22 Burst results for "Dr Neil"

"dr neil" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

04:51 min | 10 months ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"So so basically. Am i right that with ultrasound. entities and muscle imma cheese. You don't have a big training day to like. You would have for many things that you can find from incident like for example translates since you can find thousands of millions of folks that are into language season even just used them and now you need to provide the day's face exactly right so if you happen to work for google or facebook or amazon then you have access to huge volumes of data and in the case of something like facebook. It's very often actually labeled data because people upload their own photos and then they highlight regions in the photo and say who is in this picture. what you doing there is helping facebook to train facial recognition algorithms so. That's good for them. Because it happens at scale. They have billions of uses. But as you say for ultrasound we don't have open data sense because usually allowed to share medical data for you and and it's not the kind of task that really tempts people to to want to do the labeling because it's it's slow and tedious so that is the challenge and they're all ways around that with newer message. We can work with less data but it is the biggest obstacle so yeah and and about facebook. You said that we are kind of helping them. If if i don't like facebook sued. Ib labeling wrong persons like a dog to pass and so does at least throw fully the facebooks legally allowed to comment on the. It's an interesting suggestion. Yes of course. Most people probably are okay with that. Do to be honest. Facebook been in plenty of trouble before about how they use data and how they pass it onto other companies. Most people don't actually care. It's only once crimes have been committed that then they'll come back and say actually i'm not okay with addis data recognition. Rules regulation rules. Yeah and i think it's wonderful like google photos. It will classify your peak sister with one has like the lake which thursday we don't have bike and so on so after it works you can actually find your pizza's you're you're looking for so those algorithms are actually not very.

Facebook amazon google addis
Two new, large species of dinosaur discovered on British beach

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 11 months ago

Two new, large species of dinosaur discovered on British beach

"Remains of two new large species are predatory dinosaur have been discovered on a beach at Britain's Isle of Wight we don't know exactly what one of them came from but on the same beach we had to spina soul skills come out of the ground paleontologist Dr Neil Gosling says they belong to new species previously unknown to science and even different to one another the span of time between the top of the section of the box is full million years give or take so it's not like they would necessarily on the same page at the same time there were about twenty nine feet long one of them has a name Serra toast to cops infer Rodius and that means state owned Crockett traced hell haven't scientists believe the dinosaur was unusual looking crocodile like skulls would help them hunt on both land and in water and expand their diets I'm a Donahue

Dr Neil Gosling Britain Crockett
"dr neil" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"dr neil" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"We're talking about. What he was exploring was he he was putting them on those agar plates. You know the petri dishes yes but everybody grew them in in a petri dish with the lid on and he wanted to see if you have the lid off so that it was a natural air circulation whether the growth would be different but he had a sterile lab and he so he played staphylococci. He took the lid off cam nicole way for a long weekend and somebody who laptop was too stuffy and so they opened a window and some old habit to blow in and got an onto the petri plates. He came back from vacation so that there was mold growing on his plates and started throwing him out saying you know these are ruined smut. You know my and it's not a big deal but you know my weeks worth of work is gone and then he stopped because he looked closer and noticed that around. The mold was a circle and so he got curious. As to what's going on here. He looked at it under a microscope and found that the bacteria in the circle and at the edge around the the mold were either dead or dying. Any put together that with his experience as microbiologist and knew that the mold was secreting something onto the plate that was killing the bacteria and so he began exploring it and found penicillin to create something onto the plate not onto the bacteria. The bacteria well came in contact with the with the chemicals on the plate. That's right amazing. Amazing you know the last The last of your of your of your four skills making connections. I think this may be for me. One of the most important questions. And that is You use the term. And i like it. How can someone connect the dots. Let's say they have a serendipitous experience and it just seems to be an outlier..

four skills One of most important questions
"dr neil" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"dr neil" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Thing that has happened to me too. And i think it's happened to a lot of people to be open to it is that is there. Is there part of the creative person that has that is more likely to be open to this than then someone else. Maybe i think you can develop that calm. you know. we teach our medical students about about open-mindedness and had a look at everything around them In in a way to improve their interactions with patients. So i think basically you can train somebody to really. Oh that's that's hopeful that's hopeful you know. You mentioned the word earlier a phrase earlier that that really struck me as i was thinking about it. And that's serendipity absolutely demands paying attention that's not common in our society today because we live such wrote lives. You know we do the same thing in the morning. Go to work the same time home. The same time you know everything is everything is calculated and so and repetitive and so that that reduces our inclination to truly pay attention to the moments and and it seems like it would be very easy to miss one of those surprisingly beneficial unexpected events Would you agree with that. That paying attention is very essential. I do agree And i do agree that that Because people oftentimes have a wrote life that they don't pay attention but have gotten so sort of you know develop their armor and and just you know put your head down and go through the day that they don't take it in and big missing so much there's like so much incredible stuff all around us even if it's just a tiny little thing doesn't affect your whole life. It's just so so much a gas so wonderful to see those tiny little things that are around you. Yeah you know. It's it's it's i. I would add another another concept paying attention and i don't know that you write about this but it's very common in my life and that is reflection is.

today one
"dr neil" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"dr neil" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"As soon as i saw the title. I wanted to have you on the show. Because i personally. So believe in serendipity in the relationship between you know sort of an unexpected unpredicted events in everyday life. And i can't wait to further discuss this with you but really before we get into it. I think it's essential that we define terms. And so so. We're all talking the same thing with regard to serendipity had how do you define serendipity i guess the easiest way of defining certain deputy is as look at as a lot of people said well. What's the difference between luck and serendipity aren't they the same in the answer is absolutely not luck is something that just happens to you without your involvement whereas sern deputy you have to be involved you have to take agency and it and the perfect example is if he were you know. Let's say you are out of work needing needing money and a long lost relative. Who didn't know sent you a check for five thousand dollars. Certain deputy is you walking down the street and same situation. You need the money. Walking down the street you happen to see a penny on the ground then most people would just pacify but you decide to pick it up. 'cause you curious and you look at it and so it's older penny. It's from nineteen twenty two and a friend of yours had one times you remember at one time said if ever you see a penny this old don't spend it don't ignore take it to according to your cause could be worth a lot of money so you remember that in. He'd better advice. You take it to the coin dealer. And he says it's worth five thousand dollars. That's what i'll give you same outcome. But with serendipity you have to be involved. I like that i have never heard that. That definition i you know i've read several definitions and that's your involvement really. Does it serendipity really doesn't require your involvement in in several realms right. I mean it's not only paying attention but it's acting on its recognizing it and we're gonna talk all about that in this show and i'm i'm very excited but but you know one thing. You're such a good storyteller. I would love for you to give me an example. And i'm not gonna say your favourite because i know you have dozens of favorites but can you give me apart from the penny example A real life example of a serendipitous event that will give all of us a clue of what's really going on sure and and i can give you one from history and one from my and the history one is basically Thomas edison was experimenting with the telephone that had been invented just a year before any trying to see if he could record The the sound waves from the telephone onto a piece of paper just to see if he could do. And you know make a written record of it. And so he took a telephone and it has a diaphragm minute. 'cause braver membrane over the mouth over the Earpiece and he he touched a needle to it and it was going to etch into a piece of paper and as he was adjusting it. There was some sound in the room and it vibrated and stuck his his finger and he looked at that and realize. Hey wait a minute. If this could make if the sound could stick finger it could stick something pliable and so. He developed a wax. Cylinder had it rotating and spoken to the earp the microphone part of the telephone and lo and behold It s something in in the wax and when he put a needle in to try and play it back it played out. Mary had a little lamb. Which is what he had spoken into the telephone..

Thomas edison five thousand dollars Mary nineteen twenty two one time one one times dozens of favorites one thing a penny a year before
"dr neil" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"dr neil" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Serendipity. Utilizing every day expected events unexpected events. Excuse me to improve your life in your career. And as as much as i love the subject of serendipity and I wanna talk about it. I have a totally unrelated question. And what i want to know is this. What is it with physicians. Retirement and writing books you. You're my second doctor in a month. That's come on. It's that's written a book. What is it with you guys. You got to have something to do so you got to write a book. So i mean i you know that i hadn't absolutely no intention of writing book Never came to me i. I was an academic physician for six for forty years wrote of. What will you explain. What an academic physician is. I know but yeah so basically. It means you're you're employed by university and you see patients and do teaching but you also have the responsibility of doing some kind of research That's basically nicotinic physicial. You did a lot of writing then. Yeah i wrote over sixty articles and basically it was in medical ethics. That's the area. Oh really really. Yeah that's fascinating and a lot of my peers and colleagues told me i should write a book that you know summarizes everything and i kept saying that basically it's sort of self serving that i would be just repeating myself just in order to write a book and i had absolutely no intention doing that and then a month. Before i was going to retire i went to bed. Woke up at three o'clock in the morning And instantly knew what book i had to write. It just came to me And at and i as i began ready outline i realized why it came to me and not as much of my both professional and personal life was influence by the deputies events and i needed to sort of convey that message to other people. That's great. I'm so glad you did You know i am..

six forty years second doctor over sixty articles both three o'clock in the morning
How to Ask for What You Want and Get It

Here's Something Good

02:40 min | 1 year ago

How to Ask for What You Want and Get It

"If you're making a list of goals one thing may stand out many of the things we need to succeed require that we ask something of someone else and for a lot of us. That's hard people just don't like to ask for things whether it's a raised or directions or help with housework the reluctant to ask for what we want to be a huge stumbling block in life. Today we're going to hear how anyone can get past that reluctance and also tips. That will make a yes more likely when you do make the ask to learn how we talked to dr polina neil. Dr neil's an executive coach consultant and founder of unabridged. An international coaching practice. Here's what she had to say. Welcome dr neal. Well thank you delighted to be here so it seems that a lot of people are afraid to say straight out what they want. Why is that great question. I think there's a number of reasons. One of them is that we are frayed. It's that for litter f word that can stop us in our tracks. And i'm actually talking about fear which is a very powerful emotion motivator both towards ended gaidon something and we know that veer activates our fight or flight response that originated to keep a say in the face of danger and it also gets activated in response to potential emotional threats so asking someone out on a date where the outcome is uncertain can feel very much like an emotional threat in terms of possible rejection were failure embarrassment and i think another reason that i see especially with many of my clients is about knowing what we want and know how so with respect to knowing this actually times when when people simply don't know what they want hence they don't what to ask for into this often requires some time to reflect on what we want and there's also times when we actually don't know how we don't feel necessarily competent in terms of are asking skills which is actually something that we need to practice. And why is it important to ask for what you want. Even if you might not get it will i think there's a number of reasons from the importance of self expression sharing your inner voice for sharing your voice speaking up for yourself being able to expose your creative self proactively advocating for your needs and getting goes needs met role modeling all the way to being the leader. That you want to be is a person or juris

Dr Polina Neil Dr Neil Dr Neal
What Differentiates a Migraine From a Headache

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

02:22 min | 1 year ago

What Differentiates a Migraine From a Headache

"Let's talk about headaches here on the exam room. Podcast brought to you by the physicians committee and not just any headache. We're about the mother of all headaches. Today we are going to be talking about migraine headaches. What exactly they are. And then how your diet may be affecting whether or not your head is pounding or not and so. We have a gentleman with us here today. Who knows all about this matter. Fact did a comprehensive study on this very topic not too terribly long ago and with that we welcome. Dr neil barr back to the exam room. Thank you so very much for being here. Sir hijack great to be with you. Let's start with the surface level question. What is a migraine. And how does it compare to those day to day headaches that we all get great question. A migraine is not just a bad headache. untypical tension headache. That a lot of folks get is a dull ache lasts an hour or two. It's gone that's of beds. That's about it now. it can be intense. But the differentiates a migraine is that migraines are usually one-sided. They're often pounding and throbbing with your pulse. And along with it. You get lots of other things to. You're really sensitive to lights and sounds and sometimes you'll feel sick. You might even actually throw up. So it's it's a whole physical thing. as opposed to just Attention headache some people will get an aura beforehand. Not everybody but sometimes you'll see changes in your vision. That will warn you that the migraine is about to hit and we talk a lot about chronic illness on the show. Is there any research showing whether or not migraines can be genetic at all they can be and they can also strike at any time of life. Unlike so many conditions where you've got to kind of be middle aged for to happen You'll see them in kids. And i have to tell you check. There is nothing sadder than a kid. Who's got a migraine because they last a long time. They can last overnight the next day kids aren't in school They're just waiting in the dark and what they're hoping for is that they will fall asleep. Sometimes the sleep will arrest the migraine and they can function again but there are kids who have them a few times a week and it can be just really

Headaches Migraine Physicians Committee Dr Neil Barr Sir Hijack
"dr neil" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"dr neil" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Now, Dr Neil 11 is a chiropractor, a nutritionist, spokesperson and a longtime adviser for purity products. After 11 Welcome back to the show. Oh, it's great to be here with you today pad and we have a very exciting topic to cover today Pack. They were talking about strength and power and how to get it back even appear in your 50 60 seventies eighties. So if you want to feel better if you want to feel stronger, this is some very important information. We're going to cover today. Now This is an exciting topic. Talk to me about this important message today. What molecule are we talking about? And how it's impacting the lives of people who follow the science, right? Right, Right. What we're talking about a new supplement. It's called ever strong and it features and exciting molecule called creating now, pat. A lot of our listeners may have heard of creating, and I know you've used creating right. But for those that don't know about creating, it's mainly used In the Olympic circles, professional athletes bodybuilders college high school athletes because it does something extraordinary and what I'm about to tell you is proven by hundreds and hundreds of human studies. So here's what creating does for us. It helps us to get stronger. More powerful helps put muscle mass on the body, and it helps protect us from losing muscle tissue. As we get older, we know that's a big part of aging. Not only that, pat great for the brain great from memory and helps promote bone strength as well. So an amazing molecule that everybody needs to know about. It's an amazing story..

Dr Neil Olympic
"dr neil" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

Cross Examined Official Podcast

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

"And blacks.

"dr neil" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

Cross Examined Official Podcast

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

"Gender. Am i missing something now. So one of the things that martin luther king is often the held up as example of color blindness and interestingly enough colorblind is actually explicitly attacked by critical race theory. Is he cleared wideness hiding racism. Racism hidden behind color blindness. Now is that possible to do that. It can be. You can pretend to be overtly colorblind. But then you're actually discriminating or you have laws that are actually screaming tori but by the letter legally the jury the look colorblind. But actually i would say that. Martin luther king So i i do think that they're kinda confused about what color. Blind is automated. We should mean that we we treat people kindly love them regardless of color. That's colorblind right. Right ignore the color that it exists. Obviously right for example like you know after the slaves were freed immediately like eighteen. Seventy you have to say well. I'm totally colorblind. I can't tell you well know it matters. They're poor they're they're sharecroppers now because of slavery let's address that issue and we can pay attention to race and even today we can say yeah. Racism is a real problem. I can acknowledge it exists. It's a problem without abandoning my colorblind. Prince moral principles but deeper than that. What's interesting is martin. Luther king always appealed to the constitution and to our founding documents and he said america. You're not living up to this promissory note it's time for you to live up to your claimed almoner predate equal so. He was appealing to these documents and ideas and saying i'm demanding. You live up to them. Interestingly critical race theory was created in part to as a response to that they were unhappy with that approach. They would say no. Racism is built into our founding documents. They are suspicious of rights discourse. They created they question. Liberalism meaning appealing to laws and advocate principles as king did in a deep way critical race theory actually works against his own approach to civil rights and explicitly. I can give you say we're dubious. Were skeptical of at approach to black progress so going back to this issue of they have better narrative. I thought i heard you say in another interview though that while they. They're not postmodern because they do have a narrative they also believe in moral absolutes fair to say yeah the oppression is evil is okay. And they're all these absolute true right and injustices good. So they're not relativists. How do they ground that. Where's what's that grounded in. Where are the i mean. It seems to be on one hand. They're saying this neil. They're saying that. You have to believe me. Because i'm a black lesbian. A poor person. And so i have more bonafides than say an average white person and so you have to believe me and my moral conclusions. I don't have to provide any evidence for anything. I say just because of the nature of my situation how is it how. How does that ground morality. Where did they get that from. They don't try to and so critical theories are very pragmatic. Don't try to. They try to work from abstract principles and then drought the conclusions. They do that their method. Is they see a problem. They tried to fix it within the imminent frame. What's happening right now. The they're very proud of not trying to appeal to abstractions critical race. There is for example disdain. Appealing abstract la. They wanna look case studies than stories in narratives. So they don't even attempt to say what's the moral grounding for these claims. There really aren't knee so you you've quoted several people in the writings that i've seen again. You can go to chenevey. Apologetic dot com to see some of these rights. We can only cover a very small part of this. Neil but in your writings point out that they don't appeal to reason. In fact they will claim that. If you're using reason you're just trying to hide your racism. So how do you deal with a group of people that don't want to appeal to reason. How do you. How do you reason with people that reject reason. How do you persuade them. What do you do it at one. Hundred million dollar question frank. I don't know. I mean people. I think people underestimate how pernicious this worldview is. It gets into your soul because it's it's it makes you feel good. You're you're on the right side of history. You care you're compassionate. You tweet the right people you you vote for candidates and so when someone says wait a minute. This is making any sense. Your righteous is threatened. You feel like someone's attacking your justification so it is hard to reach people that are really imbibed this because they're just so they're on the right team and so i think as christians we have to. I think the best way to do it. Number one is to say what is compassionate depends on. What's true if i see a man cutting you with a knife. I stop him. Is that a good or bad action stopping him. Well depends is he a mugger or a surgeon right. If i see a person in doug digs wells in in asia to provide drinking water. And i stopped them up my evil or good while the pens. Do i know the wells infected with arsenic or not. if i'm doing the villagers say from arsenic. I'm good so compassionate. depends on reality. T. and so people are so seven being compassionate while you have to establish what's true. I and then you can be compassionate. You can't start with emotion and we're backwards. What's true neil. How do they avoid setting up a caste system because it appears that's what they're doing that you have to have these certain characteristics whether it's certain race gender whatever your sexual preferences in order you know if you have the right characteristics there or the right preference is you're going to be higher than say the white heterosexual male christian. Isn't that a caste system. Isn't it oppression in itself. It is but the view well because it's not to them because they view everything in terms of groups so as long as as the structure of society and they say look overall. We see whites with more wealth than blacks. Well they don't if to them if you if you oprah winfrey and you abuse an- curse at your white valet because he's white. You're not racist even know you're doing that. Because i hate people but you're not racist because the structure society is such that whites. You're on top people of color on the bottom so they wouldn't see this as a caste system because they're looking at again how wealth and resources are distributed award skill level. Not one of your action. That's another thing. We gotta talk about right after the break. Neil that people who are traditionally say african-american by definition can't be racist. According to this theory we'll talk about that and what you can do. What kind of questions. You can ask an ideas. We're coming back in a minute. I'm frank france. Frank turkey or i don't have to an atheist is a listener supported. Radio program and podcast. So if you like what you hear here would you consider donating to cross examined. Org one hundred percent of your donations go to ministry zero percent. Two buildings were completely virtual. So if you can help us out we greatly appreciate it. Thank you so much. If you're low on the fm dial looking for national public radio go no further. We're actually going to tell you the truth here. You will never hear this on. Npr our website cross examined dot org cross examined. The dot org. And neil dr neil. Bees website is chevy apologetic dot com. If you really want to dive into critical theory and learn more about it go to his website and you'll see right there on the homepage and critical theory and there are many articles and references that you can look up but neil. Let's go back to what we just ended win. And that is critical. Theorist redefined the term racism. What does it really mean practically to them so they would define racism as prejudice plus power. And they don't mean power as impersonal power but your groups power so because the definition a person of color cannot by definition be racist. They can be prejudiced but not racist.

Luther king tori neil Neil martin america la frank doug asia oprah winfrey neil dr neil Frank france Npr
"dr neil" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

Cross Examined Official Podcast

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

"The phrase critical theory the school a group of sociologists and philosophers running in the nineteen thirties in germany a coined the term critical theory to describe their project and they wanted to apply marx's ideas beyond just economics they wanted to apply it to things like culture and mass media and understand the other ways in which power operated to produce oppression and inequality but even that was eight years ago and since then critical theory has created entire disciplines like critical race theory queer theory critical pedagogy critical legal studies even postmodernism and second wave feminism critical social theories that have spun off of this original idea of critical theory so now what what are they all have in common all of these fields they are all trying to understand how power operates to produce social oppression inequalities and then their goal is not merely to understand it. He's inequalities but to erase them. Their goal is liberation. They want to free people from oppression. In all of this series four and so different sub fields like critical race theory will apply this critical lens to race. Queer theory would apply this critical lens to gender and sexuality. A post colonial studies would apply that lens to imperialism. I could empires in colonies so there. There are a lot of different fields that would fall under this broad category of critical theory. So how could it be seen as a substitute for christianity. How does it give meaning to people's lives. That's exactly right so what we're seeing today so you can take critical theories very broad and diverse in. Its complicated mets all. True what you're seeing. Today is sort of this coalescence of these various disciplines into this one world view. So a number of people are recognizing that we're seeing today in the sort of quote unquote woke movement is actually functioning as a world view so lindsay and pluck rose in their book. Cynical theories call it repeatedly a meta narrative. Ebron mix kennedy. He wrote the book had been. Anti-racist beginning is a Africa studies scholar and historian is very much woke but he says that this anti-racist movement it meets the same spiritual urges that were filled by his parents. Christianity is a critical. He's saying yes. This is fulfilling spiritual needs. So i do think of it as a worldview wise that well it answers basic questions like who am i. What's the problem with humanity. What is the solution to that problem. What's my purpose in. Life contemporary critical theory as exemplified in these various disciplines. It answers those big life questions that can also be answered by christianity or buddhism. Or atheism naturalism. So that's why i would consider this movement. Whatever you wanna call it. Would you call it. Cultural marxism term intersection analogy. But it is essentially acting as a world view. We're talking to dr neil chenevey. His website chenevey apologetic dot com. That's s. h. e. n. v. i. apologetic dot com. Trust me excellent. Writing on this issue and many other issues and when we get back from the break. We're going to talk a lot more about this. Don't go anywhere you're listening to. I don't have enough faith to be an atheist with frank turk on the american family radio network back into french help with something. Can you go up to i tunes. Wherever you listen to this podcast and give us a five star review why it will help more people see this podcast and therefore then here so if you could help us out there. I greatly appreciated welcome back to. I don't have enough faith to be an atheist with frank. Direct and american family radio network. My guest is neil shendi. We are talking about critical theory. We're going to get into how it comports with christianity if it does at all or where it doesn't and give you some questions you can ask people who are interested in critical theory or advocating for it. Before i do. I want to mention that on january. One two one. We're starting the essentials of christianity course. And i'll be your instructor online. If you join the premium version. I'll be with you for live. Qna on zoom on seven different occasions. If you really want to know the essentials of christianity and how to defend them out to interact with others out a major in the majors and not major in the minors then join me for the essentials of christianity. Course you'll see if you go to cross examine dot org click online courses. You'll see there. We have several other courses coming up in twenty twenty one as well. So if you wanna be a part of that Sign up soon because we're only take a limited number in the premium version. So we'll have time for qna on the zoom sessions. Okay back to dr neil. Chevy neal is it fair to say that we might say the big picture of christianity is we have sin we have repentance and ultimately we have salvation and in critical theory it's similar except you have oppression activism and then liberation right exactly right so taken. It's a meta narrative it's an overarching story that allows you to understand reality to make sense of it and as you said it begins not with creation like we're created by a good and loving and holy god. Our problem is sin. The solution is jesus came to rescue us. And then the end goal is god freeing us and got renewing the universe the trajectory is there these groups that are oppressing people. These power structures need to be dismantled these systems and you need to be taken apart by us. Not by god then. The goal is diversity equity and inclusion. It's sort of like the end. The new heavens and new earth in this world view is a state of equity. Well before we get into the central tenets. Let's ask this question. What does critical theory get right because there are some things that critical theorists talk about. I mean there is oppression right. I mean they're all right. There is systematic oppression. Sometimes so tell us about some of the things he gets right. i right. So because they look at groups and structures they identify sometimes correctly the systematic oppression for example obviously chattel slavery in the united states apartheid. South africa even abortion. Today these are. He's not just individual people doing evil things while they are but it's also built into our laws even our norms our values. We assume it's taken for granted. So here are very attuned. To looking at those systems of a we'd say where are evil or sin not just individual acts. Now they get extreme. They almost ignore the individual and only focus on these groups but they do get the groups pictures sometimes you get them right the also talk a lot about how ideas and values enormous can can sheep culture in shape the way our way of thinking. Well that's again. That's true if you've ever been in a conversation with a pro choice person that their values have been shaped by the on the.

Ebron dr neil chenevey frank turk neil shendi marx mets germany dr neil Chevy neal lindsay kennedy Africa frank jesus South africa united states
"dr neil" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

Cross Examined Official Podcast

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

"Does truth exists because you have faith. Does that make this book does go exist so when someone says there is no true if you apply the claim to itself what should you say is that true. They don't think. Christianity proved their talked out of it. Because they've never been talked into it. Cross examining skeptical and view. Welcome to cross examined with dr frank. Ladies and gentlemen. Have you ever heard anyone say things like white. People have no authority to speak on racism. Or you're just trying to maintain your privileged position or your homophobic transphobic islamophobic. Or maybe you've heard you know you're just a man you have no right to speak about abortion you just wanna control women's bodies and what about cancel culture. Where did that come from. Well some of it may have come from something known as critical theory. You've probably heard this term being thrown around in recent days what is critical theory does it comport with biblical christianity. And how can we know more about it. And what kind of questions can we ask about it if people are bringing it up in our churches and there's probably nobody better to talk about this than dr neil chenevey. If you haven't heard of. Dr neal chevy you need to learn about him. His website is chevy apologetic dot com. Chevy apologetic dot com. neil get. This was not a christian. He went to princeton as an undergrad. Then he went to the university of california at berkeley and became a christian there while he was pursuing his phd in theoretical chemistry. He's also had affiliations with yale and duke and some other places and along the way. He got very skilled at the issue of critical theory. What is it does it comport with christianity. How can respond to it. He's married to a medical doctor. And in recent years he is given up actually his career so to speak in either theoretical christianity To actually home school is four kids. So it's a great pleasure to have neil out with mesa. First time we met. Neil how are you. Thank you frank. Nail it's great the work that you've been doing. I've been following you on your website for a few weeks. Now just trying to learn more about critical theory and before we get into. What critical theory is how do you. A theoretical chemist who is like an expert in quantum mechanics is. Well how did you even get into this in a critical theory. It's long story so About five years ago. I began noticing a drift in culture. Now i was not very concerned about that. So as a christian. I became very interested in apologetic. Wanted to share the gospel with my non-christian co workers were scientists. They're often skeptics. Agnostics so i learned all the standard arguments about those got exists. Is the bible reliable things like that. So i was not concerned with addressing cultural issues per se but then five years ago around the time that black lives matter took off. I begin seeing the drift in people's questions they weren't asking is christianity true. There were asking things like is christianity the side of the oppressed not. That's strange because as a scientist i care more about truth. I mean we can have ethics flew out of truth but you have to get the truth right first. And then. I met my collaborator dr pat sawyer on the same time and he has a phd in education and cultural studies and did his dissertation on the subject so talking to him. I was like These ideas that you're you're discussing sound a lot like what i'm hearing both in the culture and even in the evangelical church and that's we've been collaborating i began reading and more and more and more. That's how i got into this area and as you can sort of see it's really exploded in the last five years so yeah and before we get into critical theory. I do have to ask you this question. My my mentor. Dr guys are used to call berkeley beserk and the question is how did a man like you. Who went to berkeley as non-christian. Come out as a christian right well. God does still work miracles today. The short answer. But i I knew my future wife. Christina and i I knew in college and we were dating. Which is not a christian which is a dangerous proposition but we intended for evil. God intended for good. So i began going to church with her and i heard the gospel preach night. I a real i love. Cs lewis as non-christian. I'd read this great bladders like ten times. But i just couldn't didn't. I just couldn't believe it. But then when i got to berkeley and i met intelligent christians. Professors were christians. Some of them album. And i was forced to confront this question. Is christianity true for the first time into really really consider it and guide just made me realize you know what a you are in need of a savior. And and that's that's the beginning of my christian journey obviously had a long way to go to my theology. But it just starts with recognizing man. I'm a sinner. Who needs a savior. So would it be fair to say that your wife who was brought on the mission field right. Yeah she was instrumental in bringing you utilize. Yes absolutely amazing and you then died into critical theory and of course you have other issues on your website other topics you cover today. We're just talking about critical theory. So can you kinda give us an overview of critical theory. What is it and how could it be for some substitute for christianity questions. So critical theory is the three broad area of knowledge that Pretty much scholars agree goes back to the writings of karl marx. So that's a consensus that he was the first true critical theorists in the words of bradley. Levinson beyond.

dr neil chenevey Dr neal chevy berkeley dr frank neil dr pat sawyer university of california princeton mesa Neil Cs lewis frank evangelical church Christina karl marx bradley Levinson
Appeals court overturns death penalty for Boston Marathon bomber

The Morgan Show

01:10 min | 2 years ago

Appeals court overturns death penalty for Boston Marathon bomber

"Pouring in from all sides after a federal appeals court overturns the death sentence of the Boston Marathon bomber, George Tsarnaev thie argument from Tsarnaev's lawyers centered around two jurors who lied when asked if they had posted on social media about the bombing. PBZ Suzanne Saws. Ville spoke with Dr Neil Livingston, author, TV commentator and an expert on security and terrorism. Tsarnaev's death penalty was overturned because of issues with jury selection. The appeals court ruled that the trial judge didn't do enough to prevent biased jurors from being selected. Terrorism expert Neil Livingston says that's a weak argument and think Tsarnaev deserves the death penalty. I believe that might have given some of the victims families. More closure is indeed the death sentence carried out. But the parents of Martin Richard, the youngest victim to die from the bombings, didn't want Tsarnaev to be sentenced to death. And despite Friday's ruling, it's clear Tsarnaev will not be walking out of prison. A free man. He's in Florence, Colorado, right now, which is one of our Super Max presents and you know Life is not going to be a bowl of Cherries Money. Any measure in

George Tsarnaev Dr Neil Livingston Suzanne Saws Boston Ville Colorado Martin Richard Florence
"dr neil" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"dr neil" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"I am your host Steve summers and I'm gonna tell you we have got a fascinating show for you today now if you're like most people you may have noticed that when you hit fifty it kind of hit the wall you know between your joins the heart the brain your eyes your energy you name it now when you hit fifty you have to pay attention to your health we all know that so whether you're forty or fifty or say in your sixties or seventies or even older for that matter I guess today says he's discovered something that you can unlock the key to feeling better at any age this is exciting what isn't what we're talking about why do you need to know about this will stay tuned Dr Neil Levin is on the line here Dr Neil Levin is a chiropractor he's a nutritionist he's a long time adviser for purity products welcome Dr Levin so great to have you back on the show today this is a big story isn't it oh absolutely Stephen let's cut right to the chase here that discover you talked about at the top there its crude oil because crude oil is simply amazing for us it's great for the heart great for that choice fantastic for the brain for the eyes and I have people coming into my clinic every single day and they want to feel better I mean they want to feel physically better stronger they want your joints to feel comfortable but they want to stay mentally sharp they want to keep their brain thinking like it did when they were younger they want to protect themselves from coronary heart disease and maintain those flexible healthy youthful arteries for one full circulation they see they want to boost their energy why not I mean we need a service and that's what we're gonna be talking about here today with this cruel omega fifty plus which is the cutting edge combination Steve of krill oil which is so.

Steve summers Dr Neil Levin Stephen
"dr neil" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"dr neil" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Hi we're back with Dr Neil Levin okay we talked earlier about this toxic world in which we live in you sent me this list called the dirty does now this is not the list of actors in that war movie from fifty years ago this is a list of the twelve most contaminated fruits and vegetables let me tell you something unfortunately several of these are in my kitchen right now as we speak so what do we do about this I'm thinking about that old war movie with telly Savalas person called frog desert it was kind of a scary movie there but yeah you're right I mean this list is scary because we're eating the fruits and vegetables on a regular basis so I'm gonna read it right now this is called the dirty dozen list these are the dirtiest fruits and vegetables in terms of pesticide residues in America so listen carefully because a lot of these are in your kitchen right now so we have apples strawberries grapes celery peaches spinach sweet bell peppers imported nectarines cucumbers cherry tomatoes imported snap peas and potatoes naked despite every sample of imported nectarines and ninety nine percent of the apples tested positive for pesticide residues the average potato head more pesticides by weight than any other food a single grape sample had fifteen different pesticide residues on it and samples of celery cherry tomatoes imported snap peas and strawberries each had thirteen different pesticide residues on them each well I don't want to scare you away from eating more fruits and vegetables in fact quite the opposite is true I've been talking for years now I've been promoting eating more fruits and vegetables but the point is it's so nice that with OJ CD organic juice cleanse you're getting three different organic superfoods you're getting they're cruciferous vegetables the berries all the superfoods and you're getting them organically the way nature intended and you're leaving behind what you don't want because it doesn't have any of the pesticide it's herbicides or fungicides duh duh eleven we're talking today about purities brand new organic juice cleanse the.

Dr Neil Levin America OJ CD purities
"dr neil" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

Wealth Transformation Podcast

11:21 min | 2 years ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

"Matter is on in in our Sam Sam base here and he is pro elephants and there was a wonderful on. This is why love facebook. Because I've seen more wonderful videos with animals with people and humor and everything and there was one and it just made me cry actually because there was an older elephant and the mother had died and this other elephant came and they they were both crying and they see you could see and it was like wow I mean this is what that's the humanity that story and the militate. Whatever you WANNA call it. That is the humanity. The Story of the elephant group that came in traveled a thousand miles because the person who founded the reservation that they were living on died and they knew it and they can talk for miles mind. What Avid Chapter in this book? By the way call the Dumbo fact. Talk about elephants right. Now there's a story for you sure you WanNa talk about something interesting. You know Dumbo. This beloved I loved it one of my all time favorite. Disney classics Dumbo. But if you look at what? Dumbo is about few look at the humiliation. If you look at the racism by the way you know and the discrimination I won't go through the whole story but I love read it anyway. Let's see it's great shop? Dumbo effects you talk about elephants. So yeah so. In mindful psychology. We try to incorporate all of that. We try to incorporate spirituality in graduate school. I was told the two things. You can't talk about talk about politics. Don't talk about religion. Give me a break. You know worry. Tally is not reliable. That's spirituality is not religion. How could you not really explore? What a person's orientation to spirituality is about it doesn't matter feud NAS TAPER ATHEIST. It's a relevant relevant. Is that the nature of the relationship that somebody maintains with that and that higher frequency that is beyond the physical being. Let's let's talk about conscious that come from exactly I can't Elaine. Nobody knows where it comes from. But I stayed still comes from the yourself. The Higher Beam God's universe with whatever you WANNA call it. I like to think about it as if we're one large human and tenor ten. That's right wages. Paulin in that consciousness. No different than your TV set is pulling those images. Everyone of US. Open to what we are to be open to out. That's right too and there again. That's where that gift comes through to us. When you're open to that spiritual being that you are and that I am and my crew. My Wonderful Dream Team are the we all have that. Every one of us has a miracle I like when you talk about openness because I like to think about it look either. GonNa live in love. Or you're GONNA LIVE IN FEAR. Either you're gonNA live in an expensive environment emotionally or you can live in a contracting environment emotionally and you can change your life. You know thinking about one of these guys. Absolute one thought can change. You can walk around right after this interview right after you watch this and you can say to yourself with this contracting experience. I had was this an expansive experience. Just and of course expansive means that involves love and connection and positively contraction is about anger. Fear you can feel it can feel simply. Hold your fist like this and yell. No it see how it feels. Yeah and I you know when opening I got involved. Twenty five plus years ago With a church I won't name it but You know and the mindfulness that I got. That's when I learned. I remember walking through my house and I was started. Say think a negative thought and I screamed out stop because I stopped myself right then I that was became. My habitual thing is because you've you. It takes the mental awareness and discipline commitment as you say to change that and you can. Anybody can do it. Anybody everybody can do it. I talk about stopping the book. F Stop.

Dumbo facebook US miles Disney Paulin
"dr neil" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

15:08 min | 2 years ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Patient so Anyway only as a physician I feel like I said so. So this is how this is how we treat cancer. We don't do this blindly anymore We really try to tailor the therapy personalized therapy for the individual. So this was. This was a drug that I spent Doing a lot of the science behind we developed an oral therapy for women with what's called hurts hurts to breast cancer. It's about fifteen to twenty percent of breast cancer when I was training Years ago at the Dana Farber. This was a death sentence of women who had her breast cancer announced. There had about six to nine months with metastatic disease and even with early stage. The risk of recurrence was extraordinarily high. This is an oral therapy. This woman has what's called inflammatory breast cancer. You can see that. She's had a mastectomy. It's come back that's like having a third degree. Burn that that went all the way down her back eroding into her lung cavity and into her lungs she was on a morphine drip not only a short quality of life for inflammatory breast cancer sir. But it's a lousy quality of life. We put her on this pill once a day pill and literally within three weeks. She was out playing Golf I. I didn't actually believe the physician when he told me. This is a miracle therapy but it's a miracle because we figured out how to shut the lights out on the tumor Sela aw again. This happened by understanding the biology and taking advantage of the Achilles heel of these particular cancers and so the question is why. Can't we do this for beryllium for Bartonella for BBC. The answer is we can. And here's a potential roadmaps it. Here's a paper that was published in Nineteen Ninety seven so twenty two years ago. I haven't been to too many conferences in the lime disease. World where people I actually talked about the genomic roadmap for developing therapies so this was the genome that was published in this is essentially the pathways. He's in Berea where one can look and try to figure out. How can we kill these bugs without taking an atomic bomb and blowing up the body audie and do this in a smart way just as I showed you without rather than giving her chemotherapy giving her a pill that reveal the old the Achilles heel of that cancer and destroyed it? So this is what we've done so we've taken slightly different approach. We're not screening the FDA approved Library Library. We're developing new therapies based on scientific information. Now we've done this in a way and brought in collaborators. It turns out that there's a group at Argonne national lab outside Chicago who have the largest genomic database of Pro Kerry outs bacteria in the world and then their top ten list. This is Barack Obama and Bartonella which I thought was rather interesting because this lab is a department of Energy Lab and I thought it was interesting that the government has beryllium Bartonella Ella as part of their top ten in trying to collect information so for a disease that a lot of the government doesn't want to recognize as being important. It's important Gordon enough. That it's on their top ten list of getting all genomic information of the world to accumulate so we worked with this group and what we do. We have the technology and collaboration with a very good friend and colleague who I've worked with for thirteen years since I've been in two on the cancer side Tim. Hey Stud and I'll show you the picture of our eighteen later we have a way of capturing a part of the genome a part of the what we call the purdy on the proteins that are made in Borelli and Bartonella that happened to utilize ATP and other appearance And it turns out if we use this technology. That's about eighty to ninety percent of the drug targets and again this is an approach that has been successfully used in other diseases and cancer in metabolic disease so so we're not reinventing the wheel retaking successful lessons that have been learned elsewhere and now just simply sang. Can we do the smarter by treating folks with tick borne illnesses and so essentially we do. Is We take the bacteria And again when we identify target. We've we've gone to this huge genomic database because we don't want to just be treating one particular species or strain of BEREA WE WANNA be treating reading across the species and strains that are pathogenic same with Bartonella. I'm but we don't want to also be wiping out the normal microbiome and we certainly certainly don't want to be affecting host cell so we don't want to be affecting your heart your kidney your normal tissues and so this is a Gel. This is taking taking all the proteins and beryllium running out And then essentially saying what are the targets that are amenable. What are the protein targets with this technology? -nology this pure and binding technology. We have this huge list of proteins. We painstakingly do mass SPEC on every one of these to identify them and then we look and we try to glean information from the literature and from experts and say what are the ones that if we can successfully target are likely to kill these bugs. I'm just going to skip through. This is some of the technical aspects. We take each one of these targets. This is sort of laborious research although we have a tremendous team and we've got it down pretty quickly now almost like a biotech company. Even though we're in an academic institution we make recombinant proteins. We put the color. GFD Green fluorescent thirteen and we have with high throughput outside. We've got five thousand novel compounds. That could be drugs and we screen them to see which those five thousand compounds can target the particular protein target that we're interested in by the way the five thousand doesn't sound like like a lot but we can expand that based on the structure of those chemicals into hundreds of thousands of compounds very quickly and and so this is what we have so far so we have targets on the left DNA K.. Beryllium Beryllium. We've had a lot more in beryllium important. We're now working with at British Werthmann if you know him from the NC State School of Veterinary Medicine. Probably the leading expert on Bartonella And now we've got several new BARTONELLA targets And as of of our last live meeting on to say I think we have an exciting Bartonella target that. We're going to be able to do what I'm going to show you in a minute. We're doing with beryllium. So this is work that we've done again With Tim set of colleague. That'll introduce what I want to show you which we hope will end up being a beryllium scan so that you could go to your doctor and rather than saying how many bands on a Western blot or do you have positively. You can actually visualize the bacteria in your body so if you went into your doctor imagine you said I got pain in my left shoulder. I got chest pain and I think I was bitten by a tick rather than having all these questions. You could actually visualize it just like we do with cancer and see the bugs. This is really based again on lessons. That have been successfully translated from the bench into the clinic. So this is work. We had a large Defense Department grand for breast cancer where we developed a probe using human Heat shock protein ninety. It's very abundant protein. There happens to be a beryllium equivalent called ht PG high temperature protein G. It's a very important protein. In mammalian cells age. Just be ninety because it prevents damage protein from accumulating which if allowed to accumulate would kill the cells. Also it's it's a highly conserved evolutionary family of proteins that protects against environmental stresses or internal stresses cell. The damage protein. That would otherwise. Kill the cell so what we did. In this case as we took H. S. P. Ninety an inhibitor. We labeled it with a probe that could be visualized and in a sense you unfortunately lighting. You can't really see it but we could visualize tumor in these. He's mice growing human breast cancers over normal tissue. And so the idea of this is if a woman has mammography has an abnormality and only ten percent one of those turn out to really be cancer that rather than doing unnecessary biopsies unnecessary angst. That you could do scan that would discriminate between malignant normal tissue issue and also ideally identify areas. What we call minimal disease states that are hiding in the body? This is actually in the clinic now and so what we did. Is We targeted the beryllium form of. HSBC ninety again is called H. G. and to make a longer story short we looked for compounds in the library and also compounds that we already developed against the human form of HSP Ninety for Breast Cancer Hanser project looking for compounds that would identify beryllium But not the human form because again. If we're GONNA make a scan and a therapeutic we don't don't want this targeting human tissue and also selecting for compounds that don't that can discriminate between Berea and and the normal microbiome Casey Choline and so we found this compound. It's called one ninety six and a few others this normally twirls around. But I don't think I have the controls for it so these are just spiral so in the left. I call it the Hawaiian Islands. The one nine thousand eight so the probe for the beryllium proteins and again this targets a protein in Borelli very abundant in beryllium. Bergdorf Roy Moore it is across the species and strains so we're not targeting just five percent of people with lung. Disease were selecting targets in this case for imaging. But I'll show you how we're using it for therapeutic that will affect fact all of the species and strains so we went from beryllium growing culture to working with Monica embers the two lane And doing a mouse study where we infected the mice with beryllium. We waited three weeks and then we injected the probe and we wanted wanted to see whether it would identify gorilla in tissues and again the bluish is the ninety eight so he could see. Infected Animals There's cartilage from the ear which is where beryllium loves to hang out. There's also the joint to joint. You could see that using the one nine eight probe the bluish probe We could identify really a- These are just obviously localized Images and then we counter stain when we take take the tissue out with a beryllium antibody to make sure that what that probe is identifying as beryllium and in fact it does and now. We're doing in Vivo. Animal Demel studies where we're going to visualize in Vivo. Knows are ongoing as we speak to see if we could actually scan now this. This fluorescent probe is is not prime time for for the clinic because it does not get good depth in the body so we could scan and probably visualize cartilage infected cartilage or the joint but to get the heart and brain. This is not gonna be sufficient so what we will do is to make pet league from this to take this and making pet scan. Most people heard of a pet scan. Not your dog or cat. But essentially a pet scan for the most part is a scam that f. d. g. pad it's taken up by hyper metabolic tissues and can identify in my case where my profession has cancer but also also infection. It doesn't tell you though if if it lights up and you think you have an infection. What the underlying infectious agent is? It just tells you that there's an infection action this on the other hand as a pet scan would tell you that's beryllium infection. So now so that's great right so we wanted to develop a beryllium Stan. We also have some targets that we want to look out for Bartonella because unfortunately this particular target for whatever reason is is not in the genome of Bartonella and so we have to look at other particularly pro teams so in the cancer world so now people may have screened one with these drugs these HSP ninety inhibitors through the FDA approved library because there are several that have gone into the clinic and cancer and maybe found that by themselves mm selves. They don't do much to really because they don't their stress proteins. You have to do something to the cell to make them relevant you. Don't just give them to happily. Holy growing beryllium doesn't kill them. That's not the way it works doesn't do that to human selves either. So what we did is and again. This is based on the lessons. Sounds from cancer where people have taken targeted therapies. Rather just relying on the targeted therapies have hooked up poison or a toxin. So this is kind The magic bullet where you drive the toxin directly to the cancer and avoid normal tissues. This happens to be a drug called. T. DM one which is an anti her two antibody but the drug called by chancing which is a my totic poison This is in the clinic. It's transformed the treatment. Seven of The Area I've been working on her to breast cancer. So what happens is the antibody recognizes the tumor cells because the her two is more prevalent Expressed on tumor cells. It has little stars on there which the Montana it gets internalized in the tumor. It releases the my Tam San and kills the tumor cells but really does oh spare the normal tissue so this is FDA approved and we said why can't we take the same compound that is directing that imaging agent that I just showed you and hook something onto it that'll bring it into guerrilla that'll kill Berea and spare normal tissue. So what does Borelli. Okay what are the things that really hates one of the things that most cells hate radical oxygen species. You know it's interesting. We've gotten very accustomed to growing beryllium now. Beryllium hates oxygen. Even though it's not a complete anaerobic but it likes living in low oxygen tension. So if you you stress these bacteria I don't care whether they're in a exponential speyrer Keitel studied around bodies state with lots of oxygen radicals. It's it's a death sentence is I'm going to show you. So what did we cook that compound so we actually have a drug.

cancer Bartonella breast cancer inflammatory breast cancer Berea Borelli FDA Nineteen Ninety Disease Breast Cancer Hanser Golf HSP Ninety Dana Farber Barack Obama Hawaiian Islands morphine BBC
"dr neil" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

"Hello and in this episode. You'RE GONNA learn three main things. How understanding the regulation of infection in the body is how HIV was brought under control? And how it will be how lyme disease is brought under control. The ways lime disease interventions would benefit from the same precision drug engineering as they do in cancer research and the drug research. Neil Specter's involved often that starts with identifying the drugs that have the best chance of physically interacting with lime bacteria. Thanks Roy and a big shoutout to all you longtime lime Ninjas. You're the reason we have way more than half a million downloads Aurora. And I really appreciate you tuning in and we'd like to welcome all the new listeners out but they're welcome to lime Ninja radio. You are now officially a lime Ninja and as you know. Lime disease is an international problem. Each week we have listeners. Join you from all over the world this past week. We've had listeners. Join from Calgary to Coquitlam Canada so like listeners. There's from Canada. Canada represent this this week. Okay welcome Canada. We're glad to have you tuning in all right. We're tells a little bit more about Dr. Neil Specter Dr Specter's undiagnosed lyme disease damaged his heart so badly that he had to get a heart transplant. Intravenous antibiotics. Antibiotics finally brought the lime disease under control and Dr Specter now brings his expertise in treating cancer to developing lime treatments. Thanks Roy and here's Dr Specter's presentation at the two thousand Nineteen Li- mine conference.

Neil Specter Dr. Neil Specter Coquitlam Canada Roy lyme Calgary
"dr neil" Discussed on Evidence In Motion Clinical

Evidence In Motion Clinical

12:10 min | 2 years ago

"dr neil" Discussed on Evidence In Motion Clinical

"Welcome to another edition of the I.. M. Clinical podcast. My name is John Childs and and joined by my co host. Dr Mark Sheppard as always days and we are privileged to have on the show of physical therapist who works actually with us at Texas physical. Therapy specialist Dr Neil. Sheth Neil completed completed the sports residency back in two thousand seventeen or so and really brings a unique perspective to all things certainly physical. Oh therapy but particularly related to strength training and so. We're really looking forward to having Neil on the show neil welcome to the clinical podcast. Thank you guys for having having them really excited so neil to get US kicked off if you would just give us a brief bit about your background maybe where you went to. PT School and sort of how you got into sort of the path that you're on now. Okay so I went to school in Philadelphia at the University of the sciences. It was a direct program so I actually didn't have to do the. Gre Three in reapply. I was just sixers don which is exciting. After that I was really well by my second year I really wanted to do. A sports. Resin team started looking looking around what I could apply to. and Luckily I am sports residency in Georgetown which XP was open and they took me on and finish that in twenty seventeen after the exam in March twenty eighteen. And now I'm down in San Antonio with one of our sports clinics where I get to mentor. The incoming residents now do a lot of teaching with that. Neil thanks for that background if you would talk a little bit about your perspective on strength with training and sort of where you think strength training sort of fits if you will and where the sort of the state of strength training I asked the question because you know oh manual therapy was sort of the decade of the two thousands and maybe overemphasize perhaps relative to strength training and it seems like the pendulum maybe swinging the other direction. Now where like all everyone talks about is like cross fit and those sorts of things. And it's like it's gone the other way so I'm just curious is like what's your perspective on strength training and what's the state of it within the profession. He adds though this really excited about. If I get to fired up just calm me down if you guys need need but again on tirades in the clinic all the time but as ours when I think I actually think that this is the biggest area that we need to improve on as a profession. Kind of like what you send John Worth starting to swing in the other way. I definitely sealed up but I think a lot of issues are that Patients are under loaded and under dosed as far as strength training principles and a lot of people. Just don't implement proper. Strengthening like thera bands are good to start with his initial seen in acute injuries. But after that initial phase there needs to be a shift to load it and having some awaits actually being put on these patients in. I could see that this so boxes. Something Neil that many people probably will resonate with and you. You know it's interesting because when you're in clinic you see you know thera bands everywhere at you know different types awaits that are usually hand weights right. If you go I went to the everyday. Outpatient clinic are even one within the hospital. It's kind of like those are the staples but you don't really see anything that can actually load people. You the heavyweights and it always kind of bugged me in two different ways one is like why is that the case too is I wasn't really comfortable understanding ending how to load people with squat racks or different types of bar. Waiting things landmine stuff like that. That took some time after I graduate sweet so when you talk about you know where the state of strength training or are really the prescription of exercises like where do you feel like. We miss the mark doc when it comes to these types of things so definitely go with the Swat rack being so at when during residency in Georgetown and even at us or as lane location. I I actually bought thought squat racks for both of those the Knicks in order to low deebo in a when I was little headed that about it but he got the point of it uh but then he was really from the beginning where in school and highly had maybe an hour a week for half a semester of going over any any strength and conditioning related things and that. Just trustees us into the clinic three graduate and we're still doing those eysenck three he by ten therapy and everything similar movements everything. Everyone gets the same cookie cutter approach and there needs to be a shift to that loading being an challenging the patient with actual weights and Neva bodyweight movements is fine but there are just not enough to have any tissue up tation Shen prevent long-term injury in. I think that also comes back to us practising what we preach. I liked to Charles Myself personally in the gym and with other colleagues of mine as far as Hauer thinking about exercise dosage. How a training myself in it leaks into how I treat? Patients Asia's Neil. Could you expand on this a little bit like you give in clinical example of like how you are implementing proper dosage. This is general as it relates to. Let's say strengthening someone's quadriceps muscle if they're coming in for let's say anterior knee pain like how does that look from your perspective when you're dosing dosing. Is it okay that provide a case about actually have a really good one for nepean young So with this. He's like a thirty three year. Old Male in the navy is all him a year after he fell on his knee and has had an tierney pain. Ever since and through the medical carousel paracel he was just prescribed straight leg. Raises and Claude sets for a whole year a whole year. That Yup and he's never done anything else using unlike multiple providers that have changed anything else. So let me stop you there. So you're telling me. Has He seen the physical therapist before this time he saw one. Yeah Yeah Oh man for a short time that kills me to know that the two exercises were still kind of on his radar but anyway. That's crazy yeah so he had no audio to do and he is in the navy he was off duty getting ready to go back to think Iraq Many leaves at the end of this month so he can squat lower than maybe like fifty degrees of neath luncheon. He tries running he kinda Gallup's because he doesn't want to bend that knee so I'm getting some of this very avoid. We didn't an week in doing things that he needs to do with him. I we do something called the Quad Index and we have a makeshift shift version with a hand held item. OMETER cheap way to do it but it works that so there's research out there especially for post. The minimum criteria needed to running is actually eight weeks and eighty percent index. So we use that. Eighty percent is our measurement to start any metrics or impact work. He we started at a at thirty percent. Thirty eight or twenty seven something like that and yeah really really low. So where I started with him outside of the cloud. Odd Settings settings. Good right especially on your continuum it's good for activation in the new progressive straight leg raises for your control and then after that you again to strength endurance endurance. He'd Kinda like that stair stepping progression over him we used. We started off a lot because of his pain with movement. We start a lot with Jafar Ayar flourished and just loading him with bodyweight movement squats split lunges straight leg raise and then eventually eventually shifts to adding weight to all those movements and making sure on his scale on what I do. A lot of patients is and use the rate of preserved exertion. So if it's something I really want them and the challenge you had told me I want it eight plus nine hundred ten anywhere in that range and if it's not there for them we just keep increasing until it's a heavy enough weight where they're actually pushing themselves not just going through the movement. That's interesting meal like so you're telling me that you're using the R.. P. To actually actually understand the reps and potentially sets for which you does your patients is that kind of how you're using yes so with the RPG round like eighty plus. It's usually definitely more my strength side or even power so I the schemes typically x amount of sets for anywhere between two to five Canadian. Six wraps her up and then if I want to get a little bit later on there are definitely increased volume for movement pattern. That were working. Oh that's cool so you know to me it would make sense. That may not be the same number going back to your statement about the three sets at ten Dan. You know that you kinda see everybody's flow chart you know potentially So yours look a bit messy. If this was documented. They're not clean. Three by ten three by tens is something I get so upset about in the clinics and we even have a table that we all work on an I wrote are actually one of my residents wrote. Think before you buy I ten has to me if everything on your flow sheet is three by ten to me. It's lazy programming. Your there's no intent behind find what you're prescribing and my floggings are definitely messy every day. There's I don't write all the way on the left side. I don't know how your flu she'd looks on the left column elements of Big Open Blank. Were most people just write back through size and then it just carries on through that entire life of that flashy for me. I leave that that left side blanket. I write in each for specific day. What I'm working on with my plan is which exercise are going to help achieve that goal and definitely the numbers are very off kilter? There's some people who do like a four by seven five three or five. I even play a lot with strength and conditioning in the clinic to every minute on the minute at a certain load of do Amr APPs so definitely. The flu sheets varied day all over the place. There's intent behind the entire goal. Now is a great discussion and you know as you talk about like this case for example you know number one. I hope you consider perhaps publishing it if you're able to do that. So the researcher in me can't not suggest that so it's thing you can share and on that note what sort of of resources the you lean on whether it be journal articles are the particular authors that you follow when it comes to all things you know how to train patients and athletes in evidence informed sorts of ways. What are the resources that are your go to? I'm definitely big on social media. I follow a lot of physical therapists percent. Strength and conditioning coaches. Some of the big ones as far as in the P. T. Rome that put out a lot of content. Is Dan Laurenz or Eric. Mira or even Mike Reimann on those people I follow. That always have a good tweeter instagram post about it. Even John Rawson has really good things breath. I also have my strength and conditioning Certification so I do rely on the NFC as website as far as articles that are coming out and Alikhan challenge different athletic populations in the clinic. So those are my big ones even J. O. S. P. T. R. J. P. T. are a good example if those that are APD members and then on that note that same train of thought you know. I know you provide a lot of mentorship to residents. So what sort of structure do you have them reading articles on a regular basis. Are You doing journal clubs or you know what's the contemporary way that you really help mentor mentor..

Sheth Neil Georgetown Dr Mark Sheppard navy Dan Laurenz Philadelphia John Childs US PT School John Worth Asia Texas Knicks University of the sciences sixers quadriceps muscle flu San Antonio P. T. Rome
"dr neil" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"dr neil" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Any age now Dr Neil Levin is a chiropractor a nutritionist spokesperson in a long time adviser for purity products dot eleven welcome back to the show it's great to be here with you today Pat and we have a very exciting topic to cover today Pat they were talking about strength and power how to get it back even if you're in your fifties sixties seventies eighties so if you want to feel better if you want to feel stronger this is some very important information we're going to cover today yeah this is an exciting topic talk to me about this important message today what molecules are we talking about and how it's impacting the lives of people who follow the science right we're talking about a new supplement it's cold ever strong and it features an exciting molecule cold creatine now Pat a lot of our listeners may have heard of creatine I know you've used creatine right but for those that don't know about creatine it's mainly used in the Olympic circles professional athletes body builders college high school athletes because it does something extraordinary and what I'm about to tell you is proven by hundreds and hundreds of human studies so here's were creatine does cross it helps us to get stronger more powerful helps put muscle mass on the body and it help protect us from losing muscle tissue as we get older we know that's a big part of aging not only that Pat great for the brain great from memory and helps promote bone strength as well so an amazing molecule that everybody needs to know about did you share some of the science and tell us why you're calling creatine one of the best kept secrets to healthy aging sure Pat what we need to understand with creatine is that it's a natural molecule to the body it's in every single cell tissue organ in your system and its job in the body is to generate and maintain strength and power it's in every single cell in the body ninety five percent of it however is in your muscle tissue because that's what we tend to use it the most it powers up the muscles it's good for strong muscle contraction and it's important to help maintain the strength and muscle contractions when you're using them over and over again for instance if you're working out at the gym if you're playing sports golf tennis anything like that it keeps your muscles powered up in their high energy state so they're strong and ready for action no Pat here's the key this is so important for those of us in our fifties sixties seventies you see we have lots and lots of creatine when we were young we had little hope of stuff that was coming out of our readers we had lots of creatine our bodies made a lot of it but as we get older like everything else we don't do that is well so we are blessed creatine in our muscles now the good news is that hundreds and hundreds of human studies show that when you supplement with creatine it goes to work or go straight to your muscles absorbed easily it pumps up the creatine in your muscle tissue and you will get stronger.

Dr Neil Levin ninety five percent
Speed vs. Safety: Rapid Approvals from the FDA

Sounds of Science

09:46 min | 3 years ago

Speed vs. Safety: Rapid Approvals from the FDA

"Why is the FDA's rigorous testing so necessary. Well I I think you're aware that a lot of drugs fail From safety concerns we all know about getting sleepy with antihistamines. Or you know that's the actual aside side effect that comes from the action of the drug on the brain. That's at the senior centers that we would like to counteract allergy. So that's what we call pharmacologic based aced toxicity. It's an effect actually on the target. But it's in a way that we don't want it to act GOTCHA. So as we're working on very new drugs we often don't understand like where there's receptors are in God or the brain or the immune system. There's a lot of things we don't understand about the basic mechanisms of action of disease and there's lot of things that we don't understand sometimes about where the receptors are in the buddy. I mean it seems great. Yeah but that's why. I'm kind of glad if my original training and classic Comic Anthology Because you have to ask questions okay. where else is the receptor? Who else could hit end so? FDA trained to think about those nightmare scenarios of what it could do that. You don't want it to do right and ask those hard questions to make sure that we have the checks and balances right a lot of the early drugs That were used in AIDS. Patients Cause Peripheral neuropathy and that wasn't shown very well in the animal models models but it caused intense pain in the patients at the same doses that was needed for the virus. It wasn't until later that we got the protease inhibitors that really counteracted the road. And that's the basis of the lifesaving therapies that we have today I was really fortunate to be. FDA during that time when the protease inhibitor came through so switching gears a little bit what is personalized medicine. When it comes to patients like for example adjacent armstead and meal Amac? I understand that Jaycee is a twenty five year old with Lou GEHRIG's disease while meal is a young girl with batons disease who have both recently benefited from personalized medicine. He I think we have come to the place in drug development where we understand a lot more about genetics of disease so so yes switching away from viruses and into genetic Madison we have a lot of inborn errors when we learned that there is an inborn Gene that was missing in a patient has always been there born like that and as soon as we can diagnose them and with that replacement gene product or the enzyme of interest interest. We can save their lives so. LS has also been learned to be a whole series of different mutations responsible for LS Um and so you have to look at those different subsets according to their genetic diagnosis. But we also know that Batten's disease is a specific mutation and there's also something like fourteen different forms of Batten's disease that are mutations in same pathway that result in the same type of phenotype of neurological article degeneration some earlier some younger and some an older kids or adults in the case of Mula. She has two mutations that are different on both of the wheels that caused the dysfunction of a particular protein. Batten's disease six seven and there's only a handful or double handful of kids worldwide. They're known to have that particular subtitled batons and Jaycees case she has a very aggressive form of al it lasts called F s mutation and it has a particularly bad course people with F.. US typically sadly succumbed LS typically approximately a year. Because it's so aggressive. It's very hard to intervene soon enough. And there has never been a medication that could actually address the fundamental gene problems in these two cases so we need to design whole new the truck when we find the particular mutation and it turns out depending on the molecular biology and that control mechanisms around them. A tation some all of them are amenable to go nuclear type therapy and both of these girls have been their particular. Genetics have been amenable to A strategy she of using nuclear tight enter equally sadly we did not know that. JC had this particularly bad ale ass us until she was twenty five. Her family had lost her twin sister at the age of seventeen and Alex add add. Actually he contracted the symptoms of L. S. at age eleven so the two girls were identical. They had the same mutation but one got symptoms at eleven on the other at twenty five. JC I guess Through some grace right. Her symptoms arose during time in which a drug was already available in unaccompanied show that happened to be appropriate for her. So I understand and that in this case she got lucky. Well in a way because the drug already existed otherwise we couldn't have intervened quickly enough. Yeah it was an act of considerable effort on the part of the patient advocacy group project. LS The head of Columbia University's LS LS center. Dr Neil Snider in the company who originated the drug and all of us that were helping around the sides trying to support like an exoskeleton including Charles forever and I was helping with the regulatory strategy and also trying to make sure that the drug that was chosen was actually appropriate to the most expedient animal model so as a result of that we were able to put together a very lean and mean I N D for JC and get her approved through the FDA. I have to say. FDA was understandably cautious but when they heard her situation detail and how she'd lost her twin sister the understood of course about a few and they made a lot of exceptions to the usual toxicology regulations. Well I know that she had been she and her family. They had been advocating pretty publicly for a while up until it was approved. I if I'd been in her mom shoes I would have done the same thing called. She lower local congressman. The Stephen King and there was actually quite a response. In Congress. There is a bill that was put forward to ask. FDA to move expediently for JC. I don't know that that had specific impact but just to say that they got some considerable public discussion. And how Camilla's case different in her case Tim you At Boston Children's Hospital recognized that her condition was suitable for an exon skipping being drug very similar to Isis Been Raza and he was able to use a similar backbone and design a drug from scratch within several months it was quite remarkable global. We've done the testing for it and then we've Were able to get started with just a acute data and then I designed a type of a program in which we would update the FDA very regularly on the progress of the toxicology studies so that we could extend her dosing and again. FDA's group group that does an enzyme replacement was wonderful. In working with us to customize that I approach how do you envision cases like these being handled in the future after all not everyone. Everyone has a congressman. That's willing to go to bat for them. Like Jaycee did not. Everybody should take one. There's definitely a sea-change coming is really exciting. And it goes back to the changes brought about by the AIDS patients who identified that they were an extreme unmet medical. Need we see the finalization of the L. S. guidance. We see a lot of guidances have come out on rare disease from the agency in the past twenty four months. And I'm very excited about this because we're really getting to the place where we custom tailor the amount of upfront non clinical research. That has to proceed to human trials customize. That the patient's situation well do you think that each was going to require its own uniquely designed non clinical research at will or will there kind of. Okay you're not gonna be able to have like a standard version that works for most Aso's typically called platform toxicology in kind of a dream. Right now when you look across all a good nuclear tides you find out remember. I mentioned early in this talk about the pharmacologically driven toxicity. Let's say there's another place in the genome that has has a similar sequence. We end up having the drug acting by its intended action bit at the wrong place which is an off what we call an on target but unwanted toxicity existed that could arise by modulating genome which is a little scary right to put something into the spine or once. You invoke gene therapy. What's done is done so you need to have really careful toxicology evaluations that look at the animal as if it were a miniature clinical trial? And you know you're basically siklie handling the animals has patients and so we get as much information as we can vary from each particular experiment and try to make sure that Ed's translation Lee accurate for predicting patient risk. We need the parents to know that right. If if you were me. Resigning are up to our child. An an in-and-out shoes

FDA Congressman Jaycee Batten Protease Inhibitor Ls Ls Center Peripheral Neuropathy Lou Gehrig Dr Neil Snider Aids Alex L. S. Stephen King Congress ASO Camilla ED