We call you the victims or the drag alongs. This is a true crime comedy podcasts. Some people are not comfortable with that combination because they immediately. We assume it's disrespectful. So we feel the need to explain up top Georgian. I have loved true crime since we were very kind of dangerously young and parallel to that we have always dealt with the hardships in our lives through humor. It's how you were raised and how we cope and so now when we talk about what we believe to be the worst things that can happen to people that can happen to a family that can happen to an individual while we talk about it. We often feel the need to make jokes during it. And that's just are coping mechanisms for dealing with the horrible shit. That seems to need to go on day after day in this fucking world so so we just want you to know that that's how we do business and if you don't like it you can get the fuck out very politely. The fuck not defensively. We'd also like you to know that our last show at Dublin. We had a pastor under who came to the meet and greet book like Hum and he was a humongous fan so he can handle it in your delicate sensibility. Closer to God than you are for Fuck Sake. He's fine with it. Simply say is is my choice for home security. It's comprehensive professional home security at a fair price and right now is the best time of year to get simplisafe security system and our listeners. Get get a free security camera. Plus a huge discount on your security system simplisafe protects every room door and window was twenty four seven professional monitoring a smart smart lock and video doorbell defender Front door from porch pirates inside an arsenal of sensors and cameras covering every inch of your home. If there's a break in they can give real time video confirmation to police as it happens so police respond up to three point five times faster plus simply safe makes it easy on you. There's no contract hidden fees or are fine print and prices started just fifteen bucks a month. Is it simplisafe dot com slash five to get a free camera. Plus simplisafe's holiday savings this offer is for a limited time. I'm only in its ending soon. Visit simplisafe dot com slash today that simplisafe dot com slash save by. Yeah but spending hours sifting through. The racks isn't especially when the holidays are busy enough threat and makes it easy to get thrift store pricing with the convenience of online shopping. Shopping thread up. The world's largest online thrift store is on a mission to help you be kinder to your wallet and the planet this season shop today for an extra thirty percent off your first order. Order dot com slash murder discover millions of secondhand finds from trendy brands like ever lane thence and theory all to ninety percent off estimated retail. And instead of spending hours at the racks you can shop millions of deals on your phone anywhere anytime. Personalize your search by budget size styles and favorite brands. Find exactly what you're looking for. All the items are high quality condition and some even still have the tags on them around ninety percent of the clothes. I buy our second hand because it's better for the wallet. It's better for the planet. I'm really only gonNA wear them a couple times only so don't feel bad about wasting money plus at startup. You can find a ton of stuff so it's totally worth it threat episode sustainable and more affordable notable way to get through the season and for our listeners. Here's a little extra holiday. Cheer get thirty percent off your first order at threat dot com slash mortar. That's thirty percent off your first order at brought up dot com slash murder goodbye. It's me it's meets you it. It is okay. Okay I feel I want I last time when I did Jack The ripper and had a nervous breakdown on this very stage I had to watch silently sweating monopoly table. There's I I didn't think it through that. The people who would know best about every minute detail of the Jack The ripper case this would be in this room with us until I was in a paragraph to going and like it all felt like the whole thing was going straight into corrections corner like it was going to be twenty nine our corrections corner when I got back I was fucking sweating leading. It was just seemed like they go on for it was it was. It was terrible now when we got back stage and we had a meet and greet that night right behind doing this curtain and we met all kinds of people there was one woman who was like. Oh no no. This is my Jack. The ripper is my whole thing and you did fine. I was just like Oh my God thank again like I truly almost cried. You know you're my you're my colonial overlords. I want please you so badly. It's it's it's in my blood it's in my DNA. Please them please them do the murder right or as they say an Ireland do the more or Orion so. I'm going to do my best tonight as idea the Lambeth Poisoner Dr Thomas Neill cream cream. There is now if we have the ability with this technology. GT's zoom in. We'd go in real close. Dr Thomas Neill Cream is because they're a little off the little little bit in the is he has a touch of the part of the jerk when it's really oh yeah Omni grabbed all. He's got the optic Rabbi Cross. And then when you think about doc as like this psychotic mad poisoner it's such a bad combination or just like would you like to take pill like near her me. Oh Me Oh no thank you. Will you know it was soft spot in my heart for cross dies. Oh I would take Elvis. I would take any pill he gave me. I don't care I would take. They do call. Oh him the Elvis of poisoners. That's why that's where that came from. Okay this is Dr Neil Cream when he was in his prime mm-hmm but then here's old. Dr Neil Cream. which is the picture you see? More often picture of that same picture turned around with. Yeah they took. Victory left it in the summer of two weeks now. He's older and more intense. But when I look at this picture it reminds me of like the first and original Gif. which is my favorite of all a dramatic chipmunk? The biggest if only we have the technology to put top hat on that Jim we would be on our way. Yeah I love it Next time when we when we go to it technical college and get degrees in whatever whatever you have to do to okay the sources use for this this story. We appeal murder Pedia and one of my favorite websites the multiple award winning blog murder by gaslight by the author Robert Wilhelm and he has three books for sale on Amazon. That look amazing. That are all about basically the murder from around this time. So check that out. Dr Thomas Neill Cream. He's or as I like to call him. Tom Cream the worst name of all time foreign may may twenty seventh eighteen fifty in Glasgow. The oldest of eight children and the nineteen fifty four the whole family most to Quebec Canada. Really it was just one girl and she happened to be. It's one girl is an opera singer from Quebec. Did that as if I could stop intimidating me London. So he's very smart grows up smart. Wants to be a doctor. He goes to McGill University. Malaya uh-huh sure to study medicine graduates. Eighteen seventy six after writing his thesis on Chewing Gum. Kind of chloroform. Oh no one thought to red tag his after you know what I wanNA study poisoning in like a creepy way. So that's shadowing you ever taken a writing in class. Hi Tom Cream majored in murder. Yeah okay surround. The the same time in eighteen seventy six he starts dating a woman named Flora Brooks. She is the daughter of Lyman. Brooks is an owner of a hotel just outside Quebec City and early in the relationship nations shift she becomes pregnant not alone he has something to do with it. He gets her pregnant. I should have written so Medical Student Tom Cream tells her. I'm going to give you an abortion in secret. Of course because back then they were illegal. Can you imagine the fucking Dark Ages anyway but he botches the abortion almost kills her when so of course. She has to go to the hospital when her father finds out that she she is really sick. And something's wrong with her. He takes her to the actual. You know he goes. There finds out that the reason and she's sick is because of a botched abortion and then he his sickly makes Tom Cream Mary his daughter at gunpoint literally yes US walks from right down to the church way to do it. Yeah so soon. After the wedding Tom Cream decides he wants to pursue his medical studies Saudis in London. Oh that's weird you WANNA get out of the entire country and off the common okay. So so he he leaves his young Canadian radian white floor behind but not before he gives her some pills that she needs to take to get better so once. He's here here in London. Of course the party starts ring comes off. It's Tom Cream party time mustache. He's rips as mustache off and runs runs into piccadilly circus yelling. I love the circus. He parties cheats on. Flora constantly. Never tells does anybody. He's married. Meanwhile back in Canada floors than taking the bills that he prescribed to her and in eighteen seventy seven. She comes down with what her doctors think is bronchitis and August of that year. She dies of consumption. Which is just a generalize is wave saying they died young so back so I wrote? I can't find any information about Tom. Cream going back for the funeral so I assume he just sent a telegram that said thoughts and prayers stop. Aw Yeah so in London party. Tom Cream fails med school. Of course so they send him up to the Royal Colleges of physicians and Surgeons in Edinburgh where the failed Londoners go to make their way man Who in God's name would start sites with the country of Scotland? What am I doing? What am I even saying hanging? Stephen can you mark this entire section. Please he's not here sailing. Okay so there he He gets his license from what I read which definitely could be Accurate but one of the articles. I read said he there. He got his license for midwifery. Oh so essentially you you studying to be like an OBGYN. I guess which is. Can you imagine that. Fuck Goosey bastard popping up between your knees as you're going into Labor I I take that out off. Stop looking at me so intensely a year later in in eighteen seventy eight. He moves back to Canada this time. London Ontario so I when when I was reading the research the J. sent me I got to this part and it was like et one o'clock today immediately assumed that I picked the wrong murder and this was a London Ontario murder not a London England. Murder that fucking feeling. You're like texting him. We've got a serious problem. I sent him like six texts in a row and then read one more paragraph and I was like Oh sorry. We're we're back in London now. Everything's back three in the morning. It was literally three in the morning crib. He hates me so okay. So He's in London Ontario. He sets up his practice. Six months later in May of eighteen seventy nine one of his patients named Kate Gardner is found dead in a woodshed jed behind his medical practice and she smells like chloroform and chloroform. Smell like A. It's really chloroform me. It smells like every Uber. You've got your whole life. Essentially oh I could I could smell that. CK One yeah from the past yeah whatever CK one used to be made out of or the designer imposter. Debbie Gibson's electric youth. So Dr Cream is immediately called in for questioning a former. A formal inquest is held cates. It's Roommates Sarah Long testifies that kate was pregnant and she went to Dr Cream to get an abortion and he testifies Dr Cream. Yes that did happen but he claims James she refused. He refused to conduct the procedure and that he says he just treated her for Sunday. Since which of course I had had to google. Yeah what is that it means aging. So He's doing vo talks sexually. He basically tolls testifies at the inquest. that it must have been a suicide because he didn't do anything. Another doctor weighs in saying no one could possibly hold chloroform over their own face long enough to kill themselves and also that the scratches on her face would indicate there was violence during that time also not indicative of someone trying to kill them so check and check but there's not enough evidence to indict him so kate's death is ruled a quote murder by persons unknown. And but don't worry because this trial ruins his reputation in Canada and everyone hates him. Well done to your grandparents or great grandparents and he does what anyone anyone in that situation. WHO's aided in Canada would do? Come on down to America. So in August eighteen seventy nine he sets up a new practice in Chicago. Elenora I just I can't what do you need. I need to move on then. I need to just simply okay. Okay and then if you lean on this it's going to grasp it just grip it. Let's drive it like a bus Double Decker uh-huh okay. Okay thank you know probe in Chicago. He opens a practice right in the what was at the time in Chicago. They're basically they're red light district and he becomes basically secretly an abortionist for the sex workers that are in the area. Yeah and also women who you know it was illegal but of course it got done constantly so most doctors. He wasn't the only one lots of doctors did it. After hours just cash under under the table I feel like he should have known that he wasn't very good at it and maybe should acquit. I think that's what he was into. Oh you're going. It'd be disappointed when you learn. Dr Neil not a very good guy prepare yourself. I know I want you to be disappointed. The mustache says he's Stephen so here he comes. Running in from the back in eighteen. Eighty Eighty police start hearing rumors that Dr Cream is performing abortions. So they keep an eye on him and his part time medical assistant a midwife named aimed. Howdy Mac so apparently back then at the time to get an abortion you had to have contact and they would set up it? Would they would be called midwives sometimes but they would basically set up deal where the doctors would meet them at a tenement apartment that no one lived in and perform the abortion and a very unsanitary Mary disgusting the Back Alley Style abortion and the doctor. Just come in and leave and there would be no trace of anything so That's what Howdy Eddie. Mack was helping set up. God bless her soul but in August eighteen eighty police discover the decomposing body of a woman named name Marianne Faulkner in this tenement apartment. And they trace it back to howdy. Mac who's the one who rented it and when she's arrested of course she's immediately like back. I did it for Dr Neil Cream and she tells police Marianne Faulkner she met her there because she'd brokered the deal and Dr Cream came to perform the abortion. He bought it and then left her to die. What of course when one doctor cream is tried for the murder of Marian Faulkner his defense is that actually had is the one who performed the abortion that she botched it and he came in he was called to try to save her life Mary Ann's life And because had he is a black woman and Dr Kramer a white doctor the jury takes his word over hers and he walks free due to lack of evidence so in December of eighteen eighty. Another patient of Dr Creams named Ellen Stack after taking medicine. The doctor cream designed himself now. So spoiler alert. Dr Cream is super into strychnine. That's his this thing. And apparently at a certain point I'm sure when he was partying in London is in his early days. He started taking a pill that he had put together himself. Self that was strict. Nine morphine cocaine. Wow that'll pack a punch. It explains the is. Yeah Yeah So. He tried to start doing that here in Chicago. So so basically basically D- Ellen Stack dies after taking this medicine and it has this pill that he put together for her how to lethal amount of strychnine in it Dr Cream accuses. The pharmacist a man named Frank Pyatt of tampering with the medication and Free Pie. It says that he's innocent. The case is never solved loved everybody. Nobody goes to jail in April of eighteen. Eighty one another patient of Dr Crain's named Alice Montgomery dies strychnine poisoning after she gets an abortion Russian abortion from Dr Cream and that's treated as a murder case but again there's no hard evidence and the case remains unsolved so then Dr Crane starts putting together he tells. People is epilepsy. Medication on my God. This guy's a dead is not a good doctor her so some people actually swear by it. One person it works for is a elderly railway worker named Daniel Stott Staudt and dental star had a wife who was thirty years younger than him. Quite beautiful named Julia and sometimes he would send Julia to go pick pick up his medication at all Dr Creams Office and so they Daniel notices. That Julia's like need any more medication. Or do you want media. Go check on your medication. Dr Creams Office. That's right they're having an affair and then soon they decided it would be better. If Daniel Stop wasn't around to ruin their good time so Daniel Start is poisoned with strychnine. He dies on July fourteenth eighteenth. Eight hundred eighty one and when this case goes to trial Julius DOT entirely turns and she's like this guy did it all. It was all his idea. It was was his plan. And finally this time Dr Neil Cream Thomas. Neill cream is found guilty and sentenced to life in prison. Guys come on ten minutes in. That's that's not how it's going to go and you know that you know that he's rich so his brother bribes the authorities and he gets out of jail ten years early. Ah Yes. Their father died I guess 1887 and left then a ton of money so he gets released July of eighteen ninety one. He's only serve of ten years so basically they say after Julius turned on him his he had always had a very obviously a very very problematic. Love hate relationship with women and after that the whole in like debacle. His hatred of women is just off the charts and acquaintance of Dr. Dr Crane says this about him quote. Women were his preoccupation and his talk of them far from agreeable he carried pornographic he carried pornographic photographs. It's the late eighteen hundred. He WanNa see this huge cardboard thing. It's dirty she has. We're close on winking at the camp. So you WanNa see the hottest ankle I've ever seen. And he was in the habit of taking pills which he said. We're compounded strychnine morphine cocaine and of which affect he declared was aphrodisiac. Jack in short he was a degenerate of filthy habits and practices and not popular. Okay so now a Dr Cream is a free man slash murderer and he decides to take his inheritance and come on back to London England. So right mixed feeling you don't know how to feel about it too sorry happen. There's nothing you can do. Why Boo he arrives on October? First eighteen ninety one. He finds himself a place to live on Lambeth Palace Road so on October thirteenth eighteen eighteen ninety one he meets a nineteen year old sex worker named Nelly Don worth And she has witnesses see her walking with a topper and that's a gentleman wearing a top hat. The next day she found slumped in her bed apparently drunk with terrible stomach pains and but she's she's able to tell witnesses that a tall dark cross eyed man gave her something to drink. Quote twice out of a bottle with white stuff Bennett. where it's like Nelly? After the first time drink she dies on the way to the hospital and the cause of her death is found to be strychnine poisoning. Okay so this is later on when this gets in the paper. There's all kinds of hilarious drawings so basically. They did dry once he was caught. They did drawings of him handing out pills cows like they were fucking lining up for it. Oh neat and also they actually had. That's after he gets okay. I thought you went to the audience and show or ankle so no. No one could connect Dr Cream. Tonelli's death but he can't leave it alone so he decides he's going to non anonymously write a letter to the coroner to say that he could name the murderer for fifteen hundred pounds. I bet it doesn't work it doesn't it actually is the thing that gets caught. He anonymously also rights to a local business owner. A man named W. F. D. Smith jury initials must have been very rich and he accuses him of the murder Demanding money in exchange for his silence so these people who had nothing to do with anything that was going on or like opening these letters like okay without on any inbox so Dr Cream strikes again on October twentieth. When a twenty-seven-year-old sex worker named Matilda clover there she is as she leaves her room at seven? PM To meet a man that introduced himself by the name of Fred and end at three am when she's back in her room after going out with him all night. She wakes up screaming and pain and telling people fred had given her pills that she now al new or poison so in spite of this because of her background and because they find alcohol in her the system they decide that she actually has drunk herself to death And she'd been prescribed sedative from Dr earlier. So that's some of that was in her system systems so they're like basically like she was all fucked up. Yeah let's not look into it. It's not treated as a murder. It's not investigated so then. Of course just once again Dr Creams gotta get in there. He's gotten away Scot free but he needs to write another anonymous letter. This time to a very well respected doctor named Dr William Broadbent and he accuses. Dr Cream accuses Dr Broadband in the letter of murdering Matilda and he demands money for her silence. Doctor Broadbent immediately takes exit down to Scotland Yard and has like this will probably interest you in some way So after Matilda's death Dr Cramped Tanks Vacation Asian back to Canada so he can buy himself five hundred more strict nine pills slowly shit. Yeah and then comes back to London in the spring of eighteen ninety two and band basically goes on a poisoning spree on April second of eighteen. Ninety two Dr Cream meets a young woman. Name Louise Harvey No as you can tell by her illustration Louise Harvey is not having it in any way. Is that a hair the hat or a hat. Okay although could be like real swoopy hair it could be. I really relate to Louis. Harvey had to sit for that picture the whole time like that. She's just like are you done yet. It's been seven weeks. Okay Dr Cream offers Louis. Some pills that he tells her will quote. Put the blush back energy uh-huh but she senses that something is off with this dramatic chipmunk and the top passer so instead of taking these. She's just like why don't take these pills. Keeps bringing it up. So when he's not looking. She acts like she took him and really she just throws them in the Thames. which is my favorite Eric? That if you're ever drinking at a bar and you have a drunk friend who keeps insisting you do shots do it. Adrian Kavanagh does Cole Sand and just pretend you're the shot but just throw it over your shoulder just throw it behind. You make sure there's no one behind you or make sure there's a broke drunk. Who wants to swap behind? You like Tequila. She she ditches those pills into the river talking lover for and basically goes on her way so on April eleventh eighteen ninety two in two more women twenty one year old Alice Marsh an eighteen year old Emma shrivel. They're both sex workers that he meets when he's out. He laces both their beers. Here's was strict nine pills and they live in the same boarding house and so that night when they're home they both. It's the same thing. They wake up screaming in pain in the middle of the night and they both die days later so at this point the police are like we think there might be a serial killer on the loose and and it was the whole Jack. The ripper thing had only happened four years before. So they're like it's it's happening to us again so this time. The newspapers nicknamed nicknamed the mysterious killer the Lambeth poisoner. which was that picture? I show Jay So they questioned both of the doctors that those anonymous US letters got sent to and of course they're both cleared of any suspicion and then they take the letters because they're like who who wrote these letters. Those are very suspicious. Asia's especially since the second letter refers to Matilda's death as a murder even though she was the corner decided that she died of drinking a a cause of her cause of death was due to drinking so I said that perfectly so in May of eighteen ninety two DR cream happens to a friend. An Ex New York City. Detective named John Hanes his living in London he is following the lambeth poisoner murders really closely. Because let's used to do for a living and he dr cream. We start discussing at one night over dinner. And the doctor tells Haynes that he can take him on a tour of the city and show him or all of these women lived and where it all happened and he can't keep his mouth shut and while he gives this chore and and in Talks About the details really specifically what happened to these women. He includes Matilda clover and Louise Harvey in the stories. So Oh the Dr John Hanes. IRA this is kind of suspicious. So he goes over to Scotland Yard and tells does his best friend. Inspector Patrick McIntyre about the whole evening and he said quote he knew the places that Times the whole commotion even in their conversations of course he said he was merely conjecturing but I watched as expression when he spoke and well. I know this sounds Dadi but well I I swear he was. There like he'd known those poor girls intimately how so inspector MacIntyre is like all right. Let's take a look at this guy. And and then they start following him. They realize that he constantly frequence sex workers. He's kind of in the mix with them all the time and then when they contact the US authorities and find out about creams eight hundred eighty-one conviction for murder by poisoning. And that little thing so they have enough evidence to arrest him so on July thirteenth eighteen. Ninety two Thomas Neill cream is charged with the murder of Matilda clover. His trial begins on October seventeenth. And the star witness is our girl Louise Harvey Yeah that's right. Same look on her face she sits. It's in the box testifying that a man and a top hat tried to make her take pills and when the prosecution acid that man is in the courtroom that day Louise Harvey Viewpoints at Dr Cream and says there he sits sir big as life could not do the accent just four days later on October. Twenty first eight thousand nine hundred ten ten after ten minutes of Juries Liberation guilty. Fuck do we have to leave the room. Can we say it now just have. I'll say it out allowed. Dr Thomas Neill Cream is found guilty so he sentenced to hang sure. Take a moment. He's sentenced to hang on November fifteenth. Eight thousand nine hundred eighty two and the story goes that he's standing there with a noose around his neck on the gallows and the bag over his as head and his last words. Were I am Jack. And then they pulled the lever and he goes down mid-sentence no easy inspector MacIntyre. Some believe this was him. Admitting to being Jack The ripper and that actually birth stem some theories that he was so rich he had a double go to jail for him because he he was in jail in eighteen. There's no way it could have been him but there were like buddy could have paid. Who'd get paid to go to jail? Komo one I'll sock it away and then in the bank it'll make interest ten years. I'll get out. I will have made five thousand dollars but others say since this was a private execution there was a hood over his Ed. There's no way anyone overheard what he was was saying from there. And that basically the that whole theory was away. It was made up to sell newspapers. But either way Dr Thomas Neill Cream. I'm was the lambeth poisoner. And that is the chilling story of Dr Thomas. Neill cream the great. Tom Wow I never heard of that before really right. I mean not cool not cool at all few. I'm glad you're able to do that. I mean the change mid for London in Ontario when I saw the words London Ontario almost killed everyone around all right. Great job wants Cedeno. The one single discovery that matters most for your dental care. It's simply that if you have good habits you're good and that means rushing for two minutes twice a day in philosophy regularly no matter. What brand do you use? That makes that simple starting with an electric toothbrush. refillable floss floss anti cavity toothpaste clips. Electric Brush has a sensitive sonic vibrations with a built in timer and thirty second pulses to guide a full and even clean and the quit floss dispenser comes with pre marked stringed. How you use just enough since this clip delivers fresh? Brush heads floss and toothpaste refills to your door. Every three months your routine is always right and yes shipping is free. Join over. Three million healthy mouths can get clipped today starting at twenty five dollars we are on our tour right now in the UK and we both brought our clips because we just love them so much. They really make a difference when I brush Schmidt teeth if I use clip it actually feels like I really did a good job totally. It means. I'm good. You are good if you go to quip dot com slash murder right now. You'll get your first refill. You feel for free. That's your first refill free get clipped dot com slash murder spelled G. E. T. Q. U. IP dot com slash murder. Quip the Good Habits Company guy by turn your dream into a reality was squarespace. Course makes makes it easier than ever to launch your passion project. Whether you're looking to start a new business showcase. Your work published content sell products or anything else Scorpion. Scores faces the tool for you with beautiful templates created by world class designers. And the ability to customize just about anything with a few clicks you can easily make a beautiful website yourself square spaces powerful our full e commerce functionality. Lets you sell anything online and analytics help you grow your site in real time. Everything is optimized for mobile right out of the box and there's nothing but a patch or upgrade great ever buying domains is simple. And you'll get the help you need with square spaces twenty four seven award-winning customer support. squarespace empowers millions of people from designers and lawyers an artist and gamers and even restaurant people and Jim People to turn great ideas into something real squarespace dot com slash murder for a free trial. And what your eight launch. She's offer code murder to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain that squarespace dot com slash murder offer code murder. Goodbye I thought this would be fun to do since as I've said before everything here is haunted including this theater. So loch ness monster this this is the story of the Enfield Poltergeist. Oh here tonight do you see. It's one of the most famous supernatural cases in history. Oh area hadn't heard of it. I'm great everything. And it's known for inspiring that Twenty Sixteen movie the conjuring I showing living. I'm showing at the theater. It did you know about this. All about the conjuring entire franchise so I got information from wikipedia. There's an article in people by Jody. Leonie sorry yes I fucking Shit at us. Even Steven can can we get. Let's get a little room tone. Stephen you have to stick this in at the top of mind. Sorry sorry sorry. I got INFO from wikipedia. The article in people by Jody Leonie People magazine. Oh an article from a website called history versus Hollywood would the PSI Encyclopedia or Cy Encyclopedia. Dark his the dark histories podcast and also so so is getting ready tonight. Showering dyeing my hair. I listened to the episode of Castle left of Yeah it was a laugh so those are doing good. It's really nice so let me tell you about this story. Peggy Hodgson there you go She's a forty seven year old divorcee. She's a single mom and she lives with her four children in Enfield. It's a quiet. It's like fifteen minutes. I mean fifteen miles from here but it's about three hours really probably because traffic traffic from Los Angeles. We're known for that. We are traffic so they live a two eighty four green street. She's known for being a quiet and strong woman. She works really hard to keep her family afloat hard financial times she'd just been divorced and her husband's like seeing a new woman. She's hot I guess so. So the oldest kid is named Margaret. She's thirteen then. There's Janet his twelve she's lively and extroverted. John is eleven. They don't explain why he got sent away to boarding school. He's just kind of not in the story. They like doing that though sending away. It's not like America where you have to be really bad to go to boarding school sometimes times you just go. It's like do you like little jackets. Do you WanNa wear a little jacket and shorts all the time. We're going to send you away. I know this is so silly silly but I just think of haunted castles boarding school which is Great. And then there's little billy who seven. Here's the family that's sewers. Oh there it is. There's a sample case everybody. There might be another one. There is another one. Oh sorry sorry there Mike. There's another one after this. It's just that they drew him. Oh He's crow. Site goes the next one. I'm so sorry sometimes. We have to turn our pictures in before we're done writing are murder so you just go like yeah. This order seems fine. I and then as as I was writing and I was just like all these newspaper. Articles are coming before the murders are taking place is. This is a really hard job. Uh guys here's another one there. He is admitting to being Jack The ripper. He's whispering it right into that guy's ear. No that's the hood that blocks his mouth and makes it that whole thing ally. Okay sorry my story is officially over them and now one in the corner looking. Sullen is Jenny. She's the one that this kind of like revolves around for the most part. So that's them years. Sorry this is. But but but but seventy this is seventeen. Seventy seven NOPE. Little nineteen seventy. America's just declared independence. It's very difficult to be a divorce. Say with the colonies have been broken off that they have photography. It's actually the way that picture is taken. They looked like really awesome band crooked. Yeah Yeah it looks like more haunted that way like their new single. You're haunting me is this definitely. Looks like he was in a Britpop pop band later one-two-three in a stomach. Okay get serious about this. The first time. Anything strange ranges noticed is on the night of August thirty first nineteen seventy seven. God it around nine thirty pm pay the MOM. She hears a shuffling sound coming from the John and Janet's room and she's like dammit those fucking kids probably GonNa shut them up but the night before the children had complained that their beds were shaking. Yeah I've been down and I'm sure she was just like blew them off as most adults children on Especially in the seventies where you're like you know hi. It is like a bus full of seventh graders in the. Is that what you're gonNA say blue someone off your you'd I wish. I wish everyone else could see the fruit room. It's a bunch of adults going like this. You guys looked sex. This is this is this is just say it this the thing we're in our country. It's no big deal to say fanny. Yeah at least I do. Sometimes we'll do so what this is about ghosts. Please have respect for goes so. She ignored their behavior which adults to children ignore behavior children. Oh now in the seventy oh now I get what. All the cringing was that. I don't know it's worse when they start booing and you don't know what they're doing. Lean start laughing at you. Don't know what they're laughing about. Yeah it's really surreal experience. Don't wish on anyone so she Peggy goes into the room and Janet is complaining about the chair and it's making noise so peggy takes out of the room but when she goes back to the kid's room to turn the light out the shuttling down starts again the sounded that she said the chair was making it keeps happening and pay later describes the sound as if someone was walking across the room wearing slippers shuffling sheesh noise I know they're being haunted by Lazy Person. Peggy turns the back on and the sound stops and happens again and then this is when the knocking starts. There's three Knox followed by a heavy Oak Chest that's on the wall. It starts moving across the room towards the door as if pushed an invisible for she sees. Peggy is like a normal woman and she's not like a you know I don't know like my mom like a bit of a hysteric. She's not like with uh-huh she's one of those low key people. I saw her sweater. I know peggy pushes the chest back against the wall and once again it slides heads back out of their minds of trying to block the doorway. Lock the kids in the room super creepy. She tries to push back again and it won't move so she freaks out grabs the kids. They go to the neighbor's house. Which I think is what most people would do right? Yes the Nottingham's the Nottingham's quickly dismissed their story. But they say okay. Okay we'll come over and listen to audio paradise as they enter the home and they all start hearing the knocking sound and it's coming from all over the house and I guess the noise is like it's like us doing it. It's not it's just coming from here. Obviously but it sounds like it's coming from the whole house it's almost like the Knox following them around the house. They don't know what to do so they just call the police come and the police constables arrive at around one. Am so they tell. Will the police about the haunting. I'm sure the police are like alcoholics later. Pc Caroline heats in her co worker. They start hearing tapping coming from the walls and they checked the walls the addicts pipes. But there's nothing to explain these weird noises when they go into the kitchen in to investigate the refrigerator pipes thinking maybe that's the problem. Caroline watches with the Hog Hodgson's as a chair in the living room wobble slightly from side to side uh-huh and then slides across the floor about three to four feet before stopping a fucking police persons. Yes this like not so. Did you see coronation from St last night. Or I feel like that's like an and she later signs an affidavit saying that this is exactly what she saw it she's not fucking around and she's not an alcoholic whatever. Today's Hodgson's in the Nottingham's witness legos and marbles flying across the room standard standard standard ghosting one of the Nottingham's picks up of marble after it lands and it's burning hot cocoa sti on September fourth. Mrs Nottingham Calls The Daily Mirror because the police are like. That's Super Weird miscarrying. We totally not our problem. See later so this the families are like trying to get someone to take them seriously. Help them demons are not in our jurisdiction. I'm sorry I'm getting the fuck out here. Yeah so they call the daily here just to be like someone come. I'm over here. You guys love it so they're hoping to gain helped by the press so journalist and photographer come to the House and the next the next day they see the legos flying around the room and even hits the photographer in the head. Get some news yes or is it. Funny it's funny. You want some proof just like what kind of asshole ghost is this. And they're all standing there and like they're all a bunch of people who they're coming from nowhere. It's like you would have seen the kid but like secretly being sliding that's not happening and so they send another reporter senior reporter and photographer. You'll follow up visit because there's a fucking story here and the senior reporter. Here's that knocking it's all. It's legit people who hear these crazy things and they. They contact the Society for for psychological research on behalf of the family so this society is from Kensington then and it's one of the oldest paranormal investigative bodies in the world who yeah they're founded in London in eighteen eighty two by a group of scientists philosophers I and other academics. It's the first words. It's the first scientific organization ever to examine claims of Psychic Nick and paranormal phenomena and remains today as one of the most legitimate research bodies that investigate supernatural activity so in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven to society members Maurice Gross. He's played by Simon McBurney in conjuring okay and I I Lyon play fair played by Tom from succession. Yes Aka Matthew McFadden yet AKA MR Darcy. Mr Darcy's in the conjurer. Yeah they were going to figure this out. We're like we're the we're like people when they have these hats on their like ghost hats. We're going to figure this out so objects continue to fly and around for weeks but by October. There's like furniture and cutlery and household whole objects that isn't nailed down. Start to disrupt various rooms of the house so it just keeps happening and one night the investigation investigators clear all the objects that can be moved. Moved Janet's room and they're like we're GONNA have a test and see what happens. They get all the furniture from her room and they report that sometime after. They hear tremendous Mendes vibrating noise coming from the now empty room. Don't you're like someone was drilling a hole. You can have that one back into the room. That had nothing and no one in it and they find that the Victorian fire grade that weighs like sixty pounds had been untorn from the wall so like not something a little kid could do and most of the hunting is around Jenny. The daughter is twelve and I guess that's kind of a normal thing thing for pre pubescent or you know little girls going through puberty to kind of get that energy going a lot of drama a lot of seriously. Yep Ah blame direction. Let's see photo. Oh Harry styles it's not home. Tom Looks Super Creepy and haunted her. Supposedly levitating no. Who is that guy was going to ask you? I don't know my glasses on. It looks like a fat Steve McQueen from hair they do. You know who the posters Starsky and Hutch stole skin coach. No all right someone got it right but I don't know go back over the counter. I'm looking at the poster intention to this story I'm so easily distracted And the pipes that supply the fireplace had been ripped in half so clearly this little twelve year old girl hadn't done that probably okay. So Maurice Froze and play fair convinced at this point that the haunting is legitimate but many members of society aren't so quick to believe that they think the girls are playing tricks and messing around and at school. Janet is bullied because of the stuff in call ghost girl also. I don't know like I would love that nickname. My God. If you're being made fun of you wouldn't keep doing you know what I mean. Yes by November Maurice Gross. I notes that the knocking sounds around. The House seem intelligence. So He's like let's ask it's a fucking questions. He starts out with simple questions and requests the disturbance to knock once for no and twice for. Yes when he asks the ghost is dead with fifty three knock. Is that a super no. What is that? It's just the creepiest thing I've ever. Ah I would scream and run okay. As November passes Jack Behavior becomes more and more erratic and at times she's very unsettled. It's almost like she's she's possessed Bro. Says she seemed to be taken over as part of the investigation. Cameras are set up in the girls room. And they're remotely operated and they take bursts of the photos and we four seconds. The images document documented show several strange things happening in the room. The first is a pillow that appears to twist around in mid air thrown thrown by no one or is it hanging off the bed. I don't know that looks super creepy. Doesn't what do you think I mean I guess it is Starsky. And I'm looking at Well I mean that's the problem with stuff like this. Is you think like oh a picture would prove but yeah you don't have the right depth here so if it is hanging you would need to be from the from the other side to show that it's hanging in mid air and there's also a curtain that appears to twist around no one like a curtain hanging on itself whatever and the most extreme photos however are the images of Janet levitating aiding in the air. Are they being and she later claimed she was unaware that she went into trances until Shawn the photos like she didn't even know that was happening. Well Yeah so and this Guy Maurice totally believes it and it's kind of sad for not their their dad is gone. He stays with them and like kind of takes care of them and the reason he is a paranormal investigator is because his daughter died in a motorcycle accident and he thought she contacted him down the grave. I got really into it and it makes sense. Yeah and so you know you have this young girl who thinks she's being possessed or that the house is haunted and stuff and then this guy who is probably like grieving leaving and they both believe in it so maybe I don't know if you believe in energy and I do since it's not like you can believe in energy or not. It's a thing psych psych. I believe in electricity and Starsky and Hutch. Okay the intelligence of the disturbance progresses even further when it starts to speak in a gravelly growling and barking sounds. Okay this is the part in any of these movies now. I'm a believer when that's like a twelve year old. That's like my favorite where I'm like. Okay okay it's the devil. I mean honestly when I heard this I was like okay I really. It's the creepiest fucking. The thing I ever heard it sounds like an an old gravelly British fellow British obviously British. It's smell American goes. It's just so creepy if you go home and listen to it fucking. There's no explanation other than she's an incredible actress which which she's like eleven or twelve so I mean Meryl Streep was once eleven or twelve so who knows. We can't know so it starts to have this low. guttural voice holds holds conversationalist the investigators for months Janet describes the experience like someone standing behind her and putting their hand on her neck like making her talk. That's how my my mom used to walk me through the grocery store. Okay what are we going to get today. I was GonNa like start grabbing ago. Yeah I was actually possessed by the grocery store so to eliminate. This is to eliminate the possibility that it's faking the boys Maurice tapes of her mouth and fills her her mouth up with water other times. That's kind of it's necessary. I don't no no and she still talks that really. Yeah it does. Sound IMPR- improvised. Can you grab marble. We're GONNA stick in Janet's mouth and see if she can if it works. This time. There was a lot of stuff like when there'd be noises at night they'd go to check the kids to make sure they're actually asleep and they'd like open their our. I list if they're sleeping. Nothing's GonNa wake you up like some weird investigator leaning over your bed. Trenton period. Me Tom Williams Ganz's opening is So then at one point the voice says that its name is bill. And that's not. That's the ghosts who used to live there. BILL BILL IT turns out that the people who lived there before had the father had died of a hemorrhage in his favorite chair in the living room. And the kicker is his name was bill but he wanted him to be I'm perfectly deliver it. It's perfect yes leave it to the British to do the perfect heckle. So they bring in like all this press they bring in magicians to try ready to see it they bring a magician's 'cause they're bored. Do some up close card tricks for us while we sit here in this kitchen wearing headphones. But they bring in you know spirit mediums they bring in legit people who know about this stuff and they're not not able to do bunk any of it like people trickery experts essentially. Yeah especially if. It's a little girl tricking all these people but there is a thing of like if you want to believe in something it'll it'll now I believe that okay. It turned out. She had twelve rabbits under her bed. The disturbances continues some early until June. July nineteen seventy eight when Janet is admitted to Molly Hospital for extensive psychiatric testing two months later. She's given given a clean bill of health with no signs. That shouldn't have epilepsy or other illnesses. That could explain some of the events when she returns home. The disturbances seemed to calm down and almost as quickly as they had started. The strange happenings at the Hodgson's home stop completely. And the incidents at Enfield are among among the most closely recorded in any poltergeist type situation and all witnesses. There's over thirty people who witnessed the stuff and even people who are walking by outside aside. The House saw Jenny levitating in her room to people who weren't involved within it said they saw that shit and then they're like ear arrested for being a peeping. I'm Tom Person was called a lollipop woman and I don't know what that means. Is it like the ice cream. Listen Listen Guard. I thought she said Coffee Cart. Oh Children's coffee that's charming. I'd never heard about that. The sign probably looks like a lollipop. I'm glad I didn't bother to look it up. That was a fun discovery for us in our British friends. Lollipop woman on the coal tape recordings mainly by play fair and gross eventually total over one hundred eighty Hours and another thing. Is that other other psychic. Mediums would come in and be like you can make a shitload of money off of this but no one made like they were serious. Maurice and Peggy were like not trying to bilk anyone out of money today over forty years later. The infield case remains Britain's most famous haunting and though it's had extensive criticism it's never been fully debunked although Janet so as an adult. Janet admits that I call her Jenny. Earlier dammit sorry is does she have your mom's name she does. You blocked it out a really. She admits that she says about two percent of it was faked by her sister. She was like you know at some point they were kind of egging us on and we were like getting into it. I swear only like two percent of the things like maybe some of the writing that had happened. And maybe some of the voices or a little bit fakes but that she won't admit otherwise and she says that she and her sister Margaret had played with weep origins before the supernatural activity. Started out your favorite Ouija boards alone. I'm not fucking kidding. They are a gateway to hell. Don't don't mess gateway to bill you don't along that kind of access to bill. Can I tell you that in the conjuring movie the whole thing builds to the reveal of bill the ghost in his chair really and they make bills seemed like he was this total piece of shit monster in like life. That's coming back to like do bad things. Children are super crazy and I didn't remember that his name was bill. I bet you. They didn't reveal that far. Ruined and family and direct neighbors believe the font they think they still to this day. Think it's real those who knew peggy have no doubts about her personal integrity and don't think she was faking anything. There's books TV documentaries and horror films made because of the bizarre happenings in two thousand sixteen conjuring to as a worldwide box office debut about three hundred twenty million. The twelve of those remind the continued for just over a year and are witnessed by over thirty people such as neighbors. Investigators technicians technicians. Reporters Police Officers Lollipop woman after Peggy guys the house this is occupied by another mother of four name Claire. She never felt comfortable in the house and she says that she felt a presence watching on watching down on her in her sons her sons would wake up in the middle of the night. Hearing people. Talking downstairs guests go go the when she finds out about the house's history she moved the family out two months later I would too. And that's the story of the Enfield. Poltergeist may me. This show is those is great during Shit Awkward. Sorry ruined I think. So how come. This show is lovingly dedicated to bill. Please don't haunt US time for. Let's do it. Everyone choosier several everybody. It has been second husband. Gary shipe anyone. I don't WanNa tell on you but the reason we never watched because Vince doesn't want to watch scary. What a sad combination Asian is mostly for? Thanks I won't go through the whole speech. We know you. Yeah no it. We know we know you know the rules but please please please. If you can we you have to be from. Please be from England. We Americans who have flown over for a trip to see us because you couldn't get tickets somewhere else. We love you. Thank you so much. This is your part. God bless you but if you have a hometown murder that is from this country and you are also from this country we would love to hear about it. Please be sober enough to have. Your story be cohesive have a beginning middle and end it quick and fun and not fun also at the same time. Georgia will choose now and we've had some really good hometowns. Yeah so let's not keep your hand hand down unless it's awesome. No one's raising their the. She goes the she got up in the levitated over to that door. We're like Oh it's Elena scared everyone home home doing hometowns. You're scared every everyone else's scared that well also rank and polite lovely combination. Will you take the lights down. So we don't feel adjudged thank you. We'll be a nice they are you. It's a Livia. Everybody I am from the Cambridge. Did you go to Cambridge did I. I went to a polytechnic in Lancashire. Does that mean your party. Did the police LISA system. I'm really part really so not be a police story because I'm not quite sure on the official secrets. Act what I'm allowed to share. Okay okay so. This is a motive in Cambridge. Okay so this is all the way back in. I think it was New Year's Eve. Two thousand four I at the time was a forensic science student before it was cool. I I I we out. I was out with my boyfriend at the time. Definitely not together anymore and having because it's a bit of a shit night because it always is. Yes across the road from us. Iranian wanted to be in called the very sorry in Cambridge or the hoax. Head is I remember it. Thank you finish listen. I had an argument. My boyfriend ignored him. Walked off on my own with some not on my way to his brother's girlfriend. Because I I liked to do dangerous. Things like just wonder off. Aren't we walked over to the mill road kind of area of Cambridge. Aw they loved. Yeah so I just lace place. This work the next day and it turned out ago had gone missing from the avery pub. Is She missing on her way home. And how texted her friends saying help. I think a a taxi by. Don't think this is a tax. This isn't a fun one right so they ended up doing in kind of like reconstructions of where she walked so she basically walked up. Whatever the hell that road is in Cambridge turned parkside walked past the police station mm-hmm but then go in what she thought was a taxi when they reconstructed it? She was a twin A she with a with Sally gleason giessen allegation. Mickey said she was also friends excited student in Cambridge. So I didn't wasn't that I had that kind of like a while. I literally walked the the same way home and was the forensic science student as the same age. She was a twin headwind the reconstruction which I don't know how she did Her body ended up in found. I think it was near the American Michio Mattingly Writing Cambridge. They worked out near into. It was and he was a soldier from Water Beach Barracks which is where. I grew up a little league motivate barracks and then my family lived in mortar beach. He Eh on the run and they found he eventually was found in Glasgow and he jumped out of the hotel window killed himself. God so he didn't you see justice but he did end up dead tens out one of my friends got married quite young and was married to somebody else. Somebody in the army and the merger guy. I think Scoop Discu David Atkinson is lance corporal and he was friends with her husband and they used to go running together. Oh my God I never met him but it was just a very like oh I was a forensic science student. I walked that same way home. I was an idiot that night in water from nine and he was connected to someone. I knew crazy. Sorry sorry no. It's what we're here for a Libya. Thank you so much Hey Guys I love my phone with a stranger. So we're keeping photos with her. I I look through your pick. Oh my God John in London yes. This is awesome thank you. This is so incredible we keep waiting and so to be back in the same giants theater that we were in last time means so much. Not Yes you guys keep coming. Thank you thank you for coming. Thank you for creating a community for your cells and connecting with each other. We meet people who tell us that they come to these shows alone. They do it for the the first time they meet people. They make friends with people that they're sitting nearer they're hanging out with you guys are making something Via our show that we are so proud of that is such a beautiful thing to get to be able to see in real life and we just honestly want to sincerely thank thank you so much for everything you're doing for each other it's beautiful. It's really loved. We're honored to be part of of it. We we want you to stay. Saved Dugard's missions please always but more than that. We want you to stay sexier and thank you understand simply safe. Is Our choice for home security. It's comprehensive professional home security at a fair price and right now is the best time of year get S. simplisafe security system our listeners get a free security camera. Plus a huge discount on your security system visit simplisafe dot com slash fade. You get a free camera. Plus simplisafe's holiday savings. This offer is only for a limited time and it's ending soon visit simplisafe dot com slash. Save today that's simplisafe dot com slash save bye.

murder Dr Thomas Neill Cream London America Dr Neil Cream Thomas Dr John Hanes US Stephen Canada Peggy Hodgson Janet his UK Dr Creams Georgia Dublin Dr. Dr Crane Louise Harvey Matilda clover lambeth poisoner
Monday, April 13, 2020

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

37:32 min | 6 months ago

Monday, April 13, 2020

"So this is an ABC news special. Kobe nineteen what you need to know here is. Abc News correspondent Aaron Katersky. The worst is over. The encouraging announcement came today from New York governor. Andrew Cuomo who state has been the hardest hit by corona virus. He said though the state and its inhabitants would have to be smart and continue to adhere to the restrictions on daily life that most Americans have been living with now for the better part of a month. And there's still plenty of suffering another six hundred. Seventy one. People Died Easter Sunday in the states. Corona Virus Death Toll. Cross ten thousand many more have recovered including Laurie batching Lupo of Island Park New York on the south shore of Long Island. Lucky for you. I kept a journal from day. One we heard about lorries journal and asked her to join US Laurie. I'm so glad to hear you're through this. Take US BACK TO THE START. Sunday night launch. Twenty-ninth I started to get a cough and I felt a little feverish so I was running ninety nine point nine to like one hundred so I started to get a little bit nervous. I woke up Monday morning. I had. Chills sweats still the fever. I had notre crazy headache. I was very tired on my aches and pains were unbearable. I couldn't even walk. That's just a one did. Did you end up having test? I did pass their series of questions. You know they say at the end of the questionnaire. Okay someone will contact you. I will tell you to this day. Nobody has contacted me. I think getting the test was one of the hardest. Things specially when you're sick like this. Who wants to be running around getting attest? When did you finally get the test? Let's go back to April. I I had all still a Lotta create. Every day was a new system a new symptom so it was the band headaches. I was soaking wet and the craziest craziest symptom was that day. It was like everything I breathed in smelt like garbage and by the next day I lost all my taste and smell. I could take a bar of Irish spring soap and practically shut it up my nose and nothing. My son made popcorn. You know when your house smells like when you make popcorn sure nothing so that was my confirmation without even getting a test. Ev- all all my friends on the forefront said the smell. The loss of smell is a dead giveaway. Were you isolated in your house. Where you around any of your family members. It's very difficult to be the head of the household. I'm the mom on the wife who's doing the laundry and who's doing the cooking. They can help so much. I have two sons and a husband and they were very helpful but at the same time. My nature is to continue to do what I do so I've been isolated with them for two weeks pretty much before I had one symptom so they've already been exposed. Everyone says isolate yourself two bedroom. How am I going to do that when I have to? Make sure the house is clean. The laundry's done. Do you know how you were exposed where this came from? I don't really know you know the few days before I had to stop at the post office. My son was exposed. We did get a phone call that you know where he was that one of the referees. Arena. He was at did did test positive and then about a week after that he had ninety nine point nine and aches and pains for twenty four hours. And that was it he was done. And then my other my sixteen year old. He drank from my open gatorade. The day I found out I was positive gs but he had a cough and just twenty four hours a ninety nine point nine but mine lingered i. Finally you know I went to date. Ten and ten was one of the scariest days because everyone says that's where you're breathing goes and I was nervous is all well heck. It's very scary. That the ten and then by the end that I really was my body was just physically exhausted from date ten till date. Twelve twelve days of this excruciating. You ready to get out of the House now. You may be one of the lucky ones with antibodies. Yes I I can't wait US SAM free. You know they say three days to to go so it's like when you really know if you're safe. I think you need a few more days because I am seeing lingering symptoms but yes. I can't wait to be done with this to be you know. Hey Yeti I'm free and I would like to to have them take some my antibodies. If they can. I can help somebody in any way. Laurie. Betcha LUPO or glad you've recovered. We're grateful you've shared your story and her thought now to help others by sharing her. Antibodies will no doubt be of particular interest to our next guest. Dr Neil Gavin Valley Hospital in Ridgewood New Jersey. Jested administered the first dose of convalescent in plasma therapy to a covert nineteen patient. Dr Gavin were excited to hear about it because convalescent plasma therapy. It's been around for a century during the Spanish flu. It's been used in the treatment of measles it was actually used for the treatment of pneumonia before the advent of antibiotics and subsequently for other viral diseases including SARS. You know or in the earlier part of the century as well as Moore's Both of which were Our Corona viruses. It's not felt to be a cure It's felt to be a bridge more to vaccines as a temporizing measure. And we've infused in approximately eight or nine people. Thus far we are collecting data so at this juncture we do not know if this will be beneficial but because there are no effective therapies for this infection. Were trying everything we can. When do you think you might have some sense as to whether it is effective that I wish I can answer it but I don't know yet and explain if you would how it works? Because my general layman's understanding is the plasma from someone who has had corona virus developed some. Antibodies is then effectively injected into someone currently infected in the hope that boosts their immune system right. That's that's actually correct. So we're actually giving like you said. We're giving antibodies to the person that they have immunity immediately neutralizing antibodies the antibodies that bind to the virus and rendered ineffective. You know through the actions of other mediators. Immune system fell to be what confers protection We don't know that for certain there are other factors most likely involved The amount of antibody that's necessary Is Not clear But that's sort of what we're going on To to you know to that that helped US launch this project. Let's assume for the sake of argument. This is successful. How easy or difficult is it to replicate on a larger scale? Well as a as an indicator of that most hospitals who are that are doing this including valley are soliciting donors. They have you know websites up and you know asking for donors so I could tell you that at least for one institution hours. The response has been outstanding. Incredible like I've never seen before. Hundreds of people in you know less than a week Have signed up to be potential donors. Is this our best prospect at the at the moment? What's your level of confidence here? I'm hopeful interesting that you're asking me that because I thought a lot about this over the last several weeks infectious disease doctor. So I don't usually deal with convalescent plasma. I usually deal with antibiotics. That were developed after convalescent. Plasma wasn't used to treat things before there were antibiotics so as an infectious disease. Doctor I really just think of antibiotics to treat infections. This is a complete change in mentality for me and it's almost like I'm being you know. Thrown back to the pre antibiotic era And because we potentially have something that has been Not Thought About for a long time particularly in the mainstream and now we're coming back to something that historically has shown benefit back to the future to combat corona virus. Thanks to Dr Neil Gavin at Valley Hospital in Ridgewood New Jersey. And coming up our chief. Medical correspondent Dr Jennifer Ashton answers your questions about corona virus. I'm Aaron Katersky and you're listening to ABC News Special Beside News Special Kovic. Nineteen what you need to know continues after this. You're listening to an ABC news special. Kobe nine hundred. What you need to know here's. Abc News correspondent any robot with me now is ABC News. Chief medical correspondent Dr. Jen Ashton. Dr Jen we know over the weekend we heard from Dr Anthony Fauci who said he was hopeful. We could cautiously start doing a few things the way we did before the pandemic what we know about this potential return to normalcy. Well Amy we. We tend to hinge on every word. Doctor out she says and for good reason he is literally legend in terms of infectious diseases. And at this time what we know is that there has to be an end point. We cannot sustain this degree of social distancing and shut down forever but we also know just based on science and medicine that if we just rip the band aid off set a date and flip a switch Dr Chee said if we come back off this too quickly and too abruptly without certain plans and procedures in place the numbers will go up again and unfortunately people will die at higher numbers. So then what do we think will help to get us back to at least some familiar activities while the thought is that it all will hinge on testing to figure out who is susceptible who is infected and who has recovered that widespread and mainstream testing is going to be incredibly important and that information will be critical if it is accurate so if the test works that's one thing we don't really know yet and the other thing that we don't really know is when we start to open up or as doctor said this rolling re opening will it be done based on region part of the country or will it be based on certain types of activities and behaviors that will still remain in place and others will be loosened. That's all to be determined all right and also to be determined. We do need some clarification on a few things in terms in terms of like when we can start doing all of this correct right. We don't know when no one has a crystal ball here. Amy You're hearing estimates like the end of the month. The end of May June by fall. No-one knows and that degree of uncertainty is frustrating but it needs to be acknowledged and we don't know where to start. Will this start in big cities? Will it start in rural America? Will it be tested in stages all of this is unknown and we still do not have a grasp on how helpful this widespread testing will be. All right Dr John. We will be checking in with you in just a bit. We'll as of today all but a handful of states have issued stay at home orders in an effort to keep people safe during this pandemic governors in states originally against the order like Georgia and Florida have now joined after the increase. Cova cases there but eight states including Arkansas. Remain Without. Stay at home orders. The governor of Arkansas as the Hutchinson is joining us now in governor. I know your state right now has over twelve hundred cases at least twenty five deaths. But you stand by your decision to not issue a stay at home order. Why why. I've never seen Arkansas take a threat. More seriously than we take cove in nineteen and so our response has been Quick we declared an emergency On the first day of a case that was reported in Arkansas. We've closed our schools. Are Bars or restaurants are state park lodges or Close Tower Hotel Lodging or closed recreational travels travelers? And so the list goes on that we have a targeted response. That's proven effective in Arkansas. But we don't WANNA put another one hundred thousand people out of work unless there's some benefit from closing a particular business We have a target response as I said. We are flattening that curve. And we want to make sure we continue to do that if we see an increase. We're open to every option but we right now are managing this in a way. That really beats the success rate of some other states. I think it's a right response and it's one that we're emphasizing mask and that's how they're taking it seriously whenever they get out they can't socially distance they're wearing masks. You go to the store. You'll see three fourths of people gloves and masks. That's the kind of response or help us to go through it in the long term. We don't know how long this is GonNa last. And I like the approach that we've taken and I think it's proven Somewhat successful to this point I know that and I know you know. Arkansas borders Louisiana which has one of the highest cova cases in the country. Does that concern you at all? Especially in cities like little rock that have higher density issues. That's right it does. I mean we have those in Tennessee. The Memphis area as well as in Louisiana hire a percent of cases and new cases that we see in Arkansas. And so we're trying to make sure that We don't have those kind of travelers that are coming in and taking those kind of targeted measures. Our biggest concern right now actually is in our prison facility. Both the federal prison but we've had some in our state prisoners. Well we've had a No visit rule in place for some time. But that's something that we have to have a very specific targeted response for that. We're working on right now. All Right Governor as the Hutchinson we certainly hope you and your fellow Parkinson's Stay safe the nation's top infectious disease expert. Dr Anthony Vouch says the could have a rolling reentry in parts of the country as early as next month provided health officials can identify and isolate people likely to get sick here to give us his take on the economic debate is the Ford professor of economics at Mit who also served as an adviser for the affordable. Care Act Jonathan Gruber. Thanks for being with us today and as an economics professor. What are your impressions of the initial government stimulus package? I think this demos package was actually pretty good along a lot of dimensions. Most importantly was the money given individuals through both the twelve hundred dollar check for adult and the expansion of unemployment insurance benefits to make sure that people can can meet their needs. Look right now. This isn't a stimulus package. Think of the economy is a patient in a coma. We don't WanNa wake that patient up until we have a cure right now. We just have keep the patient alive. And that's what that first demos package trying to accomplish. Just what do you think the priorities should be? The next round of stimulus I think for the next round of stimulus we need to focus on the healthcare sector and those losing health insurance on the healthcare sector in the first round did include one hundred billion dollar rescue fund for health care providers. We need much much more than that. We need ways to distribute healthcare providers. Hurting the most like those safety net providers that deal with the uninsured and we need to focus on the millions of people are gonNA lose their health insurance and paying for the care they need. We've got a situation. Where the we start with twenty million uninsured people that numbers can arise by several million? At least we need to make sure that people have access to health insurance care. Act Too strong as possible in this moment of need now Jonathan. There's a lot of debate which I know you know about when we can reopen our country. What are your feelings about how we can end the lockdown? How can we get the economy going again? Basically the key point is that we can't equate flat in the curve. Shirley with quarantine if n quarantine go back to life as normal. You don't flatten curve. You just delay the peak if we literally end on May first and say hey everybody go back to what you're doing we're gonNA have the same huge number of deaths hundreds of thousands of deaths just three months later we have to follow the Corentin with efforts to continue to slow the progress of the disease. What does that mean? That MEANS VIGILANT TESTING. That means contact tracing where we make sure we take those infected and traits who they were in touch with and get them out of Get them quarantined that meaning periodic shut downs of the economy. This will mont end in a fundamental way until we have a vaccine that's widely disseminated. This doesn't end on. May first this ends when we have a vaccine. Until that point we have to continue to be vigilant or we're GONNA have hundreds of thousands of deaths and we've already learned so many painful lessons to date. But what changes do you think? Our country needs to make long terms that we can better prepare for future issues. Like the corona virus. I think the most important thing long-term to recognize that we need investments in science and research. That aren't necessarily in. The interest of profit maximizing companies in my book jumpstarting America was Simon Johnson. We talk about how the US the US government used to lead the way in research and development. We suspend about two percent of our entire economy government-sponsored rnd and that's what led to great discoveries like vaccines now is less than point six percent the private sector companies. They don't want to bet the new Max vaccine. Which isn't that much money you made out of it. We need the government's lead the way in promoting the recent development that will protect US vaccines investments in our energy grid. We see whatever staying and over and over the Internet how much we need better energy and blue and broadband connectivity. These are investments that the government needs to lead for the long-term future all right very very interesting. Jonathan Gruber thank you so much for your insight and expertise. We appreciate it. You Bet my pleasure and coming up next right here when we come back Dr Jen with answers to your questions about covert nineteen and the nurse hitting the road to meet the crisis traveling a long distance to help comrades in the state that is hardest. Hit special continues after this. You're listening to ABC News Special Kobe. Nineteen what you need to know once again here is. Abc News correspondent Amy Rohbock. Dr Jen Ashton joins us again with answers to your questions about the dangers of corona virus. Dr Jen will start with the first one. Do we know if the severity of younger victims with covert nineteen virus has been linked to vaping short? Answer we don't know yet remember the viruses just about four months old. So we're still in the stage of observation and accumulating and compiling the data based on cases not just confirmed cases but hospitalized cases cases and more severe cases. But we do know that something like smoking or vaping absolutely can affect lung tissue lung function. We know from studies on influenza that it increases the risk of flu so how or if it's related to people who are getting sick with Kobe. Nineteen we still have to learn. Do you know if any data is being collected of patients blood types correlating to the seriousness of symptoms and or recovery. Time great question so a small study out of China. They looked at about twenty one hundred people. This has not yet been pure viewed or published in a Peer Review Journal but they did look for association between blood type and susceptibility for covert nineteen. And what they found. Was that people with type. A blood had a higher risk or likelihood of getting sick with covert nineteen whereas people with type O blood which we call. The universal donor had a significantly lower risk. Now some qualifiers. We think that's because of the antibodies that are present in our blood with certain blood types to other blood types. But we don't know what kind of clinical relevance this will have since you can't change your blood type so may be used for healthcare workers to help stratified their risk. We don't know but right now it's just an initial very preliminary observation all right. Our next question Jen. Has there been thought of returning to cloth. Gowns and masks there has been in fact the FDA just issued guidelines on laundering cloth gowns. They are giving the hospitals the option of doing so we have heard recently. That hospitals are starting to use vaporized hydrogen peroxide to sanitize those ninety five respirators but certainly cloth gowns as long as they're not being used for sterile surgery The FDA has given the green light for hospitals to launder them with Standard Hospital disinfectant. So that hopefully some good news certainly all right so our next question and a lot of people have underlying conditions and are curious about how that's going to impact them. I have MS and also take a med. That's an immunosuppressant that says I'm prone to get infections easily. What does that mean to me? In relation to cove in nineteen short answer amy. It means that that person is at increased risk of not just Cova nineteen but a range of other opportunistic infections or just regular community quired infections and we have to remember we heard about those vulnerable pre existing medical conditions like Heart Disease Lung Disease Kidney Disease Cancer but there are so many people with compromised or weakened immune systems people living with HIV. People who have had form of transplant people with autoimmune conditions or the list goes on and on pregnancy is an immune compromised condition. So we have to remember to think. More broadly as we studied various populations to really understand what their risk is to this disease. All right well. Thank you so much for your insights. Dr Jen and you can submit your questions to Dr Ashton on her instagram at Dr J. Ashton well after hearing New York City's call for help for healthcare workers to fight the growing corona virus pandemic. One nurse traveled from his home in Bloomsburg Pennsylvania to help out Luke Adams a registered nurse for eleven years joining us now to share his stories. First of all. Thank you look for all that you do and continue to do. But what made you say? Hey I have to go to New York City I have to go there and I I need to help. Every emergency or crisis called on a different service you know when a hurricane hit fema goes in if a war come the military goes in and it just so happened that this particular crisis was the respiratory disease that required critical care knowledge. And there's just not a whole lot of people out there who have that and so it became very clear pretty quickly that people like myself. We're going to be in dire need and at that point you know just impossible to turn away and say. I'm not going to go help so act. Everything up and game packed everything up and came and had nowhere to stay in fact. I understand you slept in the back of your car on a crib mattress for nine days. I'm hoping you now have a place to stay. Yes actually I'm talking to you from the comforts of my hotel room which the city of New York was nice enough to set up for him. But how remarkable that you that you came here with willing to sleep in your car and I know that you nurses doctors. They're all being pushed to extreme limits But you can see some positivity in all of this share with us what that is because a lot of people need to hear that positively. Sure I mean I think first and foremost is that. There's a heightened appreciation of the things that matter. No kind of old goes through life. Sometimes we're all guilty of that and we lose sight of the things that are most important. But when you're faced with an emergency all that kind of get stripped down to what really is important and suddenly things like just being able to go home or hug your children or sleep next to your south These are the things that you know a lot of times. We take for granted and now they're becoming really important to kindness from strangers You know and the and the willingness of the recipients to then pay it forward you know we we kind of forget that it does feel really good to give and everybody is giving right now and it feels good In terms of the medical community some of the positives or the doctors and nurses. That are part of this. Whether you're training whether you've been in practice We're learning things that are learning to adapt things that we never had before. And because of that we're going to be much better at our God. Yeah and you mentioned the little things that we all should remember like being able to sleep next to your spouse or hug your children. You're far away from your family and you have an eight year old and a ten month old. What do you hope they learn from you doing something so brave and selfless to help others just again. It said this before and if you have the ability to help others. I think that you have the responsibility to help. Especially in something as serious as it. where I can't just look to my left or my right and pick out a I mean say you go and said so for me. The most important thing was. I can't ask everybody else to sacrifice if I'm not willing to do it myself. And you know certainly from those of us on the frontline we're asking the rest of America tackle price and stay home and that's very difficult so in order to be able to ask them to do that. I felt like I had to sacrifice. And so you know mine is not being able to see my kids who are hugged next to myself but I want them to know that those sacrifices really They don't mean as much as you know not going through the rest of your life knowing that you didn't help when you could. That will stand out more than the three months that we are each other. Well Luke Adams. I know that we are also grateful that there are people like you in the world willing to sacrifice so much. Stay safe and please send your family love from us. We appreciate your time. Thank you very much. Bbc News Special. Kobe nineteen what you need to know continues after this. You're listening to an ABC news special. Kobe nineteen what you need to know. Once again here's. Abc News correspondent any robot at a time when we are redefining parenting and relationships because of the pandemic some parents are finding unique ways to make it work like Wayne Brady and his family bonding on social media. Wayne thanks for being with us. The videos you're making with your family leading up Internet is quarantine has it brought. It brought us closer together. Yes no yes. We spend more time together but in terms of being being close. We we have that Bob. Just in life The the youth the four of us my ex wife Mandy and my daughter Molly and Mandy boyfriend. Jason we kind of have that silly close bonded family nature anyway so this this gives us more time to spend together. What's been the biggest challenge for you as a parent? I think the challenge is of course our proximity. We're we're very lucky that we share one daughter. Among two homes in our homes are basically next door to each other so we're quarantining between our two homes so trying to give each other space. That's been the biggest problem I think as a as a dad to a seventeen year old. The secret is not to crowd then. Because we're all going through it right now right but the teenagers especially high schoolers they they they have this Schedule and they have a A social roofing and they have a life and the way the day was onto. This has needs a bit of sensitivity so I had to teach myself that to not just jump on her hanging out with day. Dad's GonNa Kiss. You could be best friends backup. It's funny you say that because I have a seventeen year old daughter and we've got three teenagers in the House too and I found myself being the same way and I got a lot of I rolling. So give me your best advice on other parents children in Split households trying to Co Parent. Especially if they're teenagers while isolating what. What's your best advice trying to cope here? It's a lot of work. And what people see the end especially when I'm dating or in life for anything people see. Oh you guys close. We've been in others. Lives for about twenty four years we have lots of history and a lot of it has been an uphill climb but we wanted to keep our relationship intact because of our friendship love for each other and to model a healthy sample of what love can be after the ideals are over because she sees that I respect their mother to to the degree and the same going the other way so at that point she sees a healthy relationship. So that's what we tried to model so right now. The best thing we can do is just give each other space when needed and give each other love love when needed so when she wants to do talk radio we do. Talk Radio. We just can't force daughter because the other day she said to said don't don't want these the not become fun because because we have to do that so okay okay. My Mom and dad back off. Yeah we're we're learning from our teenagers to hate to say it but it's true Wayne Brady. Thank you so much for being with us today and stay safe that youtube and final thoughts from our Dr Jen Ashton Jen. You and I have talked a lot about exercising while we're in quarantine and I've certainly noticed people out on these Very rural running path. That I'm on but every now and then I will see someone running with a mask on. What are your thoughts about that? Well Amy. I've been getting a lot of questions about those on social media because people are trying to follow the recommendations from the wearing some kind of face covering when they're outside but at the same time people who are exercise fanatics or just trying to go outside once a day for some exercise confused whether they need to wear a mask while running biking or walking if so does it make it better harder worse interesting interesting topic so a couple of things number one distance is important. So if you live in an area where you're running path or walking path or bike path is packed with people. Absolutely you need to wear some kind of mask or face covering the fit and the fabric potentially do play a role but remember. There's a difference between wearing a mask when you're at work or you know going grocery shopping and when you're actually breathing vigorously in some cases it can make that harder There can be skin reactions as the mass gets wet with sweat and condensation just from respiration and in some cases professional athletes will say well it actually gives you a little bit of an exercise stress test and can make the exercise a little more strenuous but again we have to caution. You do have to be able to move air through that masks. So get something that fits. Well get something that you can wear and don't assume that just because you're on a bike path you don't need to cover your face you can leave your home. Go outside for a jog. A bike ride a walk while keeping socially distanced six feet or more apart while wearing a face covering do some stuff in your apartment or your house like push. Ups squats bands. I know it will make us feel better body and mind Oh preach preach preach Gen. That's exactly what we've been doing too. And thank you for those very important words because it does make a huge difference and the familiar voice helping us through these strange times when we come back a brand new anthem from Pitt Bull joins US. Next News special continues after weeks. You're listening to an ABC News. Special Kobe nineteen what you need to know. Once again here is. Abc News correspondent. Amy Robot and that is pickles new single. I believe that we will win. And during this time of uncertainty Mr Worldwide and self hopes the catchy anthem will spread a worldwide message of hope and Inspiration Grammy Award winning artist. Pit Bull joins us now to talk about it. Pit Bull. Thanks for being with US and first of all. How did you come up with the idea for the song? Well first of all you guys for having me. I really appreciate it and second of all that everybody out there. God bless the first responders in everybody. That's dealing with this right now. What did we come up with? The record. Bottom line is to motivate the planet. And everybody knows that I believe that we win and we will and more than anything. I want to make sure that everybody out there stays healthy. Stay SAFE STAYS BLESSED. Stay strong stay. Positive stay informed. Stay living in very interesting times right now. We certainly are and the lyrics in this song are incredibly inspiring in fact some of them give new meaning to the worst fear. Fear you can either forget everything run or you can see her face everything and rise and we're going to face everything rise. That's why I started the record with that right there and that was a record showing me about someone that out very very close to me. That showed it to me. There was a chance at a basketball game. Everybody was losing their mind and I said Oh man this is what the world needs right now where they just need to stay strong. Be Strong for morning. Then you've got to believe in yourself you know so with that said everybody out there. Stay strong stay. Positive stay focused. They healthy stay safe but more than anything standard forms. Stay aware and educate yourself with everything that's going on. Yeah and I know I've always said that. Fear paralyzes you or motivates. You and I can clearly see. It's motivation you and I love this message of unity in your song because it's also a way to give back. Tell us about that. Well yeah absolutely. One hundred percent of the proceeds between My partner and which Saddam music and his team and missing five inch me and Ham. Sabban spoke one hundred percent of this is going to go to proceed cosies such as feeding America with Robinson and he's foundation to feed the hungry. You also have been educational side. Women helping on the educational side of things and also proceeds will go to the member. This isn't the first and it won't be the last where we want to be involved with those that are going to have solutions for these kind of situations in the future and to the public out there to Saint World Health Organization the John Hopkins University and their numbers and the Gates Foundation. Because they happen to put something together in October. Eighteen thousand nine thousand nine has called event to one which is an actual exercise. What we're going through right now. It's a pandemic simulation pandemic exercise. So these are the kind of things that I would love to be aware of before it happens so we can prepare the public. And we're going through right now so I'd love for everybody to go check that out study. And that's what I mean by being aware being informed being educated so you can make educated decisions in these kinds of situations and that scare yourself out of solution's very important words to live by Pitt. Bull thank you so much for all that you're doing and with your incredible you've firing song. We appreciate your time today to you. God bless governors to the world. And thank you guys so much that our program for today I mean he roebuck. Thanks for listening okay. So when the New York Times tells you one of the Eighth News podcast worth listening to well you to say thank you so go on start smart we start here the ABC News daily. Podcast take us with you. Listen to us now. Free on apple podcasts.

Dr Jen Ashton Jen ABC News US Dr Jennifer Ashton Arkansas ABC Kobe America cough Aaron Katersky Laurie Jonathan Gruber Dr Neil Gavin Amy Wayne Brady Pitt Bull Kobe Luke Adams
Guts

A Scary Home Companion

36:20 min | 7 months ago

Guts

"They drank you. Might want to get a drink. Because I'm about to tell you the most messed up thing. You're going to hear today as usual. It comes from the annals of history. I usually try to be horrifying gross and generally upsetting as possible in my stories but I can never compete the history books. Today's story is about a modern day. Incarnation of Herro specs. What's a Harris Bex by? Didn't know either. Until recently Aro- specs is kind of priest a prophecy man. They date back to around two thousand BC before the Middle Ages when science was to be distrusted. In this point in time the practice of heresy was well known perhaps not well received but in some cultures such as the Babylonian it was respected. Herro spects divined omens and portents of future events in the patterns. They found in the spilled and trails of animals. I know that me talk pretty sometimes so I want to dial this back because I wanna make sure this lands with everyone. A herro specs would take an animal. Usually a sheep sometimes a bird and they would slash open. It's living SQUIRMING BELLY TO WATCH. How the guts hit the ground by examining the viscera and the patterns made when it spilled the Harrow. Specs could see things. I guess it's not that different from reading tea leaves. This all sounds grim disgusting and I'm not disputing that. It is it's repulsive but you gotta take it in the context of the time and the place and it was intended to be a positive thing to help people and sense for every positive. There is a negative that means. There was a dark side to harrow specimen. Bear in mind at this time in this place no one had any real moral quandary about ripping guts animals. Maybe it didn't appeal to everyone but this was because of the aspect of our waste of resources. Animal rights were not a thing so people didn't have much of a problem with that living humans. When a Herro specs had his brothers it would be a sheep that he cut up. When an anthropomorphic answer had his druthers it would usually be. Geez LIVID VIRGIN male children although the elderly and slaves and prisoners of war were also common sacrifices. Anthro permanancy was used by dark warrior. Priests and evil men to foretell the wicked paths. They should walk. Thankfully practices of Harris busy and ANTHRO. Pa- Mansi are long extinct. No one has engaged in these barbaric writes in centuries until and you knew there was until coming didn't you nineteen ninety eight when a man named Neil Wallis believed that he had been shown true enlightenment he made a maypole from the viscera of his wife is siblings his parents and his kids and when he did so he was shown a horrible and glorious new purpose for his life Neil Wallace was to be the New Harrow. Spects for the world he was to use the old ways to split humanity open and show us our own inevitable. Doom in the folds of our steaming and trails buckle up were about to get visceral. This story is called. Gotz drinking whiskey in the kitchen telling scary stories around the fire music. Monsters and mayhem Keller's cannibals and colts fearful fiction and furious fact toll tails and terrible truths. This is a scary home companion. There was a man named Neil Wallace and his brain had become infected with something evil devils ghastly ones. Two of them to be precise known in dream dictionaries as the bickering butchers now. Dr Wallace was a respected man. An anthropologist man of the people a celebrated author lecturer Speaker Educator Philanthropist. A family man and risk taker he was explorer who had once discovered a hidden valley and South America populated by loss tribe. That had never had any contact with the outside world while he was there. Living with these people. Wallace had a brush with something that was perhaps supernatural a dark occurrence that somehow tarnished his spirit and this dark occurrence stuck to him. He carried it with him always for years at festered inside of him. Sometimes madness takes hold suddenly in one fell swoop most times. It's like a virus digging down deep into your core and poison a you from the inside out. And that's what happened with Dr Wallace. The darkness inside of him grew slowly ever so slowly convincing him that a glorious new path was awaiting when that darkness exploded the good doctor butchered his whole family in the most gruesome way imaginable as they died laid out all around him with their entrails in heaps. He stood in the centre. He watched them go. He had been told by the butchers in his dreams that he was chosen and his new role would be revealed in the entrails of the dying and it came to be so he saw that message. He got his new purpose in life and then he burned his home and he'd disappeared. Dr Neil Wallis had been an anthropologist. He studied people and he wrote about them in this way. His new path was just like his last but now he was not a scientist nor an anthropologist nor an author now he was Herro specs for the new world an oracle destined to divine the future in the spilled guts of the living and he had a new hypothesis he was writing a new book forging a new way to show people the truth he had been shown by these butchers that there were omens waiting to lead him to the end of his studies. A place called the end of days to his final destination and when he got there everything would be laid bare and made clear but if he truly wanted to understand then he needed to find the right people and subject them to the right conditions and only then with the truth be revealed and their spilled entrails. There was a place that he needed to go but he didn't know how to get their the answers. Were inside of you and you and you and you and you you see this isn't about Neil Wallis the modern Harris Bex. He might be the impetus for this story. But it's really about the victim. It's about you imagine I want you to close your eyes and I want you to imagine that you're waking up standing upright and you're bound face to face with someone young man about Your Age. You've never seen him before like you. He's scared beyond scared. Petrified breathing fast and shallow sweating trembling. Your belly is on fire. It's cold fire. Not like anything you've ever felt before you look down and see that it's because to small surgical incisions have been made into your abdomen. A little ex- just a left of center inside you feel cold like there's a wind blowing through you. Surprisingly there was very little blood. These incisions are precise no bigger than they need to be. No deeper than the need to be. No major blood vessels touched. Because this isn't supposed to kill you not at all. It's much worse than that. A piece of your small intestine has been gently pulled out through that acts in your belly and it looks a lot more like uncooked sausage than you would've thought thick plump whet smooth membranes shockingly pink and tied into knots. Young man that your face to face with they've also been caught with a little ex- their intestines have also gently been pulled out and then nodded together with yours. So you cannot tell where your guts and and his begin. The two of you are staring into each other's eyes. What could you possibly say you've been forced into a situation that is not only grotesque? It's not only deadly. But it's also extremely intimate so close face-to-face nose to nose. I breath intermingled sharing a heartbeat conjoined to a moment to the other exclusion of the entire. Rest of the fucking world. The sort of intimacy that comes only through sex but this is beyond even that you were now closer with this person this stranger than you have ever been with any human being. You both share a common truth that now rules your lives and that is if either of you move or poll away even slightly it will unfurl the guts from your bellies. The only thing that you can do is stand perfectly still and pray Roy The young man is talking to you whispering. Stay with me. We have to stay together. You don't answer. Of course. Of course you have to stay together. What choice do you have your looking around? You trying to assess your low cow. You and this other young man have both been stripped down to your boxer shorts and socks the floor beneath you is damp blank concrete darkness. All around you see only brick walls and the gloom not enough to get a fix on where you might be what happened. How did you get here? The two of you are standing alone as far as you can tell burs one bare light bulb right above you. Low wattage just bright enough to let you see how fucked you are. Don't panic the guy says to you. Do not panic. You cannot Hanoch how you ask him. How do I not panic? Guy Stays light and easy breezy. He says were not bleeding. Were not dying not yet we have ours at least but if you freak out or we pull away from each other we both die right now. Do we agree on that? And you not the guy look around the room just like you did. Do you know where we are. You shake your head now. Do you remember how we got here. You shake your head now. Do we know each other? I don't know you say how the fucker you so call. Well the guy says I took a shitload of asset last night. A lot of fucking acid dude. So I've got a hundred percent. Sure Adia this shit is real. I could be watching a movie right. You shake your head. You are not watching a fucking movie. Calm as good he says. Don't talk me out of this. And then he looks down. He Studies. You're not at entrails. But not with fear from a more analytical perspective gently he reaches out in runs the tip of his finger along his own exposed intestine and as scared as you are as cold as you feel inside. There's a sense of comfort from this guy. Somehow he's so calm. So placid it's bleeding through into you. Holy Shit is that the asset how does LSD work? You don't know how LSD works. Can you get dose like this? Do people on acid paranoid. Is this a part of it? The Guy sees you starting to freak and he calms you down again and then. Miraculously he throws you a lifeline. He says the one thing that will grab your attention and make you block out everything else. Something too good to be true so good. It has to be a dream. This guy looks you in the eye and says I can get us out of this. And you fucking believe Took when it comes to the mythology of the nightmare people called the ghastly one. My guest today is one of the world's foremost experts Dr Andrea Gento. Thank you for joining me once again. Over the pleasure. Marianne what can you tell me about? The butcher's sometimes called the bickering butchers. That is the name we've given to an image that has recurred in different cultures throughout the last few centuries perhaps a longer the butchers a two people standing face to face they both have been cut open and their intestines tied together into knots always screaming and yelling and attacking one another. I have read. The butchers are supposed to represent a husband and wife. Is that correct? This is done but not as much as you would expect. A substantial percentage of the cases referred to the president sister also they usually come from areas where siblings and spouses are not mutually exclusive. And what do you mean by that mall on Clay's Norma places or inbreeding? As a way of life is that seem unusual to you not so. These figures represent the bond between family and responsibility. You see you are bound. Someone be it husband wife. Abrazos SISTER CHILD PARENT. And you come to low this person because of these unbreakable family ties the bickering butchers representatives feeling taken to a psychiatric degree. You hate what you are you murder. What binds you trio life. I've done some reading on Anthropoid Mansi could this myth stem from that practice. Yes it is possible. The image of the bushes was inspired by the practice. Vent permanancy but I don't think so. I think if anything that the horrific practice was inspired by dreams ups approaches really. There's a story about a Babylonian Priest. He was the first hair respects. He was very well regarded by his peers. He started the trend years later he was retired and dying when a young priest Assim. How got inspired him? The priests said it was not got showed me the way it was a man woman it was so full of. Anga and I realized the truth could only be found between them. We believe that we find a truce in ourselves. The hair specs believes the same thing he believes. We can only see that by cutting people open and pulling it out. Do you believe that? Of course not I maybe eccentric but I am not one of them. One of the followers of the ghastly ones emissaries. So you in this guy. This white guy looks about your age skinny bad complexion. You're pushed belly to belly trying to keep from pudding any tension on the knots binding your intestines together. Every little tug feels like a digs the knots in tighter on themselves. Okay the guy says you don't WanNa hear this and I don't want to say this but I need some slack to work so you inch back and I mean just a single goddamn Incheon and you're holding your breath the whole time okay. The guy says you really told what a here this at. I really don't want to say it but I mean I need some slack to work with. He explains much to your growing horror that he's going to need a couple of feet of extra cordage to us if he wants to unfurl all of these tangles. It's an insane idea and it will probably kill you of this. You are convinced but the guy reminds you unless you wanNA spend the rest of your short life like this with me. We have to do something you close your eyes and you raise your palms. The Guy puts his poems flat against yours. And you put just a little pressure against each other at first. You're envisioning the face of your father at this point because it always soothes you but not this time. This time he gives you a sour look and you know exactly why because you can't to out at a moment like this life and death flesh and blood you need to stand tall. Anything less is cowardice. So you open your eyes and you press against the guys palm's pushing each other apart and looking down you see your own guts on spooling from that X. in your belly four six eight ten twelve fourteen sixteen holy fuck every inch feels like a mile in the coal is creeping into your heart and lungs. You WANNA SHIVER. But you know that you can't you can't tremble. Can't move at all because the guy is starting to work on those knots. You ask him. Are you really high right now? Oh yeah he says is a good goddamn thing to this is fucking crazy isn't it? Yes you say yes it. Has It occurs to you now and only now that the two of you have different skin colors because your blood in your guts are the same shade of Red Your Viscera indecipherable from one. Another baby. It's not as cute and fuzzy is the symbol of the white and black hands shaking. Maybe but it goes a lot deeper than that. You Watch this kid work. You could tell he scared as hell. He keeps pausing to ball up his hands into tight fists. And Papas knuckles. But he's working your guts so softly so gently so carefully. Can't squeeze it too much can't pull too hard can't tear open. Those delicate membranes can't pull more slack delicate. It's almost artistic and thank. How the fuck does this kid know? So much about Oregon's and then the last of the knots is sliding open. It's following away and met Tangle of entrails that can joins the both of you separates. The guy says do not jam those back inside of yourself. I was not going to do that. You say so what happens now fucked if I know. The guy says he's holding his guts in one hand but he extends the other. It's red slick with a mixture of your own. Still warm blood and his he says. I'm Terry you shake his hand and you pull them into the closest embrace yet. I'm great thank you only then. Do you both allow yourselves to cry. In some how you end up laughing at it hurts but that only makes you laugh heart. Graydon and Terry made it out of that room. They expected to find someone anyone waiting for them but they didn't the man who had done this to them. The Harris Beck's was long gone. He didn't need to stay. He'd known they would escape. He hid known there was nothing there. Guts could teach him. He had done this for them for their benefit for their enlightenment. He had done it because he had already read the story of the end of the world in the guts of the dead and he knew the roles that these two boys would play one day. Dr Neil Wallace continued on his journey into the night towards his next sacrifice in his next unholy message from the bickering butchers Roberts told Yup Light. Thank you for listening to another episode. Scary home. Companion guts marks the end of season five which was a huge season of growth for this show part of the reason for that. Growth our new patriotic page. Eric Taylor Carole darkens Kevin Sorrow Catherine Hensley. Others have already become patrons of the show. You get early. Access to new episodes bonus materials videos supplemental documents that give you deeper details about specific episodes checkout patriotic backslash. A scary home companion. I would surely appreciate your support. Find ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA. Twitter facebook and Instagram. Or email me directly at a scary home companion at G. Mail DOT COM. Subscribe to the show through spotify. Pandora iheartradio cast box pod chaser. Stitcher Google podcasts or right here buzz bro. If you'd like to know more about how Dr Neil. Wallace became the Harrow. Specs listened to the episode cold all around the May pole. If your regular listener to the show you might have recognize the names that I dropped at the end years later. Both these young men still have their fates entwined. Listen to Cemetery Smith and Graveyard Jones for more pieces to this particular puzzle. The episode was edited and produced by Jeff Davidson featured guest appearances from Dan. Joplin and Jamie Lee Hensley Music provided by John Three sixteen with divine healer. Dr Genie's in Hell with where the mouth should have been calmer. Coup with where you hear the prayer the willful boys roughest guts and Chelsea Oxen Dine as always with the theme music

Dr Neil Wallace Dr Neil Wallis Harrow Herro spects Herro South America LSD Anthro permanancy butchers Dr Neil spotify Pandora Harris Jeff Davidson Pa- Mansi lecturer Speaker Educator Phil Gotz Oregon New Harrow
Cosmic Crib, with Rainn Wilson

StarTalk Radio

49:06 min | Last week

Cosmic Crib, with Rainn Wilson

"Turn your dream into a reality with squarespace I never get tired of saying that squarespace makes it easier than ever to launch your passion project whether you're showcasing your work or selling products of any kind with beautiful templates and the to customize just about anything with a few clicks, you can make a great website yourself, and if you ever get stuck square spaces, twenty, four, seven award-winning customer support is there to help head squarespace dot com slash star talk for free trial and when you're ready to launch us the offer Code Start Talk to save ten percents off your first purchase of a website or domain. Welcome to star Talk. Your place in the universe where science and Pop Culture Colli. Dr Talk Begin. Right now. This is Dr Talk I'm your host Neil, degrasse. Tyson. Your personal astrophysicist and we're GONNA go slightly off format today. This is just GonNa Feature my conversation with Rainn Wilson. His fans know all about him and his portfolio, and of course, in fact, he's in in a recent Amazon prime. I call it a mini series we'll find out On a subject depends on if it has a season to. A mini. Series. Rainn Wilson, welcome to start talk. Thank you. So this is why I'm calling this my cosmic cribbed because just you and I are just chilling normally I have like a co host experts and all this just you and I have a conversation reaching for our. Geek not I love it. That's what's too. So. Your best known, you hate it when people say he's best known for, do you hate that? Now come on I. Mean it's just true. I'm best known for Playing Dwight. Shrewd and. This is true. In the office and and how many seasons. Nine seasons ten season. That's crazy. Every time I turn on the office you know. Congratulations for being fixture in that show and in in the Geek averse with your deeply loved and especially most recently you have a show that dropped. And it's called Utopia. You play a virologist that. So we'll have to get to the bottom of that, and also you've got a podcast of your own. Soul Pancake. Will ever be on sole pancake probably not probably not you wouldn't make the cut I'm. You're not legitimate. It's a, it's a, it's a podcast called metaphysical milkshake I did with reser, Azlan the pancakes reproduction pancake, but it's so pancake is the company that I co-founded. It's a digital media company. So it's so pancake presents, metaphysical milkshake. They're very much a part of it. It's it's kind of in the whole soul pancake, which is about exploring life's big questions and making uplifting content and bringing people together in and our podcast is is in sync with does that work today because no one wants uplifting content they thrive on conflict and tribalism. So so how how's that working out well? Yes. How is that working out? You know there's following the facebook model there is. A large percentage of the population that is looking for uplifting content and unifying content and something that contains hope and and joy even and you know I just look at you saw the documentary the Social Bouma. Yes. Yes yes. Yes. I'm so very interesting. We got right to the heart of the problem. Yeah. Yeah and I I mean I knew a lot of the stuff that was in it before a lot of people watching or like I knew all that well yeah I knew it but it wasn't put together in. The puzzle pieces weren't put together in in a in such a Way Coherent Way and and you see that so much of the division going on in the world right now is is this facebook model if they can get you outraged, get you clicking buttons more and get more ads and they make more money. So outrage and division fuels commerce. So we're a digital media company. Yes. We would like people to watch our videos, but we're trying to combat spy bringing people together and using the best aspects of the web and of Youtube, and a digital content that so noble I'm proud of you and I hope it succeeds by greater than all measures because then others with an emulated and then they would maybe be this force of attraction. Away from all that is that continues to divide us and what's this in that same a production company idiots guide to climate change. Oh. Yes. So you're into that too. You'll dig you dig this. Do I keep wanting to say Dr Tyson no no. Dr Neil to you. Just meal. Just me I know but I keep wanting to say Dr Tyson why is that? You Command such back I never want to call anyone a doctor, even my own doctor I call. It is fascinating. Many people call me that and I never I don't introduce myself that way when I give public talks are here's Dr No I don't but so so I, have to receive it as a as a as a an unsa unsuited honorific. Yes. Okay. A warm. I'm warmed by it, but still is not necessary. Well Okay Neil. Neil. Here's some. So you know you dig this show an idiots guide to climate change. Here's what we did I I was I got involved with this nonprofit called Arctic base camp that basically explores the science of how climate change is affecting the Arctic and tries to really impart that information to movers and shakers because as you know in the world of climate change was happening in the Arctic is far more extreme. That's what's happening even in California I. Mean you're in fact when they say we're warming the Earth by one or two degrees that that's the average. The Arctic gets a much bigger hit from the exact the almost doubled. Maryland. So I got invited to take a trip with them to Iceland Greenland and meet some scientists over working up there, and so we didn't really have a budget for. So Pancake, it's it's a smallish company so but On like a sixty thousand dollar budget, we were able to kind of pulled together. I kinda documented myself on this trip up to Greenland and we made it a six part series Gruenberg is on the series and the whole point of it was like. Listen there's a lot of people that believe in the science of climate change. Of course, as you always say, you don't believe in science science just right. Right to put back up for a second, you can't just call American Airlines and say book me a trip to Greenland how did you? What was the path that you took? So yes. So getting to Greenland was was a bitch we had someone invites you to Greenland. Yeah there's the scientists Dr Gail Whiteman who's the founder of Arctic Base Camp and there. are a bunch of other scientists that were working there and she was like we were going to do a bunch of events and she was like I'm going up there to meet with these scientists. You should come along and just see firsthand what's going on and okay cool documented and you can make it into this little series and then you can also kind of. As you know you can speak to science much more when you've kind of like lived it and gone through it. So the point of the show though neal was that there's a lot of people that by the science, there's a lot of people that don't buy the science and think it's kind of a crazy liberal conspiracy but there are some people in the middle. There are some young people in the middle that are kind of getting it from both sides that you know. Maybe they've got a crazy right-wing uncle that doesn't bide the. Thanksgiving, it'll happen say thanksgiving. Knocking and maybe their friends at school are climate activists and you know or something like that. So. Do Fire. Drill Fridays with Jane Fonda or something. So they don't know what to think. So I tried to make it like I'm the Doofus I'm the idiot. Going doesn't know anything climate change wants to learn something is going on this track. So it's fine. I trained use humor. It's it's kind of you know off putting and It was a lot of fun. We had Greta Berg was on it and we had blogs. Excellent. Did you glean any tactics and tools or the tools of communication from that trip? You know that's a great question. I didn't. I don't know I don't know what to do you just. Go. One. Why do I sorry. I thought you said You were hopeful do. Juice. I do think that we just need to keep fighting the good fight and try and and really work with young people. The people over forty or fifty. They've got their minds made up. They're never GONNA change their mind so. It does seem to be demographically split that way that that's a fascinating fact and so therefore, the younger demographic that they're tactically different if you're trying to get some of them off the fence versus you right the old. People and and we can make a difference if we make extreme changes right now throughout the world we can. Meet, the goals of the Paris Agreement. It's going to be really really hard, but we can do it and we just have to keep believing I'm that's it. That's all I got. Okay. Well, let's that's helpful and do you think So. I'm just wondering if this should be tourist John to Greenland to so they can see that might help because I always think. I. Think the flatter Thor's are conspiracy just so that they're the first ones to go into because that's where we're going to want to send them. So they can see the around Earth firsthand. So you get a free to send all get through, and so you don't even need to go to space you can just. You can fly to Europe and you're up so high like the Sun's rising you see the curve of the Earth it's not knowing. Here's what you do. You set him up into space and say. You have to confess earth was round otherwise we're not bringing you. There you go. I'm not suggest bringing people to green the most because the carbon footprint is so big and I talk about that in the series but just flying the Greenland had so much gas taxes and whatnot I mean the only way to do it is if you're gonNA like I'm GonNa plant a fricken forest when I'm done flying the Greenland Button, just make up for it and Greenwich. Greta is quite the ambassador on the trip with you or did come in going another time Oh this. Guy Who's on our board Callum Greaves Works with her and her organization. So he was able to kind of patron and we did we shot remotely with her. She didn't go on the trip but she's a firebrand man it's remarkable which was done really good. Yeah. Doing their Roy took. So now you've you have a show that just dropped like days ago from the guess that moment of this recording and I already know people who have been the entire series and I said Damn. So I so I confess I just read some of the reviews I haven't seen any of them yet but I just like the fact that you're virologist but in Utopia is curiously weirdly sin sink. Singer irony for non. Yes some overlap with our current a pandemic. So what's up with that It's pretty crazy man i. mean this is based on a British show. Utopia was on the BBC along town. They'll like ten years ago as was the office of thanks on a British show, and in fact, we're fighting that same battle. There are these hardcore fan boys of the British original series like the American series sucks. It's tail it's terrible and How did that always makes more money in America than England? That argument because no one's taking away that TV. Show like no one when we made the American office, we didn't take all copies of the British office and burn them like no one. Can Watch them over and over and over again plus it's an American. In American office, right it's not Americans British locations. Exactly. The same thing. So and it's been being developed for years. Gillian. Flynn was the show runner and creator of our version, and it's all about conspiracy theories but the parallels are creepy. So so give me a Gimme a break know three sentence overview a group of comic book geeks discover a graphic novel that contains the keys to the destruction of humanity, which includes a crazy viruses, an a super villain named Mr Rabbit okay. It's not. that it takes off from there and it's all. It's all downhill. It's a conspiracy theory thriller with some Science Fiction and and drama and really dark sense of humor. I call it. Stranger things meets Quentin Tarantino. Oh. So it's got some blood young and has has yet human heads being smelters. Tell me tell me about the virus was the virus of to in this in this story there my play virologist. Dr. Michael Stearns who discovered a really obscure virus in the Andes Mountains in Peru that killed a couple, hundred members of the Peruvian military and so I studied it and I created up a super vaccine that not only inoculate cures the disease the let me guess. You're scientists you call this to people's attention. No one listens to you know unless since. No one cares. I'm just spitballing. Exactly so I'm so I'm just relegated to kind of researching this virus in the basement of my college in Chicago on small potatoes Guy, and then there happens to be this huge pandemic, sweeping America and the parallels between my virus in this very stunning and so it does turn out that my virus is the virus that is killing hundreds or thousands in America. So all of a sudden thrust into the spotlight and become this very, very unlikely Hero. Oh Okay. Well, it's good to have a scientist as a hero even if it's a gory weird storytelling. Yeah. Usually, the scientists gets long forgotten after you pass them by in the beginning of this of storytelling. So I'm happy to to learn of this. Yeah, and and and the is there does it also address social cultural things like fear vaccines and the sort of things? Yes, it does an. Amazing. So we shot this thing. We finished this thing in September the virus the Wuhan virus started in December. The pandemic was in February or March and We were texting each other like January February march. What is happening here is our show coming true this is. Because, not only is it the virus, but there's a whole segment of the show that's about the vaccine's production of vaccines rushing the vaccine to market. Are we going to get this vaccine out who should rate? What it means is you have a really effective PR firm. Apparently. That's. That's it but so they started the one virus. Yes. European I'm waiting for because this is an Amazon show I'm waiting for the conspiracy theory that Jeff. BEZOS started the virus in order to promote utopia on Amazon prime but at. And with everyone was the virus known going out to everyone needs are stuff shipped so that's Exactly. Yeah. Yeah. He's the only one. You'll be a trillionaire by the time this. Rain we gotta we gotta take a quick break but when we come back more with Rainn Wilson, one of our patron Geek Saints out there and we're gonNA take questions from our own fan base. Specifically, our patron patriots starts off return. We. Love to talk about squarespace here at Star Talk Radio. Because squarespace, we'll turn your dream into a reality we're speaking from personal experience when we say that because I actually made my website with squarespace and on building a new one right now with squarespace and it's easy and awesome and I don't even get paid to say that squarespace makes it easier than ever. To Launch Your Passion Project whether you're looking to start a new business showcase, your work published content sell products, whatever it is square space is the tool for you. If you're doing it online with beautiful templates created by world class designers and the ability to customize just about anything with a few clicks, you can make a beautiful website yourself like I said I did. It. So I know you can square spaces powerful ECOMMERCE functionality. Let you sell anything online and analytics help you grow your site in real time. Everything is optimized for mobile right out of the box and there's nothing to patch or upgrade ever, which means you're not gonNA have any problems. But if you do squarespace spaces twenty, four, seven award winning customer support is always. Standing by squarespace empowers millions of people just like you to do their own thing online. So why don't you do this head to squarespace dot com slash start off for free trial and when you're ready to launch use offer code star talked to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain that squarespace dot com slash start talk offer code star Talk. We're back, Star Talk. COSMIC CRIB edition where In conversation with Rainn Wilson who's at actor and I just learned climate activist and. Can I call you that range from an activist not I'll tell you you take it. And so right now, in this portion, we solicited questions from our fan base. And we'RE GONNA lead off with a patriarch on members. These are the folks who actively support our podcast. So we got a question right here for you rain. All right. So when reading and memorizing scripts for a science heavy show like Utopia, how much of what you need and learn sticks with you and I as your understanding of science in general. Also just wondering what was your favorite Comic Book Character Nice Okay good getting with that first because that's presumably a fast fast question I'm favorite comic book character. So here's the deal with me and comic books. So I was a huge comic book Nerd as a child, and then around eleven or twelve I discovered these things neal called books. They don't have. In them, there's no pictures. There's just stories I'm just I'm just I'm just giving I'm giving him Shit I switched over to science fiction, but I have in the other room of our house. I have my nineteen seventies in one thousand, nine, hundred science fiction collections like four hundred books that I wrote when I was a teenager. So Dungeons and dragons and science fiction books were how I lived my teenage years but famer. Ultimately favorite comic book character I loved Superman I and then green lantern because I figured out that green lantern could kick superman but by just making a Kryptonite shell around him but then I always was i. really loved Thor I because I love Thalji and I love the way that it blended kind of north. And mythological characters with superheroes. So I was really big into. I into Superman, and later into thor, those are the two authentic alien superheroes become from other planets trust and put that in context. Even. Thought about that. I guess I felt like an alien myself kind of minute. Okay. So now tell me I'm I'm I actually claim Cameo appearances in five feature length films but that doesn't make me an actor and if I'm playing myself, I don't really have to prepare for it. So as an actor, what is the relationship between preparing for a role where that role has expertise and and and what might be real expertise that you'd Glean along the way I mean this question that was just this is a great. It's a great question. I. Get asked this one a lot I fortunately, I spent years playing a paper salesman and it didn't have to do. To train for that. And I'm beating farmer I didn't like research like beat growing harvest yields and an irrigation techniques or this is. For for imagine how much better you would have been an. Myself Right now, but I'm I will be I'll be brutally honest. So I. Play a viral adjust and I didn't do any research on what of Iraq lodges does. Or learns or anything like that I'm sorry I Apologize Science nerds Bun because in this case and I would if I was in if it was if it really was about the science like if this was a show where I was in the lab a lot and doing work and talking about concepts of viruses and stuff but I started in the lab and I'm immediately like episode to just like launched out into the world and I don't really deal with the science of so much. So I knew it wouldn't really help my performance or my kind of authenticity to kind of dive into the research. Of that because it's scripted in a way where you are more than just scientists, you're a whole person who's interacting with a social ecology that's out there. Yeah. Because for example there. So I, forgot what show it was one of these doctor shows Laurence Fishburne as the the medical examiner performing autopsies, right so they don't put him out in the field too much when you go down into the bowels of the of the where they store the bodies, he's there and so his lines have to come out convincingly to what might be an audience. Who has fluency in the analysis of their bodies? So presumably, some of your lines have to be sort of medically authentic you deliver them well in this case, and in this case, there were really only a handful like I'm talking three or four lines over the entire series that needed to kind of sound a medically and scientifically authentic when you're doing a TV show in your in the middle you and you're playing a doctor surgeon specialist or something like that. You're coming back time and time again, you know like Dr House or something like that you. Need to learn some more about. To be able to every single episode, be diving into some kind of bright NBA offense and authentically delivered the wind right I mean that's that's got a it's got to at least sound convincing to some experts and especially in the Geek averse you'll be held to that. That's true. We got people. Who are experts or no experts or or and you know I'm a big. Well, I am known yeah. You'd movies all the time. I watched your life. I literally followed your. Twitter feed of. WAS GRAVITY I? Think it was? A of everything that was right in most things that were wrong but. was. It it was mysteries of Avenue. That's what that was. That was the Hashtag created for but I try to give some latitude to the creative arts. So people think just total. Nasty Person Ever see a movie with, but I, I think just misunderstood might. Thank you for me to hug if this. Air Hug. Yeah. So let's get another question from one of our a Patriot members and oh sorry I didn't give the name of that for the first person was Robert Stanley. Yes. Okay. Thank you so and the next one is Chris Hampton and These are clearly your fans or. Rap Another House Chris Hampton. Chris. It's that's east of Westhampton right or. Is Like Hey rain? So these are like Total Fan Fan folks out there huge fan Do you ever get into deep conversations about the universe with other actors on set? If so who have you had the best conversations with all? That's fantastic. So let's broaden that to just you're not only utopia, but also the office for how about that. Yeah that's great. In the downtime in downturn. Sure we do. You know there's a lot of downtime when you're on the set. So there's a lot of like really deep conversations I. The one that just popped into my mind immediately was I did a long time ago. Now's got fifteen years ago I did a role in this action adventure comedy with Matthew mcconaughey called Sahara and or or miss there. Yeah. It's it's a big silly romp through Morocco and explosions and camels and hidden treasurer and. That's just the whole explosions camels hidden. There's a little bit more to it than that by. And I played a science Geeky nerd and that one. But I remember top penelope Cruz and I was just blown away by how? Smart she was and how? I. Mean. First of all, she's like the most beautiful woman planet earth. So it was a little bit. My jaw was kind of dropped but she's you know she speaks five languages she runs all these orphanages. She has got university degrees. She's very well read. She's have you can only know that in the downtime. Yeah. But I think about it you know that just sipping on a coffee eating on a sandwich and. We had some We didn't have a bunch, but I just remember this one conversation we were talking about. You know world peace and how to achieve it and working together and different cultures coming together and some big concepts, and I was just Su super impressed with her. View I like that. So I did not know that about Penelope Cruz. Very very, very good. Job. This. Basically. I have a very opposite experience that I once had. Okay. I was filming again in a cameo role and we between takes of. So I'm sitting in my you know in the in the in the chair, you know with the director's chair. But of course, I'm not the director I'm just but that's what they're called director's chairs and there's someone else one of the other actors is there and since there's some new photo from the Hubble telescope that had just arrived and I just I'm excited I'm an astrophysicist I. See I'll have you seen this photo the stars being born in the middle of this gas gonNA. Oh okay, and then went back to reading people magazine and this is a person who's playing a medical doctor and I was just so you know and again I i. I'm naive to assume that an actor is the thing that they're acting the fact that so good at what they're portraying making me think that they know their stuff. That's why they're a good answer. Okay. So I, it's some so torn by this reality that an actor can be completely ignorant about everything in the world and all that matters they deliver those lines and so the day actors are idiots. You said you said it best. Actor. Doctors. Gone. Tyson. I'll say something else here. Okay. Just to just to dig myself out of the hole. That I've got. Dog The whole. So I remember the scene she was in where she delivered a line and the director said, no, you need the line to be. This is a person you remember from the past and your good memories then but then you had later bad memories. So you have conflicted emotions go and out came to be lines firms like, yes it's all there in the in the body and the is in the gestures and and I said Damn Dan that's good and so I asked her in a in the brain. How long have you been acting should well, yeah, dependent. Wendy. Wanted to start counting but since I was six. Okay So. So if so if you ask me how long you've been thinking about the universe like since I was nine I, can I got that I and I'm totally all in in in the universe. Yeah and so so and she was all in with the Anti. Out. There's A. People. Don't. A great actor makes it look so easy and effortless is us. Brad Pitt as the example like it's just like everyone watches Brad, Pitt performance like I do that. If I was that good looking I could do that I. mean he just standing there saying? Oh, that's the that's the only thing. If I had the genetic lottery like he had I. could do but Brad Pitt isn't an phenomenal actor. I. Mean transformative subtle precise emotional like hit I'm astounded his the intelligence of his performances. So it's really complicated and you you know you spend your whole life making it look really easy. In Notices and then you get the next Gig. Jack Let's do one more question. We take take take the next break. So violator. twelve-year-old Astro. NERD in. Birmingham Alabama. And my mom is e is also a nerd. Skin nerd learn. NERD. Superior. Okay. We want to know. Do you consider yourself a nerd. and. If so what level of nerd are you was the nerdy EST thing you've ever done. Thanks love you guys. I love. So, this we need a fast answer here. Okay but I love this question I have a chest Clark over my right shoulder that should you used to be I used to play competitive chess and I was on the chess team and we would drive around competing chess, and once I went to a chess tournament and I saw guy who had mold growing in his ear. down. I'm not exaggerating look at how nerdy I am. Okay. Okay, you didn't have the mold but someone next to you did you're hanging out with their Harris hanging out with the crowd with a guy who had mold in his ear? That's how I am boom. Okay. There we go. and I'm GonNA answer this too. So I. I'm nerd way back I went to the Bronx High School of science but I was kind of nervous. Jock. The whole the whole spectrum of tribalising that goes on in high school Jackson, the nerds in the Bronx High, school of science everybody's inert. So so it's it's the nerd spectrum shifted the whole. Spectrum shifted in the nerd direction So everybody's a nerd I was just a nerd jock. Then you had the NERD, the NERDS. Okay. They were like extra. So so for me what's The nerdiness thing? I did I once wrote down Every single number. That had any significance that I knew at that moment. So that's a whole sheet. So it was like all the digits of Pi that I knew. I also have to know the fifth root of one hundred to twelve decimal places, but that's another story Every phone number that I knew including their coach. These are ten digit numbers other other numbers I just wanted to and I said how many numbers could possibly be in my head that are just there for random access and I filled an entire sheet and each number has had meaning in my life. I thought that was kind of a geeky thing to do that. That takes the cake. That's. That's remarkable. Just thought. Maybe that was kind of games do not. Filled with my God I wish I could just grab one right now I've got noble filled with drawings they did of my dungeons and dragons characters. Okay, right. Yeah. That's good south. Here you go. Okay. Is he mom Izzy and violent I? Where we are on that scale just briefly however nerdy you think you are there are people who are way more nerdy than you are true and when I finally calculated the massive thors Hammer someone corrected calculations the actual mass of thorns. All my by my calculation was his geeky thing. I've ever done with a Superhero Universe and in that as the Marvel Universe course and then someone out geeked me who was a a material science engineer who worked for the Navy who had all kinds of superhero paraphernalia in his office and he he shoghi the errors of my calculate how man so was he? Right? Yeah to had to conceive how good view that you have the humility to say you know. You got me so so it turns out I calculated that his hammer weighed the equivalent of a herd of three, hundred billion elephants and I had authentic ways to calculate that he said, no, it's actually made of a fictional substance called Lou ooh and ways exactly forty, two point three pounds. And my answer was so much better than that. So. I can see. One of my fans said, no, Neil. Neil. I'm they didn't say on what planet ways forty, two point, three fathoms because you way different amounts on different planets. At how we gotta take a break and when we come back rain, if you have questions for me, that'll be the chance to ask. When Star Talk Retired Hey it's time to give a Patriot shout out to the following Patriots Patrons Jennifer, sell map, and Chris Reynolds, guys thank you so much without. So we couldn't do this show and for anyone else listening who would like their very own patriarch shoutout. Please go to Patriotdepot DOT com slash star. Talk Radio and support US Impact. We're back star talk cosmic career welcome to it, and in my cosmic crib I got rain Wilson Rain the delight in conversation with you. The first time we've met and up and I'm also I feel good that we've. Exposed your Geek, underbelly. Yes. It's actually not your underbelly underbellies all around shoe. It's my belly. Yes. It's your little belly, not your underbelly on top of all around you and so In this third segment we wanna I just WANNA probe. What are the depths of your cosmic curiosity because it's not every day someone hangs out with an astrophysicist and I want people to fully exploit that occasion if they want to so. Listen I hear a lot from people about this thing that Einstein referenced Spooky Action at a distance, and then I know that this is kind of a controversial concept and I just can't wrap my head around it. I I'm I'm really a science neophyte around this stuff and I really have a hard time taking science and math into my brain. But you know I know it has to do with theoretical physics and kind of. Some some. Experiment or some happening in one place affecting something in some other place and just wondering what that means what that I always hear that and I just don't i. tried to Youtube video on it. I, couldn't. I. Love The way you said that Predates, Einstein let's go back to Isaac Newton. So when Isaac Newton, I wrote down equations of gravity. And in these equations it, there's a mass term of one object and mass terminent other you multiply them together. Edge divide by the distance between them. squared. And when you do that, that's the force of gravity between these two objects. So these two objects added a distance from each other. Feel each other's presence. But he knew there's nothing in space there's no cable connecting them there. No news no police. Empty and this deeply disturbed Isaac Newton is like this God to be some way that they're physically connected to each other. But until we discover that way I know my equations work. Some sticking with my patients. So the equations work the orbit of the Moon around the earth earth around the Sun Jupiter's moons around Jupiter that you could see with telescope it was knocking them out of the park, but he was uncomfortable that you could have action at a distance. And thus became this quest for is there something else going on in space that enables these two objects to know about each other? and. Then we've ended up exploring electromagnetism. There's another thing action at a distance. Okay. Magnetism magnetic field. The concept of field had to be introduced right and that was faraday in the nineteenth century faraday interest. The consoles are magnetic field, and if we're talking about feels never gravitational field if you WANNA talk that way and it's zone out there where things can happen. But there's still the mystery of what's going on. Across what is gaping that distance and it took modern field theory to come to an understanding of it. So before I get to that, let's the gravity soft. So Einstein figured out the gravity is not action at a distance. Gravity is a distortion of the fabric of space and time. And I as a mass and distorting space around me, and if you WANNA move in my space, you're going follow that path So Einstein is quoted as saying that mass tells space how to curve. Space tells matter how to move So it kind of sidestep the action at a distance question because you're just sliding up and down like like a skateboarder on a on a on a on a very terrain, going up and down in the hole and out of the whole the, that's what things are doing. Things are in orbit there just sort of falling on this Kurd fabric of space time So. That kinda buys us some time on this. Right? Maybe that's all we have to do think about gravity. With electromagnetism. When talking about spooky action at a distance it's a Photon is exchange between two particles and that creates the force So photons carry the force of electricity and magnetism that's modern field theory describing that and so we're done. So now you folded that together with this other thing, which is wait a minute. There's something way over here and something's happening is not gravity does not electromagnetism there's something else. That I think was part of your question. So but there's another sort of modern version of that. That reveals itself in quantum physics and quantum entanglement and so quantum entanglement is is where you can have two particles. You heard that particles can be wave matter can be wave particles at the same time you might have heard about that the wave particle duality. Well, okay. If you create a particle, you can create a pair of particles that are entangled with each other where they have complementary properties. Hm. All right now separate the particles. You don't know what properties one of them has until you measure it. You just don't know. But the moment you measure it, you instantly know the the properties of the other particle because they're complementary Okay. What one is the others is one of the complementary variant on that. So if you separate these particles And don't measure them just separate them put them at great. Distance. Then the instant you measure this article, the other particle shows up with a complementary properties. and. So the way eve- is occupying that entire space. And they instantly know about each other. That is the crowning achievement of action at a distance. In fact, this information communicates this happens faster than the speed of light happens instantaneously. So sci-fi people are asking is there can you make a warp drive that'll do this instantaneously and send something information instantly so there's a whole frontier of sci-fi people thinking about this phenomenon. Well, that's what I was gonna say that's the first thing that popped into my head is like wait. So these two. I'd say elements but these two thing, the particle particles that had been split apart are can. Connect with each other commune cannot communicate like language, but there's a tension between them. Is is is is faster than light space, travel a possibility. Other than this quantum entanglement phenomenon and a few other quantities tunneling which is also an instantaneous thing but other than that moving physical objects through faster than the speed of light, there is no known exception to it and highly tested laws of physics that say it's impossible. So we're kind of stuck with that, we want you need you need warp drives you have to bend space then you cheat by cutting across shortcuts through it or tunneling through wormholes. You're not gonNA, accomplish it by physically moving faster than light through space. Got It. So so they have good. I'm thinking review in Galaxy Quest. Mention. That was my first role in the movie that was. Supporting Alien. Role. Her thermionic. And so another question, I, had for you is like, what is what was your most transcendent experience in astrophysics astronomy that was filled with the most wonder like what discovery or galaxy or Experiment, did you kind of witnessed that kind of made you gasp and really stretched the limits of your of your wonder? Yeah I like that and I think wonder is an undervalued. Feature of what it is to be a scientist or to be anyone on a frontier was one foot in what is known and the other foot in what is yet to be discovering. Many people fear that they have to have an answer. They can't bask in the ignorance of the yet to be known, and that's unfortunate because the wonder is the to gaze upon something and say I have no idea what I'm looking at. An let me find out rather than I have no idea I'm afraid. Let me run back into the cave. Right? These are two wholly different reactions so for me. for parts of my PhD thesis involved obtaining data at on mountaintops, and I went to mountaintops in the country of Chile where those telescopes have access to the Southern Hemisphere skies where the center of the Galaxy passes overhead in the middle of their winter, which is the middle of our summer So I would be there. On the mountaintop. And this was a pilgrimage because I have to travel all these thousands of miles into the southern hemisphere. Then you to flip your biorhythms to go nocturnal. Because you're night becomes your day all right and so so then there's the sort of physiological transformation. Then you have to regain your intellectual shops because you're about to get data that's going to plug into research the already have in progress. Okay. So then The Sun sets. There's a cloud layer that happens to roll in. The cloud later is below. On a mountaintop. Okay. So now the carlier completely surrounds you. In the moon is out just a little bit. So as it gets dark, there's still a little bit of light. I can see the tops of the clouds in. Moonlight. And I'm this island of rock. With Telescope Jones that is ascended above this cloud And there's nothing else in the world. Nothing in your sight line to the horizon except you on this mountaintop above the clouds. So it's me on earth but really above earth looking out to the universe ready to point my telescope to the center of the galaxy waiting for photons have been traveling for thirty thousand years emanating from the middle of the galaxy to land on my detector. and. So there are low. This is a very solid while there's a technician in another room but. It it is a a moment. When you are communing with the cosmos. And Up. For me that is the closest thing I've had. To. A religious spiritual moment. Not Religious in the sense of all, their gods, not just a spiritual moment where I'm not in this moment, I'm not thinking of the universe I'm feeling it. As beautiful and this happened to many times on the mountaintop Wow that's that's a great story. That's fantastic. Yeah I I feel like. Those moments of transcendence is what we're really going for. You know as as as human beings on this planet like. You've never had. It might not know that that is something to go for. Another. It's direction to head, but I've had that same experience at a radiohead concert. I do not expect. Let's you say. I've had this grades you know campaign and being in the Wilderness and seeing the stars I've had that same experience, the birth of my son but those moments okay. Does your son know that you've analogize his birth to radiohead concert? Have Real disclosed this huge radiohead fan he's sixteen cinnamon concert twice he would be through. All right. We'll do I love that question and thanks for for for a empowering me to relive that moment, which was very special for me. We gotta get you back on at another time. I don't think we've plumbed all of the nerd space that were capable of re happy to come back rain rain? Wilson. Thank you for being on Star Talk Dr Neil degrasse Tyson you're very welcome. Right this has been star talk. Let's call it the Rainn Wilson Addition I've been your host. Tyson your personal astrophysicist as always bidding. To keep looking.

Dr Neil degrasse Tyson squarespace Rainn Wilson Dr Neil scientist Greenland Amazon Youtube director Isaac Newton Einstein Greta Berg facebook America neal Patriot
The Common Mold: Your Guide to Toxicity, Symptoms and Treatments  Dr. Neil Nathan with Dave Asprey : 733

Bulletproof Radio

1:13:56 hr | 2 months ago

The Common Mold: Your Guide to Toxicity, Symptoms and Treatments Dr. Neil Nathan with Dave Asprey : 733

"Hey guys as you know, not all water is created equal and there's one that really stands out. In fact, it's one of my all time favorites is called four water. It's really healthy and you feel different after you drink it it's got a great taste. It feels more hydrating. It's really energizing and it's what I have at the bulletproof cafe. It's what I have at the upgrade labs and I've even chosen Afoa as the official water sponsor. For the twenty twenty, one upgrade labs biohacking conference. Why? Because water is actually Nanno pure and medical grade? What is Nano pure or that they purify it more than I've ever seen before. So no micro-plastics no carcinogens pharmaceuticals and it's the only glass bottled water. You'll find that has oxygen in it. Go to Shop Dot O. Four, a water DOT COM, and use the code Dave Ten at checkout to get ten percents off your entire order today. Bulletproof radio. Station. High. Performance. Your listening to bulletproof radio with Dave asprey. Today is going to. A very cool episode. Guy. I've wanted on for a long time and because of some things that you might know if your a longtime listener, but you might not know. I had serious problems with toxic mold kid growing up and I had asthma and behavioral issues and OCD Adhd, all sorts of stuff like that. And, one of the major causes actually two of those major causes are things that were in the environment around me. You know the definition of biohacking arden science or change the environment around you and insider USA they have full control of your own biology. Well, there are some things that really mess with a huge number of people in the environment and one of them is toxic mold. That toxic mold is something that's the subject of a documentary that I funded and filmed myself moldy movie. Dot. com, it's free for you to watch it. and. The other one though is a lime disease co-infection did get diagnosed very accurately with lime disease later in life in fact, my wife and I started a lab testing company that could diagnose very in very much detail. What lime disease was which one I hadn't all that. As something that I haven't talked about on the show called Bartonella today's expert. Has Been Practising for almost fifty years and he has written a book about these types of things and you might say, Oh, great. I don't have any of these. It's not a problem. Here's the deal. If you're alive, you are constantly exposed to talk to mold if your kids are in a public school, they're getting toxic mold. If you go into many buildings you're getting exposed and the the symptoms that happened are all over the place. So I want you to know about this because it's a major variable, and if it's not you, it can be someone in your family and you have different responses and that's why I'm really happy to have Dr Neil Nathan on the show. He's a guy who's written some of the most impactful books out there about how this all comes together in this lime versus mold versus all these other things. And his book they came out in two thousand, eighteen called toxic your body from mold toxicity, lyme disease, multiple chemical sensitivities, and chronic environment illness. Well it's a it's a Bible for people who are thinking about this and you might not be thinking about it but you don't know why you suddenly get inflamed for no reason why have love handles day that you didn't have before and other things like that. Y Perfume really messes with you I lived all this for so much time and being able to understand why and how and for me to piece together those. Pieces I did by myself and I am so incredibly resilient impactful. But there's there are more things even I can do and there's probably things you can do to not let this happen to you and to not let it happen to your family as well. because different people, different genes, different effects to Dr Nathan. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me on your known for taking patients that no one else will take. Any practice in northern California where it's hard to practice because you know the medical board there is. On one hand, very open to functional medicine. On the other hand, there's lots of rules and regulations in California. So you're able to follow those and You're you're taking care of the hard cases you've done it for so much time that I'm I'm very excited about that. So thank you. You're welcome. Thanks for having me. Now. Let's go straight to for people who don't know about toxic mold or other chronic illnesses. You're talking about, walk me through the typical way people present when something in their environment is messing with them. If, you've been staying indoors a lot more like I have the other pretty high that what you're doing is affecting the environment that you live in your cooking at home more you're showering and while you're just breathing more so you're adding more moisture in your house, which is a perfect environment for mold to start breeding. Exposure to mold can compromise your immune system and make you vulnerable to infection and illness I know because it happened to me indoor environments don't have a natural protective ecosystem to keep harmful microbes away the way it happens outdoors but there is something you can do one of the companies I founded on biotic offers a probiotic spray that restores a healthy home biomass and can provide a protective barrier against mold you just sprayed onto. Any surface after you've finished cleaning and it's there to keep the mold away because we could all use a little bit of extra savings right now I'm offering fifteen percent off any probiotic spray package for radio listeners. The discount applies to the new home testing kit that we just launched as well. visit home biotic dot com slash Dave, and get fifteen percent off your entire order that's home by dot com slash Dave fifteen percent off. Walk me through the typical way people present when something in their environment is messing with them sure and I want to echo something you started saying it's currently thought that there are ten million people in this country who have some degree of mole toxic ity. So we're not talking about a rare condition that no, one would have any connection to whatsoever it's common. And it comes from. Moldy. Buildings which are ubiquitous in this country. All you need is a little bit of water damage and we're often running some of the things that scare us most is that some of these water built water damaged buildings or schools. schools typically have very little budget. Roof leaks can't quite fix it in a timely fashion and your your kids are being exposed to this stuff office buildings. So it's common and I want to echo that. Mold symptoms are all over the place as you indicated because Mold Texas ity affect inflammation in the body. And every area of the body can be inflamed by multi. And it can take different forms in different patients based on their genetics and based on their biochemistry. So we could see commonly we would see to teague. Fatigue to the point of this. Odd thing we call post exertion Malays where you do something and you get wasted afterwards for a couple of days I used to how that. Yeah. Well he's going have has a medical name. There's also post exertion. In which you do something in your muscles are sore way longer than they ever be. We have cognitive difficulties difficulty with brain fog memory focus concentration. Dale Bresson who's done a lot of. breakthrough work in Alzheimer's disease has found that a large percentage of his patients who can get well from what is misdiagnosed as Alzheimer's has actually they've got multi excessively, Dale has been on the show and he's coming back on this show and we become friends and I was like, thank, God, you're talking about toxic mold is one of the four big causes of Alzheimer's it's it's a thing it is. All types of psychological diagnoses anxiety depression. OCD. adhd. De Realization de personalization. You don't feel like you're yourself. All of those can be from old toxicity. then. We have different organ systems that can get involved all types of neurological conditions, numbness and tingling in different parts of the body. We have respiratory conditions, asthma or difficulty breathing shortness of breath or what people call air hunger, which is where you feel like you can't take a depressed even though. Definitely breathing seemingly adequately. We have. Cardiac issues. Harder regularities palpitations. All, the autonomic nervous system is messed with. So people get what we call pots where they have difficulty with sitting up or standing down all types of gastrointestinal issues. Diarrhea constipation gas loading distension heartburn. And so. And there's more but The smorgasbord of symptoms is so overwhelming. That if a physician doesn't know anything about multi city and many don't they are prone to saying if you come in and say look, I've got all of this stuff going on there prone to saying. Just. No condition I know of can cause this is in your head but. They're not doing you a favor. They just don't know what's causing this, and that's really key here because multi-ethnicity is something we can diagnose and we can treat. So if you have yourself a loved one, a friend, a neighbor and they are suffering with a host of conditions and their doctors scratching their heads and they don't know what they can do about it. The implication being it's in your head. But it's not. Tell them about MULTIDEX society because it is common and it's curable and I hope that your listeners can really take in that this is something that we need to be aware of because it's really common. and. It's possible for someone to have one of the symptoms or only to and to have it turned on and off by environmental exposures So it it. It's one of those things where if there's something that's unexplained, you don't have to have all of this I was lucky enough to have pretty much everything that happens there. at one time or another So I had an urgent need to biohacking myself and part of this too I weighed three hundred pounds and. Gaining weight unexplained ably, and unexpectedly no matter what you eat according to Daniel Amen in the documentary just my own experience without many others. Well, if you can't lose weight sometimes there's that's part of it and one thing you didn't mention Neil that. I think bears note is. A feeling you've probably heard from your patients is very hard to make decisions. Everything feels like so much work like you're walking through mud and when you're sick and you need to make a decision to get well and to do something follow through his just taken out and you get pissed off all the time. So the emotional control is a very difficult thing. So someone who just blows up out of character. I remember one time. I I'm pretty non-reactive. Now few places just. I just won't go that feel walk in the door, but I was in San Diego I walked into my room I didn't pick up something was off San Diego's a lot of mold. and. I went to a whole foods and contractor who is working on a building actually where I'm sitting right now he's working on restoring this barn. And turn into. My. Labs. And he called me some trivial thing and the mold had gotten my brain and it did something bad and something. You'RE GONNA. Explain I think right after this. and. I lit. It was like look I can't deal with this right now like how's it? Going you just throw a match, burn the place down. I am generally a nice guy does way out of character for me I don't yell at people work with me or work for me I practice kindness and was things and and then I just caught myself. I'm like wait a minute McKay sorry Harry and then I went back to tell at my I got exposed and I stood on the the restaurant I looked out of the picture somewhere all around the air register coming in's right on the water. So Moist air coming in spent black slimy mold all around. and. I said I when I got a different room and then I took a bunch of stuff to chill out but that is how dramatic it turned me into an asshole. So. I think it's really important. People understand that that's sentiments. Well, can you walk through the biology of why I turned into an asshole right? Then? Well, the basic biology of that is the basic biology of all mole dysfunction. Can you walk through the biology of y turned into an asshole right? Then well, the basic biology of that is the basic biology of all mole dysfunction, which is mole toxin. Enters the cells and begins to interfere with certain types. Of. Metabolism. That type of interference affects all parts of the body it affects the brain and brain chemistry and brain effects. So what you're describing is common with multi. Some of those effects affect the Patou Terry System, which is a part of the brain, and that means most hormones are affected. So, in the same way that a woman might have a mood swing when her estrogen level is low, that kind of thing can happen to us as well. So that the adrenal thyroid sex hormones and other hormones of the body get disrupted and. A fluctuating pattern, which is very difficult for people to understand the mole toxic level doesn't stay stable in the body it fluctuates mows up and down and so. You could be better some days and worse others. And and just to echo what you said. You don't have to have all of these symptoms. A few of them will suffice and a few of them can actually make you quite miserable. So again, it's just something to look for. So you want me to go into more detail or my answering your question. Well talk about the LIMBIC system what happened to to turn me on that way. Okay. The there are two parts of the brain that are specifically affected by mold toxicity, the LIMBIC system, and what we call the Vegas nerve. System. The LIMBIC system is the part of your brain that controls emotion. Sensitivity Cognition Energy and pain. The two that are unique to the LIMBIC system, our sensitivity, and emotion. So when the when the LIMBIC system is messed up. Mood swings, anxiety depression, all of the psychological issues we talked about. If I get that symptom think LIMBIC SYSTEM Sensitivity is another one is very, very characteristic and specific and by that I mean sensitivity to. Sound touch chemicals food any M. F.. So all of those things if a patient tells me, I have to wear sunglasses indoors loud noises startled me I exposed to chemicals and I. I walk down the street and pass someone wearing a sent and I buy legs go weak I mean start having a seizure I can't think straight I'm exhausted those are unique to the limbic system. And especially in the sensitive patients which are sort of my specialty. If the LIMBIC system is dysfunctional it will actually prevent the body from allowing you to take what you need to get well. Because I'm going to tie it in now to the vagus nerve system. The vagus nerve is a different part of the nervous system than the LIMBIC system, but they intimately talk to each other a lot and what they control is your perception of safety. So. If you don't feel safe in your body. and. For example, if if you don't know. What person you're GONNA pass wearing a sent. That's GONNA. Make you really sick for no reason if you don't know what light you're going to be exposed to. Or. Southbound or if you don't know what building you can walk into without making sick within minutes of walking into the building but you described if you've got that going. The nervous system, this is not psychological. The nervous system tries to protect you. By becoming more vigilant. It looks around into your environment and it goes I wonder if that's safe. Maybe it's not safe, and in fact, I'm not sure that safe and so I'm not gonNA. Let you take it. So are sensitive patients find that when they try to take the materials that would otherwise kept them. Well, even minute doses don't work. And so what are the biggest stumbling blocks treating people who have multi society is that it's not often recognized that we've got to quiet down the LIMBIC system in Vegas nerve first before we even address other forms of treatment. It's interesting because Steven porges has been on the show I think twice who's the founder and the father of polly Bagel theory in one of the masters of the nervous system who focuses a lot on how to turn that down. And your to my experience or to my knowledge, the the first practitioner really step up and say you've got to deal with those two things and if. Some listening to the show and you're saying, okay. Davis sounds a little out there that idea that you can develop. Hyper vigilance the environment it's real. In fact, it's really been informative for me in terms of figuring out the environments that thriving even people without mold removing the things that feel big to me. So I think there was a time my life where I was running at five to ten percent of Ryan. Now. and. So if you're running at five or ten percent of your of your capability and something comes in and. Takes you down one percent or or something that could be twenty percent of feel that day so. What that means I can say you know what? I can tell you breathing fragrances as bad for you, and I can tell you all the science about how it disrupts your endocrine system. Even if you're perfectly healthy and it's not a good practice, but it shouldn't take you out because you resilience is through the floor. So my practice as a human being has been maximizing my resilience so I can go past people where perfume doesn't smell very good. And I know it's not good for me but I don't feel like I'm going to die and want to run away. There's been times in my life where I literally would be disabled like I have to put on the dark glasses and I get a migraine or just really really be knocked out and there's Times I walk into a room and I would feel terror abject terror why I can tell you know I felt it and what it was is. My Body knew there was mold in the room before I even had tied? The two together is no have to get out of here and people like what's going on there's nothing wrong with this it turns out there is something wrong and I hadn't made the connection. So that's my body serving me to keep me out of things that are actually causing me harm but doing it in a way that is harmful in and of itself if that makes sense. Sure. It's a protective mechanism, the whole limbic system thing, but he's not trying to hurt you. It's trying to protect your. And many not all but many of our patients who get multiplicity become exquisitely sensitive to the presence of mold and since but that's protective on one hand but limiting and others at the. Paneth. But it's real and. Again human beings have a tendency to view the entire world through their own is. Is I'm not reacting to that. Why are you? Must be something wrong with you because I'm okay with this and it doesn't take into account that. We're all different. We're all biochemical genetically different, and if you are suffering with multi-ethnicity, your sensitivity you have experienced goes through the roof. And What I've learned is that my sensitive patients are excellent barometers never making it up there never. Smelling something that's not there. They're just smelling it at a level that other people can't because they're nervous system has been so sensitized. Now now, we know that dogs can do that. For example, we don't make a big deal about that I've got two dogs. They can smell things that I can't, and of course, they can their dogs. However here we have sensitized patients. Mold toxin has sensitize them. And I WANNA make a plea that if somebody tells you that they are experiencing a really horrible experience in a room that is not bothering you believe them. Yeah. Thank you for saying that it's exactly the right thing to do. Because they're not crazy and it's insulting actually to take someone who's having experienced and tell them you're experience isn't real. You're nuts I. ran into some some real challenges early on here because I was doing with this as a child even and not really aware of it until re exposure in my early twenties and. In fact wiser exposed I gained thirty pounds after fifty one, hundred pounds I had to lose and I got I must be nuts and I go to the doctor and the doctor was basically useless. I even proposed hey, it might be. Toxic mold or yeast or something, and it was like, no, you have aids can't be that. Because it if you have AIDS that. Mold or yeast carpet sarcoma and things like this can be a problem but. It was it was real and the reason I did the documentary which was a very substantial amount of work to do and flying over the country and putting together team at all This was about three years ago I think. It I. Did it because I wanted people who were being called crazy to be able to ask their spouse or their doctor to could you watch this and just hear from real doctors in here from? people who have been exposed including doctors have been exposed I'm so if you feel like you're alone at, you're not actually alone because like you said, your numbers are ten million people I know there's one hundred million structures in the US from the experts that I've interviewed that have water damage and genetically some of the early people doing research on this when they look at. The H. L., A. Dr for jeans it looks like about a third of, US may be five percent somewhere in there have some genes that make us more susceptible but anyone could get one of the symptoms or some of the symptoms. So I I think it's it's a meaningful societal thing affecting kids affecting adults, affecting relationships and probably affecting susceptibility to viral infections, the causes systemic inflammation. Yes. And if someone guests a viral infection and they have multi society, it makes them much much worse because the way the immune system deals with an infection and I'll add or allergy seasonal allergies will do the same thing. ADDS another whole layer of what we call cider kind inflammatory site or kind inflammation to an already inflamed system. So patients get worse than it lasts longer. I live at the arena cytokines, a Lotta people haven't heard of Cytokines but we certainly have signs storms something that everyone's heard about the media. Now because of covid, it turns outside kinds. Firms have been a regular part of my life for a couple of decades because they get exposed, they get kind storm I know exactly how to manage I know which herbs I know exactly what to do was toxins to bind I've gone from you know it could be a month if I'm exposed to mold going back twenty years where I just feel like Zombie and I would just sludge to the day to generally it's not more than twenty four hours for a of. Your exposure and usually it's not more than ten or fifteen twenty minutes to the point where it's just not that big of a deal like splinter. Let me take it out but I think I'm rare from old perspective. Do you give people turn off all the way where they just don't have that response at all? They don't get any inflammatory sadder kinds even though they've been exposed. Well, there's two things I think you're talking about here. One is patients people who don't have propensity and have not had multi city can be exposed and not react much at all. Maybe a little bit. Maybe there is little sting or burn the have a little bit of throat, soreness. For people who have had multi-ethnicity and recover to some extent they will always be more vulnerable. It's almost like the body goes back into a memory of. I remember when I reacted to that. Not, as bad. To the better you can care for? The better you can be. So in your case is a good example you've had severe mole Texas City but you've learnt that if I'm re-exposed I can just take my binders. I can just take materials that will quiet this reaction and I can turn it off fairly quickly. I have a theory there that this comes from might Oke Andrea it your mitochondria ancient back and what enemy bacteria have. Oh, it was mold. So mold makes on about it kills bacteria. They're both fighting over the piece of cheese cheeser the same dead dinosaur fights been going on for a billion years or something two billion. and. From that perspective I believe that the Mitochondria have their own bacteria level algorithm make intelligence as a distributed system, and it feels like it just gets wacked and the reason I say that is because of physical weakness happens like my grip strength drops through the floor and when I say This is a dynamo. This is my grip strength meter. I'm stronger micro strengthen an eighteen year old when I'm normal and when I get exposed to mold Negra shrink drops through the floor and I just can't squeeze. And okay someone that's neurological. But some of it is that lack of breathing it i. think it's metabolic thing. Am I nuts for that theory? Is there any validity to it? But last you're not the first to come up with it. Oh who did that and Bob Navajo a really okay. I haven't seen Bob's work. Have you have you are you aware of the danger response I am not aware of the danger responsible goodness you're in for a treat Hey did you know that protein has a cellular function inside your body protein function is just about everything when it comes to immunity your organs and your Mitochondria and even expressions of your DNA. That's why I recommend this amazing biohacking device called the Novi from a company called ING. Three none of patented technology uses specific wavelengths that energize tiny water droplets into a breathable. Missed it creates. A highly ordered form of water that's essential for protein activities in yourselves. When you breathe in the midst, you can actually accelerate the repair proteins in the body. I'm really impressed that none of V has proven data and rock-solid studies that back up what it does including increases in exercise performance. It's one of the reasons that I included at my home labs and at the upgrade labs. You can learn more about the cool science behind the Novi. It's on episode four, one, six of bulletproof radio. You can also find out more about the Nano v get pricing and joined the mailing list at ing three. Corp that's E. N. G. Three Corp Dot Com. Slash Dave. Have you are you aware of the danger response? I am not aware of the danger Responsi- goodness you're in for a treat back in, but Bob Navajo is a is a an MD is professor of genetics and pediatrics at UC San Diego, and he has a fabulous lab there that he's doing some of the best work in the world. On this particular subject, he's been studying this for a long time in two thousand thirteen he published a landmark paper simply called the Cell Danger Response in the Journal, Mitochondria if you simply Google Navajo Comma sold dangerous spots, you'll get a host of papers that Baba's Renton, all published and Kyrie review journals. What he realized and put together as. When a cell is exposed to either an infectious agent or a toxin, it goes through a biochemical dance, which is age old millennial old. That was protective in nature to protect the so. It is the middle country on the. So let's get the ball rolling. Meadows country are exquisitely sensitive to electrical changes inside the cell and when exposed to a toxin or an infectious agent. There is a drop in voltage in the cell Nellie voltage. The middle country react and they set the cell dangerous spots in motion. which includes shutting down the cell so that the infecting organism can't do anything with it. It's an intentional shutting down. that. Things that. Seem different. So. For example, all patients with multi city have might list function. They have to because it comes from them. All patients with Mole Texas city don't methylated very well. because. Intentionally the micro country, a signal, the cells to stop methylated. For example, a virus can't replicate unless hijacks your methylation chemistry. So what we do, we shut it down so that the virus can't do that as a series of biochemical events Dr Navajo has laid out and subsequently is published an even a larger model of what really amounts to most chronic illness is triggered by the dangerous spots, and so if we're talking about healing that we need to understand sell dangerous bonds to understand where you are in the cell dangerous spots cycle. So another. Important. Here is. Many physicians have realized that if you have this issue, your matter contra aren't functioning. So what do they do they give you supplements that help my country function better. Things like co Q. Ten, l.. Taurine L carnitine derive bows whatever your favorites are. Here's the problem when the cell is shut down in the first phase of the cell danger response, it's unsurvivable. Can't use it. It can't do anything with it. In fact, it may hurt the cell it's gotTa figure out what to do with it because it's it's just trying to save his own life. And at and that translates to the whole level of the organism. So you can't give supplements that the body needs at that point until you get rid of the toxin or the infection or both, or you're not going anywhere, and that's a landmark finding because so many physicians don't understand that and they start giving things that should help you early on without realizing that bodies not ready for it have toxic mold There's a study very, very old study that shows like a fifteen percent increase in life are either a reduction in. Mortality or an extension of life even just from charcoal because it's binding toxins over over time in your life. And I noticed quite often and people they take it, and so they feel better and it's removing some of the toxins talking about charcoal and other binders that would remove toxins to lower this l. dangerous bond so you could turn your Mitochondria back on. Sure well, we got back up. The first thing you WANNA do if we're talking about multi city is make the diagnosis and know what molds were talking about. Well I of course, please go there I. that's important. All binders don't work alike and all binders don't work on all toxins. So one of the issues is you need to know what toxins during the body in order to put together a treatment program that will be comprehensive. It's just makes sense if I'm only removing two of the four major toxin groups that are in your body. You won't get fifty percent better you're going to still be toxic. So you've got to get everything out of the body. So, if we look at the major toxin groups. Okra toxin for example, being the most common that we see in in multi Texas city, and that's the wild by the way in coffee chocolate, red wine, and beer and that's why filtered out of my coffee because having an increased exposure getting environmentally at least for me that subscript and I make a lot of other people to Ota's my favorite toxin Bor. Come here, we can talk about it, but there are a specific binders for that. There are specific binders for Kosta. Aflatoxin and glow toxin, which are the main ones that we that we will see. So the first thing you need to do is get a urine test. which will allow you to know what's in your body. When you say which toxins, this is not which mold is in your body. This is which toxin is produced by mold that's in your body, which may mean the mold in your body or may mean you're getting it from your environment just getting the toxin itself. So people knew to mold. I, think that distinctions important. No that's absolutely correct. It's the toxin it's doing all of it but as you're also pointing out some people colonize meaning the mold has been exposed to them for so long and their immune system has gotten weakened so that mold actually starts growing usually in the gut and sinus areas. So even if they leave a moldy environment, they could have left at fifteen years ago they're still carrying it in their body making it until they actually get rid of it. So there's three main steps in diagnosing and treating Texas ity. One. Getting the urine tests and knowing it's there there are other tests but there's nothing as far as I know that has more specific or useful. Second Duty to invest you need to evaluate your environment. You GotTa know where it is you can't get well, if you're living in a me environment whether it be your home or work car relatives house wherever it's coming from in need to know that so that you can not be there as you pointed out earlier within minutes of exposure to a mold environment, a mold sensitive patients can get much much worse and that can last for days if it's not dealt with immediately now deserves. I at least once a week I, have a conversation someone reaches out and says, you know I just found I have mold which I do an inch is always aimed get the hell out of your house and interesting what it It doesn't matter that you need to go somewhere else and I've told this to people with twenty five bedroom mansions. They just built yet. Sorry they built it wrong. You look at your look your air tests and look at your urine tests and look at the quality of your life and look at how your kids behavior is. This isn't worth things to do next week like tonight, get a hotel and get out and leave most of your stuff behind so. The importance of that if you know you're in a moldy environment, your brains going Oh. But it's overwhelming to leave. It'll be less overwhelming after you leave. You just have to do it and keep going but that just deserves an underlying. I'll echo that I got an email today from physician friend of mine who's been struggling with mold? And I And she keeps telling me how six she gets every time she goes into her home. And I went Duh get out of your home. I've told her that several times and I got an email today going. Thank you for pushing. Me Said, my brain wasn't working well enough to take in that I actually had to get out of my home, which is affecting her child as well, and she gave me just a nice. Thank you. Note. Thank you for pushing me I I just didn't have the. Judgment to act. At the level that I needed to excess how mold affects people we can go on from there. So you've got to evaluate your environment and you got your environments gotta be safe second. You've got to use the binders that are correct for the toxins that are in your body and third. If you've call us, you've got to take Antifungal 's for the sinus and got areas to get it out of there, and here's the good news. It's treatable. You can cure it you can fix it but you can't just ignore it. It will not go away. the fact that there's hope like it was not like that and two, thousand five or even twenty ten where we could be programmatic you couldn't get a good urinary mycotoxin thing. The US military had some things and we had a kind of a broad spectrum take everything that can bind to everything and that was certainly something I started with what happens if you take broad spectrum binders for long periods of time. Well if you have multi city they can help. You do WANNA be specific. So I'm going to answer that question two different ways. So first of all. It can help you the problem is you don't know how long to take it for because you can't know when the mold is out of your body. The only way I know of to do that is to get a repeat mold test to chose US cleared it. If you have. If you feel better and not completely well, and you stop treatment, you stop taking your binders. Mold will grow back. and. I've seen this way too often. So it's it's important not to try to do this on your own without knowing what you're doing. It's difficult enough and tricky enough that you kind of you need to be working with someone who knows what they're doing and you can't just do it. The other aspect of your question is I think how safe is it to take binders for a long time? And that's a very interesting question. Many people in the naturopathic community are putting out warnings of you can't take charcoal regularly for a long period of time where you can't take clay for a long period of time or Kalala, for a long period of time, it will deplete your body of nutrients. I've been doing this. For twenty years. and. I've given large amounts of binders to people for years on end I have not seen that. So perhaps in a medical study, a minute amount of nutrients might be lost to binders. I've not seen it. The flip side of that is more important if there's toxins in your body and I assure every listener you've got your body is loaded with toxins. There are eighty thousand chemicals in this in this world, and we don't even know how to measure most of them and we don't even know what most of them do. So I to have had mold toxicity by the way. And by view. And I tell this to my patients. As far as I'm concerned, my toxin exposure is so enormous and so constant, even leaving clean and eating organic, doing all the right things that I take binders on a daily basis and I plan on doing. So for the rest, of Marathi, earthly life Hallelujah brother that is one of the ways to live longer. It's in superhuman my how to lived under ninety book if you're not doing that. Or better. Yet, the people I'm going to get all my vitamins from other nature inside. Great. Thank you all of your toxins from other nature to. Because we are under living under a load that's bigger than it was what binders do you take on a regular basis? What were the ones that you've like I personally take a ben tonight, Clay Charcoal and Clara? Everyday. I am of the same mindset I don't do. Clara. Daily. Fish and I I'm not opposed to doing every day I just don't have the habit but I take charcoal on a daily basis. I even make one for bulletproof under other brands that were mine an extra fine particle for a specific reason. and I maybe once every couple of weeks I do one dose of Coal Styrene, which is a prescription binder that sticks to your bio and makes use excreted. What do you think about arming? It's okay. It's a fairly benign medication tends to be constipated. For many people. If you needed ochre toxin in you it's the best binder for Okra toxic. I tend to find that I never wanted again. So. I just do it. I I personally don't take that one on a regular basis I have taken well, call for the same purpose. It's a little bit. Is your way better tasting meaning it has no taste So. It's okay. I. I. Don't know how necessary it is I think we can all intuitively follow our own guys and guidances as to what we think would be the best thing for us. Some people worry about the aluminum content of benign clay. What's your take on that? To a certain extent, a teeny bit of aluminum is in it. I have I do a lot of heavy metal toxins, measurements. I have not seen anybody get aluminum toxic from prolonged use of tonight clay again, I know it's out there, but I don't see it. I I love that answer any. If you're new to this listening in saying you mean I should be binding toxins I would consider binding toxins to be at least as important as taking vitamins and in America stop doing the bad stuff before you start amplifying the good stuff is that a a good order operations from your perspective as well? Sure I'm not a big fan of multivitamins actually because there's too little of everything in there. I know the multi I mean targeted supplement. Okay. Yeah. I'm also opposed to multi. They're mostly a waste of money So agreement to me, it's about measuring learning what a body needs and giving the body, what they need, and so yes, I'm a big fan of that and. It's kind flipped on its head because people say I gotta take more of the good stuff. It's do lots of the bad stuff well to amplify that it isn't just about taking the good stuff it's about. Being, aware of and. Including detoxification in your daily regimen as well. Improving your body's ability to get rid of the toxins that are in that. There's no question about that. So again, if you want my own part of my daily regiment is a huge hot tub fan and I probably take a hot tub four or five days. A week. Sweating. Is a superb way to remove toxins if one is inclined to do a sauna on a regular basis great epsom salt bath great whatever you're drawn to doing. That would be very helpful to help the body get rid of this stuff. I'm beautiful recommendation I like an emperor read Sauna and hot tubs as long as they're not in a multi building. I've been a little outspoken having been diagnosed having run a lab company for a little while that did testing for lime actually end and some mold but more for lime. And other environmental exposures I think that eighty or ninety percent of people who think they have lyme disease actually have toxic mold no I don't know that it's that high, but it is high. I'll give you some other numbers. I do some teaching with rich Horowitz who is considered by many to be one of the top lime docs in the country and after rich learn about mold. In his patients who are treating line and not improving, he has found that seventy percent of them have mold and that's the stumbling block. So I won't go as high as ninety, but the problem is mold toxin. And the Co.. Bartonella. Give such similar symptoms that you can't tease it apart symptomatically. and. If you're not thinking mold and you're dealing with a lime patient, you really need to check mold early on because that means to be addressed before the patient can even take antibiotics if you've got if you've got a sensitive patient. And they can barely take the things you want to give them from mold. There's no way they're going to handle the antibiotics for lime until you get the mold out of there, and if you have both the vast majority of people need to treat the mold I yeah or they're not gonNa make any headway against against the line. So very important hits one of the things that Andy and I might agree on. You mentioned something else that I've never covered on the show and I'm GonNa talk about this for just a minute as to set the stage for you. When I was somewhere around ten years old I woke up in a cabin. It was in Colorado. and. I felt something on my neck. And I thought it was a mouse that I heard earlier it was a little family camping trip. So I reached up to grab the mouse now gonNA just like squeeze it to kill it or something I. Was Asleep and I was a kid and bit me on thumbs I threw it as hard as I could at the ground and it never hit the ground. And he said what? The what the heck and so I scrambled around trying to find a flashlight five-term flashlight and there's nothing there and I knew that I wasn't dreaming and I'd felt these two little tinguely spots right under my ear on the right side of my neck. So I woke up my parents, they thought I was crazy and we eventually believe me we looked around we found a bat in the corner of the room and it actually was a vampire bat. and. One of my claims to fame before bulletproof is that I'm the only person ever to have been bitten by vampire. Bat in the US. So I did get the rabies shots. The Bat did not have rabies we captured we brought to the hospital. This is a proven thing for a long time ago. And Strangely. Enough out. Oh, three four months later I started getting more joint pain than already had I started getting stretch marks I started gaining weight behavioral issues massive pain throughout the body really bad stretch marks puffiness everywhere weight gain I'm really amazing e pain pain in my feet and I kind of figured out how it's supposed to be just got used to feeling that pain. And years later after having actually stopped all the symptoms of what I do of mine. said Dave You have You have all the signs of having had Bartonella kid turns out seventy percent of empire bats have Bartonella. So the other EXC exceptionally high that that's where I got it. So most people listening don't even know Bartonella is, can you talk about what it is versus lime disease and all these other things how people get it and how common it is Sure. So, Bartonella is another bacteria that you can get not just from. Ticks but from other sources as well. SCAT. Cats are probably number one, forty percent of cats carry. Bartonella, some dogs do as well. You can get it from flea bites. You can get it from some Schiavo bites or from blackflies or horse flies. But the one that has the most. PR attached to it is getting it from Tex-. So. When a tick bites you. It I take some of your blood and puts it into its stomach and it kind of sits there for a while and then it regurgitates step blood after a while back into your body doctor Joe Births Gano. Was One of the line experts in this world calls it is dirty needle. Because when it injects back into, it injects not only the line bacteria if it has it but also Bartonella Busia. Couple of bacteria. Clemencia mycoplasma a Erhlichia. As a host of other bacterial species that can be injected into you from that. In this ticks studies that have been done. About forty in most communities about forty percent of the ticks carry lyme the back the bacteria lime called Berea the emptier tech's talking about not everything's okay. Deer tics. And forty percent also carry Bartonella. And, another ten or fifteen percent carry abyssinia about eight percent carrier -LICA-. So for a long time, it was not recognized that many people who had lime also had Bartonella. And is in your case, you can get Bartonella from other sources. So you don't have to get it from a tick bite that may not have been the source. So Bartonella is a bacteria. That is also like lime called stealth infection and what they mean by stealth infection is it doesn't float around in the bloodstream, but at boroughs into cells. Making them intracellular. And in there They both mess with your immune system so that your immune system will ignore it and not attack as it normally would, and it's got a number of mechanisms for doing that. So it releases the way lime does. These. Toxins into your body also in addition to the inflammatory nature of what it does the body. which is remarkably similar to what mold us. So once an infection. Once a toxin, but they both stimulate the immune system to have an inflammatory reaction in an extremely similar way and many of the symbols symptoms quite similar. So it can be tricky for a physician who understands this most don't. To tease them apart and figure out. Okay. Does my patient have mold or lime or Bartonella or an lime or and Bartonella? Which of these is my patient have what do I need to treat in what order? So that's a quick. Cliff. Notes version of were Noah. Well, it's a it's a wonderful one and that's also something that can be treated, but it's tricky to treat and. Specialize in in this episode, we'll get into treatments, but in your book which is really well constructed you talk about rebooting the immune system, rebooting the nervous system, rebooting the entrances in recruiting the gastrointestinal system, and then court of stepping through in a in a orderly process on how to fix these different things and get the body going back again, and along the way obviously figuring out which of these is going on. There's two of the things that people might not know about and certainly I hear from people in the bulletproof community on instagram and chats, and facebook and conferences, and all the stuff that I do. there's mass cell activation syndrome, and there's carbon monoxide, poisoning and Porphyria. Can you talk about those for a little while? I could let's talk about mass elective ation I 'cause it's much more common and much more relevant to people in the same way that mold toxin interferes with the LIMBIC system and the vagus nerve it can also trigger in the majority of patients distinct called. Nestle activation. So let's talk about mass cells what are they? Mess cells are A. Type of immune. Cells. That bridges or connects the nervous system and the immune system. So it is the direct bridge of communication between them. and. So they're out there monitoring your environment little bit the way the modern country do but on a cellular level, monitoring it for infectious agents, monitoring it for toxins, and if they're they're they react by releasing their contents and mass cells have within them over two hundred different biochemical mediators, most of which are inflammatory. Main one is histamine. Mass, cell activation refers to the fact that in quite a few patients used to be thought that it was extremely rare actually turns out is president at least ten percent of the population and in a much higher percentage of our patients with mold and lime meaning. Probably in the sixty to seventy percent category and that means that adds another dimension of inflammation to an already inflamed system it to needs to be treated early on or patients won't quiet down enough to improve. The symptoms of missile activation can be the same complicated symptoms that lyman mold have the same multi system issues, neurological symptoms, psychological symptoms, breathing gi symptoms got itching. Hives Rashes. It's so Cross, the board, and so different for all people that again, it's just one of those things that you need to include in thinking about when you've got patients who are across the board. Complicated. And beauty is once again it's treatable. Identify it. There are a number of both supplements that are natural and medications that can quiet these missiles down and allow people to improve sometimes pretty dramatically and quickly. What are the top natural supplements that turned down hives and things like that? The top ones that we tend to use Courson is number one. there's a there's a supplement called Param, which is an extract of Perella. Seed does a supplement called all clear which is a trip tastes inhibitor. There's the enzyme dao that stands for diomede oxide. Is An enzyme that breaks. Down and often the body doesn't make enough of it so that the histamine release keeps prolonging itself in the body. There's a number of others but those are the main ones that use do you like black seed oil by Human Tito? For that purpose. Yeah. I'm not I'm not sure how well it works for that purpose by I I've not. Used it that way I've seen studies that looked pretty convincing, and if you need something that has more history than I like I will take. DA. Oh, I will take that and I'll take a maybe twenty percent of a Benadryl. Foods that won't give me a headache and afterwards I was. A for much of my life. I. Would eat something of that histamine in it and I would get a really intensely swollen forehead. I would look like a Klingon for a little while and then you can actually see it. It was his big thing and it was of course really uncomfortable and then my brain would sorta turn off because this means neuro transmitters while right so I if if you're. Listening to this and sometimes chocolate doesn't sometimes it doesn't like chocolate can have histamine because of the way it's fermented in so you go through all these things and you realize it it's not that you're crazy is that there's stuff in there and you might be responding in a certain way and there's hacks for it but ideally, you train the body to not do that and that's becoming more resilient. When it comes to to that process. Let me add that a tip off that. You have mess elective Asian is if you get symptoms immediately after eating, that means within fifteen or twenty minutes. That other things will come on later. So if you get palpitations itching rash swelling. Abdominal pain and. Diarrhea. Within. Fifteen or twenty minutes of eating. That's virtually always mast cell activation. That's not an allergy and other tip off is that it fluctuates it's not an allergy. So, most people think what is it that I'm allergic to? Because I could eat that yesterday and I didn't have any reaction to it and today I can't do that because that is typical as well. It's not what eat is how activated the mast cells are when you eat. So at inactivated state, you can actually react to drinking water. And when people say that, they'll say that's crazy. You can't react to water if your muscles are activated enough you can. So again that the the take home point is if you're getting symptoms quickly after eating, think about mass selective ation because we can treated. That is fantastic. I've definitely seen people where you're right afterwards you feel that like I got a food baby in ten minutes. THAT'S NOT CBO if it takes ten minutes to get swelling, right? Exactly correct and people attributed to that, but it can't come on that fast. CBO. Now. If, you have something wrong in your gut leg CBO is at more likely to mean that you have mass electrification syndrome. Not necessarily. I mean CPA was. Complicated and basically just means that your your gut and your microbiome. Is Messed up. Keep in mind that. Many people treating CBO without looking at what's causing the CBO. And again I want to emphasize. If if you have Candida or molten city and you try to treat CBO in the ways we do you won't get very far. You've gotta get though more toxic elements out where the body can heal itself. A common mistake I see in my colleagues, which is in functional medicine you're taught from the get-go. Fixed the gut everything else comes afterwards. That's true if you're not very sick. But. If you have mole society, you won't be able to fix that gut until you get the mold in the candidate out. So once again, you need to know what to treat in water. While I I love it that you've also put the order in your book. So you sort of tell people do this I can do this, which is fantastic. You said though it's not what you eat is how activated your muscles are need. It isn't part of it. What you eat I mean I noticed that if you give me leftovers that are two days old I'm much more likely to get activated. Then if I eat fresh food so isn't there some degree of bacterial breakdown in Histamine biogenic genetic Amin formation in the food that's part of this whole equation sure. I was merely trying to emphasize that it had more to do with the reactivity of the mass sells them what you eat. You're right. and again. About fifty percent of people who have NASA lactation clearly benefit from a low histamine diet. But about fifty percent of people don't benefit from it at all. So I basically tell all of my mess outpatients from start, we're going to go on a low histamine diet for a couple of weeks and let's see how you do. If you're better stay on it if not don't because. Well it's a restrictive diet and you don't want to stay on a restrictive diet lists doing you clear benefit. Part of the bulletproof supplements stack is around supporting detox in the body as so I make a glutathione. There's many forms of go to find out that you can buy today when I first got into Theon, there was only one. Form on the market I was looking at to market that around the year two thousand and one actually, and it's evolved so much. There's many different forms that can work and can be absorbed through the gut now. So that's evolved, but there's also calcium de glue great to support the secondary backup pathway for Detox, called Glucose nation, which is the hardest word to say, and then of course, apple cider vinegar forest elation. You conference just last year back when conferences still happened at least in person the first annual vinyl toxins in genomics conference the one I wish I would have gone to, but you had presentations in there about those pathways other pathways. And the CYP pathway in the liver can you walk listeners through detox in the liver works and which ones most important which happens I kind of gives the overview? Sure Ken and actually at that meeting. Where I actually talked about the cell dangerous spots some of the other practitioners had pieces of a puzzle. We've been trying to put together for a while. Beth O'Hara. Emily gives her. Larry, Yung. All presented pieces of that puzzle you're referring to, because I've been working for a long time to try to understand. How exactly does each mycotoxin? detoxified by the body 'cause if I could figure that out, we could assist detoxification and make that work. So Beth had a piece emily had a piece Larry had a face and. We put it all together. So wow we we have subsequently done that and both. All of us have been lecturing about what we found. We basically put together a master table. Of the Mike Toxins and how each one is detoxified by the medical literature in other words, everything that we talk about how we can quote chapter and verse that Works and that Go. On my goodness. So to answer your question, click you're on a Dacian which does roll off the tongue. Is probably the major mechanism used. So if we talk detoxification, we have what people call phase one detoxification and phase two detoxification phase. One detoxification basically involves the liver changing the molecular structure of toxins. And face to it changes them even further to make them water soluble. Body can excrete them. and. What we've got in our table are both nutritionally the foods and the supplements that can enhance each phase of the toxication that corresponds to each toxin. So for example, there are four main ways that the body detoxify Okra toxin, which is we've talked about a little bit is deemed most common of the mole exits that people have to deal with. Cook you're on a Dacian is the most common? So is amino acid conjugation so is binding it to Glutathione conjugation. Sorry Oakland. Is Basic how somebody great. Then go to thion and and a seat elation kind of in that order is the model that I've been using but I don't know which talks go ride say. Because you need three if you're gonNA live in toxic world anyway. And that's partly it's partly true right. So now now you've got your mold toxin report, you can look on his table and you can go. Okra. Tux. These foods that I wanNA take mostly cruciferous vegetables up Salmon KRILL KRILL oil. And then week will supplement. With things like resveratrol Curcumin Quercetin. CBD All of those are documented at enhancing the detoxification pathways. So we can assist that body and getting rid of the toxins better. So we're real excited about this little table. If your listeners want to access it. It's available a newsletter that I wrote on my website. people simply go to my website, which is Nail Nathan MD DOT COM. Very simple. If you go to the blog section of my newsletter, all of my old newsletters there, and this one is to from two ago, and so this table is there for either patients or practitioners and Emily and Beth I are lecturing on this literally. All over the country to bring this information forward to really help people do this whole thing better. Thank you for doing that work I I just looked it up as we're talking and You've got some amazing stuff in here including things like genesee, which is a that comes from soy the generally I recommend because it gets in the way of yesterday and pathways. But if you're looking at Okra toxin a ends McCall do in that's also vomit toxin, right? Yeah. It does exactly what you think. It does cause nausea that's why I called vomit toxin It turns out. That's actually good for you. I didn't know that I'm just pulling this up in here. So having that roadmap I like to say especially, if you processed food or stuff at restaurants, you generally are getting all these toxins a regular basis while let him hang around I, like to take the general stack of things. But if you know what's going on because you've done a lab test. and I'm sure you recommend lab tests on your website as well. make there's only one has your mycotoxin now, right? No there are there are four now and and the market is. Increasing the the two that have been around the longest and do the best job are the real time laboratory and great plains. Laboratory. They both. Right and they both do. Completely different technologies and you get very different information from them. So sometimes patients get confused they say, why does one lab show that I haven't one doesn't because they're not measuring the same thing in the same way. So I often find getting both labs really helpful because it gives me the bigger picture of what's going on. Wow. You are a true expert and this chart is actually really impactful. I will write a blog post about it and reference people to this as well because it's it's important news. There's something in here in the chart as I'm looking at it that I think listeners would also appreciate Kelsen glueck rate is one of my favorite supplements because. Not only help with just the general detox here it helps men convert estrogen houses not convert helps US remove estrogen from the body. So you convert your testosterone desert and you take the stuff you can reduce extras origin that you don't need but that also means it binds to the Zeno estrogens which are made by toxic mold. So rally known, which is something that by the way, if you eat industrial meat from feedlots which you should never do if you wanna live a long time and EVALU- animals evalu- Soil and the planet and all that kind of stuff. I'm badly you can't grasp at me that stuff's good for you. But if you if you eat that stuff you're getting zero. No, this is a multi oxen gets purified into zero Renault, which is something they sell a waxy pellet that goes in the ear of the cow at absorbs in it's thousands of times stronger than estrogen, which causes that Nice Marveling of fat. So you can deal with that kind of a toxin and the mold side of Zarella known Or the industrial side of concentrated around and your own natural estrogen production. It seems like it's a good supplements take I've been taking this up for years. I would just that there's multiple reasons you could consider that. Correct. Sierra Leone is measured by the Great Plains test and it does mess with estrogen metabolism and often are patients are having what looks like a premature menopause We also Michael Gray has observed that is extremely common and and women who have endometriosis, and it may be one of those things that contribute to that condition that hasn't really been recognised so far. I. Feel like we could go on for hours and hours more because you have just a wealth of knowledge about this, and we're both in a toxic mold summit but links to that in the show notes and all, which is really cool and I would just encourage people like if you're dealing with any of the things we talked about I have had nick. Foles came on his wife. Tori. Falls has pots and he was very open about that. And we've had so many people on including doctors like Dr Hyman. Who's been on the show who had toxic mold this house he and I talked to him I. Think There's mold. I think there's more than there was, and so you know we've talked about that in one of these episodes as well. So it hits people I've wall. Street bankers teachers people from all walks of life who who can get mold from their house from their environment and then It gets worse and worse. Then there's the lime disease crowd some of whom have limestone have mold. So I think if you look around right now and you say, okay, do I have stuff maybe some people come to bulletproof because they want to get better and there's other people come to believe it because they're already awesome and they want to get even better and depending on which one of those you are. If you're that, I'm on top of the world look around and find that person who's struggling in your life. And the odds of some of this stuff going on in there? That's a biological cause of struggle rather than just a weak person the the other high, and that's when a book like this is is worth. Is Worth paying attention to thank you. So let me encourage all your listeners if this is of any interest to you at all, read my book. It's called toxic. Your body from. Multi-activity lyme disease, multiple chemical sensitivity, and other chronic environmental exposures. It I wrote it. So that it would be helpful. it has is helped already thousands of people to understand what they have and to understand how get the medical care, and that's the spirit in which I would encourage you to look into it further because I. I hope I'm told that it is a pretty clear way of understanding this bigger picture. So you can begin to understand how to approach this. Thanks again for your work Dr Nathan Very Welcome. If you like today's up. So seriously read the book. If not, you might WANNA go check out moldy movie Dot Com. It is free. You can do that and read the book the same time I recommend both because if the sounds like a heap of crap to you, okay, you just heard from an expert who really knows what he's talking about I've been talking about this for years and there's a massive community people who've figured this out but there's many many millions of people who don't know which if any of these are affecting them and even if you don't have the strong symptoms, trust me, you don't want aflatoxin floating around in your house. Why? Because number one cause of cancer. So actually may not be the number one cause of cancer. It's the most cancer causing substance. We know that doesn't mean as the number one causes different different math. So this matters to all of us and if you want healthy kids and you want reasonable healthcare costs because solve the problem as a world. Bulletproof radio was created this hosted by Dave asprey the executive producer Darcy himes podcast Assistant Bev Hamson. His podcast for information purposes, only statements and views expressed on this podcast not medical advice this podcast including Dave Aspirin. The producers disclaim responsibility for any possible adverse effects from the use of information contained herein opinions of guests are their own in this podcast is not endorser accept responsibility for statements made by guest because podcast is not make any representations, warranties about guests, qualifications, or credibility individuals on this podcast may have a direct or indirect financial interest in products or services refer to ring. If you think you have a medical problem, a licensed physician. PODCAST owned by bulletproof media.

Bartonella Busia US Dr Neil Nathan California Bob Navajo Texas USA Novi Dave Ten Dave asprey twenty twenty official Dot. Daniel Amen asthma Patou Terry System migraine
243 - Best Of Lyme Ninja Radio - Dr. Neil Nathan

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

49:23 min | 1 year ago

243 - Best Of Lyme Ninja Radio - Dr. Neil Nathan

"Join us every thursday on. I tunes for the latest episode of lime ninja radio. Hello i'm your host mckay ripi and this is a best of episode. Oh few times a year roar and i will take a break to relax recharge and rejuvenate and when we do that we'll bring you a rebroadcast of some some of the most popular episodes over the past year and today. We're gonna bring you our interview with dr neal nathan. He's an author there and health expert and it's really an amazing interview. It's really our most popular over the past twelve months by a long shot a really recommend you listen to it again if you've listed already and i know if you haven't heard this episode you really gonna enjoy it often. When i'm learning from podcast i'll listen several times because there's always always so much packed into the hour that takes a couple of cents for me to pull all the clinical pearls out of it so please enjoy our rebroadcast and were and i will be back in the beginning of september. Two kickoff spread new episodes so of lime ninja radio. Here's our interview with dr neal nathan oh and almost forgot dr nathan and i are going to be on the stage together in denver colorado presenting at bob miller's environmental toxins conference dr nathan is going to be talking about the cell danger response and i'm going. We'll be talking about how toxicity alters our nitric oxide pathways and leads to cardiovascular disease and i'm really looking forward to meeting dr nathan in person and everyone else at the conference all right. Here's our interview with dr neal. Nathan neil mackay ropy from lime. Ninja radio got the great great to have you on my show today. I'm very very excited to speak with you because you're pulling together some very interesting esteem and maybe obscure symptom patterns and disease petrologistics including math sales and poor furans which i've just been learning about in the past couple of months and linking that in with infections a new mold exposure and that is quite the perfect storm to use a cliche these days yes it is <hes> and i think it's a lot more common than people realize <hes> many people who present with the very odd symptoms that will probably be talking about or have learnt that they can't talk to their family or friends or even their doctors about it because as soon as they start to describe their symptoms the eyebrows go up the ice start rolling and they immediately get the sense of so. You're not going to understand what i'm saying. So how did you begin your history. Is you started off as a family doctor you and your doctor in a small town and you know you're more toward my side of things. I'm an acupuncturist and we tend to believe everybody initially and and then worked from there rather than the other way around. Tell me about your journey. The bill cosby line. I started as a child ruled most people do although i sorry i can't. I couldn't pass that up. <hes> <hes> i think i was always interested in medicine and research <hes> even as a teenager. I worked at chemistry laboratory at a research laboratory. I had worked as a <hes> an orderly in an emergency room and realized that i just really liked working with people so for me. It was always a passion going to medical school and honestly. I was shocked when i got to medical school because i wanted to be a healer when i grow up and i discovered a medical school that wasn't what they were going to teach me and in fact it wasn't even something that people wanted to talk about so i was quite disappointed that what i wanted to learn about wasn't quite what i was going to be taught <hes> so i went to the university of chicago and i left with my degree <hes> but was passionate about helping people and i kept feeling that what we called conventional medicine. It didn't embrace enough scope to really help people with their problems in other words. If you had a sore throat great we were good for that. If you had a gallbladder attack great we were good for that but if you had complicated illness or chronic elvis or something that felt a little bit out of the realm of simpson the college <hes> my field wasn't really geared to that and so a very very early time i i left. Medical school went into the indian health service. I worked in south dakota <hes> oklahoma and alaska then i came back to northern california where i was in as you said a family practice round the e._r. For awhile delivered babies a little bit of surgery but at the same time i was studying as hard as i could with other people. One of my partners was a chiropractor and i studied. They've manipulation with him. He convinced me to study emotional. Release works. I learned reichen therapy. I also then went onto study osteopathic basic manipulations particularly cranial work <hes> i had an acupuncturist working in my offers so i studied acupuncture and i began to acquire a skillset toolbox. If you will that i could help a lot more people than many of my colleagues did and i loved it because i felt i could help a lot more people and over the years i've simply added to payrolls box and because of my interest in if you will out liars liars or people who my colleagues weren't able to help i got more and more interested in things like chronic pain eventually chronic fatigue syndrome own fibromyalgia that led to my interest in lyme disease and mold toxicity and i have sort of evolved into into helping people that other people don't quite know what to do with which doesn't quite a name yet as a medical special it should be though the patient for short period of time and he had to retire he was a pediatric surgeon and the orthopedic surgeon and lyme disease finally rob to mow his career but before he was well known and a heap prided what's the past tense of pride he took pride in have taken care of and taking on patients who is colleagues just didn't want to deal with because they were too who complicated or required too much time yeah. I'm different than that. I love complexity kind of like. I love problem solving in a sort of like if it's complicated bring it well. It's just how i'm wired <hes> and that impetus has has led me to study more study harder expand what i know because i'm particularly drawn to the people that i can't figure out which is there's gotta be an explanation to this. I just don't have it yet. You know that's been the driving force behind my my passion for learning and so it it's a nice wedding of my passion for learning and helping people kinda works okay now now your books excuse toxic and early on in the book you distinguish between tuck -sity and sensitivity and why is that important well because i think those get confused. I think often people rump both of those together and although there is an overlap they're they're not quite the same thing sensitive refers to a hyper reactivity of the nervous system and so the patients <music> who are sensitive or often ones that the medical profession tends to turn its back on where they say. I have a horrible reaction if i take probiotics or or if i take even a tiny dose of this medication <hes> i can't even function for days afterwards and and often colleagues are medical. People are rolling their eyes. I'm going oh god one of those and they would be wrong. Almost all time things are very very real. Sensitivities with real causes. Yeah it's important in fact i wrote the book primarily for that population of patients who have not been taken seriously and have very real issues with causes that we can buy on large identify and treat now south texas. Ity is a bit different in which exposure exposure to toxins like low toxicity heavy metals <hes> petro chemicals glide glyphosate <hes> among others literally poisoned the body symptoms and can contribute to sensitivity but has to be approached differently meaning aiming at all of medicine matter what you do. You have to know what you're treating. I need a diagnosis and distinguishing. Them can be very helpful regard. Am i answering a crack house. You are and to to sum up see if i'm understanding correctly here. The sensitivity is the bodies of let's say overreaction. Let's immediate could just the way they're wired right their reaction to it but will describe it as an overreaction from from the norm and the talk city is actually the either the buildup of the because the doses in the poison right the the build up of toxin oxen or or the systems detox abilities overwhelm so so it builds up. Is that what you're exactly. Okay so somebody somebody's sensitive on the detox strategies in the world isn't going to necessarily calm things down perfect you do understand and i think this gets confusing for a lot of healthcare practitioners who who recognized that this is a very sensitive patient and it's toxic and are are baffled when those same patients can't take or tolerate the kinds of treatments that would normally work for most people in that in gory you know i run into patients like that not unfrequently in my practice in a couple oh spring to mind immediately where they even struggled with a set thing acupuncture treatment which grand scheme of things is pretty mild intervention exactly and and those patients confused others and unfortunately i think there are millions of them out there <hes> <hes> at a certain point as i alluded to before they tend to not want to tell anyone how sensitive they are because they've already learnt that no one's gonna believe the help. He trained patients to be quiet isn't it it is <hes> and keep in mind. You can have both sensitivity and taxes city like mold is a perfect example. Mold toxin is a toxin but it sensitized nervous system to make people more sensitive so that's where it really gets complicated. Now you talk about rebooting food as well as a strategy for the sensitivity and can you summarize quickly and then we'll get into some of the specifics the big of some of these sensitizing agents. I sure can and i'll try to use that as a segue so for people who know so. Maybe the fact that i'm using the word re-booting is hysterically funny because i am one of the least technological but but even i have discovered that what might computer locks up if i turn it off and turn it back on again it works again and so that imagery is very very helpful to understand what we need to do to change things in the body because until recently we've always thought about our interventions as being <hes> gentle for example your magnesium deficient sean does give you some acne. Your adrenal is low. I'll give you some supplements will build up your adrenal functioning and it's i'll give you something that will get you past wherever you your health needs to be boosted but in the illnesses that we're seeing now chronic fatigue syndrome syndrome fibromyalgia lime toxicity autism neuro degenerative illnesses these are illnesses that have gone past the point where whereas simple nutrient supplement supplementation gonna fix it. If you've got a system that is literally shut down and you need to literally literally rebooted to get functioning again you know and one of the many as we'll talk about one of many things acupuncture is something something that we know can do this. Rebooting and part of my book was to present this literally a new model of how to treat chronic illness that once as you've gone past a certain point you have to reboot it before it will even respond to the things that need. I so agree. I've used that term in my practice well to help. Patients understand what we're trying to do because they come in with the model exactly what you're saying that we're trying to fix something like no. There's nothing broken. It just need to unplug it in pre plug it in right can and the rebooting model being electrical in nature when we're talking about computers. That's the easiest way to understand rebooting because all of these conditions <hes> inflame the nervous assistant in areas of the brain and once it's inflamed the normal neural pathways aren't functioning properly early and you literally have to reboot those pathways to get them working again and in in my book <hes> toxic with with a number of site terms to help explain it. It's called toxic. Heal your body from mold toxically lime disease chemical sensitivities in chronic environmental illness about two thirds of the book is devoted to rebuilding technologies. I literally take it system by system. Rebooting the nervous system rebooting the immune system rebuilding a intestinal function removing hormonal function and so on to to try to help people understand all of the different possible ways. You could approach this in order to obtain healing. Can we jump ahead. Now i to porfirio your channel and we can and you're you're talking about sub clinical prof iria or secondary. I think i've heard it called a couple times rather than the classic or are you talking about the classic acute talking about both no no. I'm not talking about both for listeners classical. Poor area is an extremely rare genetic disease in which you build up these things called perf poor friends which make you really sick honestly in my forty seven years a medical practice. I've never seen kids however we are now beginning to understand that what you called secondary porfirio's which is preferred area that's triggered by either. An infection or a toxin is much more common than we had realized and i again for readers. Let's talk about what perea is <hes> when the buddy normally has to break down red blood cells every ninety days remake them we break them down and in the process of breaking down the red blood cells <hes> the main component of red blood cells. Everyone knows hemoglobin so in breaking down him we require a certain enzymes enzymes in order to recycle it properly secondary porfirio occurs when the body lacks the right amount of those enzymes when you build up some of the breakdown products of him which are poor for so long as simply an accumulation of these the breakdown products that the body is not able to process as it normally would it makes it in its own way toxic okay so i'm going to pause you here here for second to help me and to get a little bit technical so you're not talking about the synthesis side of poor fear talking about he mocks gymnasium and fair porton certain incited things corrective eight named poor friends that were potentially build up in any one of them if capable of causing this thing that we call porfirio so here's here's a clinical question i have a patient who struggles and angie's been diagnosed with lyme and multiple other things before and after she just got back from a hip replacement and she sent me a picture of her arm. That looks like it's been just bruised just a big giant reddish brews and the first using the came. She said nobody can figure out what's going on and the first thing that came to my mind is well. Is she bleeding because her hime pathway breakdown and transportation tation isn't working right in that area and things have just leaked out is. Is that a sign that you see with his career. Is that something else. I anything that's something else <hes> you can get a variety of clotting abnormalities with some of these illnesses so that the body doesn't caught you can get built up of literally about bleeding under the skin or that's possible but you're describing wouldn't be perfidious. Certain types of <unk> can be associated with a wide variety of rashes certain types of <unk> would be associated with <hes> if you collect your urine and leaving it out in the sun for a couple of hours it will turn brown or purple. That's rare but that's more typical for period so let me let's talk about what typical porfirio's symptoms always bring bring me back. Okay okay when someone has an acute secondary what you normally would see most prominently is intense. Nausea and vomiting intense anxiety exiled to the point of paranoia and panic attack and intense depression so for example if someone is being treated for with lime lime disease at bartonella some of the antibiotics that were used for that also can treat <hes> clinton pneumonia which is some people consider it a co-infection. It's a common <hes> infection that accompanies lying and co-infections what's unique about it is if you kill hill committee in the monja it releases horford specifically and contributor in a key of course eric action so many physicians who treat right line will use their normal antibiotics and then assume that this is a hertz <hes> the tip off that it's not a hurts that hurts his typically owner last else two or three days this goes on and on and on unremitting nausea and vomiting and on unreal anxiety can then if that's happening. That's a tip off that they're antibiotic has triggered this and you need to treat that in order to resolve this or we'll just keep going on and will that happen with the busiest well 'cause. It's a blood cell infection or it depends on the antibiotic. Use okay my problem. Rep ron would be unlikely likely to do that but my point is usually the zithromax is it through my sense which can trigger that so you can and get that with that with that kind of treatment and have you seen that happen with herbal remedies as well some of the herbal quote unquote antibiotics much much much more rarely and really doesn't tend to do that <hes> again. What's happening for many of these people so is this <hes> that's being killed. Releasing toxins creating the secondary prefers now once people are prone to perform. There's a wide variety of antibiotics depend too on their own trigger professor and if patients go to the internet look up. All of the different medications can trigger porfirio. You know start to freak out so please understand that all of them don't do that. It's quite it's fairly unusual but rarely are goes in the category could to know now also you bring up carbon monoxide and carbon monoxide is produced with the breakdown of him and his his signaling the <unk> or signaling hormone signaling molecule unassuming. You're talking about something like excess nitric oxide to aware builds up to higher levels. We'll that's one part of it and actually probably not the most common part. The usual come in part is actual exposure exposure to carbon monoxide yeah people who are using propane to heat for kerosene and it's not vented properly. <hes> may have a leaky. The source of propane in the house may actually build up true carbon monoxide poisoning probably more common than people realize. I interviewed a woman it's about two years ago now and she got carbon monoxide poisoning from stove in apartment underneath. I need her yeah. Yeah yeah it can happen again. I'm bringing it up so that the focus of my book is on sensitivity what causes it. What do you want to look for and how do you trade it and so also for people to recognize if they have any of those exposures carbon monoxide poisoning uniquely causes amongst other things extreme sensitivity to light sound and touch and smell. I mean it's like a global hyper sensitization of the nervous system. That's such a common report from people with lime disease. Yes it is and is that just the same mechanism. They're both irritating the nervous system in the same way. What do you think these are concurrent issues going on well. It's inflaming it in different ways but the end result of that inflammation formation is a hyper reactive hyper sensitized nervous system so whether we're talking barton ala which in the in the lime the world bartonella does it much more often than than line itself or abuse here and and one of the things that i'm i'm trying to teach people who've the line world for a long time is that mold toxicity does at least as commonly if not more so and it's important that people start start looking for mold toxicity in line patients who are not progressing the way you'd like because the symptoms of multi city in line particularly bartonella are very very close and let's pause there for a moment as well 'cause in your your chapter on infections you lead with bartonella and i thought that was especially in this day and age where lime berylliosis is the rock star of the stealth infections. Why did did you choose to lead with bartonella because symptomatically. That's what causes sensitivity much more than lime per se housing housing so you know the way line of all is that you know back in the eighties nineties when when physicians were first getting interest interest in lyme disease. It was really just line. That's all we knew about than we treat it like we treated other infections so as with massive amounts of antibiotics and as our understanding evolved by the late ninety s we had recognized that the d._c. Or was a player as well. We had begun to understand that when it did someone one not only did they inject morelia but they also injected but these and although we also knew that they could inject there olympia and bartonella camila that didn't really hit consciousness to a little later so i may be over emphasizing bartonella but it's because i don't think a- as as appreciated as huge a player as it is if you simply look at the percentage of these microbes in the tech when it bites someone in most states you're looking at percentages such as forty percent of ticks for example in one the population in california forty percent carry berea forty four percent kerry bartonella ten percent carry or looking at if an eight percent kerry reduce yeah so i if statistically you're going to look at what would be the co-infection. You're gonna find most often it. It would be with beryllium would be ella and i don't know that noah has been accepted as the major player that it actually because i have a friend in the area who's a retired thet and had a very successful practice and every time i'd bump into him he's popping up and down about bartonella and corporal even to the point i you know i should put together a conference and bring together veterinarians and the medical people because this this is really a serious problem so you have you have allies out there. Have i'm not going to disagree with you and there there are so many times again and you know the the rock star image of lyme disease and borelli ah but what so frequently how often do we get a patient where they just this have one infection whether it's opportunistic or a co infection that came along rarely so for those of us us who have been in this field for a long time have come to understand my love of complexity if you will. It's not gonna be usually just align. It's often going to be lime and something else. Maybe many something else and lime will affect the to retirees ability to regulate hormones. You need to look at these immigrant system and and on and on we go so those of us who work in this field have come understand that re- need to look at multiple complicated variables constantly to move our patient towards the help so now that we've got the body activated one of the main activating cells in the immune system or the mass cells. They're they're starting to get a bad name but they're there for a reason right. They had a big function. Tell me what's going on with their and where they get off the rails. I'm sorry they need a new p._r. Agent they definitely senate linked to like like all body systems. They were designed by. I presume divine forces to keep us healthy and that's what missiles have designed to do. Mass cells are present in every tissue of the body especially in the tissues of the body that are closest to the outside world where they can interface with whatever the outside world is throwing at us so we have more mess cells in our sinuses our g._i. Tract act <hes> primarily and mass cells function is to coordinate how the immune system works with the nervous the system in fighting toxins and infectious agents so if they're doing their job we love him for it. We need our mass spells. During their job they work great but if they they get to the state that we call activated what that means is but somehow they too have become so inflamed or imitated that they are what i would call trigger happy so miniscule miniscule stimuli that normally would not bother them will trigger their release of literally two hundred different biochemical mediators that they make take the main one is history and they can make it in seconds when they're exposed so the tip off to the missiles being activated or hyper reactive if you will as someone is exposed to either a scent or even more important than eat something drink something and within seconds they experience palpitations sweating pain abdominal discomfort diarrhea itching these are all symptoms of histamine release and it simply means that they're overreacted and i emphasize in my book that two of the things that caused this primarily are mold texas city and other things can do it but those are the two that we see most commonly now once this activation has occurred and people are having more histamine now you you take someone who's already overreactive and we make them exponentially more overreactive so it's important to identify patients who have have become mass cell activated and treat it's so we quieted down so our patients can move forward otherwise they stay okay and that hyper reactive state and these are the folks that can't tolerate one tiny dose of a homeopathic without getting thrown under the bus so how does a couple questions the first one is so i would understand the mass cells getting activated so you ate something and worked its way down through the stomach and into the intestines testi- and then you had a bunch of diarrhea right so that would take forty five minutes or so to make it through but how long on how long it transit time you're right but what's happening is only histamine which is being released instantaneous on contact in particular nope in the gut as soon as soon as you swallowed something to thirty in the stomach right right <hes> okay back so those mast cells are irritated they produce histamine in large quantities and they will set off waves of parasols that will trigger the diarrhea diarrhea immediately so it's dump of histamine that creates a dozen correct dump of histamine name the creates the sweating the hell petitions the of tech hardy of the itching. It's an immediate histamine release primarily now. There's a lot of other things going on there but that's the primary event that's doing it and for some patients even drinking water if they're in a particularly league over stimulated meself place that will trigger i've heard of this bird yeah yeah exactly if it's mechanical touching anything even water to those irritated cells and boom for off you know and you can imagine someone saying i get sick when i drink quarter and most people rolling their eyes and going over really brother okay. You need a higher dose of xanax and that's wrong. It's a very real thing and it really is difficult for those patients. It's a very real phenomenon so as we begin to wind down here. Let's move into re-booting so somebody's got this type of sensitivity reactively. What are the general general ideas in rebuilding our realize. It's going to be different preached system but there has to be overlapping or underlying right well again. That's a ton of information in my book on that. I can't even possibly deal with it here but let me talk about preparatory very rebooting. Which is there's a couple of things that need to be done. First before you eat can even get at what's causing it so i mean mean key ultimately to treat these patients is to clearly identify either mold or lime or bartonella or whatever the causative agent is because because that will lead to healing but many patients can't even start there and i can't even get them to step one until they do do some things to start quieting down this hyper reactive system so one of the rebooting and it's not the first is is identifying and treating treating mast cell activation but before you get there. You may have to do to other things. The first is rebooting the limbic system. The limbic system is a part of the brain that is primarily concerned with emotion but also concerned with a coordinating how emotion and memory works with pain cognition energy and especially emotion. Almost all of my 'sensitive patients have a an inflamed limbic system which is specifically 'cause again same broken record mold lime or the key things that inflamed the system so there's a couple of methods that have evolved to treat it. <hes> the one i've worked with the most is ah system developed by annie hopper called d. n. R. s. dynamic neural retraining systems could also be called limbic retraining raining and it's a a series of if you will exercises and visualizations that patients their daily to quiet the olympics system and having had well over two hundred of my most sensitive patients use it almost all with wonderful benefits benefits. That's almost always the first thing i do. There's a couple of other systems that have evolved to do the same thing there's a fellow in england and ashok gupta <hes> who has what he calls a middle retraining system which is very similar but quieting down that limbic system is really important. The second can bid player. Here is an understanding of the vegas nerve and it's real players in this whole process and there's a new concept. If if you will called poly vehicle theory developed by a fellow named steven porges that is a new understanding of the vegas nerve what is connected to an how critical it is and quieting down this process. The new understanding is that for many many years we've thought of the order nominee service system as being basically two opposing systems they sympathetic system which we call the fight or flight and the parents synthetic system richest involved with relaxation. The new understanding is actually a branch of the vagus nerve it hasn't been appreciated fully cold eventual branch that controls our perception of safety and in almost all the patients that get to the sensitized state date they are being threatened by stimuli that they can't control and don't know where the next one's coming for example in our patients with mestalla vacation many of my patients <laughter> no longer want to eat because they don't know what's going to throw them under the bus because it's not an allergy. You can't predict it. It's i don't know how herbal my muscles are so i don't know how horrible i'm gonna feel so the nervous system goes on hyper hyper vigilant alert so that it's literally highly focused and hardwired to assess potential a friend and it gets to the point that it does that excessively so in the same way that mass cells which are supposed to coordinate these reactions start overreacting reacting now the nervous system react. It's not psychological. It's a hard wired reaction of the nervous system itself so that it is overreacting reacting to stimuli so treating that quieting the vagus nerve and the connected cranial nerves becomes a key component to treatment and there's a number of approaches that we can use to do that with that so beautifully woven together and reminds me of so many of the patients when i was studying acupuncture in england the the british at the time had a saying. They said i it feel better within myself so they come back a couple treatments well. How's your back doing well. My back still hurts but i feel better within myself and that's pointing toward that awareness of well there. That's that part of the nervous. System is calming down there feeling safer in their body. They're more able to relax and then then the rest. Appealing can begin to bring up some fascinating fascinating points here and i think people are really going to resonate are resonating. I'm sure you're listening to this to your message in how you put the salt together. It's really really well done. Thank you and i to be honest. I i really like what i was able to write and i really think it's going to help potentially thousands thousands of people if they can begin to understand. There's a reason for what they have. It's diagnose -able. It's treatable and they don't a half to keep wrestling with that if they can begin to approach this a different way exactly and you're pulling together. I can't say this properly. Just got a sense of it's like you're. You're pulling together the the alternative treatment world but you're doing it with the science basis basis. I tell people sometimes you know. You can stand on your head enchanting. That'll that'll be enough to to change your perspective in and start art healing and but there's a scientific explanation for why that's that's working and you're really you've really brought it home and i wanna on it. Thank you for being so jesuit their time and also have a final question for you and this has given your book and you love complexity this is going to be maybe the hardest this question you've ever been asked but for people with chronic infections and chronic illness what are the three most important certain things for them to recognize her due to begin healing probably not the hardest i've been asked but maybe the most difficult to answer. You're only three <hes> <hes>. We'll give you political license. Thank you <hes> yeah i i. I think it's critical that people keep a positive attitude and believe that there is helped as possible <hes> most of the people overnight trade. Maybe the ones that you treat have have seen dozens of healthcare providers are not gonna help and are down on the possibility they can get well and if i had to pick one thing that really matters is coming to the table with the possibility that <hes> they can feel better infect. Perhaps even kept completely well. If there's a second thing it's if you're not getting helped by the people you're working with with find somebody else. It's critical that you work with someone who understands complexity so that they can put all this this together and a pattern. That's right for you. <hes> the new organization that's out now called i._c._i. Spelled i. i s e stands for the international society for environmentally acquired illness that is attempting to teach conditions are healthcare providers how to do this in the most scientifically don't way that we've got right now into certify five a._m. So that perhaps patients will have some avenue to find healthcare providers that can actually help them. The third one phrase that comes to mind is don't give up and maybe a fourth would be believe in yourself. Even if you're a family friends neighbors and doctors aren't hearing you or believing in your you know that there's something wrong that's fixable and they haven't identified at you. Believe in yourself and believe in your intuition brilliant. I'll make a poster so can i plug my book when wartime absolutely that's the actually the final question is please let people know where they can buy it. Your websites anything. You'd like to share absolutely so i you you certainly can go to my website site. I have newsletters tons of information on it. It's simply <hes> w._w._w. Dot neil nathan m d dot com and the book which i'm thrilled about. We'll be out on october ninth. You can get it through amazon either a book or paperback <hes> you can order it now. Even it's called toxic heal your body from motor city lyme disease multiple chemical sensitivities activities and environmentally acquired illness and i hope that we'll be help to you it undoubtedly will undoubtedly will neil. Thank you so much for your time mckay. Thanks for having me. I really appreciate the opportunity to share what i what i think. I know <music>. This was a super interesting episode and you know aw what really surprised me the way he was talking about neural retraining and how it's connected to the limbic system and things like that it reminds me of how you talk about that that treatment in five element acupuncture coal. It's called possession but i don't like to say that that's one of its we have lots of nicknames for the official name is the releasing of the seven dragons begins to devour this seven internal demons so we call it dragons or ideas or something like that but yet demons possession is one of the nicknames for the treatment because the name so long but you're right. I never really thought of that. It really is a form of neuro reprogramming. What people say after this treatment is wow you know. Nothing's nothing's changed and everything's different so we use it with people with p._t._s._d. People who've been in bad car accidents emotional emotional traumas things like that and there's a version you do for external traumas such as being infected with lyme disease. The just seems to free up the mind to say. You're a little bit more in control of yourself so yeah i think i think you're right roy good insight. Thanks for sharing that. If you like what we're doing doing here lime ninja radio hit the subscribe button so you won't miss an episode. If you really like what we're doing lease review on your podcast app and if you really really like what we're doing at appreciated if you support us by donating a buck a month for just one dollar you can help us make the another one dollar one dollar team starting job for one dollar for just one dollar. You can help us make the world better out of place for people with tick borne diseases just head on over to our new homepage w._w._w. Lime ninja radio dot com and look for the patron link under the how can we help help you headline it should be how can you help us for that particular one but there's other great stuff other good links there including a a symptom tracker and list of interviews things like that anyway. Why am i thinking about that. I'm thinking about redoing the homepage and i'm thinking about that. We need to update things. Constantly update. Make things better. It's not quite right yet anyway a shoutout to all our patrons thank you so much for supporting reporting us at lyman into radio just a dollar a month. It's kind of like holding up. Your lighter for a concert is letting us know you're out there. You're listening and you really like what we're doing so we really appreciate it. Those eighties metal band exactly metallica or something right. If you have any feedback for us just send us an e mail to feedback at lyman injury dot com we will read. Everyone may not respond but we do read all their email and last as you longtime lime inches. No this podcast would not be complete unless we left you with the lime ninja effect of the day did you now mel ninjas can whistle in sign language. <music> london to radio is a purely public broadcast and is not intended to be personalized medical advice bites for any individuals specific situation. Each individual's medical situations unique and liming radio should be relied upon android considered as personalized medical advice. The radio is not licensed render medical fight and should be considered simply the public opinion of lime major radio and its guests recommendations on specific treatment options are not not intended to address any listeners particular medical situation as always contact your physician before considering any new treatment.

lyme disease histamine Nathan neil mackay nausea bill cosby texas dr nathan dr neal mckay ripi dr neal nathan denver fatigue syndrome university of chicago fibromyalgia wrestling