5 Burst results for "Dr Montenegro"

"dr montenegro" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

04:21 min | 7 months ago

"dr montenegro" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"If you look on the CDC's website, you'll see information about life. Expectancy broken down by race. Overall White Americans can expect to live longer than Black-americans, but research points to a cause beyond a person's biology for that outcome for black people and joining us now to dig deeper into the question of how racism can affect. Your health is Dr Roberto Montenegro. He's a psychiatrist with Seattle Children's Hospital Dr. Montenegro, thank you so much for joining us. Thank you so much for having me. It's not uncommon to see healthcare outcomes broken down by race. What kind of differences do we see? We continue to the ongoing. Dispute Thirties and equity in health and health outcomes. Specifically we see differences in morbidity and mortality, so for example we see that are black community. Continue to have disproportionate negative health outcomes like increase preterm births increased hypertension increased, complications and surgeries decrease amount of proper pain. Managment compared to their white counterparts, so what are some of the factors that are playing into these numbers? Great Question I think one of the most important things to understand is that? We have to move beyond the into individual level of explanation fortunately medicine sometimes continues to look at health health outcomes and inequities at the individual level alone and ignore social and structural factors of healthcare, so for example, one of the most common ignored factors that is really affecting health and health outcomes is racism and that's one that only recently has begun. Begun to get attention within the field of health equities research, and when that still has an needs a lot more investigation, other factors that are social or structural factors include to care poverty. Environmental factors also play a big role housing segregation plays a big role lack of access to clean air. An environment that allows individuals to exercise for example plays a role. Our educational system and the lack of funding for educational system plays a role in poor health. The school to prison pipeline for example, another structural factor that plays an important role in inequities in health as well. There are a lot of things that we as a society can impact. That continues to hurt the outcomes of Black Brown and other people of Color. Now you've written about how medical research is affected by assumptions about race. So how does the healthcare industry look at race? For the most part, the health industry continues to look at race. As if to biological reality they failed to upton acknowledge the increasing number of overwhelming research, especially genetic research that shows that biologically people are actually a lot more similar than different zone. Fortunately, a lot of our medical institutions continue to use the factor of race as a risk factor. It sort of clouds, the numerous factors that are really behind what people are intending to capture with race. So for example if they say black communities experienced disproportionate, pre-term birt's, they leave it at that and failed to address the numerous societal structural systems that are playing a role and pretend birt's. What the researchers failed to do is look at how the system is failing this particular population and being able to to be healthier, so is there anything being done to change that specifically slowly? But surely there's a lot more writing that is happening in the academic world of race and racism racial is medicine as a concept, so that for example means that specific interventions are being made for specific groups with the idea that there are differences in the way that biology works within that group. So some universities, for example at the University of Washington were I'm an assistant professor..

Dr Roberto Montenegro CDC birt Seattle Hospital Dr. Montenegro University of Washington assistant professor upton
"dr montenegro" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"dr montenegro" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Chance school of public health that number's important to scientists begin to learn more about how racism affects people's health longevity reporter rail and betrayal has this next story in our series you me and them today dr a bear to montenegro finished his phd was memorable but not for the right reasons i still cringe when when i think about it his colleagues at ucla had taken him and his wife at to a fancy restaurant they were celebrating his new phd insist geology and he was about to head to medical school he was legit we laughed and we eight end we were excited we didn't have to pay for this when they got in mind for the valet a really nice car pulled up to the curb a woman got out and walk past the other couples in line montenegro says and she gets to me and she hans me her keys she assumed he was a valet if vividly remember turning red and i don't often turn red and i remember my heart pounding i remember feeling really confused end and hurt and avery five minutes later still waiting for his car it happened again and even now reliving that story it's it's uncomfortable this was not the first or the last time heating counter racism at conferences colleagues would accidentally try to order drinks from him as a medical student people at the hospital with sometimes mistake him for a technician or janitor even when he was wearing a white doctor's coat that happens to me so much montenegro's experiences might not sound like a big but a group of researchers thinks that being discriminated against over and over again could actually hurt a person's health when you start to worry about something whether that's race or something else then that initiates a biological stress response that amani new regita a social epidemiologists at the university of california berkeley she and dr montenegro who's now a fellow in child psychiatry at seattle children's hospital are trying to understand what discrimination can actually do to your body that might people assume montenegro's of la turning red and my heart pounding those are scientists body was stressed cranking up the levels of hormones like adrenaline and.

public health ucla technician berkeley montenegro reporter hans avery amani university of california dr montenegro seattle five minutes
"dr montenegro" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"dr montenegro" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To pay for this when they got an line for the valet a really nice car pulled up to the curb a woman got out and walked other kazan line montenegro says and she gets to me and she hands me her case she assumed he was a valet if vividly remember turning red and i don't often turn red and i remember my heart pounding i remember feeling really confused end and hurt and angry later still waiting for his car it happened again and even driving that story it's unconscionable not the first or the last time heating counter racism at conferences colleagues would accidentally try to order drinks from him as a medical student people at the hospital with sometimes mistake him for a technician or janitor even when he was wearing a white doctor's coat that happens to me so much montenegro's experiences might not sound like a big deal but a group of researchers think that being discriminated against over and over again could actually hurt a person's health when you start to worry about something whether that's race or something else then that initiates a biological stress response that amani new regita a social epidemiologist at the university of california berkeley she in dr montenegro who's now a fellow in child psychiatry at seattle children's hospital dan what discrimination can actually do to your body that might people assume montenegro was of la turning red and my heart pounding those are scientists body was stressed cranking up the levels of hormones like adrenaline and.

technician dr montenegro kazan amani university of california seattle
"dr montenegro" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"dr montenegro" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Teach chance gulick health that numbers important to scientists begin to learn more about how these affect people's health and their longevity reporter rail and betrayal has this next story in our series hugh me and them the day dr a bear to montenegro finished his phd was memorable but not for the right reasons i still cringe when when i think about it ucla taken him and his wife at to fancy restaurant they were celebrating his new piandi insists geology and he was about to head to medical school he was legit we laughed and we eight half job for this when they got in mind for the valet a really nice up curb human got bp past the other couples in line john says and she gets to me and she hans me her keys she assumed he was a valet if vividly remember turning red and i don't often turn red and i remember my heart pounding i remember feeling really used and hurt and angry five minutes later still waiting for his car it happened again and even now reliving that story it's gone confidential this was not the first or the last time heating counter racism at conferences colleagues would actually try to from him student people at the hospital with sometimes miss mission or janitor even when he was wearing a white doctor's coat that happens to me so i need montenegro experiences might not sound like a victorious group of researchers thinks that being discriminated against over and over again could actually hurt a person's health when you start to worry about something whether that's race or something else named initiate a biological stress response that amani new retur po at the university of california berkeley she and dr montenegro who's now a fellow in child psychiatry at seattle children's hospital are trying to understand what discrimination can actually do to your body that might people assume montenegro was a valet turning red and my heart pounding named his body was stressed cranking up the levels of hormones like a missile this hormones can be really helpful for gearing up to fight or to flee but it's not good if they linger eggs apple play the things were finding in my research is that on this.

john berkeley reporter hans amani university of california dr montenegro seattle five minutes
"dr montenegro" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"dr montenegro" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Robert wood johnson foundation and the harvard t h chan school of public health that numbers begin to learn more about how he system affects people's health and their longevity reporter rail and bishop l has this next story in our nation's you me and then the day doctor roberto montenegro finished his phd but not for the right reasons i still cranes who when i think about it his colleagues at ucla had taken him and his wife to fancy restaurant they were celebrating his new phd insists geology and he was about to head to medical school he was legit we laughed and we eight end john jeff to pay for this but when they got an line for the valet a really nice car nick herb a woman got out and walk past the other couples in line montenegro says and she gets to me and she hands me her keys she assumed he was a valet if vividly remember turning red and i don't turn said and i remember my hogged bounding i remember feeling really confused end and hurt and angry five minutes later still waiting for his car it happened again and even now reliving that story it's it's uncomfortable this was not the first or the last time heating counter racism at conferences colleagues would accidentally try to order drinks from him as a medical student people at the hospital with sometimes mistake him for a technician or janitor even when he was wearing a white doctor's coat that happens to me so much montenegro's experiences might not sound like a big deal but researchers thinks that being discriminated against over and over again could actually hurt a person's health when you start to worry about some uh whether that's race or something then that initiates a biological stress response that amani new regita a social epidemiologist at the university of california's she and dr montenegro who's now a fellow in child psychiatry at seattle children's hospital are trying to understand what discrimination can actually do to your body that night people assume montenegro's valet turning red and my heart pounding those are scientists body was stressed cranking up the levels of hormones like adrenaline and cortisol this hormones can be really grateful for gearing up to fight or to flee but it's not good if they linger for example one of the things we're finding in my research is set on this process most of racism stress.

Robert wood johnson foundation roberto montenegro ucla john jeff technician cortisol harvard t h chan school of pub reporter amani university of california dr montenegro seattle five minutes