5 Burst results for "Dr Murphy Westwood"

"dr murphy westwood" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:20 min | 3 months ago

"dr murphy westwood" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"Suited to do some major impact stuff for a bunch of trees and the main focus of what we were connected over our oaks because the icn just did their assessment or trying to get this out that what is it. Forty one percent of species across the globe are facing extinction or at least of conservation concern. And i just spoke with your colleague dr murphy westwood about a lot of exit. You so taking trees to other places to help conserve them. But you are position in a way that you're doing a lot of the institute the other side of that coin which is also desperately needed. So let's take a closer look at just. What in situ conservation means to you before we look at some of the species. You're working with right. So the global tree conservation program in the morton arboretum. We have a very specific approach to how we try to save threatened tree species. We've i go through prioritizing because unfortunately we cannot save all the sixteen thousand three species on the planet and we wish we could right now but we don't have the money or manpower resources so we need to make some hard choices of what we are going to folks and that is We used a lot the redmi sting which is why you talked about with murphy and the new red list of folks which is one of our target tax on groups was published and my team members did that and so now we have a clear picture of which species need our help the most so then two approaches we can take our well. Try to go and save these species right were they occur and that's go in situ conservation so within their native range but also complement to that. Sometimes we just can't that we were not able to save the species right where they occur. So then we can compliment that with ex situ conservation. Which is what murphy. Also talked a lot about hoochie. You can do see the preservation and you can save species by having specimen symbol. Tammy berea so. My job is to focus on the in situ conservation part so where we do is that we select right now. We have tools as if he projects with two different species off endangered oaks which are coworkers brandy. Gi which is endemic micro endemic old that only occurs in the tip or huckabee -fornia peninsula in the california lack in mexico. Scowls working mogo. Well people those these resorts drink margaritas. And they have no idea that fifty kilometers from there There is these amazing biosphere reserve called sierra laguna forest biosphere reserve. And we've seen that reserve. There is the majority of the distribution of these core brand This is a very dry arid. Ecosystems very scrubby and so these are tree only occurs on by edges obese announced streams. And when you think of a stream or a river you imagine that yes. What but he's he's really funny. I guess share some pictures of you just sad there dry and only when there's hurricanes or weather events then erase a lot there and it feels app and it crashes the mountains a mountain range right there and so all. The rain gets dunked on everything. Floods the roles get destroyed. And then you pass this they rebuild it like with the sand like they have. Ob sands so anyway abc's where these oak grows but the problem is that because it's a very dry ecosystem that is also where the ranchers want to have the ratchets. That's there's water so they put these long hosts. And that's how they watered needle gardens or wetlands. Show there's a conflict between the place where the you know the specific habitat for these species. And where the ranches are and the problem. The ranchers be street because he'd provides shea in

costa rica michel mac two latin america next week next weekend costa rica avenue one weekend one three first place kogyo single day florida caribbean indian evan sonya five morton arboretum
In Situ Community-Based Oak Conservation At The Morton Arboretum

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:20 min | 3 months ago

In Situ Community-Based Oak Conservation At The Morton Arboretum

"Suited to do some major impact stuff for a bunch of trees and the main focus of what we were connected over our oaks because the icn just did their assessment or trying to get this out that what is it. Forty one percent of species across the globe are facing extinction or at least of conservation concern. And i just spoke with your colleague dr murphy westwood about a lot of exit. You so taking trees to other places to help conserve them. But you are position in a way that you're doing a lot of the institute the other side of that coin which is also desperately needed. So let's take a closer look at just. What in situ conservation means to you before we look at some of the species. You're working with right. So the global tree conservation program in the morton arboretum. We have a very specific approach to how we try to save threatened tree species. We've i go through prioritizing because unfortunately we cannot save all the sixteen thousand three species on the planet and we wish we could right now but we don't have the money or manpower resources so we need to make some hard choices of what we are going to folks and that is We used a lot the redmi sting which is why you talked about with murphy and the new red list of folks which is one of our target tax on groups was published and my team members did that and so now we have a clear picture of which species need our help the most so then two approaches we can take our well. Try to go and save these species right were they occur and that's go in situ conservation so within their native range but also complement to that. Sometimes we just can't that we were not able to save the species right where they occur. So then we can compliment that with ex situ conservation. Which is what murphy. Also talked a lot about hoochie. You can do see the preservation and you can save species by having specimen symbol. Tammy berea so. My job is to focus on the in situ conservation part so where we do is that we select right now. We have tools as if he projects with two different species off endangered oaks which are coworkers brandy. Gi which is endemic micro endemic old that only occurs in the tip or huckabee -fornia peninsula in the california lack in mexico. Scowls working mogo. Well people those these resorts drink margaritas. And they have no idea that fifty kilometers from there There is these amazing biosphere reserve called sierra laguna forest biosphere reserve. And we've seen that reserve. There is the majority of the distribution of these core brand This is a very dry arid. Ecosystems very scrubby and so these are tree only occurs on by edges obese announced streams. And when you think of a stream or a river you imagine that yes. What but he's he's really funny. I guess share some pictures of you just sad there dry and only when there's hurricanes or weather events then erase a lot there and it feels app and it crashes the mountains a mountain range right there and so all. The rain gets dunked on everything. Floods the roles get destroyed. And then you pass this they rebuild it like with the sand like they have. Ob sands so anyway abc's where these oak grows but the problem is that because it's a very dry ecosystem that is also where the ranchers want to have the ratchets. That's there's water so they put these long hosts. And that's how they watered needle gardens or wetlands. Show there's a conflict between the place where the you know the specific habitat for these species. And where the ranches are and the problem. The ranchers be street because he'd provides shea in

Dr Murphy Westwood ICN Morton Arboretum Murphy Tammy Berea Fornia Peninsula Sierra Laguna Forest Biosphere Mexico California ABC Shea
"dr murphy westwood" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

06:14 min | 3 months ago

"dr murphy westwood" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"The plants soil and i had never even class. They had never microbiology. Career mentioned soil. I hate for positively before the four five years and so he was again like another revelation. Answer i focused on nutrient cycling amateur nation. I started out force. Virtualization experiments That's actually thirteen years old. Now and you to look at how forests response to allegations in phosphorus and nitrogen which are the two most important nutrients for plant growth and productivity. And so i do that for my But then again. I've always wanted to go back to survey ship to back to make an impact and it was not only onto. I started working at the morton. Arboretum that i had an opportunity to finally do what i've always wanted. So it took a while tune in total more than fifteen years so excited that finally get to voice feel that has been my calling. You know well wolf first of all congratulations. That's really great that you found your path and it's against so good for people to hear that. Because i get a lot of emails especially from kids in undergrad or heading into college. They're saying i'm so afraid. I don't wanna get locked in on something. What do i do. What's the best path. there is no best path. You just kind of figured out as you go. It kinda sucks. Sometimes but fifteen years may sound like a long time to someone. That's just getting into biology. But it's really not i mean. It's a blink of an eye. Wake up one morning. How how did i get exactly. And i even got. Tenure will see show at a small college around here. Nobody i didn't like it. Is i do not i wanted to do. It was not the truck. I couldn't do tropical ecology because he was a very focused premed You know pat his various local Was he was very very difficult. Decision to make. I you know we all look forward many times. I as getting the tenure. Track position. And i was so unhappy and he was just not for me and it was a really hard career choice to say no visas not for me. I'm gonna look for something different by it was worth it. No that's amazing. And i wonder i'm not gonna put any numbers or guests but i wonder how many people wish they could have been made the same decision or had the fortitude to say. No this is not going to keep me happy because you see that a lot unfortunately in academia someone that picked this career and things they have to stick with it and now they're just not doing well right and of course i was lucky and fortunate i had a choice and you know i have a husband that had a job so that i could take a little time for transitioning not having a full time position right away. A lot of people. Don't have my luxury buddy. You do on your own happy. You can always try to modify or at least try to make the best out of the position you are in to kind of make it more what you really feel that you should. I mean the key is. Don't be afraid to take some chances. I mean the the degree of chance. It's okay it's okay. To make mistakes. Everybody tells students spot. I keep repeating well. It's nice to have again a physical example of someone that has lived that life instead of just saying it as sort of the cliche things we tell kids but it does sound to me like you've always had an appreciation for nature and for ecology in the interconnectedness. And it's cool that you've finally got to go from the ground up with the soil stuff all the way now to conservation. But even if you still care about birds conserving trees is a good way to take care of the birds down the line right exactly and that he's to me. The most interesting part is that there has been so many resources says and money on time put into wildlife conservation which i think he's extremely important and i fully report but you cannot save the birds if there's nothing for them to eat and these the very particular case that i know you. That's what god you moly motivated to start your ask but the trees are folding on which the forest he's being built and if you don't have the trees you don't have the plants in general you know there's gonna be no wildlife that can be saved or protected right when we talk about habitat destruction being the leading cause of extinction on this planet. I think even people picture clearcutting but they. It's it's not said enough that that connection between oh. It is literally getting rid of the plants. That's habitat destruction because they are like you said the scaffolding. That's exactly what's happening. You're going and taking out the plants. And that's what destructs. At least the first step towards destruction in a lot of cases doesn't necessarily have to be just clear cutting the forest right. You can be doing a lot of other things like building row and selective logging and climate change and there's a lot of things about ultimately while they're eating to ease their. You know elimination of fancies right right. But the reason we're talking today is because you did find this pathway industry conservation and you're really wonderfully suited to do some major impact stuff for a bunch of trees and the main focus of what we were connected over our oaks because the icn just did their assessment or trying to get this out that what is it. Forty one percent of species across the globe are facing extinction or at least of conservation concern. And i just spoke with your colleague dr murphy westwood about a lot of exit. You so taking trees to other places to help conserve them. But you are position in a way that you're doing a lot of the institute the other side of that coin which is also desperately needed. So let's take a closer look at just. What in situ conservation means to you before we look at some of the species. You're working with right. So the global tree conservation program in the morton arboretum. We have a very specific approach to how we try to save threatened tree species. We've i go through prioritizing because unfortunately we.

fifteen years today Forty one percent more than fifteen years first step dr murphy westwood four five years thirteen years old two most important nutrients one morning first
"dr murphy westwood" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

03:27 min | 3 months ago

"dr murphy westwood" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"Right. Dr murphy westwood. It's so great to have you on the podcast. How about we start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is you do. Thank you for having me. So i am. The director of global tree conservation at the morton arboretum. Which is a large public art in in the suburbs of chicago just west of chicago and we have a program of tree conservation that focuses on conservation of trees with a focus on species as the unit of conservation so we recognize that ecosystems and habitats are really important to conserve but we really focus on biodiversity conservation and ensuring that tree species. Don't go extinct and as part of that. We really need to focus in the world's biodiversity hotspots which our hearts of the world where there is a lot of especially plant diversity and also a lot of habitat loss so that is kind of crux of the program and at the morton arboretum. We a very strong exclamation cheese on to focus on oaks so we have A team of very talented scientists of study oak aleutian and history and biogeography and ecology and our culture techniques around oaks and we have a local conservation program are chicago region trees initiative that has a strong oak ecosystem recovery plan and program and my group naturally started focusing on oaks globally so You know i grew up in chicago. I grew up here in the midwest. And i think that we have a vision of oaks is being like our trees because conic wonderful you know important parts of our ecosystem and our habitats here and the white oak is the state tree of illinois. And so i think we have this feeling that we like own oaks right. But actually the the global centers of diversity are in mexico and in china and southeast asia which i didn't even realize so our global tree conservation program really has a strong focus on oaks and especially Trying to enact conservation programs and to build conservation capacity. Eaten those local centers of diversity for the group. That's excellent and it's funny. You brought that up. Because i was just thinking that this morning. I've been on a major oak bent lately. And i'm really lucky that it's happening as i'm living in the midwest because we do have a fair amount of oak species to peruse and get to know but when you look at again those distribution maps like we've only just scratched the surface. Not downplaying are wonderful oak diversity but there is so much to this group of plants and we can get into all that because that's really going to be the focus of our talk today but what brought you to treat conservation in the first place. I mean you hear. oh environmentalists. What tree huggers was that kind of the direction or was it. More of the scientific conservation bent Where did this all begin for you. Well i went to college as an english major and my freshman year in college. I started taking environmental science classes and no english classes. So after about a couple of years of this i went to my academic adviser and she said you know you should probably start taking english class. You're going to english major or maybe we can talk about you. You know switching to the school of natural resources and.

china mexico chicago southeast asia today illinois this morning english first place couple murphy westwood years
"dr murphy westwood" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:12 min | 3 months ago

"dr murphy westwood" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"How's everyone doing this week. I just wanna say thank you to everyone. That's preordered my book so far you have made it number one on multiple lists in terms of new releases on amazon but i do want to mention. There are other options if you do not want to go through amazon to order. The book from what. I've been told. Bookshop is a great because it helps support independent bookstores. A lot more than any of the other box stores do. So if you want to get your hands on the book and go through unethical source or really any source. It all helps me to be honest. Just make sure you check the show notes because i put up links on preorder info. Thanks again if you picked one up. I really appreciate it but today i'm really excited for this incredibly important conversation. If you've been following my social media accounts over the last few months you'll know that. I'm on a huge oak kick. I'm finally getting around to trying to understand the diversity of species which isn't too easy considering it's a pretty diverse group of trees. Unfortunately it's also really threatened group of trees. The red list of oaks was just published in twenty twenty and the i. u. c. n. estimates that forty one percent of all oak species are of conservation concern. And that's not good considering the massive cultural and ecological impact oaks. Continue to have across the world joining us to talk about. This is dr murphy. Westwood of the morton arboretum. We discuss a lot of things. Oak related but most of the centered on the global conservation. Consortium four oaks and the challenges that they face in terms of both in situ and ex situ conservation one of the big takeaways. Here is that because acorns don't store well aren't trees that lend to syed banking which means conservation organizations like the morton arboretum have to get creative but that doesn't mean they're not stepping up to the task. This can be a really depressing subject but his doctor westwood. And i discussed there is hope and it lies in all of the wonderful organizations involved in oak conservation. So let's just jump right into it without further ado. Here's my conversation with dr murphy. Westwood i hope you enjoy all.

Westwood amazon westwood today forty one percent twenty twenty dr murphy this week both four oaks last few months u. one