17 Burst results for "Dr Michael Ziggler"

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Longer hair? Everybody listen up. You gotta promise around saying nothing. Now get up, arrested back down so much that we are on other schools. We almost base mirror. Image in the mirror Ambulance. There's no way students trapped. Parents break you gave us slightly out of baby and a wife. Drugs and play with gone insane chopper with different names, Lives destructive fall I rate ties Serve the lies. Now is the time topping. All right, guys, everybody, listen. We had Thomas around. Can we say nothing. Now get out the back down so much that we are on this. Still, we are face in the mirror energy in the mirror. Mm yeah. I'm doing. Yeah. Yeah. Have a chance or lost today. Today, the data price no one should pay. I got the age and we are Everybody listener we gotta. Yeah, saying nothing. Now get out of here back down so much that we are on other health. We are images. Man. Tune in to the CJ ratio Sunday mornings, starting at seven. Only on AM 9 70 the answer. Want to find out more about C J. Ray, check out c j ray dot com. The preceding pre recorded the Lutheran hour, bringing Christ to the nations. Loving other people is always a challenge, and Dr Michael Ziegler says it's even harder when we avoid getting to know them. Jesus says I am the life I've come to be a neighbor for all those people. You're killing yourself trying to avoid And we'll learn about investing ourselves in building a hopeful neighborhood can't necessarily control what other people do, but you can live out God's calling in your life and your vocation as a neighbors. That's today on the Lutheran hour. This is Mark, I sure Thanks for making this program part of your day and thank you for your faithful support. Your gifts and prayers. Help the Lutheran hour. Bring Christ to the nations and the nations to the church. Learn more at Lutheran hour dot org. Now, here's our speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler..

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Here's our speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler. An elephant is a living, mighty active creature. Elephants are the largest land animals on the planet, and they can run faster than an Olympic sprinter. And even when they're not sprinting, elephants are almost always active. For nearly 20 hours a day, they're walking, foraging grazing consuming in some cases, more than £1000 of plant material every day. Elephants are Active and elephants are mighty. They are built like a tank with the power of a forklift and over the course of human history For more than 4000 years, human beings have employed them as both Tanks and fork lifts. Sometimes for entertainment to in some Asian countries, they stage tug of war contests between an elephant and people. One end of the rope is tied up to an elephant in a harness. And at the other end of the rope. There are 2050 as many as 100 men, all pulling, pulling, pulling Against one elephant. And one elephant is all it takes. To drag 100 grown men through the dirt like rag dolls attached to a string elephants are living busy, mighty active creatures of a living, mighty active God. Living, mighty active. That's how one Christian described the faith of Jesus Christ the Messiah. Martin Luther was his name, he said. Oh, it is a living Busy, mighty active thing is faith, Faith. It's like an elephant. Sometimes we try to keep faith locked up. Traveler was walking through the streets of India one day. And he saw an elephant. Out back. In the alley. He walked around and get a better view, and he noticed that the elephant was tied up to a rope to a little metal stake hammered into the ground. And observing this Magnificent mighty creature. Tethered by that tiny rope, he wondered. Why doesn't the elephant break free? The story goes. 20 years ago, maybe 30 years ago. When she was just a baby elephant. Someone captured her and change her up to a big banyan tree. With an iron shackle around her hind foot, and she pulled and pulled and pulled against those chains for days, but It didn't do any good. She was stuck. So years later. Even as a four grown elephant whenever she feels that iron around her foot. She knows that she's stuck. Even though she has the power to break free. She doesn't use it. She's a prisoner of her own small expectations. Different versions of that story of the elephant and changed circulated. You'll hear them from motivational speakers. The value of such a story is metaphorical. The elephant in the room is that you and I are the ones captive to our own small expectations, and the moral of the story is that we're all much bigger than we think. But hold on. If you read up a bit on real elephants. You'll see that the image isn't accurate. Maybe there's a better lesson in the comparison. Yes, elephants have been captured, trained and employed by human beings for 4000 years, maybe longer. But unlike horses and cows and cats and dogs, elephants have never been domesticated. That's according to Richard Layer, who worked with the United Nations who lived with and studied elephants in captivity for more than 20 years, who is the world's foremost expert on the Asian elephant? Mr Lehrer says that every elephant In captivity is genetically and behaviorally. Wild. Elephants have never been selectively bred to sift out their wildness. An elephant born and raised in captivity when released back into the wild, quickly adapts to its natural habitat, Unlike the family dog, who's wolf like traits have been sifted out through centuries of selective breeding. Elephants don't need to be taught to be wild. They are wild. Mr Lehrer explained that, uh, domesticated elephant Is simply a wild animal in Shane's. In the blink of an eye, an elephant can kill a grown man with its tusks with its forehead. With its trunk. With its mouth. With its legs or with any combination thereof. First thing to remember. Mr Lehrer warns. Keeping elephants in captivity. Human deaths are unavoidable. So this picture of a metaphorical elephant mentally tethered by a single rope. It might be useful for life coaches and motivational speakers, but it's not accurate. Even in captivity. Elephants are mighty dangerous and mysterious. And yet Under the right conditions. Elephants can form strong bonds, even affectionate bonds with human beings. We don't want to romanticize this relationship, And there's more than enough to mourn about the way human beings have exploited these wondrous creatures of God. But at the same time, a simplistic hands off approach to elephants doesn't seem to work either, especially as human. An elephant populations overlap in a place like India. Elephant Advocates in Asia denounced animal cruelty but also note how humans and elephants have lived peacefully and productively together for millennia. Sadly in a modern, mechanized world humanely caring for elephants. Is a dying art. However, even in modern times, elephants have worked in ways and in places where machines would fail. And logging operations. For example, elephants can selectively remove fallen trees in steep mountainous terrain without the widespread damage done to the environment when heavy equipment is used. After the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004. Elephants were employed to carefully clear the wreckage. And to deftly pick through the rubble to search for survivors. In ways that would have been impossible for bulldozers and backhoes. Make no mistake. Elephants aren't domesticated. But Richard Lair says.

Richard Lair Martin Luther Richard Layer 4000 years Jesus Christ Michael Ziegler India Lehrer Asia more than £1000 United Nations 30 years ago more than 4000 years 100 men 20 years ago more than 20 years 100 grown men both four grown elephant 2004
"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Now. Here's our speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler. An elephant is a living, mighty active creature. Elephants are the largest land animals on the planet, and they can run faster than an Olympic sprinter. Even when they're not sprinting, elephants are almost always active. For nearly 20 hours a day, they're walking, foraging grazing consuming in some cases, more than £1000 of plant material every day. Elephants are active and elephants are mighty. They are built like a tank with the power of a forklift and over the course of human history For more than 4000 years, human beings have employed them as both Tanks and fork lifts. Sometimes for entertainment to in some Asian countries, they stage tug of war contests between an elephant and people. One end of the rope is tied up to an elephant in a harness. And at the other end of the rope. There are 2050 as many as 100 men, all pulling pine pulling Against one elephant. And one elephant is all it takes. To drag 100 grown men through the dirt like rag dolls attached to a string elephants are living busy, mighty active creatures of a living, mighty active God. Living, mighty active. That's how one Christian described the faith of Jesus Christ the Messiah. Martin Luther was his name, he said. Oh, it is a living Busy, mighty active thing is faith, Faith. It's like an elephant. Sometimes we try to keep faith locked up. Traveler was walking through the streets of India one day. And he saw an elephant. Out back. In the alley. He walked around to get a better view, and he noticed that the elephant was tied up to a rope to a little metal stake hammered into the ground. And observing this Magnificent mighty creature. Tethered by that tiny rope, he wondered. Why doesn't the elephant break free? The story goes. 20 years ago, maybe 30 years ago. When she was just a baby elephant. Someone captured her and change her up to a big banyan tree. With an iron shackle around her hind foot, and she pulled and pulled and pulled against those chains for days, but It didn't do any good. She was stuck. So years later. Even as a four grown elephant whenever she feels that iron around her foot. She knows that she's stuck. Even though she has the power to break free. She doesn't use it. She's a prisoner of her own small expectations. Different versions of that story of the elephant and chains circulated. You'll hear them from motivational speakers. The value of such a story is metaphorical. The elephant in the room is that you and I are the ones captive to our own small expectations, and the moral of the story is that we're all much bigger than we think. But hold on. If you read up a bit on real elephants. You'll see that the image isn't accurate. Maybe there's a better lesson in the comparison. Yes, elephants have been captured, trained and employed by human beings for 4000 years, maybe longer. But unlike horses and cows and cats and dogs, elephants have never been domesticated. That's according to Richard Lair who worked with the United Nations who lived with and studied elephants in captivity for more than 20 years, who is the world's foremost expert on the Asian elephant? Mr Lehrer says that every elephant In captivity is genetically and behaviorally. Wild. Elephants have never been selectively bred to sift out their wildness. An elephant born and raised in captivity when released back into the wild, quickly adapts to its natural habitat, Unlike the family dog, who's wolf like traits have been sifted out through centuries of selective breeding. Elephants don't need to be taught to be wild. They are wild. Mr Lehrer explained that, uh, domesticated elephant Is simply a wild animal in Shane's. In the blink of an eye, an elephant can kill a grown man with its tusks with its forehead. With its trunk. With its mouth. With its legs or with any combination thereof. The first thing to remember Mr Lehrer warns. Keeping elephants in captivity. Human deaths are unavoidable. So this picture of a metaphorical elephant mentally tethered by a single rope. It might be useful for life coaches and motivational speakers, but it's not accurate. Even in captivity. Elephants are mighty dangerous and mysterious. And yet Under the right conditions. Elephants can form strong bonds, even affectionate bonds with human beings. We don't want to romanticize this relationship, And there's more than enough to mourn about the way human beings have exploited these wondrous creatures of God. But at the same time, a simplistic hands off approach to elephants doesn't seem to work either, especially as human. An elephant populations overlap in a place like India. Elephant Advocates in Asia denounce animal cruelty but also note how humans and elephants have lived peacefully and productively together for millennia. Sadly in a modern, mechanized world humanely caring for elephants. It's a dying art. However, even in modern times, elephants have worked in ways and in places where machines would fail. And logging operations. For example, elephants can selectively remove fallen trees in steep mountainous terrain without the widespread damage done to the environment when heavy equipment is used. After the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004. Elephants were employed to carefully clear the wreckage. And to deftly pick through the rubble to search for survivors. In ways that would have been impossible for bulldozers and backhoes..

Richard Lair Martin Luther India 4000 years Jesus Christ Michael Ziegler Asia Lehrer more than £1000 United Nations more than 4000 years 20 years ago 30 years ago Olympic 100 men 100 grown men more than 20 years both four grown elephant 2004
"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Here's our speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler. An elephant is a living, mighty active creature. Elephants are the largest land animals on the planet, and they can run faster than an Olympic sprinter. And even when they're not sprinting, elephants are almost always active. For nearly 20 hours a day, they're walking, foraging grazing consuming in some cases, more than £1000 of plant material every day. Elephants are active and elephants are Mighty. They're built like a tank with the power of a forklift and over the course of human history For more than 4000 years, human beings have employed them as both Tanks and fork lifts. Sometimes for entertainment to in some Asian countries, they stage tug of war contests between an elephant and people. One end of the rope is tied up to an elephant in a harness. And at the other end of the rope. There are 2050 as many as 100 men, all pulling, pulling, pulling Against one elephant. And one elephant is all it takes. To drag 100 grown men through the dirt like rag dolls attached to a string elephants are living busy, mighty active creatures of a living, mighty active God. Living, mighty active. That's how one Christian described the faith of Jesus Christ the Messiah. Martin Luther was his name, he said. Oh, it is a living Busy, mighty active thing is faith, Faith. He's like an elephant. Sometimes we try to keep faith locked up. Traveler was walking through the streets of India one day. And he saw an elephant. Out back. In the alley. He walked around to get a better view, and he noticed that the elephant was tied up to a rope to a little metal stake hammered into the ground. And observing this magnificent mighty creature. Heather. By that tiny rope, he wondered. Why doesn't the elephant break free? The story goes. 20 years ago, maybe 30 years ago. When she was just a baby elephant. Someone captured her and change her up to a big banyan tree. With an iron shackle around her hind foot, and she pulled and pulled and pulled against those chains for days, but It didn't do any good. She was stuck. So years later. Even as a four grown elephant whenever she feels that iron around her foot. She knows that she's stuck. Even though she has the power to break free. She doesn't use it. She's a prisoner of her own small expectations. They're different versions of that story of the elephant in chains circulated, you'll hear them from motivational speakers. The value of such a story is metaphorical. The elephant in the room is that you and I are the ones captive to our own small expectations, and the moral of the story is that we're all much bigger than we think. But hold on. If you read up a bit on real elephants. You'll see that the image isn't accurate. Maybe there's a better lesson in the comparison. Yes, elephants have been captured, trained and employed by human beings for 4000 years, maybe longer. But unlike horses and cows and cats and dogs, elephants have never been domesticated. That's according to Richard Layer, who worked with the United Nations who lived with and studied elephants in captivity for more than 20 years, who is the world's foremost expert on the Asian elephant? Mr Lehrer says that every elephant in captivity is genetically and behaviorally. Wild. Elephants have never been selectively bred to sift out their wildness. An elephant born and raised in captivity when released back into the wild, quickly adapts to its natural habitat, Unlike the family dog, who's wolf like traits have been sifted out through centuries of selective breeding. Elephants don't need to be taught to be wild. They are wild. Mr Lehrer explained that, uh, domesticated elephant Is simply a wild animal in Shane's. In a blink of an eye, an elephant can kill a grown man with its tusks with its forehead. With its trunk. With its mouth. With its legs or with any combination thereof. First thing to remember. Mr Lehrer warns. Keeping elephants in captivity. Human deaths are unavoidable. So this picture of a metaphorical elephant mentally tethered by a single rope. It might be useful for life coaches and motivational speakers, but it's not accurate. Even in captivity. Elephants are mighty dangerous and mysterious. And yet Under the right conditions. Elephants can form strong bonds, even affectionate bonds with human beings. We don't want to romanticize this relationship, And there's more than enough to mourn about the way human beings have exploited these wondrous creatures of God. But at the same time, a simplistic hands off approach to elephants doesn't seem to work either, especially as human. An elephant populations overlap in a place like India. Elephant Advocates in Asia denounce animal cruelty but also note how humans and elephants have lived peacefully and productively together for millennia. Sadly in a modern, mechanized world humanely caring for elephants. Is a dying art. However, even in modern times, elephants have worked in ways and in places where machines would fail. In logging operations. For example, elephants can selectively remove fallen trees in steep mountainous terrain without the widespread damage done to the environment when heavy equipment is used. After the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004. Elephants were employed to carefully clear the wreckage. And to deftly pick through the rubble to search for survivors. In ways that would have been impossible for bulldozers and backhoes. Make no mistake. Elephants aren't domesticated. But Richard Lair says Elephants are frequently gentle and intelligent enough to be totally.

Richard Lair Martin Luther Richard Layer Jesus Christ 4000 years Michael Ziegler Asia India Lehrer more than £1000 United Nations Heather 30 years ago 20 years ago 100 men more than 4000 years more than 20 years 2004 four grown elephant both
"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Now. Here's our speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler. An elephant is a living, mighty active creature. Elephants are the largest land animals on the planet, and they can run faster than an Olympic sprinter. And even when they're not sprinting, elephants are almost always Active. For nearly 20 hours a day, they're walking, foraging grazing consuming in some cases, more than £1000 of plant material every day. Elephants are Active and elephants are mighty. They are built like a tank with the power of a forklift and over the course of human history For more than 4000 years, human beings have employed them as both Tanks and fork lifts. Sometimes for entertainment to in some Asian countries, they stage tug of war contests between an elephant and people. One end of the rope is tied up to an elephant in a harness. And at the other end of the rope. There are 2050 as many as 100 men, all pulling, pulling, pulling Against one elephant. And one elephant is all it takes to drag 100 grown men through the dirt like rag dolls attached to a string elephants are living busy, mighty active creatures of a living, mighty active God. Living, mighty active. That's how one Christian described the faith of Jesus Christ the Messiah. Martin Luther was his name, he said. Oh, it is a living Busy, mighty active thing is faith, Faith. It's like an elephant. Sometimes we try to keep faith locked up. Traveler was walking through the streets of India one day. And he saw an elephant. Out back. In the alley. He walked around to get a better view, and he noticed that the elephant was tied up to a rope to a little metal stake hammered into the ground. And observing this Magnificent, mighty creature tethered by that tiny rope, he wondered. Why doesn't the elephant break free? The story goes. 20 years ago, maybe 30 years ago. When she was just a baby elephant. Someone captured her and change her up to a big banyan tree. With an iron shackle around her hind foot, and she pulled and pulled and pulled against those chains for days, but it didn't do any good. She was stuck. And so years later. Even as a four grown elephant whenever she feels that iron around her foot. She knows that she's stuck. Even though she has the power to break free. She doesn't use it. She's a prisoner of her own small expectations. Different versions of that story of the elephant and change circulated. You'll hear them from motivational speakers. The value of such a story is metaphorical. The elephant in the room is that you and I are the ones captive to our own small expectations, and the moral of the story is that we're all much bigger than we think. But hold on. If you read up a bit on real elephants. You'll see that the image isn't accurate. Maybe there's a better lesson in the comparison. Yes, elephants have been captured, trained and employed by human beings for 4000 years, maybe longer. But unlike horses and cows and cats and dogs, elephants have never been domesticated. That's according to Richard Layer, who worked with the United Nations who lived with and studied elephants in captivity for more than 20 years, who is the world's foremost expert on the Asian elephant? Mr Lehrer says that every elephant In captivity is genetically and behaviorally wild. Elephants have never been selectively bred to sift out their wildness. An elephant born and raised in captivity when released back into the wild, quickly adapts to its natural habitat, Unlike the family dog, who's wolf like traits have been sifted out through centuries of selective breeding. Elephants don't need to be taught to be wild. They are wild. Mr Lehrer explained that, uh, domesticated elephant Is simply a wild animal in Sheen's In a blink of an eye, an elephant can kill a grown man with its tusks with its forehead. With its trunk with its mouth with its legs or with any combination thereof. First thing to remember. Mr Lehrer warns. Keeping elephants in captivity. Human deaths are unavoidable. So this picture of a metaphorical elephant mentally tethered by a single rope. It might be useful for life coaches and motivational speakers, but it's not accurate. Even in captivity. Elephants are mighty dangerous and mysterious. And yet Under the right conditions. Elephants can form strong bonds, even affectionate bonds with human beings. Now we don't want to romanticize this relationship, and there's more than enough to mourn about the way human beings have exploited these wondrous creatures of God. But at the same time, a simplistic hands off approach to elephants doesn't seem to work either, especially as human. An elephant populations overlap in a place like India. Elephant Advocates in Asia denounced animal cruelty but also note how humans and elephants have lived peacefully and productively together for millennia. Sadly in a modern, mechanized world humanely caring for elephants. Is a dying art. However, even in modern times, elephants have worked in ways and in places where machines would fail. And logging operations. For example, elephants can selectively remove fallen trees in steep mountainous terrain without the widespread damage done to the environment when heavy equipment is used. After the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004. Elephants were employed to carefully clear the wreckage. And to deftly pick through the rubble to search for survivors. In ways that would have been impossible for bulldozers and backhoes. Make no mistake. Elephants aren't domesticated. But Richard Lair.

Martin Luther Richard Layer Richard Lair Jesus Christ 4000 years India Michael Ziegler Lehrer Asia more than £1000 United Nations 30 years ago 100 men more than 4000 years 20 years ago more than 20 years 100 grown men four grown elephant Olympic both
"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler and elephant is a living, mighty active creature. Elephants are the largest land animals on the planet, and they can run faster than an Olympic sprinter. And even when they're not sprinting, elephants are almost always active. For nearly 20 hours a day, they're walking, foraging grazing consuming in some cases, more than £1000 of plant material every day. Elephants are active and elephants are mighty. They are built like a tank with the power of a forklift and over the course of human history For more than 4000 years, human beings have employed them as both Tanks and fork lifts. Sometimes for entertainment to in some Asian countries, they stage tug of war contests between an elephant and people. One end of the rope is tied up to an elephant in a harness. And at the other end of the rope. There are 2050 as many as 100 men, all pulling, pulling, pulling Against one elephant. And one elephant is all it takes. To drag 100 grown men through the dirt like rag dolls attached to a string elephants are living busy, mighty active creatures of a living, mighty active God. Living, mighty active. That's how one Christian described the faith of Jesus Christ the Messiah. Martin Luther was his name, he said. Oh, it is a living Busy, mighty active thing is faith, Faith. It's like an elephant. Sometimes we try to keep faith locked up. Traveler was walking through the streets of India one day. And he saw an elephant. Out back in the alley. He walked around to get a better view, and he noticed that the elephant was tied up to a rope to a little metal stake hammered into the ground. And observing this magnificent mighty creature. Heather. By that tiny rope, he wondered. Why doesn't the elephant break free? The story goes. 20 years ago, maybe 30 years ago. When she was just a baby elephant. Someone captured her and change her up to a big banyan tree. With an iron shackle around her hind foot, and she pulled and pulled and pulled against those chains for days, but It didn't do any good. She was stuck. So years later. Even as a four grown elephant whenever she feels that iron around her foot. She knows that she's stuck. Even though she has the power to break free. She doesn't use it. She's a prisoner of her own small expectations. Different versions of that story of the elephant and changed circulated. You'll hear them from motivational speakers. The value of such a story is metaphorical. The elephant in the room is that you and I are the ones captive to our own small expectations, and the moral of the story is that we're all much bigger than we think. But hold on. If you read up a bit on real elephants. You'll see that the image isn't accurate. Maybe there's a better lesson in the comparison. Yes, elephants have been captured, trained and employed by human beings for 4000 years, maybe longer. But unlike horses and cows and cats and dogs, elephants have never been domesticated. That's according to Richard Layer, who worked with the United Nations who lived with and studied elephants in captivity for more than 20 years, who is the world's foremost expert on the Asian elephant? Mr Lehrer says that every elephant In captivity is genetically and behaviorally. Wild. Elephants have never been selectively bred to sift out their wildness. An elephant born and raised in captivity when released back into the wild, quickly adapts to its natural habitat, Unlike the family dog, who's wolf like traits have been sifted out through centuries of selective breeding. Elephants don't need to be taught to be wild. They are wild. Mr Lehrer explained that, uh, domesticated elephant Is simply a wild animal in Shane's. In a blink of an eye, an elephant can kill a grown man with its tusks with its forehead. With its trunk. With its mouth. With its legs or with any combination thereof. The first thing to remember Mr Lehrer warns. Keeping elephants in captivity. Human deaths are unavoidable. So this picture of a metaphorical elephant mentally tethered by a single rope. It might be useful for life coaches and motivational speakers, but it's not accurate. Even in captivity. Elephants are mighty dangerous and mysterious. And yet Under the right conditions. Elephants can form strong bonds, even affectionate bonds with human beings. We don't want to romanticize this relationship, And there's more than enough to mourn about the way human beings have exploited these wondrous creatures of God. But at the same time, a simplistic hands off approach to elephants doesn't seem to work either, especially as human. An elephant populations overlap in a place like India. Elephant Advocates in Asia denounced animal cruelty but also note how humans and elephants have lived peacefully and productively together for millennia. Sadly in a modern, mechanized world humanely caring for elephants. Is a dying art. However, even in modern times, elephants have worked in ways and in places where machines would fail. And logging operations. For example, elephants can selectively remove fallen trees in steep mountainous terrain without the widespread damage done to the environment when heavy equipment is used. After the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004. Elephants were employed to carefully clear the wreckage. And to deftly pick through the rubble to search for survivors. In ways that would have been impossible for bulldozers and backhoes. Make no mistake. Elephants aren't domesticated. But Richard Lair says.

Richard Lair Martin Luther Richard Layer Jesus Christ India 4000 years Lehrer Asia 100 men more than £1000 Michael Ziegler United Nations Heather more than 4000 years 30 years ago 100 grown men 20 years ago more than 20 years both 2004
"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Here's our speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler. An elephant is a living, mighty active creature. Elephants are the largest land animals on the planet, and they can run faster than an Olympic sprinter. And even when they're not sprinting, elephants are almost always active. For nearly 20 hours a day, they're walking, foraging grazing consuming in some cases, more than £1000 of plant material. Every day. Elephants are active and elephants are mighty. They are built like a tank with the power of a forklift and over the course of human history for more than 4000 years. Human beings have employed them as both Tanks and forklifts. Sometimes for entertainment to in some Asian countries, they stage tug of war contests between an elephant and people. One end of the rope is tied up to an elephant in a harness. And at the other end of the rope. There are 2050 as many as 100 men, all pulling poin pulling Against one elephant. And one elephant is all it takes. To drag 100 grown men through the dirt like rag dolls attached to a string elephants are living busy, mighty active creatures of a living, mighty active God. Living, mighty active. That's how one Christian described the faith of Jesus Christ the Messiah. Martin Luther was his name, he said. Oh, it is a living Busy, mighty active thing is faith, Faith. It's like an elephant. Sometimes we try to keep faith locked up. Traveler was walking through the streets of India one day. And he saw an elephant. Out back. In the alley. He walked around to get a better view, and he noticed that the elephant was tied up to a rope to a little metal stake hammered into the ground. And observing this magnificent mighty creature. Heather. By that tiny rope, he wondered. Why doesn't the elephant break free? The story goes. 20 years ago, maybe 30 years ago. When she was just a baby elephant. Someone captured her and change her up to a big banyan tree. With an iron shackle around her hind foot, and she pulled and pulled and pulled against those chains for days, but It didn't do any good. She was stuck. So years later. Even as a four grown elephant whenever she feels that iron around her foot. She knows that she's stuck. Even though she has the power to break free. She doesn't use it. She's a prisoner of her own small expectations. They're different versions of that story of the elephant and chains circulated. You'll hear them from motivational speakers. The value of such a story is metaphorical. The elephant in the room is that you and I are the ones captive to our own small expectations, and the moral of the story is that we're all much bigger than we think. But hold on. If you read up a bit on real elephants. You'll see that the image isn't accurate. Maybe there's a better lesson in the comparison. Yes, elephants have been captured, trained and employed by human beings for 4000 years, maybe longer. But unlike horses and cows and cats and dogs, elephants have never been domesticated. That's according to Richard Lair who worked with the United Nations who lived with and studied elephants in captivity for more than 20 years, who is the world's foremost expert on the Asian elephant? Mr Lehrer says that every elephant in captivity is genetically and behaviorally. Wild. Elephants have never been selectively bred to sift out their wildness. An elephant born and raised in captivity when released back into the wild, quickly adapts to its natural habitat, Unlike the family dog, who's wolf like traits have been sifted out through centuries of selective breeding. Elephants don't need to be taught to be wild. They are wild. Mr Lehrer explained that, uh, domesticated elephant Is simply a wild animal in Shane's. In a blink of an eye, an elephant can kill a grown man with its tusks with its forehead. With its trunk with its mouth. With its legs or with any combination thereof. First thing to remember. Mr Lehrer warns. Keeping elephants in captivity. Human deaths are unavoidable. So this picture of a metaphorical elephant mentally tethered by a single rope. It might be useful for life coaches and motivational speakers, but it's not accurate. Even in captivity. Elephants are mighty dangerous and mysterious. And yet Under the right conditions. Elephants can form strong bonds, even affectionate bonds with human beings. We don't want to romanticize this relationship, And there's more than enough to mourn about the way human beings have exploited these wondrous creatures of God. But at the same time, a simplistic hands off approach to elephants doesn't seem to work either, especially as human. An elephant populations overlap in a place like India. Elephant Advocates in Asia denounce animal cruelty but also note how humans and elephants have lived peacefully and productively together for millennia. Sadly in a modern, mechanized world humanely caring for elephants. Is a dying art. However, even in modern times, elephants have worked in ways and in places where machines would fail. And logging operations. For example, elephants can selectively remove fallen trees in steep mountainous terrain without the widespread damage done to the environment when heavy equipment is used. After the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004. Elephants were employed to carefully clear the wreckage. And to deftly pick through the rubble to search for survivors. In ways that would have been impossible for bulldozers and backhoes. Make no mistake. Elephants aren't domesticated. But Richard Lair says Elephants are frequently gentle and intelligent enough to be totally trustworthy even as a babysitter. To watch over human infants. Elephants aren't the docile captives. We imagine. Even in captivity. They remain on domesticated and so also The faith. Of Jesus Christ. Like Martin Luther said. Luther was echoing what the New Testament letter of, James says about faith. Like Luther James, One of the early followers of Jesus was correcting a domesticated view of the faith. James encouraged and corrected the followers of Jesus, to whom he was writing. He shows them That there is no such thing. Has a domesticated faith..

Richard Lair Martin Luther James Michael Ziegler 4000 years India Luther Jesus Jesus Christ Lehrer Asia more than £1000 United Nations Heather 20 years ago 2004 more than 20 years 30 years ago more than 4000 years 100 grown men
"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

07:35 min | 1 year ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Here. He is now with our speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler. Thank you, Mark. I'm really glad to be here with all of you today, and I'm excited to kind of turn the tables on the Reverend Dr Michael Ziegler. Usually during this time he gets to interview somebody. And today I'm going to interview him. Where, at the beginning of a series of sermons on the book of Ephesians, which is one of my favorite books, and I'm very excited for this series. But I have to be honest with you, Mike. As we go into this series, I find it kind of a daunting task for you to have to go through each of the these chapters of Ephesians. There's just so much in there. Chapter one, for example, what you're talking about today. I mean in Greek. It's one sentence. It just keeps going and going and going word. Long sentence. Yeah, our grammar teachers would hate it. How do you approach the text? How do you decide what you're going to preach on when you're just so much well with a letter and to remember that this is a letter written by Paul The way I approach it is to imagine that I'm his letter carrier. I'm taking us like the guy he mentions at the end of the end of the chapter, Chapter six. And in that time in that culture to be a letter carrier, it wasn't like dropping the envelope off in the mailbox and emphasis. The letter carrier actually performed the letter. Like Kid at a piano recital would perform the piece that they had practiced. So I treat the letter like a written musical composition and I just start plunking out the notes. I start saying it out loud. In my own hearing by myself, I just say it over and over and over again until I Learn it by heart and I could speak it to myself and and hearing it over and over again. I m in expectation that God is going to be speaking to me. And I wait and see what he brings to my attention. And for this case and Ephesians, Chapter one, it was this idea of inheritance. It's a word that Paul mentions three times and the opening chapter and And I sense God leading me in that direction by meditating on the text. What is it about the idea of inheritance? This idea of inheritance that you think is so important and relevant for us today in our Normal dealings with inheritance. It's driven by death. We talk about inheritance as something you get from, Uh, parent or relative that passes something onto you when they die, So as I started thinking about how we experience inheritance, it is Always driven by death. But Paul is not talking about it. In that way. He's talking about it as something that We receive in Jesus, who has defeated death, So I felt like that was the first challenge for us is here's to get what Paul is saying is Not talking about an inheritance that is driven by death. But One that is given by one who has conquered death. It is a real good point. I think the world Today is so drastically different than the world that Paul was writing to that. We hear that word inheritance like you said, as oh, Grandpa died, And so now I inherit something back then it's much more an establishment of identity. It says. You're a part of a lineage, a different type of person. Because you're within this inheritance. That makes these statements from Paul Pretty radical. I would think. Yeah, I like how you say that that it's it's more about an identity. It's about belonging to people. But even in their case, they also are there. Membership in this people is still limited by death as at least as a unique individual. I can be a part of this people for a time, but then We all face death. And so I think Paul is speaking to that. That cultural understanding of inheritance as identity being part of a people, but then also addressing this thing that we have in common with the people 2000 years ago, limitation by death. No, I'm thinking through the words of Chapter one. Now with this lens of inheritance, I'm seeing This idea that we have been adopted. Right. And if you're part of the inheritance than that, says something about the surety of your adoption. I'm thinking about the fact that where this has all been sealed by the Holy Spirit and That it costs the very blood of Christ and just how clearly important This must have been for Paul. I'm also kind of thinking about what we started with this idea that this is 1 200 plus word sentence that just seems to keep going and going and going and it's almost like Paul is so excited about this idea that he loses track of himself. And kind of nerds out on theology and Gloria talk like this is just so amazing. And I also kind of thinking about the person who's listening to us right now. What do you think Paul might want? The average listener. Me, you someone else listening to us right now to take from this today. Well, you you used the phrase, I think overwhelmed. That chapter one leaves the listener in in this overwhelmed the state of being that this is just so big. He goes on and on and on. And what is this that I have been adopted into? I think that's part of Paul's. Strategy as a speaker is to overwhelm us with awe and gratitude and humility. It does feel like in some ways you're standing on the edge of this cliff. Of what you know, and having to leap off into something completely unknown. You mean no more death? You mean the whole world brought together under Jesus? You mean None of the things that we currently struggle with all the divisions and Things that separate people are all gone away and done away with in Jesus to leap into that is a in some ways exciting but a terrifying thing. But if I can leap into the arms of someone whom I know Jesus, who has given his life for me then then I can make that leap but it but it is. It's an overwhelming in some ways, terrifying thing. Think about inheritance in this way. You know, I've got to thank you, Mike. For this sermon and for going through effusions, I picture where I am. Usually when I get a chance to listen to Lutheran hour, And to be honest, I'm doing the most mundane things. I'm driving a car. I'm doing the dishes and listening to a podcast version. I'm doing household chores and listening along to you. In the midst of those mundane things it can really seem like life is just those mundane things. But in this you've given me a picture of just how big God's plan for us is and how big his plan for all creation is. And that there is an invitation to jump into that. So I'm really excited for everyone else to get a chance to hear the sermon, but also for the rest of the sermons in this series. I want to thank you for giving me the opportunity to be with you here today much Yeah, thanks for for turning the tables on me and asking these questions, Delightful conversation..

Mike Paul Mark Jesus Christ 2000 years ago today three times Today Ephesians one sentence Gloria each first challenge 1 200 plus word Michael Ziegler One one of one Chapter six
"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"He is now with our speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler. Thank you, Mark. I'm really glad to be here with all of you today, and I'm excited to kind of turn the tables on the Reverend Dr Michael Ziegler. Usually during this time he gets to interview somebody. And today I'm going to interview him. Where, at the beginning of a series of sermons on the book of Ephesians, which is one of my favorite books, and I'm very excited for this series. But I have to be honest with you, Mike. As we go into this series, I find it kind of a daunting task for you to have to go through each of the these chapters of Ephesians. There's just so much in there. Chapter one, for example, what you're talking about today. I mean in Greek. It's one sentence. It just keeps going and going and going word. Long sentence. Yeah, our grammar teachers would hate it. How do you approach the text? How do you decide what you're going to preach on when you're just so much well with a letter and to remember that this is a letter written by Paul The way I approach it is to imagine that I'm his letter carrier. I'm to kick us like the guy he mentions at the end of the end of the chapter, Chapter six. And in that time in that culture to be a letter carrier, it wasn't like dropping the envelope off in the mailbox and emphasis. The letter carrier actually performed the letter. Like Kid at the piano recital would perform the piece that they had practiced. So I treat the letter like a written musical composition and I just start plunking out the notes. I start saying it out loud. In my own hearing by myself, I just say it over and over and over again until I Learn it by heart and I could speak it to myself and and hearing it over and over again. I am in expectation that God is going to be speaking to me. And I wait and see what he brings to my attention. And for this case and Ephesians, Chapter one, it was this idea of inheritance. It's a word that Paul mentions three times in the opening chapter, and and I since God leading me in that direction by meditating on the text. What is it about the idea of inheritance? This idea of inheritance that you think is so important and relevant for us today in our Normal dealings with inheritance. It's driven by death. We We talk about inheritance as something you get from, Uh, parent or relative that passes something onto you when they die, So as I started thinking about how we experience inheritance, it is Always driven by death. But Paul is not talking about it. In that way. He's talking about it as something that We receive in Jesus, who has defeated death. So I felt like that was the first challenge for us as hearers to get what Paul saying is We're not talking about an inheritance that is driven by death. But One that is given by one who has conquered death. That's a real good point. I think the world of today is so drastically different than the world that Paul was writing to That we hear that word inheritance like you said, as oh, Grandpa died, And so now I inherit something back then it's much more an establishment of identity. It says. You're a part of a lineage, a different type of person. Because you're within this inheritance. That makes these statements from Paul Pretty radical. I would think. Yeah, I like how you say that that it's it's more about an identity. It's about belonging to people. But even in their case, they also are there. Membership in this people is still limited by death as least as a unique individual. I can be a part of this people for a time, but then We all face death. And so I think Paul is speaking to that. That cultural understanding of inheritance as identity being part of a people, but then also addressing this thing that we have in common with the people 2000 years ago, limitation by death. No, I'm thinking through the words of Chapter one. Now with this lens of inheritance, I'm seeing This idea that we have been adopted. Right. And if you're part of the inheritance, and that says something about the surety of your adoption, I'm thinking about the fact that where this has all been sealed by the holy spirit and that it costs the very blood of Christ. And just how clearly important This must have been for Paul. I'm also kind of thinking about what we started with this idea that this is 1 200 plus word sentence that just seems to keep going and going and going and it's almost like Paul is so excited about this idea that he loses track of himself. And kind of nerds out on theology and Gloria talk like this is just so amazing. And I also kind of thinking about the person who's listening to us right now. What do you think Paul might want? The average listener. Me, you someone else listening to us right now to take from this today. Well, you you used the phrase, I think overwhelmed. That chapter one leaves the listener in in this overwhelmed the state of being that this is just so big. He goes on and on and on. And what is this that I have been adopted into? I think that's part of Paul's strategy as a speaker is to overwhelm us with awe and gratitude and humility. It does feel like in some ways you're standing on the edge of this cliff. Of what you know, and having to leap off into something completely unknown. You mean no more death? You mean the whole world brought together under Jesus? You mean None of the things that we currently struggle with all the divisions and Things that separate people are all gone away and done away with in Jesus to leap into that is a in some ways exciting but a terrifying thing. But if I can leap into the arms of someone whom I know Jesus,.

Mike Mark Paul Jesus Christ 2000 years ago Ephesians today Gloria three times Michael Ziegler 1 each one sentence first challenge 200 plus word Chapter six One one one of
"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"We are bringing Christ to the nations and the nations to the church. Learned Maura at Lutheran, our DOT or g'kar. Now, here's our speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler. Apparently, I had abnormally long eyelashes for an eighth grade. Boy. I suppose I should be grateful. Because of all the things that I have, and could have gotten made fun of for Eyelashes. Isn't that bad? The girls in my eighth grade class, pointed it out one day. They said that I had Maybelline eyelashes. As they were walking past me in the hall in a group as a third grade girls do. They would giggle and point and one of them would call out Maybe he's born with it. And another would answer. Maybe it's Maybelline. Hysterical. I know. But nobody likes to be laughed at. When you're not trying to be funny. They make horror movies about this stuff, you know? It's a cycle of mockery and ridicule, which leads to resentment and hatred, which leads to destruction and death. There was that horror movie from the 19 seventies, when the mother is hysterical, pleading with her daughter not to go to the prom. They're all gonna laugh at you. She says. As the high pitched horror movie soundtrack is building in the background. They're all gonna laugh at you. They make horror movies out of this stuff. Obviously, mine wasn't that bad. They made fun of my eyelashes. Why should I care? My mom says, my eyelashes there just fine, by the way. But I let it get to me. Somehow, even something that ridiculous can be enough to induce an identity crisis. And so I locked myself in the bathroom that night. And got out my mom's little beauty scissors and trimmed my ridiculously long eyelashes. It was ridiculous that I would let it get to me like that. But I know what it's like to be laughed at. You know what it's like. It's the stuff of horror movies. The Old Testament Book of Jonah. Starts like a horror movie, The Lord, the Creator of Heaven and Earth, The God of Israel tells Jonah to Goten Innova. No, never was the queen of the mean girls. The ancient world. She was a metropolitan beauty. Promenading through the halls of the ancient Assyrian empire. Powering over and terrorizing the awkward, underdeveloped school boys and girls around her. Cherishing the opportunity to crucify any under lane that stepped out of line. And the Lord said to Jonah Goten Innova. And call out against her. Because they're evil has come up to me. And you can almost hear the horror movie plane and Jonas head. Because he runs away. Charters. A ship sails the tar shish about as far away from the nervous you can get. And we're right there with him. Because we know what it's like to be laughed at. But the Lord his God would have Jonah face this horror head on. So the Lord sends a storm to chase Jonah down on. The sailors were so frightened that they throw him overboard. Jonah sinks, the storm stops and the Lord sends a great fish to save Jonah. Swims in back to land. Three days later it belches him out. Back on the road to Neineva. And this time, Jonah Ghost Ananova. Expecting the worst. And to everyone's surprise. The people of never listened. They believed, God. The mean girl had a change of heart. It wasn't quite happily ever after. The conversion didn't last long. Yes, the generation of the Ninja fights who heard Jonas message that day they Leave. They change their ways and by the grace of God, they were saved. But the generations that followed Turn back to the status quo. Never went back to her old ways, tormenting and terrorizing the people around her and one day God stepped in. Put an end to it. God had given another prophet. The prophet Nay home a message for Ananova. He called none of the city of bloodshed. Full of lies, unceasing evil, preying on victims without end. God stepped in and stopped it. Because God has a way. Dealing with bullies. In his own time. Roughly a century after Jonah in the year. 6 12 BC god's justice would be served. None of a would be destroyed, laid low by the Lord never to be rebuilt and its ruins are still there, just on the other side of the Tigris River in modern day Iraq. Modern archaeological digs have uncovered some surprising details. For thousands of years and then of a had been a diva in the ancient near East. But around 7 50 BC just before Jonah visited new novel was enduring some unstable economic and political conditions, conditions that would have been harsh enough to push her to the brink of an identity crisis. And so historically speaking. By the grace of God. Minimal was at a particularly vulnerable moment when Jonah rolled in that day. After his month long desert caravan covered in dust and the stench of fish guts with a deranged revenge of the nerds look in his eyes, not even caring if they laughed at him. Yourself happened. And the Lord commanded the fish. Innit? Vomited Jonah out onto dry land, and the word of the Lord came to Jonah, a second time saying Rise. Golden in Nevada. That Great city. And call out to her. Message that I am going to speak to you. So, Jonah. Rose. Went Ananova according to the word of the Lord..

Nevada Tigris River Iraq Neineva Goten Innova Jonas Rose Michael Ziegler 6 12 BC Maura Christ Maybelline thousands of years Three days later Jonah Goten Innova Went Ananova 7 50 BC second time The Lord, the Creator of Heave Lutheran
"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

09:44 min | 1 year ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"It's the Gospel of Mark Chapter five through six first 13. First impressions form quickly. But they don't need to become lasting impressions. Authors Thomas Mann and Melissa Ferguson offer this example. Say you learn about a man who was a card carrying member of the Nazi party. In Germany. In the late 19 thirties, he devised a plan to make a fortune by capitalizing on the Nazi party's persecution of Jews in Germany. He took over several Jewish owned businesses since the Jews couldn't legally owned them anymore, and they were forced to agree to his terms. Then he made loads of money. Using those businesses to produce war resource is for Germany while employing Jews as cheap labor, knowing that he didn't have to pay them a fair wage. So what's your initial impression of that guy? Let's say that you learned that this man was Oscar Schindler. And that he used all of his money and all of his connections to keep his Jewish workers from being killed. While deliberately producing essentially zero materials for the war effort. And as a consequence of all of this, Schindler ended up dead broke, broken by the sacrifice that he made to save the lives of his people. You see? First impressions don't need to become lasting impressions because a larger story can cast a first impression in a new light and Jesus has come to give you Ah, larger story. That's part of what it means to have faith in Jesus sent to follow Jesus. It means seeing yourself as a character, a developing character in his story. No. Some people are laboring under the false impression that Jesus is a distant, irrelevant historical figure. Some people are under the false impression that Jesus is just a spiritually being that they'll get around to dealing with in the after life when they die. Some people. Know him to be The living present son of God. The Messiah. What are laboring under the false impression that he doesn't care to notice them. But if Jesus Story includes new chapters for seemingly minor characters if a demon possessed man becomes a preacher of God's mercy, It's an invisible old woman becomes a daughter of the king. If a 12 year old girl gone too soon is raised to life. Then Jesus has new chapters for you. There is a new story for you because you have left an impression on Jesus. I don't mean that you've impressed him. Business consultants have advice on how to make a great first impression. But that's not what I'm talking about. Jesus sees right through all that posturing. He sees you. He sees Even the things that you don't want anyone else to see. He sees it all. As an author sees a beloved character. An author who wrote himself into the story. An author who wrote himself into the tragic story of humanity and then Fresh down and nailed to a cross. He suffered the consequences of our short sighted, self centered false impressions. We can't impress Jesus. We have left an impression on him. Nail scars on his hands and his feet. Impress upon us the truth. At our first impressions. Lead to dead ends. His resurrection re casts everything in new light. Would you pray with me? Lord Jesus. You see us as we are. You love us as we are. But you don't leave us the way you found us. Remind us that we don't have to try to impress you. And make us mindful of our impressions of others. Have I cashed someone into an idol that I fear or worship? Let me see them as a struggling sinner just like me. Have I written? Someone off is not worth the effort. Then let me care for them as a beloved child of God, for whom you died. Impress your love on our hearts and recast all our impressions in the light of your life and death. Your resurrection and your promised return to raise the dead and renew all things. Because you live and you reign with the father and the Holy Spirit. One God, now and forever. Amen. You're listening to the Lutheran hour. For free online resource is archived Audio are mobile app and mortgage. Oh, to Lutheran, our dot work now back to our speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler. Once again. I'm visiting with Professor Daniel Pavalock. He's a professor at Concordia University, Wisconsin. He teaches courses about the Bible folk scene on New Testament and ministry that flows out of God's word. Welcome back to the program. Dr Pavel to thank you for letting me come back and thank you listeners. It's a pleasure to be with you and Dr Pavel, You've written a commentary on the gospel of Mark If someone wasn't familiar with what that means, a biblical commentary on a book of the Bible. How would you describe it to them? Well, we'd love to have mark sitting with us and explaining and such. But how about if as best we can We have a companion with us, and that companion could be the commentary. Yet hopefully gives you some answer. Bit by bit page by page of the What is this text trying to say? And then some application off that text also, how will this change my life? How can I use this in my Service. My prayers, my worship. That's a good goal of a commentary. As you wrote this commentary some years ago. How are you hoping to help people answer that question. What does this mean and understand Mark's gospel? Well, I think we're really fortunate that Mark wrote to people. Somewhat like ourselves. He's writing the story of Jesus. But most commentators will agree. He's probably reflecting the preaching of Peter, which was done in Rome and writing to probably people who are not right there in the center of Jerusalem or Galilee, but rather more likely. Those who are learning the story of Jesus at a distance from Jerusalem, Judea, Galilee, and so a commentary wants to be the partner with Mark Insane, too. Distant readers and we're really distant now, 2000 years later here. Let me tell you this story. It's set in a particular time in place. You're gonna want to know who these people are here it you're gonna want to know their nature and cruelty heritage, for instance, and his cruelty towards John the Baptist. You're gonna want to know why this was such an important issue. Should we wash our hands in a ritual manner before we eat or not? Why is that a question while commentary hopefully gives that context. So people and say, Oh, I got it. And maybe even Possibly AH, connection to today. In this format, you've provided a short devotion at the end of each passage, which allows the reader to remember that this isn't just about Acquiring information about the past. But walking with the living Lord along the way. Well, absolutely. I tell my students in the New Testament class I teach the survey of the New Testament. And repeated sections every semester. Why are we doing this? When they have wonderful answers were reading the New Testament were reading it to understand that's good. I'm all for that. But it better change your life. Its intention at least change your life. If after we read the New Testament and spent all these hours together if there's no Greater peace if there's no greater Sense of forgiveness. There's no purpose in life. Then it really didn't do its job. And so a commentary has to have that same purpose. It can't just be information on hair it and his long line or what that particular Greek word means. It's got also speak to our needs off. I need to be forgiven. I need peace with God. I need to know how I can face an uncertain future. And that would be exactly what Mark is writing us well, and all the gospel writers So it's six toe change lives as well as informed you have many quotations from teachers of the past who have come out of the Reformation tradition. So teachers like Martin Luther Teachers like John Calvin and John Wesley and many, many others. Why is that helpful to listen to voices from the past, as we Meditate on God's word like this. Well, there's certainly richer than any one of us by ourselves..

Jesus Mark Insane Oscar Schindler Germany Nazi party Dr Pavel Thomas Mann Jerusalem Dr Michael Ziegler Professor Daniel Pavalock Melissa Ferguson Wisconsin Martin Luther Teachers Concordia University Holy Spirit John Calvin Bible professor Peter John the Baptist
"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Gift in prayers Help the Lutheran our bring Christ to the nations and the nations to the church learned Maura at Lutheran, Our dog. Now, here's our speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler. You remember that story? The one about the Good Samaritan. Who saw the guy who had been mugged left for dead on the side of the road. Other people passed him by, but the Samaritan stopped and helped Or what about the story with the sun? The one who demanded that his father give him his inheritance. And then he took all that money, skipped town and wasted it on wild living, and then After he was dead broke. Returned to his father to see if he would somehow take him back. You don't have to be a religious person to recognize these stories, and those were just two of them. There are dozens and dozens more. Vivid, memorable stories about extravagant wedding banquets and lost sheep. And tiny seeds that earn 1000% return on investment. Stories have been speaking to people for generations. Sort of like how Pixar movies have spoken to this generation movies like Toy Story and Finding Nemo and up But these stories, the ones that I was mentioning they've been around for a couple of 1000 years. This kind of story is normally called up. Terrible operable is a story that aims to say something true about life. And these stories that I mentioned they all originate from one person. The most talked about person in human history. Jesus of Nazareth. So Why did you just tell parables? Well, who doesn't like a good story Stories connect Story can take something. Complicated and make it simple. All good communicators. Tell stories. So why wouldn't Jesus use them? But if we thought that Jesus Told stories on Lee to be an engaging communicator. Then it might be difficult for us to understand. What happened to him eventually. You know the whole crucifixion and all. See people who dedicate their lives to telling moving stories connecting with people and emotionally enriching their lives. They don't normally get the death penalty. Authors of the chicken soup for the Soul books end up on a seller lists, not death row. So Jesus with all his engaging and vivid stories. How did he end up getting crucified? Before we try to answer that. How about we let Jesus speak for himself? Listen to some of his parables recorded in one of his biographies in the New Testament, the Gospel according to Mark, and as you Listen, Ask yourself Why did Jesus tell parables? It starts like this. Again. Jesus went out and began teach beside the Sea of Galilee. And a giant crowd. Began to gather around him so that he got into a boat. And stationed himself out on the sea. And the whole crowd was on the shore facing the sea. And he began to teach them many things. In parables. And in his teaching, he was saying, Listen, look. The farmer. Went out to sow his seed. And it happened. As he was sewing. Some of the seed fell along the path. The birds came and gobbled it up. Other seed fell on rocky ground where it did not have much earth. And straight way it sprang up because thier Earth was shallow. And when the sun came up It was scorched. And since it had no root, it withered. Other seed fell into the weeds, and the thorns grew up and choked it, and it produced no grain. And other seeds fell into the good or the rich earth, and they proceeded to produce grain growing and increasing and bearing in one case, 30 times more in another case, 60 and in another case, 100 times more than what was sown. And he continued to say Whoever has ears. To here. Listen. And when he was alone. Those who were around him. Along with the 12, the 12 disciples began to ask him about the parables. He said to them. To you. Is already given the mystery of the rule and reign of God. To those on the outside. It's all in parables. So that they are looking and they look If they do not see And they are hearing and they hear They do not understand otherwise. Day would turn And be forgiven. And he continued to say to them. Do you not understand this terrible How then, will you understand all of the parables? The farmer is sowing the word. Some people are like those along the path where the word is being song. When they hear Satan the adversary straight way comes and takes away the word that was sewn into them. Others are like those sewn on the rocky ground. They're the ones who, when they hear the word straightaway, receive it with excitement. But since they have no root in themselves, they endure on Lee for a while. When trouble comes or persecution because of the word straight way they stumble and fall. Others air like those sown among the thorns. They're the ones who have heard the word. With the cares of this present age. Deceitfulness of wealth. And the desires that come in with everything else..

Jesus Good Samaritan Lee Dr Michael Ziegler Maura Nazareth Pixar Sea of Galilee Mark the Soul
"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:38 min | 2 years ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Our data Warg. Let's welcome our Lutheran our speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler. Thank you, Mark. I'm visiting with Dr Deo Mayer. Welcome back to the program, Dale. Thank you. Michael's an honor to be with you again. And we are blessed it toe have you speaking for us today? Your message inspired by the life of Jesus recorded in Mark, Chapter three. Make sure that you you were the one who preached on this part of the gospel of Mark. You know, we hear Jesus say this thing about the unforgivable sin the sin against the Holy Spirit. And we hear Jesus say this that someone could commit an unforgivable sin and never have forgiveness. So What? What do we need to say about that? Well, there's a reason why I didn't Well on this. If a sermon. Yeah, this is a difficult passage. I'll tell you what a pastor told me long ago and I've heard it many times since If you are worried that you have or are committing the unforgivable sin against the Holy Spirit. Then you are not Farris ease. Describes said that that holy spirit that was in Jesus was in league with the devil. It's in their context that, he said. There is an unforgivable sin. He was aiming it at those whose hearts were not only hard but believe that he Jesus was in league with the devil. And that would mean that is the son of God. God himself would be in league with the forces of evil. That, he says, is the unforgivable sin. But I would round this out by saying If you're concerned that you have committed that Don't worry. You're not just keep bringing the word of Jesus into your heart that liberates you from the Dominion of Satan and evil forces. Let's talk more about the gospel and it's setting in the Bible. You think about with most books you maybe you read them or hear them one time and then you never pick him up again. Someone mentions the book later you'd say. Oh, yeah, I read that book was a good book. But God's people have a long history of doing something different. With the Bible in general. And with the Gospel of Mark Specifically, we come to these narratives, these accounts again and again over. Ah, lifetime. So what has that been like for you, Dale personally. Coming back to the Bible to Mark's biography, specifically, again and again over a lifetime. There have been any number of times when I was a pastor prepared a sermon. Get into the pulpit, and I read the sermon text. Okay. The word of God for today is not to And as I'm reading that something jumps out at me that I had noticed in all my hours of preparation. And I just let it be. It will deal with this The next time I preach on this text, okay? That's one of the things about about the word of God. You can find it in some other literature, especially in poetry. But in the word of God, we have inexhaustible source of thought. As we get older in life, we also experience the word of God from a different vantage point. What have you gotten to know? More deeply about your Lord? Jesus by repeatedly coming back to Mark's story like this, not just in bits that we here in a formal worship service, but hearing it from start to finish again and again and again. How is that help you No, Jesus better. There are two things that come to the top of my mind. In response to your question. Won his patients the patients of Jesus. These disciples don't get it. Over and over again. Jesus does something spectacular. And the fact is they don't get it until after the resurrection. The Gospel of Mark does not tell us that But the acts of the apostles and the subsequent history of the church after the resurrection Shows us that they finally got it. Dr. Luther says that we haven't preached the gospel unless we have also preached the resurrection. So that's one thing the patients of God and that's so much with them. But with me I am slow to get it. Just a slow is those first disciples were And yet he is long suffering patient with me and slowly trying to bring me More and more to him and eventually to my eternal home. The second thing that strikes me off the top of my head about Learning Mark. Will seem to be a contradiction to what I just said. And that is the anger of Jesus. You know that That was new for me. Jesus has emotions. They are sanctified emotions. They do not sin. Many a time our emotion. Leads us to do something sinful no more often than not, but Jesus has anger but this coupled with grief That people oppose the good and gracious will of God. That tells me a number of things, but one is That I have to live my life in fear of God. Not in Cowardly fear that in survival fear like a slave would have before a mean master. But I have to know my sin and I have to know that I continue to send rooms, three says, you know, all of sinned and fall short still fall short of the glory of God. Have to live my life in all. Reverence and thorough going humility. That Jesus saves me. Next week. We're gonna get to the parables and Chapter four. And you've also learned these by heart and presented them many times. What? What could we do to prepare our hearts to receive what Jesus has to say in these parables? Jesus was great about using pictures Great about illustrations and we call some of them Terribles. But in preparation for next Sunday's broadcast, I would say, you know, think about how visual life is and realize that Jesus does not come to us. In theological tomes and in proposition all statements and again, there's a place for all of that. But he comes to us common people in pictures. Of his love of his kingdom of his reign and rule in our lives, and we can lean back and enjoy those pictures, but also think about them, mold them over and see how the picture describes who we are. And the goodness of God to us in Jesus. Thank you for joining us,.

Jesus Mark Holy Spirit Dr Michael Ziegler Dale Dr Deo Mayer Farris Terribles Dr. Luther
"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

06:57 min | 2 years ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"The Bible's reliability by pointing out apparent contradictions. However, Dr Michael Ziegler says, these challenges can open doors to a deeper understanding of who God is and what he's done for you when you open yourself up to hearing the backstory behind, the apparent contradiction you may encounter with the Bible is all about. It's a story about the God who loves his people and wants to stay with them and it Jesus God has come to stay and we'll talk with former Lutheran our speaker, Dr Dale Meyer. That's today on the Lutheran hour. Hello. I'm Mark. I sure Thanks for joining us today. Your gifts and prayers Help the Luthor. One hour. Bring Christ to the nations and the nations to the church. Thank you for your faithful support. Learned Maura at Lutheran, Our daughter Warg. Now here's our speaker, Dr Michael Zigler. Robert handed me a stack of papers. Five pages neatly stapled together. Robert had Diligently studied the Bible. And carefully recorded all the contradictions that he had found there. Bibles full of contradictions, He told me. Here's a list What was special about Robert's list whose head it was so long? Five pages. Single spaced times. New Roman 10 Point font. There were the standard ones. Like The Bible says that God never grows weary. Then it says that God rested. On the seventh day after creation, the first Sabbath Day or All of the different changes in the rules and laws from the old Testament to the New Testament and then There were some really obscure ones. I mean down in the weeds. For example, how in Mark Chapter two verse 26. It says that the high priest was ah by afar. When David ate the bread. But in first Samuel chapter 21 it says that Ah, him elect was the priest. Here's what I've learned about these so called Bible contradictions. There's usually a backstory. And if you're open to hearing it You may encounter what the Bible is all about. Let's try this out with the so called Baya Thara him elect contradiction, The one that I just mentioned, and what makes this so interesting is that it comes straight from the mouth of Jesus. It's recorded in Mark, Chapter two, and Jesus is in an argument with the Farris ease. Farris Seas were the self appointed authorities on God and the Bible. And of all the reasons that they had to dislike Jesus. The thing that really set them off was how he came off as contradicting the Bible. For example. Affairs. He's knew that God had commanded that there be no work on the Sabbath Day. Here. Jesus was letting his disciples work on the Sabbath day. They were plucking heads of grain for a snack as they were walking through the grain field. Now that is a little nit picky on the Ferris. He's part toe. Consider that work, but from their perspective, it was a clear contradiction of God's law. Why are you letting them do this on the Sabbath? And Jesus. Instead of directly answering them references this obscure passage from the life of David, and what's really interesting is that apparently Jesus gets the name of the high priest wrong. Because the guy abaya Thor, But if you go and look it up in first Samuel chapter 21 right there in black and white, it's ah, him, Elek. And apparently the Farris. He's don't even catch this because they don't call him out on it. Perhaps they're so busy looking for other contradictions that they didn't even bother to check the back story. Okay, so listen to the context behind this so called Bias are him. Elect Contradiction recorded in the Gospel of Mark Chapter two. All started verse 13. Once again, Jesus went out beside the Sea of Galilee. And all the crowd. Began to come to him and he began to teach them. As he was going by. He saw Levi, the son of al Fia's sitting at the toll booth. The place where he was collecting taxes. And he says to him Follow me. He got up and followed him. And it happens. That he is relaxing in his house in Levi's house, and there are many tax collectors and sinners. Reclining at the table with Jesus and his disciples. You know there were many and they were actually following him. And the scribes of the Farris sees when they saw that he was eating with Sinners and tax collectors. He started saying to his disciples he's eating with tax collectors and sinners. Jesus when he heard it says to them. It is not those who are strong who need a doctor. But those who are sick. Did not come to call righteous people. Sinful ones. Now John's disciples and the disciples of the Farris Ease were fasting. And they come and they say that Jesus Why do John's disciples and the disciples of the Ferris he's fast, but your disciples do not fast and Jesus said to them. Wedding. Guests are not able to fast while the bride groom is with them, are they As long as the groom is with him, they cannot fast. The day's air coming when the bride room will be taken from them. And then they will fast in that day. No one saw was a patch of new unstrung cloth on an old outer garment. If he does, the patch shrinks pulls away the new from the old so that the worst terror is made. No one pours new wine in tow. Old wine skins he does the wine will First the skins. So that the wine is lost along with the skins. But new wine Is for.

Jesus Bible Farris Robert Levi Farris Seas David Samuel Dr Michael Ziegler Dr Dale Meyer Dr Michael Zigler Ah Maura Baya Thara Elek abaya Thor Sea of Galilee John
"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

06:56 min | 2 years ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Skeptics questioned the Bible's reliability by pointing out apparent contradictions. However, Dr Michael Ziegler says, these challenges can open doors to a deeper understanding of who God is and what he's done for you when you open yourself up to hearing the backstory behind, the apparent contradiction you may encounter with the Bible is all about. It's a story about the God who loves his people and wants to stay with them. Andy Jesus. God has come to stay and we'll talk with former Lutheran our speaker, Dr Dale Meyer. That's today on the Lutheran hour. Hello. I'm Mark. I sure Thanks for joining us today. Your gifts and prayers Help the Luthor. One hour. Bring Christ to the nations and the nations to the church. Thank you for your faithful support. Learned Maura at Lutheran, Our daughter Warg. Now here's our speaker, Dr Michael Zigler. Robert handed me a stack of papers. Five pages neatly stapled together. Robert had Diligently studied the Bible. And carefully recorded all the contradictions that he had found there. The Bible's full of contradictions. He told me. Here's a list What was special about Robert's list whose head it was so long? Five pages. Single spaced times. New Roman 10 Point font. There were the standard ones. Like The Bible says that God never grows weary. Then it says that God rested. On the seventh day after creation, the first Sabbath Day or All of the different changes in the rules and laws from the old Testament to the New Testament and then There were some really obscure ones. I mean down in the weeds. For example, how in Mark Chapter two verse 26. It says that the high priest was ah by afar. When David ate the bread. But in first Samuel chapter 21 it says that Ah, him elect was the priest. Here's what I've learned about these so called Bible contradictions. There's usually a backstory. And if you're open to hearing it You may encounter what the Bible is all about. Let's try this out with the so called Baya Thara him elect contradiction, The one that I just mentioned, and what makes this so interesting is that it comes straight from the mouth of Jesus. It's recorded in Mark, Chapter two, and Jesus is in an argument with the Farris ease. Farris Seas were the self appointed authorities on God and the Bible. And of all the reasons that they had to dislike Jesus. The thing that really set them off was how he came off as contradicting the Bible. For example. The Ferris he's knew that God had commanded that there be no work on the Sabbath Day. But here Jesus was letting his disciples work on the Sabbath Day. They were plucking heads of grain for a snack as they were walking through the grain field. Now that is a little nit picky on the Ferris. He's part consider that work, but from their perspective, it was a clear contradiction of God's law. Why are you letting them do this on the Sabbath? And Jesus. Instead of directly answering them references this obscure passage from the life of David, and what's really interesting is that apparently Jesus gets the name of the high priest wrong. Because the guy abaya Thor, But if you go and look it up in first Samuel chapter 21 right there in black and white, it's him a lack. And apparently, the fair seas. Don't even catch this because they don't call him out on it. Perhaps they're so busy looking for other contradictions that they didn't even bother to check the back story. Okay, so listen to the context behind this so called Bias are him. Elect Contradiction recorded in the Gospel of Mark Chapter two. All started verse 13. Once again, Jesus went out beside the Sea of Galilee. And all the crowd. Began to come to him and he began to teach them. As he was going by. He saw Levi, the son of Alphas, sitting at the toll booth, the place where he was collecting taxes. And he says to him Follow me. He got up and followed him. And it happens. That he is relaxing in his house in Levi's house, and there are many tax collectors and sinners. Reclining at the table with Jesus and his disciples. You know there were many and they were actually following him. And the scribes of the Farris sees when they saw that he was eating with Sinners and tax collectors. They started saying to his disciples he's eating with tax collectors and sinners. Jesus when he heard it says to them. It is not those who are strong who need a doctor. But those who are sick. Did not come to call righteous people. Sinful ones. Now John's disciples and the disciples of the Farris Ease were fasting. And they come and they say that Jesus Why do John's disciples and the disciples of the Ferris he's fast, but your disciples do not fast and Jesus said to them. Wedding. Guests are not able to fast while the bride groom is with them. Are they As long as the groom is within, they cannot fast. The day's air coming when the bride room will be taken from them. And then they will fast in that day. No one saw was a patch of new unstrung cloth on an old outer garment. If he does, the patch shrinks pulls away the new from the old so that the worst terror is made. No one pours new wine in tow. Old wine skins. He does the wine wolf. First the skins. So that the wine is lost along with the skins..

Andy Jesus Bible Farris Robert Levi Samuel David Farris Seas Ah Dr Michael Ziegler Dr Dale Meyer Dr Michael Zigler Maura Baya Thara abaya Thor Sea of Galilee John
"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Michael Zigler begins the new year with a new series of messages in which we meet the savior who can't stand still and is more much more than anyone expected. A lot of people like Jesus. Even if they don't like organized religion, they might be font of Jesus and Jesus for sure is a wise teacher. But if that's all you have to say about him, it's not enough. And so Jesus is too much. Jesus is too much for a merely human description of him, and Dr Daniel Pavel, a joins us later to talk about the book he describes as the gospel of breathless excitement. That's today on the Lutheran hour. Hello. I'm Mark. I sure Thanks for joining us today. Your gifts and prayers help the Luthor in our bring Christ to the nations and the nations to the church. Thank you for your faithful support. Now, here's our speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler. Sometimes he could be Too much. They were just discussing this taker's been getting so bouncy nowadays. That it's time we taught him a lesson. Rabbit, says two piglets and Pooh bear in the classic Children's book, The House at Pooh Corner, written by a A Milne 1928. It's the second in the syriza of books about the animals of the 100 Acre wood. It's the book that introduces the character. Tigger. Now they had never met anything like a Tigger before. And when they did meet him. It was too much. You're the donkey said it best, he said. I don't mind Tigger being in the forest because it's a large forest. Any room to bounce there. But I don't see why he should come into my little corner of it and bounce there. Bouncing is what you're called taking people by surprise. And that's what Tigger did. He was too much, and that's why Rabbit wanted to teach him a lesson. Haven't idea He said, And here it is. We take Tigger out on a long explore. Somewhere. He's never been And then We lose him there. And the next day when we find him Mark my words, he'll be a different Tigger altogether. You'll be a humble Tigger. Be a sad Tigger. Phobia. Small and a sorry, Tigger. Now, piglets who is generally fun of everyone wasn't sure about this idea. Although he did admit to himself privately, that however much you like Tigger. You couldn't deny it. He sure did bounce..

Tigger Jesus Michael Zigler Rabbit Dr Michael Ziegler Pooh Corner Dr Daniel Pavel Luthor Mark
"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"dr michael ziegler" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"For free online resource is archived Audio are mobile app and mortgage. Oh, to Lutheran, our dot orc. We're joined now by our Lutheran. Our speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler. Thank you, Mark. I'm getting to visit with Jennifer Profit today. Jennifer is a co worker of mine at Lutheran, Our ministries. She works as the community manager for a new project that Lutheran, Our ministries is launching its called the Hopeful Neighborhood project. It's a collaborative network committed to improving community well being all around the world..