20 Burst results for "Dr Neil"

"dr neil" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

07:12 min | Last month

"dr neil" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"But it's real and. Again human beings have a tendency to view the entire world through their own is. Is I'm not reacting to that. Why are you? Must be something wrong with you because I'm okay with this and it doesn't take into account that. We're all different. We're all biochemical genetically different, and if you are suffering with multi-ethnicity, your sensitivity you have experienced goes through the roof. And What I've learned is that my sensitive patients are excellent barometers never making it up there never. Smelling something that's not there. They're just smelling it at a level that other people can't because they're nervous system has been so sensitized. Now now, we know that dogs can do that. For example, we don't make a big deal about that I've got two dogs. They can smell things that I can't, and of course, they can their dogs. However here we have sensitized patients. Mold toxin has sensitize them. And I WANNA make a plea that if somebody tells you that they are experiencing a really horrible experience in a room that is not bothering you believe them. Yeah. Thank you for saying that it's exactly the right thing to do. Because they're not crazy and it's insulting actually to take someone who's having experienced and tell them you're experience isn't real. You're nuts I. ran into some some real challenges early on here because I was doing with this as a child even and not really aware of it until re exposure in my early twenties and. In fact wiser exposed I gained thirty pounds after fifty one, hundred pounds I had to lose and I got I must be nuts and I go to the doctor and the doctor was basically useless. I even proposed hey, it might be. Toxic mold or yeast or something, and it was like, no, you have aids can't be that. Because it if you have AIDS that. Mold or yeast carpet sarcoma and things like this can be a problem but. It was it was real and the reason I did the documentary which was a very substantial amount of work to do and flying over the country and putting together team at all This was about three years ago I think. It I. Did it because I wanted people who were being called crazy to be able to ask their spouse or their doctor to could you watch this and just hear from real doctors in here from? people who have been exposed including doctors have been exposed I'm so if you feel like you're alone at, you're not actually alone because like you said, your numbers are ten million people I know there's one hundred million structures in the US from the experts that I've interviewed that have water damage and genetically some of the early people doing research on this when they look at. The H. L., A. Dr for jeans it looks like about a third of, US may be five percent somewhere in there have some genes that make us more susceptible but anyone could get one of the symptoms or some of the symptoms. So I I think it's it's a meaningful societal thing affecting kids affecting adults, affecting relationships and probably affecting susceptibility to viral infections, the causes systemic inflammation. Yes. And if someone guests a viral infection and they have multi society, it makes them much much worse because the way the immune system deals with an infection and I'll add or allergy seasonal allergies will do the same thing. ADDS another whole layer of what we call cider kind inflammatory site or kind inflammation to an already inflamed system. So patients get worse than it lasts longer. I live at the arena cytokines, a Lotta people haven't heard of Cytokines but we certainly have signs storms something that everyone's heard about the media. Now because of covid, it turns outside kinds. Firms have been a regular part of my life for a couple of decades because they get exposed, they get kind storm I know exactly how to manage I know which herbs I know exactly what to do was toxins to bind I've gone from you know it could be a month if I'm exposed to mold going back twenty years where I just feel like Zombie and I would just sludge to the day to generally it's not more than twenty four hours for a of. Your exposure and usually it's not more than ten or fifteen twenty minutes to the point where it's just not that big of a deal like splinter. Let me take it out but I think I'm rare from old perspective. Do you give people turn off all the way where they just don't have that response at all? They don't get any inflammatory sadder kinds even though they've been exposed. Well, there's two things I think you're talking about here. One is patients people who don't have propensity and have not had multi city can be exposed and not react much at all. Maybe a little bit. Maybe there is little sting or burn the have a little bit of throat, soreness. For people who have had multi-ethnicity and recover to some extent they will always be more vulnerable. It's almost like the body goes back into a memory of. I remember when I reacted to that. Not, as bad. To the better you can care for? The better you can be. So in your case is a good example you've had severe mole Texas City but you've learnt that if I'm re-exposed I can just take my binders. I can just take materials that will quiet this reaction and I can turn it off fairly quickly. I have a theory there that this comes from might Oke Andrea it your mitochondria ancient back and what enemy bacteria have. Oh, it was mold. So mold makes on about it kills bacteria. They're both fighting over the piece of cheese cheeser the same dead dinosaur fights been going on for a billion years or something two billion. and. From that perspective I believe that the Mitochondria have their own bacteria level algorithm make intelligence as a distributed system, and it feels like it just gets wacked and the reason I say that is because of physical weakness happens like my grip strength drops through the floor and when I say This is a dynamo. This is my grip strength meter. I'm stronger micro strengthen an eighteen year old when I'm normal and when I get exposed to mold Negra shrink drops through the floor and I just can't squeeze. And okay someone that's neurological. But some of it is that lack of breathing it i. think it's metabolic thing. Am I nuts for that theory? Is there any validity to it? But last you're not the first to come up with it. Oh who did that and Bob Navajo a really okay. I haven't seen Bob's work. Have you have you are you aware of the danger response I am not aware of the danger responsible goodness you're in for a treat Hey did you know that protein has a cellular function inside your body protein function is just about everything when it comes to immunity your organs and your Mitochondria and even expressions of your DNA. That's why I recommend this amazing biohacking device called the Novi from a company called ING. Three none.

US Bob Navajo Oke Andrea Texas City Novi Zombie H. L.
"dr neil" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

03:34 min | Last month

"dr neil" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Going to. A very cool episode. Guy. I've wanted on for a long time and because of some things that you might know if your a longtime listener, but you might not know. I had serious problems with toxic mold kid growing up and I had asthma and behavioral issues and OCD Adhd, all sorts of stuff like that. And, one of the major causes actually two of those major causes are things that were in the environment around me. You know the definition of biohacking arden science or change the environment around you and insider USA they have full control of your own biology. Well, there are some things that really mess with a huge number of people in the environment and one of them is toxic mold. That toxic mold is something that's the subject of a documentary that I funded and filmed myself moldy movie. Dot. com, it's free for you to watch it. and. The other one though is a lime disease co-infection did get diagnosed very accurately with lime disease later in life in fact, my wife and I started a lab testing company that could diagnose very in very much detail. What lime disease was which one I hadn't all that. As something that I haven't talked about on the show called Bartonella today's expert. Has Been Practising for almost fifty years and he has written a book about these types of things and you might say, Oh, great. I don't have any of these. It's not a problem. Here's the deal. If you're alive, you are constantly exposed to talk to mold if your kids are in a public school, they're getting toxic mold. If you go into many buildings you're getting exposed and the the symptoms that happened are all over the place. So I want you to know about this because it's a major variable, and if it's not you, it can be someone in your family and you have different responses and that's why I'm really happy to have Dr Neil Nathan on the show. He's a guy who's written some of the most impactful books out there about how this all comes together in this lime versus mold versus all these other things. And his book they came out in two thousand, eighteen called toxic your body from mold toxicity, lyme disease, multiple chemical sensitivities, and chronic environment illness. Well it's a it's a Bible for people who are thinking about this and you might not be thinking about it but you don't know why you suddenly get inflamed for no reason why have love handles day that you didn't have before and other things like that. Y Perfume really messes with you I lived all this for so much time and being able to understand why and how and for me to piece together those. Pieces I did by myself and I am so incredibly resilient impactful. But there's there are more things even I can do and there's probably things you can do to not let this happen to you and to not let it happen to your family as well. because different people, different genes, different effects to Dr Nathan. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me on your known for taking patients that no one else will take. Any practice in northern California where it's hard to practice because you know the medical board there is. On one hand, very open to functional medicine. On the other hand, there's lots of rules and regulations in California. So you're able to follow those and You're you're taking care of the hard cases you've done it for so much time that I'm I'm very excited about that. So thank you. You're welcome. Thanks for having me. Now. Let's go straight to for people who don't know about toxic mold or other chronic illnesses. You're talking about, walk me through the typical way people present when something in their environment is messing with them. If, you've been staying indoors a lot more like I have the other pretty high that what you're doing is affecting the environment that.

Dr Neil Nathan California Dot. USA asthma Adhd OCD
Appeals court overturns death penalty for Boston Marathon bomber

The Morgan Show

01:10 min | 2 months ago

Appeals court overturns death penalty for Boston Marathon bomber

"Pouring in from all sides after a federal appeals court overturns the death sentence of the Boston Marathon bomber, George Tsarnaev thie argument from Tsarnaev's lawyers centered around two jurors who lied when asked if they had posted on social media about the bombing. PBZ Suzanne Saws. Ville spoke with Dr Neil Livingston, author, TV commentator and an expert on security and terrorism. Tsarnaev's death penalty was overturned because of issues with jury selection. The appeals court ruled that the trial judge didn't do enough to prevent biased jurors from being selected. Terrorism expert Neil Livingston says that's a weak argument and think Tsarnaev deserves the death penalty. I believe that might have given some of the victims families. More closure is indeed the death sentence carried out. But the parents of Martin Richard, the youngest victim to die from the bombings, didn't want Tsarnaev to be sentenced to death. And despite Friday's ruling, it's clear Tsarnaev will not be walking out of prison. A free man. He's in Florence, Colorado, right now, which is one of our Super Max presents and you know Life is not going to be a bowl of Cherries Money. Any measure in

George Tsarnaev Dr Neil Livingston Suzanne Saws Boston Ville Colorado Martin Richard Florence
"dr neil" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:33 min | 3 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"I am your host Steve summers and I'm gonna tell you we have got a fascinating show for you today now if you're like most people you may have noticed that when you hit fifty it kind of hit the wall you know between your joins the heart the brain your eyes your energy you name it now when you hit fifty you have to pay attention to your health we all know that so whether you're forty or fifty or say in your sixties or seventies or even older for that matter I guess today says he's discovered something that you can unlock the key to feeling better at any age this is exciting what isn't what we're talking about why do you need to know about this will stay tuned Dr Neil Levin is on the line here Dr Neil Levin is a chiropractor he's a nutritionist he's a long time adviser for purity products welcome Dr Levin so great to have you back on the show today this is a big story isn't it oh absolutely Stephen let's cut right to the chase here that discover you talked about at the top there its crude oil because crude oil is simply amazing for us it's great for the heart great for that choice fantastic for the brain for the eyes and I have people coming into my clinic every single day and they want to feel better I mean they want to feel physically better stronger they want your joints to feel comfortable but they want to stay mentally sharp they want to keep their brain thinking like it did when they were younger they want to protect themselves from coronary heart disease and maintain those flexible healthy youthful arteries for one full circulation they see they want to boost their energy why not I mean we need a service and that's what we're gonna be talking about here today with this cruel omega fifty plus which is the cutting edge combination Steve of krill oil which is so.

Steve summers Dr Neil Levin Stephen
"dr neil" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:01 min | 5 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Hi we're back with Dr Neil Levin okay we talked earlier about this toxic world in which we live in you sent me this list called the dirty does now this is not the list of actors in that war movie from fifty years ago this is a list of the twelve most contaminated fruits and vegetables let me tell you something unfortunately several of these are in my kitchen right now as we speak so what do we do about this I'm thinking about that old war movie with telly Savalas person called frog desert it was kind of a scary movie there but yeah you're right I mean this list is scary because we're eating the fruits and vegetables on a regular basis so I'm gonna read it right now this is called the dirty dozen list these are the dirtiest fruits and vegetables in terms of pesticide residues in America so listen carefully because a lot of these are in your kitchen right now so we have apples strawberries grapes celery peaches spinach sweet bell peppers imported nectarines cucumbers cherry tomatoes imported snap peas and potatoes naked despite every sample of imported nectarines and ninety nine percent of the apples tested positive for pesticide residues the average potato head more pesticides by weight than any other food a single grape sample had fifteen different pesticide residues on it and samples of celery cherry tomatoes imported snap peas and strawberries each had thirteen different pesticide residues on them each well I don't want to scare you away from eating more fruits and vegetables in fact quite the opposite is true I've been talking for years now I've been promoting eating more fruits and vegetables but the point is it's so nice that with OJ CD organic juice cleanse you're getting three different organic superfoods you're getting they're cruciferous vegetables the berries all the superfoods and you're getting them organically the way nature intended and you're leaving behind what you don't want because it doesn't have any of the pesticide it's herbicides or fungicides duh duh eleven we're talking today about purities brand new organic juice cleanse the.

Dr Neil Levin America OJ CD purities
"dr neil" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

Wealth Transformation Podcast

11:21 min | 6 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

"Matter is on in in our Sam Sam base here and he is pro elephants and there was a wonderful on. This is why love facebook. Because I've seen more wonderful videos with animals with people and humor and everything and there was one and it just made me cry actually because there was an older elephant and the mother had died and this other elephant came and they they were both crying and they see you could see and it was like wow I mean this is what that's the humanity that story and the militate. Whatever you WANNA call it. That is the humanity. The Story of the elephant group that came in traveled a thousand miles because the person who founded the reservation that they were living on died and they knew it and they can talk for miles mind. What Avid Chapter in this book? By the way call the Dumbo fact. Talk about elephants right. Now there's a story for you sure you WanNa talk about something interesting. You know Dumbo. This beloved I loved it one of my all time favorite. Disney classics Dumbo. But if you look at what? Dumbo is about few look at the humiliation. If you look at the racism by the way you know and the discrimination I won't go through the whole story but I love read it anyway. Let's see it's great shop? Dumbo effects you talk about elephants. So yeah so. In mindful psychology. We try to incorporate all of that. We try to incorporate spirituality in graduate school. I was told the two things. You can't talk about talk about politics. Don't talk about religion. Give me a break. You know worry. Tally is not reliable. That's spirituality is not religion. How could you not really explore? What a person's orientation to spirituality is about it doesn't matter feud NAS TAPER ATHEIST. It's a relevant relevant. Is that the nature of the relationship that somebody maintains with that and that higher frequency that is beyond the physical being. Let's let's talk about conscious that come from exactly I can't Elaine. Nobody knows where it comes from. But I stayed still comes from the yourself. The Higher Beam God's universe with whatever you WANNA call it. I like to think about it as if we're one large human and tenor ten. That's right wages. Paulin in that consciousness. No different than your TV set is pulling those images. Everyone of US. Open to what we are to be open to out. That's right too and there again. That's where that gift comes through to us. When you're open to that spiritual being that you are and that I am and my crew. My Wonderful Dream Team are the we all have that. Every one of us has a miracle I like when you talk about openness because I like to think about it look either. GonNa live in love. Or you're GONNA LIVE IN FEAR. Either you're gonNA live in an expensive environment emotionally or you can live in a contracting environment emotionally and you can change your life. You know thinking about one of these guys. Absolute one thought can change. You can walk around right after this interview right after you watch this and you can say to yourself with this contracting experience. I had was this an expansive experience. Just and of course expansive means that involves love and connection and positively contraction is about anger. Fear you can feel it can feel simply. Hold your fist like this and yell. No it see how it feels. Yeah and I you know when opening I got involved. Twenty five plus years ago With a church I won't name it but You know and the mindfulness that I got. That's when I learned. I remember walking through my house and I was started. Say think a negative thought and I screamed out stop because I stopped myself right then I that was became. My habitual thing is because you've you. It takes the mental awareness and discipline commitment as you say to change that and you can. Anybody can do it. Anybody everybody can do it. I talk about stopping the book. F Stop.

Dumbo facebook US miles Disney Paulin
"dr neil" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

Wealth Transformation Podcast

11:57 min | 6 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

"Education and training in mindfulness and psychology. He maintains a private clinical practice. In Marin California. This is the second segment of our two part discussion with. Neil Coburn any you know that's being in nature smelling flower you committing yourself from on a daily basis to be as fully present as possible waking up in the morning saying. I am better pay attention today. I'm GonNa pay attention to myself. I'M GONNA pay attention to my body. I'm going to pay attention to the world in a way where I can focus because this whole thing about multitask doesn't work. We all do it but it's just not as effective as if we really pay. Attention is focused. I mean that's just like you know focusing on on the show you know that's all I focused on. I'm always getting new guests and I'm researching and I'm reading and and more it's going I mean that's because I know that's what my passion and my purposes I when I start looking outside and it's like it's not working now get back on focus get back on focus and if if people can it takes discipline takes tremendous and people are. This is what. I've tried teaching my child. I have one daughter self-disciplined because that's what it takes US discipline. Maybe that's I wish. I often thought we should come up with a better word than discipline. Discipline seem so negative. Because you know you're you'RE GONNA get in trouble for has announced disciplined how commitment. Well it is a commitment. It's a commitment to being healthy. All what you talk about healthy. So unmindful psychology. We also introduced health and wellness. Oh my goodness I mean it is first of all I mean. Not The bore your viewers. You know we're we're one of. It's not the fattest country in the world. Especially in the silent diabetes to is an epidemic. And it's very indulgence. Because diabetes diction diabetes to is linked very very positively with Alzheimer's Alzheimer's. Become an absolute about you and I was a kid. I actually didn't know a single. I grew up in a neighborhood in Queens Middle Village. I love Middle Village where there were octogenarians all over the place. I didn't know a single eight year old that had dementia. Now you show me a family that has not been touched by Alzheimer's dementia. My grandmother had I know Alzheimer's I mean no dementia. It wasn't quite you know but I think it was because she lost her husband. She wasn't rooting depression. You know there was a lot. She used to walk. She's eight right but you know she wasn't well but it's funny. She ate rights. So part of this. Mindful psychology is health and wellness. Now it's learning really what we need to be eating. But it's not just eating and it's not just exercising sleeping. Oh my goodness. That's a big one league one. We need to sleep. I mean we have. Our country doesn't sleep. Yeah it's crazy. It's neurotic absolutely Roddick. You know what happens when we sleep? Yeah how about something called Mile? A Nation Mile Nation simply means that the way our system is built to transmit information is through these lines that mylan carries the information the electrical and chemical impulses that goes from one spot to the other spot in your brain throughout your system. Myla NATION TAKES PLACE DURING SLEEP. Lack of mile a nation slows everything down. We have learning deficits we have cognitive deficits not to mention. How does it affect us? Emotional exactly physically. I mean all of it. That's why I love when I I've focused on sleeping when I have wonderful dreams and I can wake up and I can ride him down I. That's what I do. I use my dreams as messages. How interesting that when we have a two year. Old who accessed? What are we saying? I never snapped today. Thank the we say with a forty year old. Never what changed nothing because we also have that little child inside still need seven or eight hours worth sleep? I remember ice from bill on five and a half. I was like this is crazy when I got finally got educated myself enough so I seven between seven and eight for sure and when I can get eight. Wow what about the hydration? Oh my gosh yeah we. Oh cheers cheers and more general rule. Drink half your body weight in ounces of water a day so what? I've tried to do with mindful. Psychology is really integrate all of these areas high traditional psychology in eastern psychology mindfulness neuroscience health and wellness and of course consciousness and spirituality. You know I love to say it. I'm not the originator of this. We are not human beings having a spiritual experience we are spiritual beings have a human experience so impact the way you live this precious life of ours this miracle I know and it is a miracle and I have to say that from my whole being because I was an rh baby. So as soon as I do you know what you tell me And they cha- they have an anti serum of the year. I was born which is thank God. But when your father's positive positive and your mother's negative our age factor after the second baby. I'm the third. The blood is soon as the courts. Cut The blood goes bad so I'm basically was dying. My blood was dying when they took her away from me so I had to have a blood transfusion so I guess. Maybe that's why I can do what I do and I've been through so many challenges because I I've already gone through that I on her life and and human beings you know because it's I've already been through that death experience even though even at birth. I mean it's taken me years to get to really fully integrated and understand that fee. It's so interesting Cheryl to me. It's very similar and that is I shouldn't even be here. I don't know how it was that I was born my story also the youngest third and I have two siblings eight and ten years older than I am both of which were handicapped so my sister was severely. Handicapped your cerebral palsy. And what's interesting about the story? Is that my parents. Although she was born premature lead I dunno three and a half pounds. Think about this. She's seventy years old now too long time ago. They didn't know that she had cerebral palsy. Until my mother was pregnant with my brother. Wow right so my brothers porn two years apart and just as my sister who's turning four years old is about to undergo a series of operations. That's GONNA last ten years to see if she can walk. My brother contracts polio wound. My mother tells the story of walking into the bedroom watching their son dragging her by his body across the floor and having no idea what's going call the doctrine those days they came to the house he told my mother Millie. Sorry to tell you this. But he's got polio. So now my parents have a crippled cerebral palsy. Child in a crippled polio. Child so what I say is how was I ever born and I mean that and I asked Videotapes I was not an accident. My mother had the fortitude and persistence. Bring me here and you know just is what you've said about your birth. That's guided me on. I just I never take that for granted and I feel obligation. I feel a commitment to give to. Well I feel the same way because I need to Actually it gets me emotional. Because it's like I need to be to give and help people get to that spot there that miracle spot that we all have inside of me emotion to sit here and cry because my two precious you know and we all have our gift to give we forget we forget. Yeah that's why you gotta you gotta close out all their garbage in when I say we forget. Look I don't care what orientation you are the more athletic but it doesn't matter to me but this idea of awakening it's because we forget we forget what a miracle is the more we can embrace it. That's why we have to keep being reminded on my show. I always say the beginning in my end because we have to be reminded because we're stubborn human beings fact. That's my next book started. What are you going to call it? The stubborn human being no love it. So I'm trying to get more educated than you the neuroscience. I'll tell you with stubborn but the reality is with fear based stubbornness yeah. I mean. It's interesting. I've been a psychologist for a long time. I have a private practice. I've worked with lots of people. I first of all believe with tribal in nature. You know I've often said I'll ask you. So what's the difference between a lion and a tiger? I love asking people. This question right on the spot strides. That's what everybody says. Yeah but a lion and entire. They're they're actually different. A little bit different temperaments. They're completely different. Yes and they they don't they don't breathe the same way as well. I mean it depends on educated. You are about about each animal. Hikers are solitary beings was that mean they live alone a male tiger if he encounters a male offspring talking about his red. He'll kill him. Yeah lions very social. They live in prides. They have a very sophisticated social network. So when people ask me they say you know. What's the problem? I was too many people out there in the world. Living Tiger live that meant to be living must not forget the elephant. Because I just you know we have Martin Perl..

Alzheimer polio US Neil Coburn Middle Village Marin California mylan Queens Middle Village Myla NATION Roddick private practice Cheryl
"dr neil" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

Wealth Transformation Podcast

02:38 min | 6 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

"Are you so full of fear? You can't even talk about money and wealth. Dr Cheryl is showing you. How shift your mindfulness with your wealth relationship? Most people don't even like to talk about money from a personal level..

"dr neil" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

Wealth Transformation Podcast

09:19 min | 6 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

"It's very very powerful. You're going to watch. You're going to sit and watch. Cnn for twelve hours your brain is gonNA live. You know they'd be is the brain center for fear. And that's exactly what's GonNa get stimulated stimulates so would mindful. Psychology does is it takes the findings of neuroscience says. Well how do we apply that to psychology? Well let me ask you so. If a monkey's brain is stimulated by watching another monkey eat a peanut. What are the ramifications of something like that while how? `Bout that we WANNA pay attention. The things that are for us that are positive for us. Things that are expansive and not contracting things. That allow love and positivity as opposed to fear anger and hatred. Yes yes yes. Yes and that's why there's so much on TV. That is all fear and anchor. Bay saluted in in stupidity. Actually I watch ninety plus because I wanna not. I won't watch. I know that all these killings and everything going on these horrible things. But you know what I'm not GonNa put that in my psyche because we have to stay positive in order to keep spreading it absolutely and someone much wiser than me once said we must post sentinels at the Gateway of our mind. Yup It's absolutely true. Sentinel AS SOLDIER TECH. What comes to mind absolutely and we know. Now there's something that you probably aware of called Neuro plasticity. Those people these days have heard about it. When I went to graduate school I was taught that your brain is fixed meeting. It develops to a point and then it stops and you know it started. They said it was gone. When you were an adolescent then they changed and said now maybe early twenty s but your brain becomes fixed. And that's that nothing you can do. God bless Wonderful Deepak Chopra. Because I I've studied him for years I mean he's like my most one of my most favorite and listening to him you. Your mind is always expanding. Not only is your mind. Expanding your brain is constantly doing new cells constantly have an opportunity at any given moment to create new neural pathways. Yes right and don't you WanNa have positive pathways. Wouldn't you rather attend to things that will allow your life to be more fulfilling? My Gosh please. I wish we want to spread that to the rest of the world watching watching murder watching anger watching hatred. Now do no no it just. I have my my My Gate I have a gatekeeper. Whatever because I will not. I just walk away or anything like that because it's not it's I know. It's not healthy. So mindful psychologists denial or just going. You know what's going on so much not not knowing what's going on. Sister protect that precious because we have that press precious miraculous. Mind THAT WE MOSA visit. Don't use nor we trained to use it when not yet no not in schools now in in religious sitting kicks not in government and they're the biggest ones that need to change anyway. I won't go on. They're sitting in a classroom seven or eight years old and the teachers screaming Duchesne. Anybody teach you truly teach you how to pay attention. Hara focus all starts in wrong. Well it does start at home. And whether you call it meditation or contemplation you take an eight-year-old and sit them down for five minutes three minutes and teach them how to focus. Focus is a fantastic thing for comms the body by the way and may share a little. I was teaching with my daughter's kindergarten class and I was one of the other teachers and there was one little boy that I just. He melted my heart and he was a crack baby so one of the one of the practices that I would have him do is sit in the chair. We did this for five minutes. I tried to get him to do it for ten minutes. It didn't quite work ten minutes. Got Him and I had him read the alphabet but just focused but it I and and I mean the he was so happy. It's when he when he finished that five minutes and I would keep you know a kept getting more and more and I thought this is wonderful. I mean for us as human beings. That's why I meditate every day medicate. But it's interesting you know. Read the alphabet. I mean reading. The alphabet is no different than having a mantra mantras. Just an opportunity to focus. I mean you know Classic Meditation. Your focus on your breath first of all breathing is the best thing for us. And you know what you're gonNA love this. That's in every one of your chapters. It starts out at the very end. Nobody teaches us how to breathe. You think it's natural. You're a woman. Is it natural. Have a baby how natural nobody can..

Deepak Chopra Cnn murder
"dr neil" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

Wealth Transformation Podcast

15:44 min | 6 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

"Our special guests. This evening is Dr Neil Coburn. This is the first segment of our two part discussion with. Neil Dr Neil Coburn. Phd's a licensed clinical psychologist from UC Berkeley and his L. C. S. W. and M. F. T. with decades of experience in human transformation and emotional wellbeing. He is the author of the book emotional wellbeing embracing the gift of life and is the is the founder and president of the Academy of Mindful Psychology. He is an international workshop leader and in Mindfulness and emotional health shortly thereafter. He assumed the role of president and CEO of California Graduate School of Psychology. Dr Coburn Rebuilt and rejuvenated. The institution eventually merged school of American schools of psychology and national set of graduate schools of psychology. Dr Coburn actively continues to augment his knowledge of mindfulness and Buddhist psychology in addition to attending dozens of training throughout the US led by far most leaders in the subject area. He is a member of the spirit. Rock Meditation Centers saying Haw and continues to steady with world renowned teachers such as Jack Cornfield and other teachers counsel as well as distinguished visiting teachers. He has trained and facilitated workshops with Zen Master Gimpo Roshii training facilitators from all over the world in the big mind process. Doctor Dr Coburn plays an active role in the Academy of Mindful Psychology and Organization designed to provide education and training in mindfulness and psychology. He maintains a private clinical practice. In Marin California this is the first segment of our two part discussion with me. We'll come kneel well. I'm really happy that you have are joining us tonight. We have had several communications in passing in the media center. And you're a local media person and also author and I said you know it's time to have you on our show. Well it's about time so thank you thank you. I've pretty much already given your bio and background. But I know we dig a lot deeper and get into some more fun stuff of what you're doing and So I know you're from New York and so tell me about how you got into psychology. Well that's an interesting story. Actually I went to school in Brooklyn so I was raised in New York City and my freshman year. I was a business major because I didn't quite know what I was supposed to be doing. My father was an accountant and it was so unbelievably boring. I'm the people that were in this program. It's just like oh please take a breath. Have a pulse. I thought to myself where are there? Some dynamic people and we're all the pretty girls you know. Obviously that's a motivation. When you're you know freshman in college and it turned out. I took a psychology class and I was always oriented that way. Anyhow but that really. I've been a psychologist the my family's since I was two years old. I missed three and that whole deal but I just took to it and I was passionate about it and from the ADS. I figured out once twenty seven years of education it's a lot of years to my PhD and also gesture experiential education. As well as your all you can. You can take another thirty years. But that's as far as that's as far as we take care of that boy looking pretty good so no really. I've just always been very passionate about it. You know what makes us tick? And how is it feelings? Come up the way they come up. And why some people this way and other people that way and I've just I was a student of it all my life really so well. I can understand except that I went towards more of the financial part and probably because they got involved with my family's business but then I never felt there's always something missing but I knew that I was preparing myself. You are the whole time. I was prepared. I knew that. Why am I doing this boring stuff but I was also challenging my brain to get into the complicated stuff but preparing yourself just like you were. You've been preparing yourself for what you're doing. And you're an author now emotional wellbeing embracing the gift and I. I already blessed our viewers that a beautiful cover. Yes it is to that cover you know? Oh well tell us the story of that cover since we're talking about it. Well you know the book is titled Emotional Wellbeing Embracing the Gift of life and this is really a book about how miraculous life is and how so many of us just. We don't really value and appreciate what an incredible gift that is and the story is a story about the rarity of life and interestingly enough there was just a scientific study done two weeks ago. I put it on my website. Kademi mindful psychology for people. That are interested where they determined the probability of being born interesting. The probability of being whittled. That does that mean what it means is. It's astronomical the odds that any of us have ever been born and why I tell you this is all we all miracles absolutely and there's a story. I think it comes out of the Buddhist. Tradition could be the Hindu tradition and the story is of a blind sea turtle we are roaming an ocean the size of the universe and once every hundred years it's surfaces to the top and the rarity of birth is as if that turtle emerges through a ring bobbing on the top of the ocean. That's how unique and special life is the odds of that kind of event occurring. Send a metaphor or is that it's a metaphor of course. It's a metaphor. I thought what better depiction to really talk about this gift. And then of course. My son did the art. I have a twenty one year olds artist. That means a lot. Jay Brennan is fantastic. Yes yes so. How did you come up with? I know I- preempted this by saying I talk about wealth but if we don't have wealth and this is where the transformation comes in if we don't have wealth in relationships there really is to me. There's nothing else that matters when it really comes down to it so that's why I wanted to have you on. The show is because you know emotional wellbeing how you know how did how did you come up with that and also? I don't want to give you too many questions at once. But his like mindful psychology. So let's start at the hour so it's interesting you know if we don't have wealth in our relationships X Y and Z. I'll go one step further. If we don't have wealth in our relationship with ourselves then we have nothing absolutely. That's the first and foremost you know it. It's it's an inside job. Yeah that's what I like to say and you know I'm sure you've observed this in so many. All the way out there is that women are emerging in that and I mean all over the world. They're merging without relationship with themselves. And you know I it. You know it's like the pendulum. A pendulum is probably you know going swinging swinging swinging. And now it'll be nice because you know men also can become more used their feminine side to in this whole process. So it's very interesting definitely. I think there's a tremendous movement and frankly I'll say thank God for the Internet. You know I'm I line up just the opposite way when everybody's talking about you know all the potential pitfalls and they exist. The reality is the Internet ultimately connects the entire universe. I'll I'll get the mindful psychology in just a second. But I want to tell you story if you don't mind please. That's why you're here. So the tower babble Biblical story is very very interesting story. I don't know if you know it of some people do something. I don't know the details. Well basically what occurred? Is that the tribes in the middle of the desert. Were REALLY UPSET. Because they had a very arduous life you know dwelling in the desert is not an easy thing to do and they prayed and they prayed and prayed and they get very frustrated that their prayers are not answered so they did something that had never been done before. They came together and collectively. They decided they were going to build a tower way up into the heavens and they were going to climb this tower and at the top of the tower they were going to confront God face to face and basically say. Why aren't you listening to us? Why aren't you helping us? So they got together. They believed so they climb this tower. They built this tower. They spent years constructing this massive at and just as they were about to ascend into the heavens God appears in fury and he smashes the tower thousands and thousands of pieces question. Exactly how dare you question? And he said every piece of this tower will represent a different language. So you'll never be able to talk to one another again and do anything as outrageous as you've just. That's the story. Oh you should because how powerful is that story and now what we have now we have the Internet and you know what the Internet does. It allows me to talk to China. It allows my son to talk to Spain. It's connecting the world in a way where we have to understand. We're all interconnected this awesome them. It's an illusion and it's it's demonstration now if people can emotionally mentally spiritually and physically embrace that and appreciate that absolutely. I mean that's going to be the true revolution. Yes I'm in one Santa Cruz where part of this movement revolution. It's true. So thank you. I always give. Thanks all right. So but the mindful you know I know there's a lot of spiritual spiritual things in here and you look and but mindful psychology. So tell us how you started writing an article. The other day and this article was written two psychologists psychotherapists and it starts by saying we are not mindful so mindful psychology is an integration of a long spiritual practice notice. Mindfulness now twenty. Six hundred years basically comes from Buddhist philosophy with traditional psychology. And what I mean by traditional. I'm talking about Eastern and Western psychology. So one day in the shower came to me. It's time it's time that psychology becomes mindful. Now What's interesting about mindfulness? Mindfulness is about awareness. It's about higher consciousness. It's about stepping back and observing instead of reacting. It's about being fully present in the moment in a higher frequency in a higher frequency. Absolutely Cheryl this is it right. What's going on between us is all or is that could be going on. This moment is all we have back and my full. Psychology takes the teachings of mindfulness and it. Integrates it with neuroscience. I'm into mazing what we're learning and neuroscience and integrates. It will explain that just a little bit. I'm I'm going to break this down just a little bit. So so our viewers can maybe understand you know the neuroscience of the mindfulness. Okay so I'll tell you a very interesting dynamic this so much to say about neuroscience but I just give you I'll give you a little a little taste so years ago. They had in a lab that to monkeys monkeys were wired up because they were looking at their brain activity and took a peanut. They gave it to a monkey on a set here. Monkey a monkey started the peanut and they watched what was happening in the brain of that monkey. Well what they didn't anticipate was what was happening in the monkey that was watching the monkey. Eat the peanut. You know what was happening. Exactly the same level of activity. Now think about this. We've got one monkey watching another monkey. Eat The brain goes into whatever monkey absolutely monkey monkeys but the ramifications of this are staggering. Because what it says is what we attend to absolutely influences our brain how our brain functions into absolutely and you say intend to air intentions intentions. But I'm talking about what we attend what we see what we focus on effects the way our brain functions..

Dr Neil Coburn Academy of Mindful Psychology Academy of Mindful Psychology school of American schools of California Graduate School of Dr Coburn president and CEO founder and president Emotional Wellbeing US Marin California Phd UC Berkeley Rock Meditation Centers Brooklyn Jack Cornfield Haw
"dr neil" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

02:39 min | 9 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"That can grow we so far. We've grown enough cells to treat the entire planets so we can then go to clinical trials. It's the same drug for for all parts of the trial and once it gets approved. It's the same drugs. There's no difference between them. The agency called the heterogenous. They have a drug. That's not exactly the same so with what's this with one of these cell lines which were were testing a lot right now. One I'm these sellers will be up to go from you. Know clinical trial all the way to therapeutics with it. And so that's my goal in the next five years is to you're GONNA have to get a product approved in the US and get a lot wider low broader use And I don't plan on writing another book now. I do plan on Updating the rising tide with new stuff here in another couple years okay very cool. Yeah I'M GONNA drop a link to the rising retired and the and the description of today's podcast episode. I think it would be beneficial to all parents and just tax the link and then pick it up and read last thing. I WanNa hit you with your doctor. Ask all the data on the PODCAST. What type of advice do you happen that new dad or for not about to be father? WHO's out there listening? Just get ready Buddy Well I don't know I think I probably biggest advice is to go with the flow because if it's the overthinking it's that that got me in trouble trying to over think something so Go with the flow and and and And hopefully your wife breastfeeds because man. That's the best thing a father can have right there that gift. Yeah all right well said my mom was a big Breast cancer not breastfeeding she. She literally wrote the book on Human Lactation. It's called human lactation by Jan Weird and so we were breastfeeding family and and thankfully my wife was breastfeed her That's your that's your health out but It just go with the flow and and enjoy it. I love the message. He's been an honor for me. I gotta say Dr Neil Reardon. You are firstly his father all the way. Thank you so much time on first-class Fatherhood Alex real appreciate it. Take care back to wrap things up here on. I gotTA give a special. Thank you once again to Dr Neil reardon for giving me a few minutes of his time here was such an honor police at me up on twitter guys or dropping it on.

Dr Neil Reardon Breast cancer Human Lactation Jan Weird US twitter
"dr neil" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

12:02 min | 9 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"Let me ask you. Let me ask you about your book here. Your stem cell therapy. A rising tide. What was the genesis of the book? And what does the book about. S- well the book is It's it's kind of temporal. It alerts when I started. You know like how I got started in the whole thing but during the tumor immunology things and making the cancer vaccines and then So it's it's it's a bit memorial orest in the beginning but each chapter laid out to each chapter about each condition is laid out so that it can stand alone. For example. There's the chapter on. Autism is chapter on Rheumatoid Arthritis Multiple Sclerosis heart failure lung diseases and laid out. So that's My biggest motivation for the book was I I have conversations with people all the time and and it seemed like I had the same conversation over and over and over again and I thought it. Wouldn't it be wonderful if I gave some resource. And they could you know all this stuff but that would be at the tip of their fingertips they can read it and then we can have have a really good conversation afterwards. So that was my biggest That that was the biggest reason for writing a book. And I tell you the best thing I've ever done for from you know just from a business standpoint because people they once they read the book they get it written for late public's written for eight grades You know they're the two words you have to learn to get through it. All the rest of the words are just normal normal binoculars and And it is I I have raving fans who by you know by one hundred bucks at a time and handed out to their friends because they see this technology as being transformative and I certainly do. I think that these cells have capacity to reduce human suffering the vastly and We're were you know we're in the infancy of it. I've been doing it for twenty years but we're we're still in the infancy of the of the you know the world there there. There's a there's a approved approved product in in South Korea. There's a product in Canada one in New Zealand and and now a couple of in Japan so there yet they're yet to be a an approved product in the US. But I think once you once that happens the economics I think so not just the cells but the cell to sell products the things that the cells secrete will ultimately replace a vast majority of the pharmaceutical industry and So it's an exciting time to be here and I love seeing all the results and and you know every time we go to Panama. It's it's story after story because you know last year over two thousand people and you know I I only meet a very small percentage of them but when I do it's always very gratifying and a lot of a lot of them. Got There because of the book. They got there because the book they got there because because they watched Joe Rogan. You Know Mel Gibson on Joe Rogan with me and And and and then and then they bought the book. So it's to me. It's it's great because it imports. Little every it's just my group that I put down my truth. Clinics Truth are the research truth and People are able to to grasp it and I had a UFC fighter. Call me the other day and and wanted to talk about treatment. I said Hey once read the book first and then you know you read the book and then we had a very intelligent conversation now. We know what we want to see what he wants to do. So that's main main reason for the buck. Yeah very cool. Yeah and it's awesome that you put it in a simple form there because today it seems like The order of the day is to come up with the the catchy headline and people don't even read the story anymore. So I know that. But there's there's some pushback against the whole stem cell research and everything what why is such Opposition is it from big pharmaceutical companies. What does the odd position that you face mostly doing all this well so the early opposition was from misunderstanding? because stem cells back on George Bush He basically banned further federal funding on embryonic themselves cells that were outside of this scope that they identified that had already been that's already been created and so everybody thought stem cells man and you know dead baby or you know or or an embryo that could become a human well these so I think we're over that now Uh We you know. In two thousand fifteen we tried to get a bill introduced into the Texas legislature about adult stem cells. Because he's fallen a category that adult stem cells. A baby is born healthy and you know mom delivered the after birth which is normally going in the trash or in into you know to incineration that is collected. And that's what we used to know. Baby is harmed so I think the early early push back was all about the IMBRIANI steps. You had the you know the most of most of the you know the Catholic church was against bath the Baptist against most most religious people really against the loss of life. There is no loss of life here in fact the Catholic Church supports this research So we've gotten over that hurdle I think the the public consciousness has changed so that that is no longer an issue and we actually got a law passed in Texas that its it. Basically makes everything that we do in Panama legal do in Texas. Unfortunately we still have a federal law that that that is over that and We made some amendments to that that bill this year this year and it was it was again. It's still on the books in Texas but it's against federal law and nobody wants to be the first one to do it against federal law. Because you know I'm not gonNA as a business man I'm not gonNA. That's a bunch of money and manufacturing facility that's going to be potentially hacked up by the you know by the sets for some reason you know. So that's that's that's the deal and there's got a Lotta money on the other side you know. Hey if the the the the anti rheumatic drugs are fourteen billion dollars a year. And if it's my fourteen billion dollars might not be happy about some Other option you know so And I think I my prediction is all all these these biologic animal. No matter the cost fifteen thousand dollars shot every month. We'll we'll go to zero. You know there was a big clinical study of room service rightous where they use these excels and and you probably heard of like I'm not gonNA mention the name but these drugs that they're they're antibodies to two molecules. The Mo- mostly eighteen up right. So this crisis factor kinda general of the immune system and it kind of keeps it keeps the inflammation going and so they they make antibody this season you if you just watch. TV for twenty four hour period to see all these ads and the the top selling drugs in the world are are the this class of drugs. Watch anti rheumatic and Anyway I trial using this Using these cells reduced one single infusion reduced use that that bad that bad actor the Tanf Alpha by fifty percent and the second infusion dropped another twenty five percent and then made all the subjects asymmetric and that persisted for this study was only eight months long but we have faces now. That are eight years out who they're treated one time and they never have go back on any any Drugs so that's the trial that were finishing up right now in in Panama is for the RIM tourists right. So you know it's only only human nature that there's an economic the economic pushback against When you're making a ton of money and you have a ton of money you're GONNA you're not gonna be too thrilled about the next thing thing that will that will reduce your revenues by law? So yeah this one is incredibly important. What you're doing? It's just amazing that you know you're passionate about what you're doing and you're a helping you know countless lives and continue to do so for many years to come and we got this one more question about you as a father have you what type of I know it takes a lot of discipline to do what you do for a living. So what type of disciplinarian were you as a dad but the kids growing up your spanker timeout. How'd you Kinda handle discipline No I never was a spanker of it was a time out deal and You know just but I like the bigger is better than the stick to you know so there we set up goals for them to for for certain milestones and they would get rewarded. I think that that always works better for me and And the honestly. I don't think I was that much of a disciplinarian. Just you know if they acted it up or something then But yeah there I said I was super lucky or as them being self starters because I I can't imagine I have a really good friend of mine. His his son in schools you know just does not thrive and I am and I know that she spends an inordinate amount of time trying motivate them and I never had that challenge so I don't know what I'd do in that case but and very cool and what. My my father was not. My father was very much against any sort of corporal punishment. Even though so it's funny because my father would never spank and he he. My father was a psychiatrist and he was very anti spanking but yet we went to school in my day and we got the hell beat out for teachers or gym teachers. Yeah so now. I guess that's all band but when when I was at school that was still a part of the deal and and nobody ever said a word and now I think you couldn't even look at a kid funny without getting written up or something so yeah isn't real very true very true. What type of goals are planning to happen here? As far as you have any other books documentaries doc entries into making. What's what what kind of goals for the future here Well you know. I'm just putting my head down and getting clinical trials done is the main thing waste. We just built out a new Because we've been completely full without any advertising for the last five years and and we've been we have a waiting list so we built a new faith out a new space out in a very large four hundred million dollars hospital complex. That's a and it's the grand opening next month. We have a twelve thousand square foot space over there and we plan on doing a lot more in this fine world because the So that they the basically you need you need certain facilities. If you're going to be injecting fine so we got some studies set up for that and spine pain back pain lower. We're back pain neck pain. It's such a huge problem that we've never been in that space and we're GONNA start getting into that space clinically dente Panama and then here in the US. Yes I have a company that You know we figured out this this. We figured out a way to manufacturer sells so one of the big problems with with Going through any regulatory in like FDA or any regulatory bodies is that. There's the the when you when you take umbilical cord and you go through. Let's say enough cells to treat three hundred people and then you take another bill for corddry grow up three hundred people. Then you have a new drug for every three hundred people. And they don't like that so one thing that we've developed my my skunkworks lab in Dallas is sell way too. I select cells else.

Panama Texas US Joe Rogan Catholic church South Korea UFC FDA neck pain Mel Gibson lung diseases Japan George Bush
"dr neil" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

01:45 min | 9 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"I think we need a lot fewer kids in college to be honest with you. I mean the. There's a in my generation of a lot of my friends didn't go to university at all and then I. Did you know hooker crooked eventually. You know what I mean but I started. I went to college for a year. I was expensive and I and I you know how to work to pay for it and then I went off and I worked In the oilfield you know to earn money so I don't think there's anything wrong with that that I think you learn a whole bunch. I I learned a whole lot more from life certainly than I ever did from college and and I think there's there's plenty things that people can do with alcohol. I think if you can afford it and it's you know I I I can tell you. I'm really happy. None of my kids I went to Nyu and studied art history. I can tell you that I that I wouldn't have paid for it because I don't know I don't know how they're gonNa make a living doing that. But yeah there are there are there are a lot of these wacky majors for sure that I hear about Let me ask you let me ask you about your book here. Stem cell therapy here rising tide. What was the genesis of the book? The book about all right guys many of you have hit me up saying that you would like to start your own podcast than I am telling you right now. Anchor is the easiest way to get this done number one. It's free. I have never paid a dime to publish any of my podcasts. And their creation tools. Allow you to record and edit right from your phone or your computer anchored those all the distribution as well so it can be heard on spotify apple podcast and many more also you can make money with.

Nyu spotify
"dr neil" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

11:52 min | 9 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"Joining me now first class Father Dr Reardon First Fatherhood Thank you Alec happened. Would it be here all right. Let's start right here. How many kids do you have? And how old are they have four and thirty three. Let's see three thirty twenty eight and twenty five three girls and the twenty eight year old boy and well ladies and men. Now I guess they're they're all grown and out driving in the world so yeah very cool exact opposite of you there. I have Four myself and I have three boys and then we got the girl on the end. So Oh you got to finish. Then that was it. I mean We didn't get around four. We'd have five by now but we We put a stop to it there. Oh Gotcha gotcha graduate PODCAST. A couple of them here Just thought he'd saw Dana White Out in Vegas I. I was just out there for a medical conference. Get Him to fight so that was kind of fun. Yeah very cool after Dana invited me to come need them at. UFC she and Madison Square Garden. You have forty four so we had a chance to hang out with them. There is really great guy. Great Father I play a guy all the way around. Yeah Yeah What type of what type of sports activities for the kids into growing up well with my oldest was into was into cross country and my My my son was into kind of everything but more more into guitar and that sort of thing and My youngest was a swimmer. Wimmer and My second one oldest plays off all together which you know that's great. That's more fun for the parents. I think it is for kids but We'll get this little bit of that. Thing is though they're all really super good students. So they're self motivated but you know they. They actually worked very hard in school and they've done they've done quite well because of it and I'm very lucky to have self-motivated heads the other. Maybe don't have the same self-motivation automation and I know. They struggle with trying to get their kids studying that sort of thing but mine all just sort of did on their own and like my oldest daughter actually insists. That's it she she. We were moving to England and she found She found a boarding school herself. She wanted to go to boarding school so anyway they're all. It's pretty well traveled and and They're all educated and out on their own and thankfully daddy got raised. When you know they get a lot of schools Yeah good stuff if you could please just take a minute here to hit my listeners with a little bit about your background what you do well my the main deal now. I've been an entrepreneur for twenty years. I worked at a cancer research lab for fourteen years. I saw some opportunities there that of some treatment auctions that I wanted to watch some of the some of the property the some of the intellectual property that we had had done that created out of our research work there and so I started my own my own business twenty years ago and self therapy I do drink self service coach therapy to cancer vaccine and Then from out of that we have some series of patents on on isolation and growing SIM cells because because that was kind of the starting material and so because of that I got into stem cell world. And I think that's where I spend most of my time is in Panama. Anima we have We've we've been Panama now for thirteen years. We have a we have a fifteen thousand foot manufacturing Laboratory there. We have a an eight thousand square foot medical. We see about two hundred to two hundred fifty patients every month from pretty much all over the world but you know price seventy percent from the the. US and Canada and the restroom elsewhere. We see a lot of athletes We've done a recent years we we finished the clinical trial Using these umbilical cord. They're called themselves but really not thinkable cells and the the nomenclature is changing. I don't want to confuse as the audience but for lack of a better term. We'll just call them. Ms's and these cells we get them from live healthy bursts from from consenting. Mothers tested They're they're heavily tested and screened and we multiply them in the laboratory and then they're frozen down for us and so we just finished a clinical the trial and autism and that was published in May last year Prior to that we finished a clinical trial on multiple sclerosis us and that was published. Maybe eighteen months ago We currently we have a trial in rheumatoid arthritis that we're doing So that's that's that that's most of my time I have. I have four companies. But they're all kind of similar in the regenerative medicine space so we have a company in the US signature biologics where we manufacturer factor after birth products for doctors to use Mostly surgeons and wound care that sort of thing so I'm pretty much a one hundred percent and regenerative medicine for the last at least thirteen years or so so it's incredible what you do and thank God we have someone like you. That's involved in this and you know one of the things Doctor about parents are F at some point leading up to the delivery of their child if they want to store the the core blood or the umbilical cord tissue. That's that stuff can get pretty expensive. How important is that? What's the difference between the two well Alex And on the cord blood. That's those those. The cord blood contains the themselves for example. If you you're part of a bone marrow transplant right if somebody has cancer and they walking doses of chemotherapy and radiation. You can salvage the bone marrow because when you're giving those big doses of things to kill the cancer you kill the bone marrow. Oh stem cells as well. So those are the cells that make all your blood components and if you don't replace those with a matched You know with the match either bone marrow or order the blood from a biblical cord. which has those cells in it? Then you'll die from the treatment so That the I think the odds of using using math in a lifetime or something around between one and two thousand and one in ten million So it it economically. You know if if there's no economic if it's not an economic hardship then it seems like a reasonable thing to do. If if it's if it's the difference between making your house payment or not I wouldn't I wouldn't do that for sure Then the for the the tissue issue it's the tissue contains the cells that I worked with the MS's and I think they are going to be a lot of clinical applications coming coming up and again if it's not an economic hardship I would I would do that For sure as store the tissue I mean I wish I had my to be honest with you I wish I had mine Biblical gorge issue to make as many cells as I want you know for the rest of my life So and you know I'm in. I'm in a position to do that. Because Corona Laboratory and then the company I have companies in Panama where. It's legal to do that and I think only things are going to open up here. I don't to be honest with you. I can't predict the future. How long that's going to take? I think we'll probably get an first. Mse Cell Therapy approved here. Maybe in three to five years but it'll be limited so that's a long answer. The short answer is if it's not if it's not economically too onerous for you to do it then it's an insurance policy and there may be some great stuff that you can do with yourself and your kids heels later down the road. Yeah very well said and let me bring this back at you. About how old were you Neil when you became a father and how to becoming a dad kind of change your perspective on life. Oh Oh boy well I think it was twenty seven And it's pretty much changed everything you know you. Just I don't think anybody can prepare for uh-huh or are you can tell you all you want but until your actual father is the change that happens is something you can't predict It's certainly truly changed all of my Focus on my from you know for myself and my wife to to you know there's little one that's GonNa take care of and So it didn't change change everything and then have changed everything. Another state everything I can. I can tell you all you know. All four of them are they're they're they're all super smart and super like self motivated but also super different. They're all very very different from each other and That's been fun and challenging to you know just just to watch them grow and then you know. It's so exciting exciting to see them. They have their careers. And they're they're they're doing that. You know I think as a parent you know if if they if they're able to go off and do their own thing And the you know a good member society you've done a good job and so I'm pretty happy with how this all turned out and And they never go away. I you know I mean they're gonNA kill her forever for for younger parents out there you know. I don't know my my father. I think that generation nation was sort of more. You know pretty hands off I don't recall ever asking me my father for anything. After the age of seventeen I graduated my school and I paid for my own college. Did you know I worked my way through school and all that night But my but you know I kinda I kinda overcompensated for my kids. And I was willing to pay for their pay for their their educations but only to a point you know And and anyway there's still the you know I'm happy. I'm happy that we lived in several different places because they I think you learn so much watch and and you can be your. The Flexibility of your brain improves dramatically. If you visit different countries and for example I my youngest daughter we lived. She lived in five different countries before high school. So a lot of exposure and she's she's probably the biggest traveler is he went to school and Saint Andrews so she was over in in Europe and says they will travel a lot and then she finished up in London but So I think you know I just I love hanging out with them and And and seeing how they grow and how they think and Anyway that thing that I've never done I think is is having kids so and and hopefully raise them in a way that they're there continue to be productive and wonderful people. Yeah well said Dhaka A and you know one of the things that I talked about when I know. You're an entrepreneur yourself. I'M GONNA have a lot of these high fine entrepreneurs on the show here. I mean my oldest is only thirteen. So he'll be hitting high school next year and that we start early conversations about college and from what I'm seeing right now Ah The way the kids are getting buried in the college debt. And they're they're majoring in minor things seemingly seemingly How do you feel about the whole college? I mean obviously if you're going to be something doctor or one of the stem You know focuses. It seems seems like it's necessary but College necessary in your opinion for children are kids to succeed in..

US Panama Dana White cancer Dr Reardon UFC Alec Madison Square Garden Wimmer MS Mse Cell Therapy England Ms Dhaka Vegas
"dr neil" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

01:53 min | 10 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Know cancer. The researchers basic scientists when they saw this sort of data they were doing handsprings. And so I think that It's a good sign and they're very skeptical so they had no skin in the game of lime disease they were just pure biochemists cameras. Drug developers And so I think again. It's you know if we have the resources to do this we could be in the clinic in a short period of time. I mean within five years to three years yeah It all depends on how much researcher opt to drive and so outside of Resources than one of the primary barriers diagnostics fix it. which is it seem surprising in some ways to get to a new drug? You actually need new diagnostic and so and watching your talk. You know it was one of my reactions. was how cool would it be to be able to actually see the brilliant right. But it's actually becomes a mental Sort of us be like a companion onion diagnose which is The thing would happen cancer right. A companion diagnostic which in most cases and cancer turns out to be a mutation for drug that targets the butane the protein in work therapy for a particular phenotype of cancer So we could develop the you know penny diagnostic. You're right. The challenge is always the FDA requires the population an indication. You can't just say we want to treat everyone with chronic illness with us us You have to have something on the label You can you. You can do that with and you can do it with Lysol Ram because they're approved and you can just your doctor will prescribe it. You could take it. Yeah but for a new drug you need to have an indication. Yeah now it's interesting unfortunately no longer the FDA commissioner but a good friend of ned sharp losses.

FDA researcher commissioner
"dr neil" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

15:08 min | 10 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Patient so Anyway only as a physician I feel like I said so. So this is how this is how we treat cancer. We don't do this blindly anymore We really try to tailor the therapy personalized therapy for the individual. So this was. This was a drug that I spent Doing a lot of the science behind we developed an oral therapy for women with what's called hurts hurts to breast cancer. It's about fifteen to twenty percent of breast cancer when I was training Years ago at the Dana Farber. This was a death sentence of women who had her breast cancer announced. There had about six to nine months with metastatic disease and even with early stage. The risk of recurrence was extraordinarily high. This is an oral therapy. This woman has what's called inflammatory breast cancer. You can see that. She's had a mastectomy. It's come back that's like having a third degree. Burn that that went all the way down her back eroding into her lung cavity and into her lungs she was on a morphine drip not only a short quality of life for inflammatory breast cancer sir. But it's a lousy quality of life. We put her on this pill once a day pill and literally within three weeks. She was out playing Golf I. I didn't actually believe the physician when he told me. This is a miracle therapy but it's a miracle because we figured out how to shut the lights out on the tumor Sela aw again. This happened by understanding the biology and taking advantage of the Achilles heel of these particular cancers and so the question is why. Can't we do this for beryllium for Bartonella for BBC. The answer is we can. And here's a potential roadmaps it. Here's a paper that was published in Nineteen Ninety seven so twenty two years ago. I haven't been to too many conferences in the lime disease. World where people I actually talked about the genomic roadmap for developing therapies so this was the genome that was published in this is essentially the pathways. He's in Berea where one can look and try to figure out. How can we kill these bugs without taking an atomic bomb and blowing up the body audie and do this in a smart way just as I showed you without rather than giving her chemotherapy giving her a pill that reveal the old the Achilles heel of that cancer and destroyed it? So this is what we've done so we've taken slightly different approach. We're not screening the FDA approved Library Library. We're developing new therapies based on scientific information. Now we've done this in a way and brought in collaborators. It turns out that there's a group at Argonne national lab outside Chicago who have the largest genomic database of Pro Kerry outs bacteria in the world and then their top ten list. This is Barack Obama and Bartonella which I thought was rather interesting because this lab is a department of Energy Lab and I thought it was interesting that the government has beryllium Bartonella Ella as part of their top ten in trying to collect information so for a disease that a lot of the government doesn't want to recognize as being important. It's important Gordon enough. That it's on their top ten list of getting all genomic information of the world to accumulate so we worked with this group and what we do. We have the technology and collaboration with a very good friend and colleague who I've worked with for thirteen years since I've been in two on the cancer side Tim. Hey Stud and I'll show you the picture of our eighteen later we have a way of capturing a part of the genome a part of the what we call the purdy on the proteins that are made in Borelli and Bartonella that happened to utilize ATP and other appearance And it turns out if we use this technology. That's about eighty to ninety percent of the drug targets and again this is an approach that has been successfully used in other diseases and cancer in metabolic disease so so we're not reinventing the wheel retaking successful lessons that have been learned elsewhere and now just simply sang. Can we do the smarter by treating folks with tick borne illnesses and so essentially we do. Is We take the bacteria And again when we identify target. We've we've gone to this huge genomic database because we don't want to just be treating one particular species or strain of BEREA WE WANNA be treating reading across the species and strains that are pathogenic same with Bartonella. I'm but we don't want to also be wiping out the normal microbiome and we certainly certainly don't want to be affecting host cell so we don't want to be affecting your heart your kidney your normal tissues and so this is a Gel. This is taking taking all the proteins and beryllium running out And then essentially saying what are the targets that are amenable. What are the protein targets with this technology? -nology this pure and binding technology. We have this huge list of proteins. We painstakingly do mass SPEC on every one of these to identify them and then we look and we try to glean information from the literature and from experts and say what are the ones that if we can successfully target are likely to kill these bugs. I'm just going to skip through. This is some of the technical aspects. We take each one of these targets. This is sort of laborious research although we have a tremendous team and we've got it down pretty quickly now almost like a biotech company. Even though we're in an academic institution we make recombinant proteins. We put the color. GFD Green fluorescent thirteen and we have with high throughput outside. We've got five thousand novel compounds. That could be drugs and we screen them to see which those five thousand compounds can target the particular protein target that we're interested in by the way the five thousand doesn't sound like like a lot but we can expand that based on the structure of those chemicals into hundreds of thousands of compounds very quickly and and so this is what we have so far so we have targets on the left DNA K.. Beryllium Beryllium. We've had a lot more in beryllium important. We're now working with at British Werthmann if you know him from the NC State School of Veterinary Medicine. Probably the leading expert on Bartonella And now we've got several new BARTONELLA targets And as of of our last live meeting on to say I think we have an exciting Bartonella target that. We're going to be able to do what I'm going to show you in a minute. We're doing with beryllium. So this is work that we've done again With Tim set of colleague. That'll introduce what I want to show you which we hope will end up being a beryllium scan so that you could go to your doctor and rather than saying how many bands on a Western blot or do you have positively. You can actually visualize the bacteria in your body so if you went into your doctor imagine you said I got pain in my left shoulder. I got chest pain and I think I was bitten by a tick rather than having all these questions. You could actually visualize it just like we do with cancer and see the bugs. This is really based again on lessons. That have been successfully translated from the bench into the clinic. So this is work. We had a large Defense Department grand for breast cancer where we developed a probe using human Heat shock protein ninety. It's very abundant protein. There happens to be a beryllium equivalent called ht PG high temperature protein G. It's a very important protein. In mammalian cells age. Just be ninety because it prevents damage protein from accumulating which if allowed to accumulate would kill the cells. Also it's it's a highly conserved evolutionary family of proteins that protects against environmental stresses or internal stresses cell. The damage protein. That would otherwise. Kill the cell so what we did. In this case as we took H. S. P. Ninety an inhibitor. We labeled it with a probe that could be visualized and in a sense you unfortunately lighting. You can't really see it but we could visualize tumor in these. He's mice growing human breast cancers over normal tissue. And so the idea of this is if a woman has mammography has an abnormality and only ten percent one of those turn out to really be cancer that rather than doing unnecessary biopsies unnecessary angst. That you could do scan that would discriminate between malignant normal tissue issue and also ideally identify areas. What we call minimal disease states that are hiding in the body? This is actually in the clinic now and so what we did. Is We targeted the beryllium form of. HSBC ninety again is called H. G. and to make a longer story short we looked for compounds in the library and also compounds that we already developed against the human form of HSP Ninety for Breast Cancer Hanser project looking for compounds that would identify beryllium But not the human form because again. If we're GONNA make a scan and a therapeutic we don't don't want this targeting human tissue and also selecting for compounds that don't that can discriminate between Berea and and the normal microbiome Casey Choline and so we found this compound. It's called one ninety six and a few others this normally twirls around. But I don't think I have the controls for it so these are just spiral so in the left. I call it the Hawaiian Islands. The one nine thousand eight so the probe for the beryllium proteins and again this targets a protein in Borelli very abundant in beryllium. Bergdorf Roy Moore it is across the species and strains so we're not targeting just five percent of people with lung. Disease were selecting targets in this case for imaging. But I'll show you how we're using it for therapeutic that will affect fact all of the species and strains so we went from beryllium growing culture to working with Monica embers the two lane And doing a mouse study where we infected the mice with beryllium. We waited three weeks and then we injected the probe and we wanted wanted to see whether it would identify gorilla in tissues and again the bluish is the ninety eight so he could see. Infected Animals There's cartilage from the ear which is where beryllium loves to hang out. There's also the joint to joint. You could see that using the one nine eight probe the bluish probe We could identify really a- These are just obviously localized Images and then we counter stain when we take take the tissue out with a beryllium antibody to make sure that what that probe is identifying as beryllium and in fact it does and now. We're doing in Vivo. Animal Demel studies where we're going to visualize in Vivo. Knows are ongoing as we speak to see if we could actually scan now this. This fluorescent probe is is not prime time for for the clinic because it does not get good depth in the body so we could scan and probably visualize cartilage infected cartilage or the joint but to get the heart and brain. This is not gonna be sufficient so what we will do is to make pet league from this to take this and making pet scan. Most people heard of a pet scan. Not your dog or cat. But essentially a pet scan for the most part is a scam that f. d. g. pad it's taken up by hyper metabolic tissues and can identify in my case where my profession has cancer but also also infection. It doesn't tell you though if if it lights up and you think you have an infection. What the underlying infectious agent is? It just tells you that there's an infection action this on the other hand as a pet scan would tell you that's beryllium infection. So now so that's great right so we wanted to develop a beryllium Stan. We also have some targets that we want to look out for Bartonella because unfortunately this particular target for whatever reason is is not in the genome of Bartonella and so we have to look at other particularly pro teams so in the cancer world so now people may have screened one with these drugs these HSP ninety inhibitors through the FDA approved library because there are several that have gone into the clinic and cancer and maybe found that by themselves mm selves. They don't do much to really because they don't their stress proteins. You have to do something to the cell to make them relevant you. Don't just give them to happily. Holy growing beryllium doesn't kill them. That's not the way it works doesn't do that to human selves either. So what we did is and again. This is based on the lessons. Sounds from cancer where people have taken targeted therapies. Rather just relying on the targeted therapies have hooked up poison or a toxin. So this is kind The magic bullet where you drive the toxin directly to the cancer and avoid normal tissues. This happens to be a drug called. T. DM one which is an anti her two antibody but the drug called by chancing which is a my totic poison This is in the clinic. It's transformed the treatment. Seven of The Area I've been working on her to breast cancer. So what happens is the antibody recognizes the tumor cells because the her two is more prevalent Expressed on tumor cells. It has little stars on there which the Montana it gets internalized in the tumor. It releases the my Tam San and kills the tumor cells but really does oh spare the normal tissue so this is FDA approved and we said why can't we take the same compound that is directing that imaging agent that I just showed you and hook something onto it that'll bring it into guerrilla that'll kill Berea and spare normal tissue. So what does Borelli. Okay what are the things that really hates one of the things that most cells hate radical oxygen species. You know it's interesting. We've gotten very accustomed to growing beryllium now. Beryllium hates oxygen. Even though it's not a complete anaerobic but it likes living in low oxygen tension. So if you you stress these bacteria I don't care whether they're in a exponential speyrer Keitel studied around bodies state with lots of oxygen radicals. It's it's a death sentence is I'm going to show you. So what did we cook that compound so we actually have a drug.

cancer Bartonella breast cancer inflammatory breast cancer Berea Borelli FDA Nineteen Ninety Disease Breast Cancer Hanser Golf HSP Ninety Dana Farber Barack Obama Hawaiian Islands morphine BBC
"dr neil" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

01:39 min | 10 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Hello and in this episode. You'RE GONNA learn three main things. How understanding the regulation of infection in the body is how HIV was brought under control? And how it will be how lyme disease is brought under control. The ways lime disease interventions would benefit from the same precision drug engineering as they do in cancer research and the drug research. Neil Specter's involved often that starts with identifying the drugs that have the best chance of physically interacting with lime bacteria. Thanks Roy and a big shoutout to all you longtime lime Ninjas. You're the reason we have way more than half a million downloads Aurora. And I really appreciate you tuning in and we'd like to welcome all the new listeners out but they're welcome to lime Ninja radio. You are now officially a lime Ninja and as you know. Lime disease is an international problem. Each week we have listeners. Join you from all over the world this past week. We've had listeners. Join from Calgary to Coquitlam Canada so like listeners. There's from Canada. Canada represent this this week. Okay welcome Canada. We're glad to have you tuning in all right. We're tells a little bit more about Dr. Neil Specter Dr Specter's undiagnosed lyme disease damaged his heart so badly that he had to get a heart transplant. Intravenous antibiotics. Antibiotics finally brought the lime disease under control and Dr Specter now brings his expertise in treating cancer to developing lime treatments. Thanks Roy and here's Dr Specter's presentation at the two thousand Nineteen Li- mine conference.

Neil Specter Dr. Neil Specter Coquitlam Canada Roy lyme Calgary
"dr neil" Discussed on Evidence In Motion Clinical

Evidence In Motion Clinical

12:10 min | 11 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Evidence In Motion Clinical

"Welcome to another edition of the I.. M. Clinical podcast. My name is John Childs and and joined by my co host. Dr Mark Sheppard as always days and we are privileged to have on the show of physical therapist who works actually with us at Texas physical. Therapy specialist Dr Neil. Sheth Neil completed completed the sports residency back in two thousand seventeen or so and really brings a unique perspective to all things certainly physical. Oh therapy but particularly related to strength training and so. We're really looking forward to having Neil on the show neil welcome to the clinical podcast. Thank you guys for having having them really excited so neil to get US kicked off if you would just give us a brief bit about your background maybe where you went to. PT School and sort of how you got into sort of the path that you're on now. Okay so I went to school in Philadelphia at the University of the sciences. It was a direct program so I actually didn't have to do the. Gre Three in reapply. I was just sixers don which is exciting. After that I was really well by my second year I really wanted to do. A sports. Resin team started looking looking around what I could apply to. and Luckily I am sports residency in Georgetown which XP was open and they took me on and finish that in twenty seventeen after the exam in March twenty eighteen. And now I'm down in San Antonio with one of our sports clinics where I get to mentor. The incoming residents now do a lot of teaching with that. Neil thanks for that background if you would talk a little bit about your perspective on strength with training and sort of where you think strength training sort of fits if you will and where the sort of the state of strength training I asked the question because you know oh manual therapy was sort of the decade of the two thousands and maybe overemphasize perhaps relative to strength training and it seems like the pendulum maybe swinging the other direction. Now where like all everyone talks about is like cross fit and those sorts of things. And it's like it's gone the other way so I'm just curious is like what's your perspective on strength training and what's the state of it within the profession. He adds though this really excited about. If I get to fired up just calm me down if you guys need need but again on tirades in the clinic all the time but as ours when I think I actually think that this is the biggest area that we need to improve on as a profession. Kind of like what you send John Worth starting to swing in the other way. I definitely sealed up but I think a lot of issues are that Patients are under loaded and under dosed as far as strength training principles and a lot of people. Just don't implement proper. Strengthening like thera bands are good to start with his initial seen in acute injuries. But after that initial phase there needs to be a shift to load it and having some awaits actually being put on these patients in. I could see that this so boxes. Something Neil that many people probably will resonate with and you. You know it's interesting because when you're in clinic you see you know thera bands everywhere at you know different types awaits that are usually hand weights right. If you go I went to the everyday. Outpatient clinic are even one within the hospital. It's kind of like those are the staples but you don't really see anything that can actually load people. You the heavyweights and it always kind of bugged me in two different ways one is like why is that the case too is I wasn't really comfortable understanding ending how to load people with squat racks or different types of bar. Waiting things landmine stuff like that. That took some time after I graduate sweet so when you talk about you know where the state of strength training or are really the prescription of exercises like where do you feel like. We miss the mark doc when it comes to these types of things so definitely go with the Swat rack being so at when during residency in Georgetown and even at us or as lane location. I I actually bought thought squat racks for both of those the Knicks in order to low deebo in a when I was little headed that about it but he got the point of it uh but then he was really from the beginning where in school and highly had maybe an hour a week for half a semester of going over any any strength and conditioning related things and that. Just trustees us into the clinic three graduate and we're still doing those eysenck three he by ten therapy and everything similar movements everything. Everyone gets the same cookie cutter approach and there needs to be a shift to that loading being an challenging the patient with actual weights and Neva bodyweight movements is fine but there are just not enough to have any tissue up tation Shen prevent long-term injury in. I think that also comes back to us practising what we preach. I liked to Charles Myself personally in the gym and with other colleagues of mine as far as Hauer thinking about exercise dosage. How a training myself in it leaks into how I treat? Patients Asia's Neil. Could you expand on this a little bit like you give in clinical example of like how you are implementing proper dosage. This is general as it relates to. Let's say strengthening someone's quadriceps muscle if they're coming in for let's say anterior knee pain like how does that look from your perspective when you're dosing dosing. Is it okay that provide a case about actually have a really good one for nepean young So with this. He's like a thirty three year. Old Male in the navy is all him a year after he fell on his knee and has had an tierney pain. Ever since and through the medical carousel paracel he was just prescribed straight leg. Raises and Claude sets for a whole year a whole year. That Yup and he's never done anything else using unlike multiple providers that have changed anything else. So let me stop you there. So you're telling me. Has He seen the physical therapist before this time he saw one. Yeah Yeah Oh man for a short time that kills me to know that the two exercises were still kind of on his radar but anyway. That's crazy yeah so he had no audio to do and he is in the navy he was off duty getting ready to go back to think Iraq Many leaves at the end of this month so he can squat lower than maybe like fifty degrees of neath luncheon. He tries running he kinda Gallup's because he doesn't want to bend that knee so I'm getting some of this very avoid. We didn't an week in doing things that he needs to do with him. I we do something called the Quad Index and we have a makeshift shift version with a hand held item. OMETER cheap way to do it but it works that so there's research out there especially for post. The minimum criteria needed to running is actually eight weeks and eighty percent index. So we use that. Eighty percent is our measurement to start any metrics or impact work. He we started at a at thirty percent. Thirty eight or twenty seven something like that and yeah really really low. So where I started with him outside of the cloud. Odd Settings settings. Good right especially on your continuum it's good for activation in the new progressive straight leg raises for your control and then after that you again to strength endurance endurance. He'd Kinda like that stair stepping progression over him we used. We started off a lot because of his pain with movement. We start a lot with Jafar Ayar flourished and just loading him with bodyweight movement squats split lunges straight leg raise and then eventually eventually shifts to adding weight to all those movements and making sure on his scale on what I do. A lot of patients is and use the rate of preserved exertion. So if it's something I really want them and the challenge you had told me I want it eight plus nine hundred ten anywhere in that range and if it's not there for them we just keep increasing until it's a heavy enough weight where they're actually pushing themselves not just going through the movement. That's interesting meal like so you're telling me that you're using the R.. P. To actually actually understand the reps and potentially sets for which you does your patients is that kind of how you're using yes so with the RPG round like eighty plus. It's usually definitely more my strength side or even power so I the schemes typically x amount of sets for anywhere between two to five Canadian. Six wraps her up and then if I want to get a little bit later on there are definitely increased volume for movement pattern. That were working. Oh that's cool so you know to me it would make sense. That may not be the same number going back to your statement about the three sets at ten Dan. You know that you kinda see everybody's flow chart you know potentially So yours look a bit messy. If this was documented. They're not clean. Three by ten three by tens is something I get so upset about in the clinics and we even have a table that we all work on an I wrote are actually one of my residents wrote. Think before you buy I ten has to me if everything on your flow sheet is three by ten to me. It's lazy programming. Your there's no intent behind find what you're prescribing and my floggings are definitely messy every day. There's I don't write all the way on the left side. I don't know how your flu she'd looks on the left column elements of Big Open Blank. Were most people just write back through size and then it just carries on through that entire life of that flashy for me. I leave that that left side blanket. I write in each for specific day. What I'm working on with my plan is which exercise are going to help achieve that goal and definitely the numbers are very off kilter? There's some people who do like a four by seven five three or five. I even play a lot with strength and conditioning in the clinic to every minute on the minute at a certain load of do Amr APPs so definitely. The flu sheets varied day all over the place. There's intent behind the entire goal. Now is a great discussion and you know as you talk about like this case for example you know number one. I hope you consider perhaps publishing it if you're able to do that. So the researcher in me can't not suggest that so it's thing you can share and on that note what sort of of resources the you lean on whether it be journal articles are the particular authors that you follow when it comes to all things you know how to train patients and athletes in evidence informed sorts of ways. What are the resources that are your go to? I'm definitely big on social media. I follow a lot of physical therapists percent. Strength and conditioning coaches. Some of the big ones as far as in the P. T. Rome that put out a lot of content. Is Dan Laurenz or Eric. Mira or even Mike Reimann on those people I follow. That always have a good tweeter instagram post about it. Even John Rawson has really good things breath. I also have my strength and conditioning Certification so I do rely on the NFC as website as far as articles that are coming out and Alikhan challenge different athletic populations in the clinic. So those are my big ones even J. O. S. P. T. R. J. P. T. are a good example if those that are APD members and then on that note that same train of thought you know. I know you provide a lot of mentorship to residents. So what sort of structure do you have them reading articles on a regular basis. Are You doing journal clubs or you know what's the contemporary way that you really help mentor mentor..

Sheth Neil Georgetown Dr Mark Sheppard navy Dan Laurenz Philadelphia John Childs US PT School John Worth Asia Texas Knicks University of the sciences sixers quadriceps muscle flu San Antonio P. T. Rome
Speed vs. Safety: Rapid Approvals from the FDA

Sounds of Science

09:46 min | 11 months ago

Speed vs. Safety: Rapid Approvals from the FDA

"Why is the FDA's rigorous testing so necessary. Well I I think you're aware that a lot of drugs fail From safety concerns we all know about getting sleepy with antihistamines. Or you know that's the actual aside side effect that comes from the action of the drug on the brain. That's at the senior centers that we would like to counteract allergy. So that's what we call pharmacologic based aced toxicity. It's an effect actually on the target. But it's in a way that we don't want it to act GOTCHA. So as we're working on very new drugs we often don't understand like where there's receptors are in God or the brain or the immune system. There's a lot of things we don't understand about the basic mechanisms of action of disease and there's lot of things that we don't understand sometimes about where the receptors are in the buddy. I mean it seems great. Yeah but that's why. I'm kind of glad if my original training and classic Comic Anthology Because you have to ask questions okay. where else is the receptor? Who else could hit end so? FDA trained to think about those nightmare scenarios of what it could do that. You don't want it to do right and ask those hard questions to make sure that we have the checks and balances right a lot of the early drugs That were used in AIDS. Patients Cause Peripheral neuropathy and that wasn't shown very well in the animal models models but it caused intense pain in the patients at the same doses that was needed for the virus. It wasn't until later that we got the protease inhibitors that really counteracted the road. And that's the basis of the lifesaving therapies that we have today I was really fortunate to be. FDA during that time when the protease inhibitor came through so switching gears a little bit what is personalized medicine. When it comes to patients like for example adjacent armstead and meal Amac? I understand that Jaycee is a twenty five year old with Lou GEHRIG's disease while meal is a young girl with batons disease who have both recently benefited from personalized medicine. He I think we have come to the place in drug development where we understand a lot more about genetics of disease so so yes switching away from viruses and into genetic Madison we have a lot of inborn errors when we learned that there is an inborn Gene that was missing in a patient has always been there born like that and as soon as we can diagnose them and with that replacement gene product or the enzyme of interest interest. We can save their lives so. LS has also been learned to be a whole series of different mutations responsible for LS Um and so you have to look at those different subsets according to their genetic diagnosis. But we also know that Batten's disease is a specific mutation and there's also something like fourteen different forms of Batten's disease that are mutations in same pathway that result in the same type of phenotype of neurological article degeneration some earlier some younger and some an older kids or adults in the case of Mula. She has two mutations that are different on both of the wheels that caused the dysfunction of a particular protein. Batten's disease six seven and there's only a handful or double handful of kids worldwide. They're known to have that particular subtitled batons and Jaycees case she has a very aggressive form of al it lasts called F s mutation and it has a particularly bad course people with F.. US typically sadly succumbed LS typically approximately a year. Because it's so aggressive. It's very hard to intervene soon enough. And there has never been a medication that could actually address the fundamental gene problems in these two cases so we need to design whole new the truck when we find the particular mutation and it turns out depending on the molecular biology and that control mechanisms around them. A tation some all of them are amenable to go nuclear type therapy and both of these girls have been their particular. Genetics have been amenable to A strategy she of using nuclear tight enter equally sadly we did not know that. JC had this particularly bad ale ass us until she was twenty five. Her family had lost her twin sister at the age of seventeen and Alex add add. Actually he contracted the symptoms of L. S. at age eleven so the two girls were identical. They had the same mutation but one got symptoms at eleven on the other at twenty five. JC I guess Through some grace right. Her symptoms arose during time in which a drug was already available in unaccompanied show that happened to be appropriate for her. So I understand and that in this case she got lucky. Well in a way because the drug already existed otherwise we couldn't have intervened quickly enough. Yeah it was an act of considerable effort on the part of the patient advocacy group project. LS The head of Columbia University's LS LS center. Dr Neil Snider in the company who originated the drug and all of us that were helping around the sides trying to support like an exoskeleton including Charles forever and I was helping with the regulatory strategy and also trying to make sure that the drug that was chosen was actually appropriate to the most expedient animal model so as a result of that we were able to put together a very lean and mean I N D for JC and get her approved through the FDA. I have to say. FDA was understandably cautious but when they heard her situation detail and how she'd lost her twin sister the understood of course about a few and they made a lot of exceptions to the usual toxicology regulations. Well I know that she had been she and her family. They had been advocating pretty publicly for a while up until it was approved. I if I'd been in her mom shoes I would have done the same thing called. She lower local congressman. The Stephen King and there was actually quite a response. In Congress. There is a bill that was put forward to ask. FDA to move expediently for JC. I don't know that that had specific impact but just to say that they got some considerable public discussion. And how Camilla's case different in her case Tim you At Boston Children's Hospital recognized that her condition was suitable for an exon skipping being drug very similar to Isis Been Raza and he was able to use a similar backbone and design a drug from scratch within several months it was quite remarkable global. We've done the testing for it and then we've Were able to get started with just a acute data and then I designed a type of a program in which we would update the FDA very regularly on the progress of the toxicology studies so that we could extend her dosing and again. FDA's group group that does an enzyme replacement was wonderful. In working with us to customize that I approach how do you envision cases like these being handled in the future after all not everyone. Everyone has a congressman. That's willing to go to bat for them. Like Jaycee did not. Everybody should take one. There's definitely a sea-change coming is really exciting. And it goes back to the changes brought about by the AIDS patients who identified that they were an extreme unmet medical. Need we see the finalization of the L. S. guidance. We see a lot of guidances have come out on rare disease from the agency in the past twenty four months. And I'm very excited about this because we're really getting to the place where we custom tailor the amount of upfront non clinical research. That has to proceed to human trials customize. That the patient's situation well do you think that each was going to require its own uniquely designed non clinical research at will or will there kind of. Okay you're not gonna be able to have like a standard version that works for most Aso's typically called platform toxicology in kind of a dream. Right now when you look across all a good nuclear tides you find out remember. I mentioned early in this talk about the pharmacologically driven toxicity. Let's say there's another place in the genome that has has a similar sequence. We end up having the drug acting by its intended action bit at the wrong place which is an off what we call an on target but unwanted toxicity existed that could arise by modulating genome which is a little scary right to put something into the spine or once. You invoke gene therapy. What's done is done so you need to have really careful toxicology evaluations that look at the animal as if it were a miniature clinical trial? And you know you're basically siklie handling the animals has patients and so we get as much information as we can vary from each particular experiment and try to make sure that Ed's translation Lee accurate for predicting patient risk. We need the parents to know that right. If if you were me. Resigning are up to our child. An an in-and-out shoes

FDA Congressman Jaycee Batten Protease Inhibitor Ls Ls Center Peripheral Neuropathy Lou Gehrig Dr Neil Snider Aids Alex L. S. Stephen King Congress ASO Camilla ED
Millennials Are Getting More Obesity-Related Cancers Than Baby Boomers

KCBS Radio Overnight News

01:24 min | 1 year ago

Millennials Are Getting More Obesity-Related Cancers Than Baby Boomers

"Cancers linked to obesity are on the rise. Among millennials those born in the eighties. Nineties Adriana Diaz has more on the study and young adults ages twenty five to twenty nine over the last twenty years kidney cancer rates increased to six point two percent. Every year pancreatic gall bladder. And endometrial cancers are also rising. When baby boomers were younger their risk for some of these obesity related cancers was half the rate thirtysomethings face today. Millennials are seen as health conscious. But this study would suggest that that might not be the case. Excess body weight is a known carcinogen number of fat cells is greater Dr Neil. I n gar researches its effects. What is it specifically about fat cells that might be contributing to cancer, those fat cells overtime start to become inflamed. And diseased these larger fat cells then produce inflammatory molecules that can stimulate the growth of cancer. We know that one out of six female cancer related deaths are related to obesity and one out of seven male cancer related deaths are related to obesity if we can improve the obesity epidemic. We stand to impact. The lives of many many people right now obesity is the second most common preventable cause of cancer after tobacco. But with the decline in smoking doctors expect it to become the primary. Preventable cause of cancer in young

Obesity Cancer Kidney Cancer Adriana Diaz Preventable Dr Neil Twenty Years Two Percent