35 Burst results for "Dr Martin Luther"

"dr martin luther" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

04:30 min | Last month

"dr martin luther" Discussed on Words Matter

"As i listen to ralph abernathy and his eloquent on the generous introduction and then thought about my i wonder who he was talking about..

"dr martin luther" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

07:11 min | Last month

"dr martin luther" Discussed on Words Matter

"On april third nineteen sixty eight. The reverend dr martin luther king junior was in memphis tennessee to lend his support his help and his leadership to the memphis sanitation worker strike. That february black tation workers had walked off the job because two of them have been crushed to death. In a garbage compacting truck there was already unrest and tension because the black workers were paid poorly and treated even worse. They deserved a raise and better working conditions on march twenty eighth. Dr king participated in a huge memphis march but to his dismay it ended in violence with the intention of leading a peaceful march. Later that week. Dr king returned to memphis on april third. That evening he spoke at mason temple. Then the church of god in christ world headquarters as he had throughout the tumultuous struggle for civil rights during the nineteen fifties and sixties. Dr king called on america and americans to live up to the promise of our founding creed and to honor the words of our founding documents. All we say to america speed to what you're saying been china even russia any totalitarian country. Maybe i could understand some of these illegal injunctions. Maybe i could understand the denial of basic first amendment privileges because they have committed themselves to that older that but somewhere i read the freedom of assembly some rare rare. The freedom of speech somewhere ran the freedom of press some rare. The greatness of america is the right to protest far-right. Dr king came to the end of his speech. He talked about his nineteen fifty-eight attempted assassination. The bomb threat that delayed his plane that day and threats made against him in memphis as a storm raged outside the church. Dr king prophetically spoke of his own. Mortality will happen now. We've got some difficult days ahead. But it really doesn't matter with me now because i've been to the mountaintop a long life longevity has explains but i'm not concerned about that now i just wanna do wheel and he's allowed me to go up to the mount oval and i've seen the promised land may not get back with you know the night we get to the talk about anything. I'm not fearing man have seen the the next day. Thursday april fourth nineteen sixty eight dr king was at the lorraine motel with aides and supporters. Reverend billy kyle's of memphis arrived to take the group to dinner at about six pm. Dr king stood with reverend. Kyle's on the balcony outside his room. Three oh six and told musician ben branch to make sure to play take my hand precious lord at the rally that evening then as dr king leaned over the balcony railing to speak with his young aid. The reverend jesse. Jackson he was struck down by an assassin's bullet. He was thirty nine years old. This is a cbs news special report. Dan rather reporting. Cbs news from new york. The reverend martin luther king junior was shot to death by an assassin late today as he stood on a balcony in memphis tennessee. Dr king had found the lead. Another civil rights march in memphis next monday later. That evening in indianapolis indiana presidential candidate. Senator robert kennedy delivered the news of dr king's murder to a crowd of black and white supporters. Could you lower those signs please. I have some very sad news for all of you. And that is that martin luther king. It was shot and was killed tonight. Martin luther king dedicated his life to love and to justice between fellow human beings. He died the cause of that effort in this difficult day. This difficult time for the united states. It's perhaps well to ask what kind of a nation we are what direction we want to move in but we need in the united states is not division but we need in the united states is not hatred what we need in the united states is not violence and lawlessness but his love and wisdom and compassion toward one another feeling of justice to those who still suffer within our country whether they be weighed whether they be black exactly. Two months later robert kennedy himself would be assassinated in los angeles after winning the california democratic presidential primary with that. Let's listen to the reverend. Dr martin luther king junior's. I've been to the mountain top speech in its entirety in my.

april third new york march twenty eighth Jackson Kyle los angeles indianapolis two april third nineteen sixty eig next monday later tonight Martin luther king nineteen fifties Thursday april fourth nineteen thirty nine years old Senator martin luther king china cbs nineteen fifty-eight attempted
Women Share Why They Fight For Reproductive Justice

Ordinary Equality

05:40 min | Last month

Women Share Why They Fight For Reproductive Justice

"Welcome back to ordinary equality. I'm jimmy wilson a writer editor and feminist activist. And i'm kate. Kelly human rights attorney and feminist activist. Today we're talking about an issue that has been undercurrent of a lot of what we've covered so far reproductive justice it's a framework created by black women to center our needs in the midst of a movement that has ignored us for far too long. This episode we're going to discuss some of the reproductive injustice. That continued post emancipation. And how it spurred the founding of a movement bill to address the inequity and the mistrust caused by centuries of reproductive oppression at the end of the episode will learn white folks myself included can do to better center marginalized and underrepresented voices in this conversation. And what organizations are doing on the ground to ensure reproductive justice the slave breeding industry we discussed in episode three left a painful and persistent legacy in this country. Professor jennifer morgan talked about how the historic commodification of black bodies set the stage for ongoing mistreatment of folks embedding generational trauma that persists today that shamas sits beneath much more recent oppression of reproductive rights throughout most of the twentieth century. Eugenics campaigns flourished in the united states quickly becoming the dominant scientific view. The goal was to exterminate all so-called undesirable qualities in society through often-forced selective breeding and sterilization mental illnesses criminal records unwanted racial traits low intelligence levels and even poverty were considered undesirable indicators leading scientists. Believed that all these traits could and should be selectively bred out of the human population by any means necessary as we now know all of these ideas have since been proven to be as false as they are immoral. Time and time again. In the heyday of eugenics thirty-three states allowed involuntary sterilization on groups lawmakers claimed were unfit have children in california mental institutions. Alone about twenty thousand for sterilizations between nineteen o nine and nineteen seventy-nine unsurprisingly. People of color in immigrants were far more likely to be selected as an undesirable group worthy for sterilization mainstream. Scientists pushed these views. As fact margaret sanger the founder of planned. Parenthood got involved in the eugenics movement as she tried to promote reproductive rights. On october sixteenth. Nine hundred sixteen sanger opened the first birth control clinic in the united states. In order to push the idea of birth control rights forward. She consorted with leaders in the ever growing eugenics movement. She even personally advocated for selective breeding herself in one thousand nine hundred ninety one article. She wrote quote. The most urgent problem. Today is how to limit and discourage the over fertility of the mentally and physically defective as damning as that is. There's more to the story. Here's loretta ross. A professor at smith college and former national coordinator of sister song women of color reproductive justice collective on sanger's legacy her involvement in movement. But i also contextualized wbz devos was vaulted with the jenex movement. And so because it was a popular pseudoscience at that time a lot of people were involved in it. And so to single out margaret sanger as the demon is trying to eliminate the black race is just bad historical research because in fact. She was far ahead of her time. Even i called in a sectional list one day because in nineteen teams retired nineteen sixteen. She about poverty. She wrote about racism she wrote about all the inner sexual issues. We're talking about now. One hundred years later she was so ahead of her time and so she was an accident. Early intersection analyst. Who made some mistakes. But then everybody i know. Who's a human being makes. Mistakes if i wanted to do an analysis of everything dr martin luther king junior it wrong. It's an attention. But maybe they demonize him as they do margaret sanger. Many anti-choice advocates claim. That singer sought to eliminate black people from america altogether. That couldn't be less true. She focused the spread of birth control on poor communities many of which were largely populated with people of color. But it's because they were more likely to be susceptible to unwanted pregnancies and she wrote in one thousand nine fourteen enforced. Motherhood is the most complete denial of women's right to life and liberty. It's definitely disturbing to read about many of sanger's eugenic spaced beliefs. Today though she later repudiated everything. About the idea of selective breeding we still have to contend with the damage her involvement in the movement when a well known figure participates in such a harmful ideology it may provide others the justification to do the same. Her language may also have sowed increased wariness and communities of color after atrocities committed by nazi germany on earth. The terror born from the disgusting ideology of eugenics the vocal public support for the movement fizzled and most sleep died in the united states. But for sterilization continued behind the scenes for decades and still takes place today as we'll discuss later in the

Jimmy Wilson Jennifer Morgan Shamas Margaret Sanger Sanger Loretta Ross America Sister Song Women Of Color Rep Wbz Devos Kate Kelly Dr Martin Luther King Smith College California Germany
Heather McGhee - “The Sum Of Us” And The True Cost Of Racism

Democracy Now! Audio

04:20 min | 2 months ago

Heather McGhee - “The Sum Of Us” And The True Cost Of Racism

"Joe biden and vice president khama harris head to atlanta today where they plan to address tuesday's mass shootings at three spa. That killed eight people including seven women. Six of whom were of asian descent. The trip to atlanta was originally scheduled as part of biden's campaign promoting nearly two trillion dollar american rescue plan democrats hailed. The deal has the largest anti poverty law in a generation. One study projects. It will lift. Almost fourteen million americans out of poverty including five point seven million children while the relief plan has broad public support. Not a single republican supported the legislation. We spend the rest of the hour with heather. Mickey author of the new book. The some of us what. Racism costs everyone. And how we can prosper together. Have there is the board chair of color of change and former president of the think tank. Demos thanks so much for joining us. Heather congratulations on your new book. Thank you congratulations on twenty five years. Thank you so much. The whole team at democracy now is celebrating. Hopefully soon we can celebrate together. Well you just sat there and watched once again. The reverend warnock you tweeted while he was speaking and said everyone should do themselves a favor and watched the speech. Can you talk about the significance of what happened in georgia for this whole country. Reverend warnock the first black democrat to be elected from the former confederacy. It was so moving. I mean i really think of the crucible of the twenty four hours between january fifth and january sixth as american promise in american paralyzed nutshell. I we saw a multi-racial coalition a multi-racial anti-racist coalition that was standing up to four years of division pain and suffering and putting the man who is the successor to reverend dr martin luther king marching through the pews of that story to church and putting him in office. Along with reverend with jon ossoff. That was an historic moment. So many of the political class had counted georgia out and yet a coalition that went from black folks who had been organizing for years with stacey abrams and the touch brown Two white women in the suburbs who turned away from the republican party for the first time and generations young people really overcoming a number of barriers to the ballot in the middle of a pandemic. Did the impossible with the promise of relief from this pandemic. it's self disease that has retaliated disproportionately on people of color. But that has shown that our fates are inextricably linked and then not twenty four hours later the dark spirit of american white supremacy. Fueled by a big lie that has as its core logic racism. The idea the common sense that of course a man who was rejected by the majority of people of color could not possibly have lost the presidency. That of course when people of color vote it is somehow suspect and criminal. This is the tension and explore this tension in my book because fundamentally racism has been the most powerful tool wielded against the best of america against american democracy against cross racial solidarity against the american dream itself. I talk about how it's brought us. The inequality era and figures like reverend warnock who put into perspective who in their own lives have so much of the course of american history on display are whom we need to look to right now to remind us that that tool always robs this country. It's best

Khama Harris Atlanta Reverend Warnock Joe Biden Reverend Dr Martin Luther King Jon Ossoff Biden Stacey Abrams Warnock Georgia Mickey Heather Republican Party America
Interview With Roy Kinsey, The Rapbrarian

Good Life Project

06:48 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Roy Kinsey, The Rapbrarian

"Tell me if this is true. Your parents met in a way that kind of foreshadowed your future in a little bit like they didn't mean a bar that didn't mean party is actually true that they met at a library. Of course it's a. I've had my own moments with that story. But it's the absolute truth. My mother was going to interview at. What was the large libraries in sta cultural center and my father was working at a desk. Saugus he Slip some gaming but yet that's that's where they met and then my mother was working actually on the the floor where the music was where all the film were. The vinyls that was this is not harold washington library This is before perr washes number and They met their first date was purple. Rain of the movie yet differs date was to go see preparation. The movie that is not suspicious. I eight yeah yeah. My dad loved france and it was really interesting. Because when i was putting out kinsey a memoir that is very reminiscent to me in a lot of ways of the story of purple rain Imprint the first place that i was asked to come pretty much to drop. The album actually was to first avenue for sold out show. And that's where my father lives now. My father has lived in minnesota for longer than twenty years. Twenty five thirty years probably which is why. This album is a purple winds wire at the vinyl herbal. But it was the first show that i was asked to come in do at prince's club where my father would walk at c be reforming in his hometown. Right before the shutdown so was the first and last show that i got to perform before we before the pandemic times matt. What what was it like for you. It was magical. It was so so amazing. I felt like it's called me. They're a felt like prince called me. You know called me to be there not knowing that things would shut down in a couple of weeks after that. But i think that it's sustained me in a way. I really miss performing and to be sold out show. I was called by desa so Of doom tree who lives in minnesota's a artist and author our own. Right of course asked me to come an open for her. So i do the sold out show and it was just one of the most magical experiences that i've had as far The reception was so so incredible and You know the people of minnesota really made me feel like a star that day in so it was just a lot of moments that were more magical more synchronised than even you know just the forty minutes i was on stage. It was just a whole magical experience that it's sort of like everything was leading up to that moment. Have you talked to your dad about that. His show yeah. It was so funny. My dad is very mysterious guy so when he came i didn't see him. He called me till we. It was a great show. And all that but i think just the way my mind works in the art. That was moving through in the art. That i was making and where i was in that space. I can't lie that i was like. I don't even know if he came. I don't even know if he was even actually here and van but me and my dad had this really interesting connection. I mean you have that connection with your parents. You have the connection with people that brought you into the world doesn't have to be so literal or on the phone or shortly proof or whatever life. I have that tie with my parents. My parents no when. I'm going through something whether i talked to them or not. Like they'll feel it from across town or prostate or cross country in so Randomly two or three weeks later. He sends me a video of me like on my last song. You know rocking the stage of okay. Right he was legit there. that's awesome. yeah. I mean as bad i think You know amazon. There's that connection. There's that sort of thing which. I'm fairly practical person. But there's also certain things like that that i just believe in you just feel something doesn't matter where you are I know you're also really close with grandma coming up as well right. Oh yeah my best details. Tell me more better ellen thompson. She was born in nineteen forty three in mississippi. And i love to speak her name. She was one of the first people that clap from me in made a really big deal out of me knowing how to read on my seventh birthday. She made me de. Protagonist of this book was a story of dr martin luther king junior. It should be around here somewhere. But it's right there so in this in this book that my grandmother gave me my tribute to martin luther king. Junior i am the protagonists of this book. And i'm writing a paper on martin luther king junior at tell the story of his life. But i'm you know in the beginning saying oh telling my cousins rookie creek turtle i have to write this paper on martin luther king junior Go into the story by the end of the story. I've told this whole thing. I turned it in. I get a on the paper. That is the book right. So not only. Did my grandmother clap for me. When she sees me reading. And saying that. I you know had a love. For words you should go to market a garden classes with me and sit in a walk me home and then when i began talking she would call me radio or lawnmower. She said because. I've talked so much if you call me that. And that was a foreshadowing in itself. Right i mean of me getting a on the paper. Maybe the paper was the black album. Right me. Being able to use my words for the upliftment of myself in marginalized communities in it was really just kind of like thinking about this is a power device and words in education literature a are powered by

Sta Cultural Center Prince's Club Minnesota Harold Washington Saugus Kinsey Desa Ellen Thompson France Prince Matt Martin Luther King Dr Martin Luther Amazon Mississippi
22-year-old poet Amanda Gorman delivers stirring inauguration performance

the NewsWorthy

00:36 sec | 4 months ago

22-year-old poet Amanda Gorman delivers stirring inauguration performance

"Have heard about it by now. The words of the youngest inaugural poet in recent. Us history quickly spread around social media after she spoke on stage twenty two year old. Amanda gorman delivered her original poem the hill we climb. During yesterday's inauguration ceremony it was about overcoming obstacles coming together as a nation and taking part in positive change. Gorman told cbs news. She researched speeches. From abraham lincoln. And dr martin luther king as she began writing she told npr. She struggled to finalize the poem until the capital riots. Then she completed it that night. A variety of celebrities including oprah winfrey praised her performance online.

Amanda Gorman Dr Martin Luther King Gorman Cbs News Abraham Lincoln United States NPR Oprah Winfrey
In open letter to Dr. King, Stevie Wonder calls for equality

AP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 4 months ago

In open letter to Dr. King, Stevie Wonder calls for equality

"Singer songwriter Stevie Wonder releases an open letter to Dr Martin Luther King Jr on The holiday honoring the slain civil rights leader in the video, wonder laments the lack of progress against racism. In this 36 years since the holiday became a reality, it makes me physically sick. I am sick of politicians try to find in the easy solution to a 400 year. Problem Wonder once the new administration to form a Truth commission to find solutions and recommendations for

Dr Martin Luther King Jr Stevie Wonder Truth Commission
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:00 min | 4 months ago

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy

"Today is Martin Luther King Day a day when we look back on Dr King's commitment to nonviolent civil disobedience to advance civil rights and reflect on his famous 1963 speech delivered here in D, C. I have a dream. A little Children. One day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin. But by the content of their character, I agree. Following last year's death of a black man, George Floyd at the hands of a white police officer and this month's deadly attack on the U. S Capitol by supporters of President Trump include including far right extremists. Is Dr King's dream still alive? Well, joining us now to talk about that Maya King with politico who covers politics, race and campaigns. My It's always good to talk to you. Thank you so much for joining us today. Hi. Thanks for having me. What might Dr King think of the protests going on today? How far have we really come on racial issues as we mark his birthday. I think it's king were alive today he would be able to draw a number of parallels between his time in his experience and activism and what we've seen really over the past 12 months, with massive protests and civil disobedience, calling out Systemic racism and police violence on But of course, the current threat that we face of violence largely led by white supremacist groups, who have felt largely emboldened by a number of Government leaders of these are things that Martin Luther King also warned us against, and said that you know if America really did continue to try to advance on the platform or legacy of racism and racial terror. That that could cause issues for more than just racial minorities. But the broader community that we see across this country and I think that's especially evident, of course, looking at just how tight security is around Wednesday's inauguration.

Martin Luther King George Floyd White Police President Trump Maya King U. America
"dr martin luther" Discussed on 3 in 30 Takeaways for Moms

3 in 30 Takeaways for Moms

06:46 min | 4 months ago

"dr martin luther" Discussed on 3 in 30 Takeaways for Moms

"Almost hatton last evening. I might soon call with local women's ministry book club reading a book however compromise and one of the women says all of a sudden. This summer i have. He was a murder. virtually. And i don't know much time learning and here's what i'm doing. I'm joining this vocals. Who were and. I'm gonna have this is to ask. She is a learner. We're all learners not arrived. Brazil learner. She stepped into her woke states for her. And she's going to have to ask questions. But i'm also that if you're a white woman and you have children if you live in a neighborhood where most of the people around you a white church when most of the people around you away you send your kids to schools where most of the people are white where you're circles of influence and engagement and exposure. You're just exposed to more of the same bowl suggestion is that you get out of that bowl. You go to other places other churches that are not what you begin to join groups that have people of color in those groups. You actually go to places in town that you've never gone to before and you start to begin to expose yourself to the basis outside of the bubble and instead of talking about dr king while we listen to the words of darpa king by reading the books dr king wrote in those books not just ourselves but actually read those votes works heads and the again to have this special groups around the things that dr king road is not the wrote about the negro american revolution government wrote about the negro american and yet the vast majority of people don't know anything about the american revolution. I think right to the thing often as humans. We bring defensiveness is. Let's explore places as you do. Why if we can just be intentional about letting go about the business so that we can listen and be curious. Learn using things at cachet. Her has okay. Because that's good and so we've listened while we form these relationships and we comfort. Yes and i love this emphasis on expanding outside of what's familiar. What's comfortable and learning and reading and embracing other people's stories and asking questions. That's where this all begins. And i think we need more women in government. I think we need more women who are educating themselves in all of these issues and where would you recommend that women start as we wrap it this interview. I'd love for you to give them a resource. You would love for them to start with given the fact that we are coming up from week day and then going right into walk history month recommendation. Is this that every person. Hearing the of michael's get dr king's book why we can't wait and read that book. Starting point. read that book and then discussing not just read it and walk away from it but actually read it and discussing storrow a reading roofer or reading circle. Have this sessions about what those issues are in that book because what dr king describes in that book is exactly what we're living through today I read this book in preparation for the interview. And i loved it and i found it inspirational and also convicting. Made me think deeply about how i'm participating in not participating in things that matter. And i completely agree that this is a book i read it and underlined it. But now you're right. I need to take that and discuss it with somebody. Make it really part of me by discussing it with other women who i care about and other people that i care about generally and i can't thank you both enough for your time and energy that you've put into educating us in the three and thirty community and thank you so much for the work that you're doing for the world rachel thanks so very much. Thank you rachel. you're doing great work as well. We appreciate while friends. I hope you learned as much from this conversation as i did. It is fascinating to dig into the history of our country and learn more about our systems. Today are still deeply impacted by twentieth centuries segregation azam. When we honor. Dr martin luther king junior. It's important to remember that. He fought to in segregation and discrimination in three major areas education housing and banking. These three are very connected to each other and unfortunately research shows a huge disparity between white america and black america continues to exist in all three of these areas. Today as mike said in the interview we inherited a society that we did not have a hand in creating but we do have a role to play in the society that we pass on to future generations. Dr king's work is far from over and we as mothers can take the first step towards helping his work continue by listening and learning reading and researching and also getting outside our bubble to get to know people of color and to get involved in our local communities as emily said towards the end of the interview even though this learning can feel overwhelming. The truth is that as we learn a next step really does open up for us. Start with the learning and your action steps will become clearer. I want to remind you mike. And emily's organization common ground conversations on race in america which will link in shona. I'll keep you updated when they offered the next session of their ten week facilitated online course this spring and in the meantime please take. Mike's challenge to read dr king's book why we can't wait with a group of people you trust and discuss it together. As i mentioned. I read this book in preparation for the interview and going into it. I thought it would be really heavy dense and long. But i found that i couldn't put it down. It was so inspirational. Dr king tells the story of the movement in birmingham alabama and the summer of nineteen sixty three that began with meticulously organized and bravely executed lunch. Counter sit ins. I love getting to know him and his work more intimately through his first person account a link. The book in the show notes from a small black owned bookstore my friend. Thank you for being here and for carrying about creating a better world for our children for all children. I appreciate you and all the work you do within your homes and communities that. I hope you have a beautiful week with your family..

Mike mike darpa king emily last evening birmingham rachel three twentieth centuries dr king ten week Today both today first step Brazil one king dr this spring
"dr martin luther" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

04:56 min | 4 months ago

"dr martin luther" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Can you talk a little bit about that? Dr Martin Luther King played a significant role within the at this, you know, during during his time frame during the civil rights movement, many of the organizations or the organizing that took place on the civil rights movement. Took place with the shape and Dr Martin Luther King being right at the right of the helmet a lot of these efforts, and I think that speaks glowingly because, while um Dr Martin Luther King was not leading the end of the paper say. There was an alignment as far as idea ideas. There was different that there was a line and as far as what the ultimate goals were, and I think that speaks to the fact that you could have You're different groups were different organizations that you're supporting, advocating. But you could find the linemen around things that are significant, and in this case, it was alarming around equitable treatment for communities of color, and he played a significant role in helping to organize with protest. Organizing with the John Lewis is an individual's of that sort. Throughout his time frame here, sacrificing so much in these moments many do while Dr Bob Dr Martin King is the one that's often time, um, champion and that any ship be in many respects. There's so many others that place to significant role in this movement during that time frame, those within the city those who were not, ah, part of the city itself, and so Wait can be in and we celebrate. Dr. Martin was the team because of the sacrifice that he made because he was a symbol of so much something much greater symbol of that sacrifice. The killer that the commitment that was needed in order to see the changes that were looking, um, that they're really ongoing. You know, we haven't seen the full manifestation of that dream that he spoke of But it's an ongoing commitment. It's not something that we're going to check a box on, but it's something that we have to continue to be routed in going forward. And so I think those alignment with Dr King and the association throughout the years is what has allowed us to continue to push forward in many respects to this day. I'm joined by Trevan Williams, the vice president of marketing and communications for the deep. All Americans have learned about the work that Dr Martin Luther King Jr did for this country. But As a person of color. I'm sure you have a very unique perspective on all of that. What does his work mean to you? Uh, Dr Martin Luther King, Dr Martin Luther King Jr means so much to Me because it really goes back to what I just made makes it to it's the level of commitment. You know, I looked up a few years ago at the trajectory of our country, and I made a decision. But I wanted to get involved with the piano larger level, and I was blessed with the opportunity to join the organization almost two years ago to help an advocate on behalf. I have my own Children, and I'm trying to That set the course so that when they get to my age, they're not having the same battles that I'm having at 30. Plus, you know, 30, plus years of age at this point, and I look at Dr Martin Luther King as that example of the commitment to beyond just Today, but commitment to the future and how much we have to sacrifice in order to do so. In some cases, it's sad that we have to continue to sacrifice at the level that we are, but the reality is is that if it's going to push things forward My three Children down the line that it's completely worth it. And I think many people there are off the country, whether you're black, right or what have you You have the same sense of what you want to do whatever is necessary. You want to commit yourself to ensuring that your family your future? Your Children have a better life than you have. That was the commitment that I get from document document everything I think about him as the father and what it meant to sacrifice or to put his Children. In a better position, and I think that commitment if that's something that at its base level that we can all kind of, um, take that in and realize the commitment that's necessary in order to do that. That's that's it. That's a powerful thing is what wouldn't you do for your Children? Right? That's how I think about it. When I think about Dr Barlow, the king is what the sacrifice that he made for his Children. I want to do that same level of commitment for my Children so that they have a better life. And I am we certainly saw a lot of young people involved in the racial justice protests during the summer of 2020 from those that you talked to the younger generation. How much of an impact has Dr Martin Luther King Jr is legacy had on them and the work they're doing now? I think what was unique about this opportunity is that it provides us with the with the amount of protest in public displays that we've seen over the last few years. I think it allows us To galvanize the young. Basically, that you made mention two and allow them the opportunity to say you're doing many of the same things that are John Lewis or Dr Martin Luther King did in these moments. Um, there's there's interesting video that we did. Leading up to the virtual march in Washington last laugh August as well in which we had one of the long time Snake organizes Courtland Cox, who spoke to effectively the mantle being passed..

Dr Martin Luther King Dr Bob Dr Martin King Dr. Martin Dr Barlow John Lewis vice president of marketing Trevan Williams Washington Courtland Cox
"dr martin luther" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

07:19 min | 4 months ago

"dr martin luther" Discussed on In Black America

"Easygoing of friendly joking. Clowning lovable guy. And nineteen fifty-three. Cain complete is doctrine was granted the degree two years later upon completion of his dissertation married at the time we returned to the south pastor of dexter avenue baptist church in montgomery alabama there. He made his first mar. On the civil rights movement king plight for justice and equal rights began on december fifth nineteen fifty five five days after the late roles. Apartment may the city rules mandating segregation on buses and nineteen fifty-six boycott continued king gain national prominence as a result of exceptional speaking skills and personal courage. Although increasing betrayed as a preeminent black spokesperson kings mobilized mass protests activities during the first five years after the mcgovern rape bus boycott had in on august twenty eighth nineteen sixty. Three king led a massive march on washington. Dc and delivered one of his most passionate addresses of his career even the state of mississippi a state sweltering with the heat injustice sweltering with the heat of oppression be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream. My four little children one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of that character. I have a dream. have a green that one day home in alabama with its vicious racist with having his lips dripping with the words of into position. Another vacation one day right that in alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands a little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. I have a dream. I have a dream that one day every she'll be exalted. Never heal in mounting so be made low. The rough places would be made plain and the crooked places will be made straight and the gore. The law should be revealed and all flesh sell. See it together. This is our whole. This is faith that i go back to the south. With with this faith we will be able to hugh out of the mountain of despair. A stone of who with this faith we will be able to transform the jangling this call of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together to pray together to struggle together to go to jail together to stand up for freedom together knowing that we will be free one day will be the day. This will be the day when all look to be able to sing with new meaning. My country is the sweet land of liberty of land where my fathers died land. But the pilgrim's pride from every mountainside let freedom ring and if america's to a great nation. This must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of new heavens let freedom ring from the mighty mountings new york let freedom ring from the heightening alleghenies of pennsylvania that freedom ring from the snowcap colorado let freedom ring from the slopes of california and not only that let freedom ring from stone mountain of georgia. Let freedom ring from lacob mountain of tennessee that freedom ring from every hill and molehill of mississippi from every mountainside let freedom ring and women's happen when we allow freedom ring when we let it ring from every village and ever hamlet from average state and every city we will be able to speed up that day when all about children. Black men and white men jews and ten clouds. Protestants and catholics will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old negro spiritual free at last free at last. Thank god almighty. Nineteen sixty three time magazine named him. It's person of the year a few months later. In december nineteen sixty four th recipient of the nobel prize for peace after his retirement from no way kane took on new challenges and sale mala. bama he led a voter registration campaign. They ended in the sandwich to montgomery to march. King brought his crusades chicago where he started program to rehabilitate the slums and provide housing and april nineteen sixty eight king lent his support to the memphis sanitation workers. He wanted to discourage violence and wanted to focus national attention on the plight. Of the poor and unorganized workers of the city. The men were bargained for basic union representation and long overdue raises. The strike became the new testing ground for the new direction of the poor. People's campaign was taking which merged civil rights issue economic concerns on the eve of his nation. This king seal see second attempt at a nonviolent. Protest march want do god's wheel and he's allowed me to the mountain look over and i've seen the promised land. I may not get back with you. I want you to know the night. We have people who get to the promise man. Happy tonight. I'm not about feeling have seen the glory civil rights leader. Dr martin luther king junior was shot in the head and is now in critical condition in a memphis tennessee hospital. The latest reports from memphis say. Dr king was hit by gunfire while standing on the balcony of his hotel room. Just before seven o'clock eastern standard time village.

washington alabama tonight december nineteen sixty new york april nineteen sixty california martin luther four little children pennsylvania montgomery kane Three king chicago second attempt nineteen fifty-three august twenty eighth nineteen montgomery alabama december fifth nineteen fifty one day
Ossoff, Warnock 'play the race card': Alveda King

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:38 sec | 5 months ago

Ossoff, Warnock 'play the race card': Alveda King

"Sunday nights. Georgia Senate runoff debates The niece of Dr Martin Luther King had some thoughts about the elections Lance Bride has more from the USA Radio News West Coast Bureau. Georgia Senate Race Debates took place Sunday night. Dr Martin Luther King's niece, Alveda King on Fox says Democrats are playing the race card and that's dangerous. John Assad Rafiah Wanna car a debt that teaching fear anger? Stirring up bitterness. It's called playing the race car, so starting up emotions and fear is very dangerous, but giving solutions Ginger Howard and I and our book, We're not color blind. Teach people how to do that from the West

Georgia Senate Dr Martin Luther King Lance Bride West Coast Bureau John Assad Rafiah Alveda King USA FOX Ginger Howard
Interview With Dr Matteo Luzzeri

Physical Activity Researcher

05:53 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Dr Matteo Luzzeri

"In this last part of our discussion. We review the lessons learned from the empirical work as avella's mateos thoughts on future directions. In this gnassinde line of research from the show notes. You will find a link to mattel's research which will help in exploring his work for dr martin. Luther terry completed his doctoral dissertation in the field of sports psychology at florida state university. He's also professional water skier. A coach and has a very popular water skiing. Podcast i hope you enjoy the last part of our discussion. A new already. Obviously done a massive amount of work of in- inputting this research together. But i was wondering if you have looked at The actual content of those findings or kind of that would be interesting to take the actual writing and do more qualitative research and analysis on those writings to more. Understand what what's going on there. Yeah so that's that's step two This was definitely something that i want to to follow up on Hopefully when i when my current job winds down in a couple of months. I'll be able to to dive into that. I have obviously read all the old writings And i have done some quantitative analyses on them so Defending the fact that was stopping the tricon of me of meaning. What i ended up doing was analyzing The the words of the type of words that were used. And i use the a what is called dinning quiz. Sticking quired word count so this is A software essentially dead categorizes richton words a bits of text of any length in categorizes the amount of wards in percentage across the totality of words on some categories. It's It's called the liw. See any something that has been used He's being used quite a beating psychological research. And so what i did. Was i analyzed for the intervention group. Six writing Sessions the six writings and suffering since if the expressive the expressive writing exercise about a negative. Like the most traumatic event in sports would elicit more negative emotion than the one about the positive and uplifting event or for instance if the reflective writings would elicit more innovative processing words than dependent. Back your exercises. So i did this type of analyses of tried to see more of like a manipulation of of sorts. So were might writing exercises actually eliciting what they were supposed to release it and fortunately that seemed to be seemed to be the case But in terms of qualitative work. Even i haven't done anything formerly on the data yet. Okay so that would be something that. At least i am very much looking forward to hearing when you when you had the time to look into that and in terms of your intervention. So you mentioned that it was fairly short if you had all the time and resources in the world would you look to do something. That is a longer timespan or what. What would you do differently. If you had all the time resources you needed Seats you might. You might be surprised by my answer. But i would actually make it shorter That's interesting provided a war to do this. Study again because one of the point that in my defense the mike committee made is that you're already working with athletes who are burnt out. And you made the case that they're burned out that you screen for them You we can. We can argue about the criteria. Used to of course. But i went through the effort of screening and taking those who were hiring burnout so the less the least demanding of intervention the better and despite my intervention. I don't think. I don't think was super demanding. Because the average time that is spent on these activities was twenty minutes so twenty times. Three was two hours total across two weeks. Some murky enslaving took more So i i don't think he was very demanding but if i had to do it again with burn out athletes i would probably do. It even shorter if i were to just try to increase. Presence of meaning in sports in athletes not necessarily burnt out athletes Probably i would either do the same or more but the the gold standard would be to to being person as opposed to online There are that are studies he now during interventions a lot of mindfulness intervention studies showing a lot of benefits from an online intervention compared to a nonintervention certainly in not a lot of differences between an online intervention in in-person intervention. Buddy seems to me therefore topics that are these There so the the manding and somewhat strange to talk about how to write about possibly im- person might. We might see something a little different. Yeah i mean as a qualitative researcher. I

Avella Dr Martin Luther Terry Florida State University Mattel Skiing Mike Committee Burnout
Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:16 min | 7 months ago

Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Britannica. Today's politicians but most of her life fighting for civil rights, she put her life at risk to change the course of American history, but she's often left out of history books. Let's talk about Constance Baker Motley. Constance Baker Motley was born on September fourteenth nineteen, forty one in new haven connecticut she was one of twelve children born to working class immigrant parents from the West indies. Constance. Was a bright child who grew up attending integrated schools and quickly fell in love with reading. She didn't learn much about black history in school. But what she did learn about civil rights leaders inspired her she decided she wanted to become a lawyer, but constance couldn't afford higher education. She took a job as a maid for a while before moving on to work for the National Youth Administration an organization focused on providing work an educational opportunities for young adults. Constance was giving a speech at a local community center one evening when her oratory skills impressed a wealthy white philanthropist. He, offered to pay for constants college tuition. So in nineteen, forty, one constance began attending college at Fisk University in Nashville. She later wrote that the train ride down to Tennessee was the first time she experienced overt racism and Jim Crow laws after being forced to ride in a broken down segregated train car, it was a perspective changing moment for constance two years into her attendance at Fisk Constance transferred to New York University and finished her bachelor's degree in economics. Then in nineteen, forty, four constance became the first black woman to be accepted to Columbia law school. After graduating from Columbia in nineteen, forty, six constants worked for the NWC peas legal staff under Thurgood. Marshall who later became a court justice over the course of her work at the N. double ACP constance assisted with almost sixty cases that ended up reaching the Supreme Court. She also personally argued ten supreme court cases and one nine. Constance is work integrated multiple southern state universities putting her toe-to-toe with racist governors determined to bar black students from schools. She also helped protect the right to peaceful protests and opened up parks for. Black. Americans. She did all that despite the sexism and racism personally experienced during her legal career. Some judges actually turned their backs on her and refused to hear her speak. But Constance didn't let others biopsies bar her from success. Her work made her a key player in the civil rights movement and she even occasionally represented Dr. Martin? Luther. King Junior. Constance was constantly in danger when she was working in the south racists threatened her life and the lives of other prominent figures in the black community constance was barred from staying in hotels. So she had to stay with local activists, but even that didn't make her feel completely safe her friend Mississippi civil rights leader Medgar. Evers. was murdered his own driveway. So in nineteen, sixty, five constance left her work in the south and moved back to New York City. Shortly thereafter, she became the first black woman to serve in the New York State Senate. She was also elected president of the borough of Manhattan which made her the first woman in that role. During her time as a politician constance focused on raising up under served communities in the city like Harlem and East Harlem in nineteen sixty, six president Lyndon Johnson appointed constance to the US. District Court in the southern district

Constance Baker Motley Fisk Constance Constance District Court Supreme Court Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network New York State Senate Fisk University Columbia Law School New York City West Indies New York University National Youth Administration Connecticut Nashville Mississippi Manhattan Lyndon Johnson
Politician, Cardiss Collins

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:40 min | 7 months ago

Politician, Cardiss Collins

"Today's politician was one of the longest serving women of color in the US Congress. She spent several of her over two decades of service being the only black woman in the chamber. Let's talk about Cardis Collins. CARDIS. Robertson. Was Born on September twenty fourth nineteen thirty one in Saint Louis Missouri. When cardis turned ten, her family moved to Detroit where she attended high school. After graduation, cardis moved to Chicago to live with her grandmother and find a job. She worked in a mattress factory before joining the Illinois Department of Labor as a stenographer. At the same time, she also studied accounting at Northwestern University. In. Nineteen fifty eight Cardis Mary George W Collins. The couple had a son Kevin the following year. After graduating from college in Nineteen, Sixty, seven, Cardis was promoted to secretary then became an accountant and auditor for the Illinois Department of Revenue. All the while she supported her husband's campaigns, for Alderman, committee men and US representative. Cardis also gained her first direct political experience as Committee Woman of the Twenty Fourth Ward Democratic Organization. In nineteen seventy George won seat in the US House representing the predominantly African American west side of Chicago. He was elected following the death of his predecessor. He served two terms and was particularly passionate about improving the lives of black people serving in the military. Shortly, after winning election to serve another term George died in a plane crash. Carts was devastated by the loss of her husband. Through her grief. She announced her candidacy to fill her husband's congressional seat. She was supported by the city mayor and won the nomination with eighty four percent of the vote. She then won the election on June Fifth Nineteen, seventy-three with ninety, two percent of the vote that made Cardis the first black woman to represent Illinois in Congress. Transition into her new congressional role wasn't easy. She was politically inexperienced and wasn't confident enough to voice all of her opinions right away. She relied on her colleagues to show her the ropes and she later said once people learned I had something to say I gained confidence. Hardest is main goal is a representative was to improve life for the on Chicago's West Side. Along with other low income communities and people of color across the country. She always kept the well being of her constituents as her main focus. Spending eight days a month in her district to remain accessible. Because of the attention, she paid her voters she went back her seat comfortable margins for two straight decades. Throughout her tenure, she would serve on several committees including the influential committee on Energy and Commerce. She started serving on the committee on government operations. She participated in two different subcommittees later, working to tighten regulations on the transportation of toxic materials and improve air travel safety. In nineteen seventy nine. Cardis was elected president of the Congressional Black Caucus. She was only the second woman to earn this honor. She openly criticized President Jimmy Carter's record on civil rights, as well as his failure to make Dr Martin Luther King Junior's birthday a national holiday. Cards spent much of her time in Congress defending affirmative action programs and ensuring equal funding and attention to women and people of Color. Curtis staunchly advocated Breast Cancer Awareness. In nineteen ninety, she wrote a law expanding Medicare coverage for elderly and disabled women to receive. Mammograms. She also designated October as national breast cancer awareness month. In nineteen ninety-seven after twelve consecutive terms cardis decided not to run for re election she returned to Chicago and later decided to move to Alexandria Virginia. She passed away on February third twenty thirteen. She was eighty one years old. Cars Collins overcame grief and hesitation to speak up and make a positive difference for people in her district and across the country.

Cardis Mary George W Collins Chicago Congress Illinois Department Of Labor Congressional Black Caucus Committee Woman Representative Robertson United States Twenty Fourth Ward Democratic Illinois Department Of Revenue Northwestern University Us House Saint Louis Missouri Detroit Illinois Kevin Breast Cancer Awareness Cardis Energy And Commerce
Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:19 min | 8 months ago

Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is encyclopedia will Manica. All month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up against injustice and four a better world. Today we're talking about an American civil rights activist whose work began as a student and extended throughout her life and beyond. She was one of the leaders of the sit in and Jalen movements continuing to fight for a more just society even when faced with serious harm. According to The New York Times her FBI file was over four hundred pages long. Let's talk about Patricia Stevens do. Patricia Gloria Stevens was born on December ninth nineteen, thirty, nine fifteen months after her sister Priscilla who would go on to be partner in many organizing efforts. Patricia was the second of three kids born to Lottie Mae Powell Stevens, and Horace Walter Stevens. The Stevens family lived in Belgrade Florida for most Patricia Youth. By the time she was thirteen years old Patricia was very aware of the discrimination she faced for being black and was ready to protest. She and her sister refused to go to the designated colored window at their local dairy queen. Instead, they stood in line for the window marked whites only. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, seven Patricia started school at Florida Am University. Two years later in Nineteen fifty-nine Patricia and Priscila attended a workshop put on by the Congress of racial equality or core on nonviolent civil disobedience. Patricia then started a local chapter of the organization in order to continue the work, she tried to tackle it just thirteen years old integration. The following year on February. Twentieth Nineteen Sixty Patricia, her sister, and some other students sat down at a whites only lunch counter at a Woolworth Tallahassee and refused to get up until they were served. Nineteen days earlier, four guys sat down at a similar lunch counter in Greensboro North Carolina officially kicking off. Since movement across the South Patricia and ten of her peers were arrested rather than paying three hundred dollar Fine Patricia and. Out Forty nine days in jail. Their determination to serve their time as a statement became a norm when others were arrested and charged on fairly. Patricia leadership and courage caught the attention of people around the country support of the cause including Jackie Robinson Eleanor Roosevelt Harry Belafonte, and James. Baldwin. Dr Martin. Luther King. Junior. Sent the sisters telegram that said. Going to jail for a righteous cause as a badge of honor and a symbol of dignity. After she was finally released, Patricia continued the fight to change her city and country. One of her fellow activists was a man named John D do junior. He was law school at Florida Am University. The two got married in nineteen, sixty three and would go on to have three children together for their honeymoon Patricia and John went to the march on Washington and heard Dr King's I have a dream speech. The following year in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, Patricia took on a new role in corps. She served as field secretary for a voter education and Registration Project in North Florida under her leadership. program. More. Voters than any other regional program in the south. Patricia also worked to improve the lives of workers, the poor and other underserved populations in the US. But her activism took a physical toll on her. After being hit in the face by a can of tear gas, Patricia is were injured and she was forced to wear dark glasses for the rest of her life in nineteen sixty, seven, ten years after she enrolled. Patricia graduated from Florida Am. University it took her all of a decade to get her degree because she spent periods of time traveling around the US to rally energy behind the civil rights movement. She was also suspended multiple times by the

Patricia Patricia Gloria Stevens South Patricia Patricia Youth Florida Am University Florida Lottie Mae Powell Stevens Horace Walter Stevens Luther King Harry Belafonte Stevens Jalen Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan United States FBI Woolworth Greensboro John D
The March ON Washington, 57 Years Later

20/20

06:18 min | 9 months ago

The March ON Washington, 57 Years Later

"Hello I'm Deborah Roberts those images from today an echo of something fifty seven years ago when a quarter of a million people I descended on the nation's capital protesting for jobs and freedom. On today's anniversary of Dr Martin Luther. King Junior's I have a dream speech we at twenty twenty or proud to present the march a documentary directed by Jonah Comfort and narrated by Denzel Washington originally made in twenty thirteen to commemorate the Marches Fiftieth Anniversary. Some of those voices sadly are now gone, but their legacy lives on. I have had to tell my children about the segregates what it means. Seven year old daughter she wanted to go from town. And we found it necessary to explain to That she couldn't go to fun town because she was colored. To attempt to explain a system like unjust and. Segregation. Six year old child is very difficult thing. In nineteen sixty three. The Movement for civil rights came to the most segregated city in the American. South. Birmingham Alabama. All. Resistant to the gration. Thoroughly, segregated. City the United States. had. More on saw on. WILL HOMES ENSURE A. United. States. Many other southern city. Okay. Birmingham is bombing him. They have quarries and conducting the quarry business you used dynamite. So there are a lot of local people who are expert in Isa Dynamic. Teenage. Board riding a bicycle had been knocked off the bike and castrated. Young couple had gone to the City Hall to get a wedding license. Came around the corner. And Brush shoulders with Birmingham policeman and he pulled out his pistol and pistol whipped the more to the ground. It was a horrible heinous place. The campaign was to be led by the organisation's Ben Thirty four year old leader. The Reverend Dr Martin Luther King Junior. WHO HEARD PEOPLE? who except in dusted oppression and second-class citizenship. in an attempt waiting go the Paul Pompidou. The time all we ripe to do right. Dr King was the voice of Civil Rights from the bus boycott on but by the end of nineteen, sixty, two, he recognized. That the civil rights movement. was. Losing what he called its window and history. The. South was still segregated and he said we need to take more of a risk. We need to go for broke I need to go for broke. I think he felt that. We have to be willing to give our lives to put an end to segregation. If we do. Then segregation will end even if we die. That was the reason he chose. Birmingham. For the victory won some even have to face physical death. We must come to see the now some things. So eternally true that they're worth dying for, and if a man has not discovered something that he will die for he fit live. In January of Nineteen, sixty three. One man was determined to stop kings desegregation message from spreading any further. Birmingham's police chief Eugene. Bull Connor. Negro is off the attempted takeover of our country the lazy. The beat nate, the ignorant and buy some misguided religious and bleeding ought. Do, you think you can keep coming in the present situation of segregation I may not be able to do it, but I'll die trying. Overcoming Bull Connor segregationists zeal not to mention his jails would take something special. And in the winter of sixty, three king would find out just how special that effort needed to be. Spent all of January February and March nineteen sixty three training people to accept nonviolence to go down into marches and be willing to go into bull connor's jails. But. Conner's jails were so fearsome that no matter how much they exhorted people no matter how many freedom songs they sang, how many prayers they prayed, how much fervor there was in the meetings, people wouldn't show up to risk going into those jails.

Birmingham Bull Connor Dr Martin Luther Dr King Deborah Roberts Negro Denzel Washington Isa Dynamic Twenty Twenty Jonah Comfort City Hall Alabama Paul Pompidou United States. Ben Thirty Conner Nate Bleeding
March On Washington Demands Racial Equality

Wealth Creator Radio

00:13 sec | 9 months ago

March On Washington Demands Racial Equality

"Some 57 years after Dr Martin Luther King Jr is I have a dream speech, and thousands turned out yesterday in Washington, D C to commemorate the historic address. People travelled from across the country take part in that rally.

Dr Martin Luther King Jr Washington
Thousands gather at March on Washington commemorations

Markley and Van Camp

00:44 sec | 9 months ago

Thousands gather at March on Washington commemorations

"Morse, we must answer the call of institutional racism. Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee among the speakers at today's march on the National Mall. It comes On the 57th anniversary of the march, led by Martin Luther King Jr The anniversary comes amid a summer of nationwide protests and racial unrest following the death of George Floyd. It also comes amid protests after the police involved shooting of Jacob Blake, who was shot multiple times in the back. George Floyd died after a police officer pinned him to the ground by his neck. And the March on Washington today has been named by organizer's as Commitment March. Get your knee off our necks. Speeches today or at the Lincoln Memorial site of Dr Martin Luther King Jr is I have a dream speech and just blocks away from a memorial in King's

Dr Martin Luther King Jr George Floyd Congresswoman Sheila Jackson L Lincoln Memorial Jacob Blake National Mall Morse Washington Officer
How Does Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Exercise Work?

BrainStuff

05:49 min | 9 months ago

How Does Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Exercise Work?

"The past fifty, two years teacher and diversity trainer Jane Elliott has been stirring up trouble on the subject of racism. It can still be uncomfortable squirm in your seat stare at your shoes uncomfortable when she subject someone to the very same exercise she I unleashed on third graders more than half a century ago designed to expose racist thinking. Something, her method can get downright mean but again, the subject is racism, it should be troubling. Elliott came to prominence when the day after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Junior in nineteen, sixty, eight, sheep herself a white woman took her classroom of all white third graders in. Riceville Iowa and decided to teach them what it was like to face discrimination. She separated the kids into two groups those with Brown eyes and those with blue and proceeded to proclaim the. Brown. Is these superior group she allowed the group extra privileges more time recess seats at the front of the room they were told they were cleaner smarter more talented. How children reacted to this newfound pecking order was startling. The Brown eyed group immediately began to wield their dominance. The blue is almost immediately slipped into the role of subordinates. Anger flared disputes popped up. After switching roles a few days later, which gave both sides of the classroom taste of being in the lesser group the exercise ended. Many parents complained after reading about what had happened in Elliott's classroom through student essays printed in the local paper. A month or so later, Johnny Carson invited Elliott to appear on his late night talk show she became a national story. Many praised efforts at her students is but not everybody a two, thousand five storied Sonian magazine reported hundreds, viewers, wrote letters, saying Elliott's work appalled them how dare you try this cruel experiment out on white children? One said black children grow up accustomed to such behavior but white children, there's no way they could possibly understand it. It's cruel to white children and will cause them great psychological damage. Elliott spoke with us for the article that this episode is based on from her home in Iowa. She said, you think that's traumatizing try living that way for a lifetime. Elliott taught for years before she decided to take her anti-racism lesson out of the classroom and Corporate America. She's also led the exercise for the US Department of Education and other governmental groups. She's appeared before numerous church and school assemblies she was on. Oprah Winfrey's TV show several times in June of twenty twenty. She appeared on the tonight show starring Jimmy Fallon. She often faces uncomfortable and sometimes angry reactions but her goal as it has been for the past fifty two years is education. She says, it's the best weapon against racism. But good education about racism and race is hard to find. Elliott said, that's because the educators believe the same thing that they were taught and they were taught the same thing I was, which is that there are three or four different races and you can tell what a man's intelligence is by the color of his skin or the shape of his head. You can't lead people out of ignorance if you're still teaching the Columbus discovered America and we came here to civilize these savages. Will need to teach the three RS of rights respect responsibility if teachers would respect the rights of those students to learn the truth and be held responsible for seeing that they present them with the truth we could kill racism in two generations is not a doubt in my mind that could be done. Elliott at eighty seven years. Old has seen. America, grapple with racism all her life. She's marked major mile posts in the struggle over the past fifty years or so the civil rights movement and the assassination of doctor king in the sixties, the race riots in Miami's Liberty City in nineteen eighty and in Los. Angeles after the Rodney King beating in nineteen ninety, two, the protests in Ferguson. Missouri and twenty fourteen after the killing of Michael Brown and in Baltimore Maryland in two thousand fifteen after that of Freddie Gray and in Charleston south. Carolina. That same year after a church massacre. There are many others. But the problem she has been relentlessly attacking Elliott says, goes far beyond the occasional race-based. Clara. For people of Color in the United States facing racism is an everyday fight every minute of every day. Elliot said. It's only been going on with me for fifty two years. I know black women who have been doing this for eighty nine years and their mothers did and their grandmothers dead and their great is dead and their daughters and their granddaughters and their great granddaughters are going to have to do. It must be get off our polyunsaturated fatty acids and do something about this. I get paid to talk about it. They aren't even allowed to talk about it. One of the biggest hurdles in educating people about racism in the United States Elliott says is that most everyone knows it exists and knows that it's harmful but few are motivated to change it. She stood in front of. and asked who among the white people in the room would want to switch places with a black person no one ever volunteers. She cautions that recognizing the problem is only the first step but Elliott is nothing if not persistent, she says, she'll continue to educate for the next fifty years. She'll push her mantra of one race the science behind the simple words it's clear. According to the National Human Genome Research Institute your genome, the bodies blueprint that contains all of your DNA is ninety, nine point nine percent the same as every human around you. And she says, she will urge people to get out and vote November no hope of electing leaders who will attack racism as she has had on.

Jane Elliott Michael Brown Iowa United States America Dr. Martin Luther National Human Genome Research Us Department Of Education Oprah Winfrey Jimmy Fallon Johnny Carson Sonian Magazine Twenty Twenty Corporate America Missouri Elliot Rodney King Clara
Obama to deliver eulogy for civil rights icon John Lewis in Atlanta

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:59 sec | 10 months ago

Obama to deliver eulogy for civil rights icon John Lewis in Atlanta

"Report The Life and Legacy of John Lewis. Family, Friends, congressional leaders and former presidents have have gathered gathered at at Ebenezer Ebenezer Baptist Baptist Church Church in in Atlanta Atlanta to to say say goodbye goodbye to to congressman congressman and and civil civil rights rights icon icon John John Lewis, Lewis, CBS CBS News News correspondent correspondent Alison Alison Keith Keith at at the the beginning beginning of of the the Celebration Celebration of of Life for John Lewis Historic Ebeneezer Baptist Church. Joint with churches all over the nation, bringing a bill 80 times to honor the man who faced death throughout his life and his battle for civil rights. The funeral is being held at the church where Dr Martin Luther King Jr and his father once preached former President George W. Bush. John Lewis. Always looked outwards. Not in words he always thought of others. Former President Barack Obama will deliver Lewis's eulogy. CBS News Special Report. I'm Jim Krystle. And, of course, stay with

John John Lewis John Lewis Historic Ebeneezer Ebenezer Ebenezer Baptist Bapt Alison Alison Keith Keith CBS President George W. Bush Congressman Dr Martin Luther King Jr Atlanta Jim Krystle Barack Obama President Trump
Ebenezer Baptist Church a fitting site for John Lewis' funeral

AP 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 10 months ago

Ebenezer Baptist Church a fitting site for John Lewis' funeral

"Congressman John Lewis is lying in repose at the Georgia capital are Julie Walker reports capital. Members of the public pay their respects that on Thursday, a private service will be held at Ebenezer Baptist Church, or Dr Martin Luther King Jr s funeral was also held. Lewis died July 17th at age 80

Congressman John Lewis Dr Martin Luther King Jr Ebenezer Baptist Church Julie Walker Georgia
Civil rights icon Lewis to lie in repose at Georgia Capitol

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 10 months ago

Civil rights icon Lewis to lie in repose at Georgia Capitol

"John Lewis will lie in repose at the Georgia capitol in his hometown of Atlanta today in one of the last memorial services for the long serving congressman and civil rights icon before he is buried today's service is part of a series of public remembrances for Lewis that began over the weekend members of the public will be able to pay their respects following a ceremony in his honor then on Thursday a private service will be held at Ebenezer Baptist church where Dr Martin Luther king junior's funeral was also held Lewis died July seventeenth at age eighty four to sharecroppers during Jim crow segregation he was beaten by Alabama state troopers in nineteen sixty five during a civil rights March across the Edmund Pettus bridge in Selma at the nineteen sixty three March on Washington Lewis spoke ahead of king's I have a dream speech and in two thousand eleven was awarded the medal of freedom by president Obama I'm Julie Walker

Washington Lewis Alabama Jim Crow Dr Martin Luther Georgia Julie Walker Barack Obama President Trump King John Lewis Selma Edmund Pettus Bridge Ebenezer Baptist Church Congressman Atlanta
"dr martin luther" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"dr martin luther" Discussed on BrainStuff

"The O'Hara's says that Reagan's John was to frame king story as another example of American exceptionalism quote. We had an injustice and we corrected it. It's all about the power of individuals in the power of American democracy, these will be key elements in terms of how the civil rights movement comes to be memorialized international culture. By nineteen eighty seven four years after the creation of Mlk Day and nearly twenty years after King's murder on a hotel balcony in Memphis Tennessee, a full seventy six percent of Americans had a favorable opinion of king, and those numbers only continued to grow by nineteen ninety nine king came in second on a Gallup survey of twentieth century individuals that Americans admired most behind mother theresa. Political Scientists Sheldon Appleton wrote in one, thousand, nine, hundred, five younger college educated White Americans tended to support king, and both of these demographics were larger in nineteen, eighty-seven, than in nineteen, sixty six. He also noted that the widespread lack of knowledge about king and the civil rights movement in general, might have also influenced earlier perceptions. Appleton wrote perhaps recent media. Treatment of King has helped to induce selective memory by some middle, aged and older Americans. Of course Americans have every reason to venerate Martin Luther, King and to celebrate his accomplishments. He didn't do it alone, and he had his flaws like any other human, but as carton explains he also had an undeniable gift for challenging, Americans, then, and now to make good on the promise of our founding principles Carson said he had that ability to link the goals of the civil rights struggle to. That most Americans believe that they have that's what he was doing in the I. Have a dream speech in Washington we as a nation justified, our independence with a human rights statement called the Declaration of Independence The question is. Can we.

King Sheldon Appleton O'Hara Carson Tennessee Memphis Reagan murder Martin Luther John theresa carton Washington
"dr martin luther" Discussed on The Daily Article

The Daily Article

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"dr martin luther" Discussed on The Daily Article

"If you're looking for Valentine's Day gift your loved one will remember. You might consider a handwritten note from Dr Martin Luther King Junior sometime sometime in the mid nineteen sixties. He was asked to define the meaning of love. Dr King Road love is the greatest force in the universe. It is the heartbeat of the moral cosmos. He who loves is a participant in the being of God then he signed the note. Best wishes Martin l King Junior. The rare note is for sale for forty two thousand dollars. If only everyone agreed with Dr King. One way our our culture rejects. Dr King's ethic of love is by rejecting those who most deeply share his faith. A Penn State study found that American society is is in a downward spiral of interreligious intolerance Highly Religious Protestants are among the groups that feel most targeted for their religious group. Membership and beliefs in the lead investigator noted when people see their religion or religious beliefs mocked in the public domain or criticized by political leaders. These experiences signaled to members of entire religious groups. That they don't belong a case in point the Academy Awards the Twenty Twenty Oscars were watched by the smallest audience ever according to variety twenty three point six million viewers tuned in Sunday night. The show had six million fewer viewers than last last year however an audience of twenty three point six million is still larger than the population of one hundred. Seventy seven of the world's countries the cultural the popularity of the Academy Awards together with the credibility they bestow on actors directors and films can make it difficult to resist the worldview Hollywood promotes. So if we are to believe the movie and Television Industry Gender is fluid same sex relationships are to be celebrated LGBTQ people are to be accorded accorded protected status marriage is optional and divorce is nearly inevitable and life begins and ends whenever we say it does I could cite popular ocular movies and TV shows that proclaim each of these values if we disagree we are branded as homophobic bigoted. And even dangerous and we haven't even discussed the sexualize super bowl halftime show. If my grandchildren had been watching the game with us we would have been forced to change the Channel One solution for Biblical Christians is to avoid all popular media but even if that were possible is it biblical.

Dr King Road Dr King Martin l King Junior Twenty Twenty Oscars Dr Martin Luther Academy Awards investigator Hollywood
"dr martin luther" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"dr martin luther" Discussed on WTOP

"The legacy of Dr Martin Luther king junior honor today in the district I'm Melissa Howell WTOP at twelve thirty one hello world disarming you and me lowered the prime rate that's the question you can never answered nor can you tell us how any of the new laws that he's advocating would have stopped the tragedy in Virginia beach last year he can answer that question either gun rights advocates feel Richmond's capital square and the streets of the city on this chilly and sometimes tense Monday afternoon they've been rallying and lobbying against tighter gun control laws in the Commonwealth W. T. of these Max Smith is in Richmond he joins us live some Max what's been going on during the past ninety minutes or so I guess the rally wrapped up yes the rally wrapped up just as the General Assembly session gaveled in for the day as it does every year that rally in the last hour or so as lawmakers go into their caucus meeting that caught up with them Democrats outside their caucus meeting putting up on the Lopez of Arlington who said basically look yes there are thousands of people here today but they're also thousands of people who voted for Democrats gave Democrats the majority in Richmond this year and that's why Democrats are moving forward on some of these gun bills that have so disturbs so many of the people who are out here today wearing orange guns save lives stickers or someone even was holding up a sign that said the American revolution began overlap you heard that does sound bite we just played from that rally Vallier who was talking about the the legislative session and the laws that Virginia governor Ralph north on is backing what are some of those laws that these protesters gathered around to dispute today there's a few one is one that actually it was struck by the Senate but there was a proposal that would have created a Virginia ban on assault weapons that no longer under consideration in the Senate but the ones that are moving forward from Democrats one that I heard it pretty heated dispute between advocates and US senator Jennifer Boyce go of loud in Fairfax county over is a red flag law that is one that's been passed in more than ten other states and it basically allows a court you temporarily removed guns from someone who is determined to be a threat to themselves or others while that can also can't stop mass shootings it's also I intended to help deal with the the problem of suicide and so there are a number of bills like that the one handgun a month permit permission to by law that was repealed in twenty twelve by the Republican legislature in Virginia and there's also a universal background checks but generally there's opposition among the people who showed up here today many wearing camouflage or carrying long guns in the area just outside the small securities on they all basically say no laws having to do with guns whatsoever okay thank you Max that's W. T. O. P.'s Max Smith part of our live team coverage of the gun rights rally in Richmond's of course more big news from Capitol Hill lists afternoon that's happening this week president trump's legal team just filed a new brief spelling out his defenses preparations move ahead for the effective start of his Senate impeachment trial tomorrow let's get the latest from W. T. O. P.'s Mitchell Miller the one hundred and ten page brief argues that the president did absolutely nothing wrong and that the articles against him abuse of power and obstruction of Congress are not impeachable offenses it also calls the case a dangerous perversion of the constitution the seven house managers who will press the case meanwhile have been meeting at the capitol and conducted a walkthrough in the Senate chambers their preparations come as political leaders continue to hash out details over how the trial will proceed on Tuesday the Senate's top Democrat Chuck Schumer complains there's been little guidance from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell leader McConnell has still not come up with his proposal that's unheard of we don't know what it is I as democratic leader don't know what it is but McConnell is said he plans a trial that will be based on the model of the impeachment trial of former president Bill Clinton on Capitol Hill Mitchell Miller WTOP news it's twelve thirty five coming up next it's a day of reflection at the seas Martin Luther king junior Memorial Day so are you the type of guy the once look put together but doesn't want to spend hours at the mall finding you clothes so you can look great at the office on the road or even just on the weekend with friends and.

Melissa Howell WTOP Dr Martin Luther
"dr martin luther" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

11:16 min | 1 year ago

"dr martin luther" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Of talk about of course we could talk about Dr Martin Luther king your thoughts on on him and boy I'd like to have a penny for his thoughts on some of the things that are going on today that I would I I mean I I'm dead serious because I was raised on him when I say raised on him and I'll never get he was in the sixth grade I had a teacher at PS two oh six in Brooklyn by the name of mis keys who for lack of a better term was a drunk old battleaxe no no I'm all right I'm dead serious it was known for that and she used to sleep basically through the morning and but what she did she well we all had to have the read the Herald Tribune at the time and it was a newspaper much like that I felt was like the times it it look like that and we had to take three articles we had to read it every morning take three articles every student in the class and we had to describe him you know put the articles in our own words and explain it so like to get to get up on the current events yeah yeah and that became my interest in current events but you have to remember well obviously you don't remember but at that time that was all about civil rights it was about doctor king was about the movie and it was about governor George Wallace and trying to keep Alabama university of Alabama segregated so it was about the dogs and the fire hoses so when you reading that every day a year eleven twelve year old kid it has a lasting impression on you sure it does it really really does and then obviously I've got a little older and I never get it at you know when he was assassinated in April nineteen sixty eight I believe it was April fourth nineteen sixty eight I'll never forget that day either because I was a student of Brooklyn tech and I'll never forget my black friends committed to school the next day and like the pain that was on their faces you know the anguish that was on their faces and it really hit home so any of your thoughts folks on doctor Martin Luther king feel free to give a call but like I say there is so much to talk about today this is the impeachment stuff going on there is the the bail reform what should I say the lack of bell look no the failing Belle river yeah let's call it that I'm not calling it the bail reform anymore I'm going to call it to fail reform because it is absolutely imbecility okay just absolutely moronic and of course we have these Major League Baseball scandal which that totally blows my mind for a lot of reasons listen cheating is cheating okay but some of the things that I'm hearing from from people with in baseball like laci sees a bath you god bless them I love CC but CC shot up with you know we feel cheated you feel cheated by the Astros and the red Sox well how do you think the teams that you will be eating and the games you were winning what you had did did the big juicer in your line of Alex Rodriguez and it will listen I love any pet it any better use and and and the other guys use one little Roger Clemens a lot of hypocrisy so what like let's not to be the pot calling the kettle black here okay and you know what really blows my mind meeting I'm here with comments like from fans from people like all of a sudden they're indignant when somebody else cheated but when their team was cheating well what we picking on a guy a good guy you know what that sounds like it sounds like the world of politics yeah and it's very very early similar and since it would talk about the about the world of politics well it sounds like the world of politics it sounds like tons of hypocrisy because there is plenty of hypocrisy going on yeah all and then of course we've got the Kansas City Chiefs and the San Francisco forty Niners going to the Superbowl yeah and I I will tell you the chiefs game it was a good game the forty Niners game stock I mean I it unless you were a forty Niners fan it stunk I mean they absolutely I don't remember the Packers looking that bad yeah well for the casual football fans out there that first game was a very fun to watch and like you saying that the later game in the afternoon was they they were so it was twenty seven nothing at halftime or something like that you know it though it was I mean it was just it was over yeah so I mean you get a hit the snooze button on that it was over but the chiefs have been installed as your early one point favorites over the forty Niners and to get back to baseball for one second tomorrow is a big day for Yankee fans anyway because they listen there's no suspense Derek Jeter is going to get voted into the hall of fame only spent as you get unanimous that's exactly right you took the what age right out of my mouth big man does he follow in the footsteps of his beloved teammate Mariano you know that that is the only question does he get in unanimously what do you think Reggie think is gonna get in unanimously you know what I think is the one guy the whole point a to point to defect to say he couldn't play died as average defense of the the the point of that I agree with you I agree with the backlog is gone I mean that you don't have all these players stacked up as they were here where you got okay right I have fourteen names like only like ten so yeah let's listen to what I go back to the day when sandy Koufax didn't get in unanimously and I said to my I think at that time he had gotten the most votes but it was unanimous or made was is that maybe Siva following when that was their own until both got any names there will be three guys who say that the most votes ever right that that's really what you're looking at so Koufax's when he finished like ninety six low nineties mid nineties I think about on the vote yet even he was unanimous he won a yogi Berra who is on his second ballot the heating in the front yogi and Whitey Ford wait in together not why he wanted it seventy four mail is that right that's right you're right you're right you're right and why you to get on the first ballot okay yeah you're right about that but anyway listen we were talking about hypocrisy Meanie yes and speaking of a pocket see this one guy to me and I used to like him okay I know where you're going to now yeah but it's I used to like him because I used to like a lot of the Democrats and the person I'm talking about is one senator Chuck Schumer the president's afraid of the truth most Americans my guess is even Republicans know what the true face and no he's hiding it we Democrats aim to get the truth well let me tell you something folks if you haven't read it and you still have yesterday's New York Post I suggest you turn to page thirty four postscript palette ticks because the polls with the post did they read a statement for the record of senator Charles E. Schumer the trial of the president February eleventh nineteen ninety nine and what they did many they highlighted comments from Schumer that I'd be it's hysterical when you think that a let me just read something here it has shaken me that we stand at the brink of removing a president not because of a popular ground swell to remove him and not because of the magnitude of the wrongs he's committed but because conditions in in late twentieth century America has made it possible for a small group of people who hate Bill Clinton and his policies to very cleverly and very doggedly exploit the institutions of freedom that we hold dear and almost succeeded in on doing cats right now I'd be the hello thank god for the internet because if it did you know that if politicians would never be I mean they're not held to account anyways but they will at least we could go back in site some evidence where it's like hello you said these words about you know of a president was being impeached and now you're saying that it's just it's really it's nice to have that we could go back and see you know what they did say and call them out as much as we can for it because it is not let me let me read another one for you if you had asked me now remember folks this is Chuck Schumer February eleventh nineteen ninety nine we're talking about the impeachment of of Bill Clinton if you had asked me one year ago of people like this with such obvious political motives could you is our courts played the media and realize the legislative branch to achieve their ends of bringing down the president I would have said not a chance that doesn't happen in America and the call phone he's on this guy it's unbelievable saying the complete opposite today he's arguing you know just against that now he said nineteen ninety nine twenty years twenty one years later raising it is absolutely amazing but again folks that structure where we're talking a peach meant but talking MLK we'll talk this respect for our police which continues to gets can have it it's reprimand I'm just here to we have an example that will will will get until and we'll also talk about I I which really me tick me off and you've heard me hurt me last week sitting here with with Bernie talking about well who would I vote for this and that and and one of the guys that I really felt as an option the only option from the Democratic Party was Michael Bloomberg but then I heard Michael Bloomberg comments on the view screw that screw that and then at seven forty you go to one on one to listen we've got the Brooklyn borough president a friend here Eric Adams coming gone he's got a plan to try and solve or clean up the mess of anti semitism in particular coming from the the black community here in New York City so well let's talk about this morning again Eric Adams coming up the Brooklyn borough president at seven forty and of course we've got you the people the listeners the call is out there so give us a call at eight hundred eight four eight nine two two two that's eight hundred eight four eight W. A. B. C. comes in many forms entertaining and informative doesn't hold it.

Dr Martin Luther
"dr martin luther" Discussed on The Daily Article

The Daily Article

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"dr martin luther" Discussed on The Daily Article

"This is the daily Article podcast published by the Denison Forum or culture changing Christians to receive the daily article directly to your or email inbox each weekday morning visit the daily Article Dot Com. Now here's Today's news. Discerned differently elitist the latest volume and our perennially popular biblical insight to tough questions. Series is now available for volume for I answered each of its ten questions and a recent trip to Israel standing at the place I discuss. Each answer uses a holy land site like the garden tomb or the Western Wall as the basis for each insight plus us every chapter includes a full color photo of the Holy Land site being discussed with questions like when life gets hard. Where can I turn and do? I really have love everyone. This volume is sure to challenge and inspire you. Request your copy today at daily Article Dot Org The Kansas City chiefs defeated the Tennessee. Titans in yesterday's AFC conference championship game. The San Francisco Forty niners one at home against the Green in Bay packers in the NFC Conference Championship. oddsmakers are favoring the chief slightly in Super Bowl fifty four since this is not a sports column and our nation is celebrating the birthday of Dr Martin Luther King Junior today you may be wondering why I am leading with these results. Here's what the teams who competed yesterday and Dr King have in common. They illustrate the cultural leverage of excellence. The chiefs are led by CEO. Clark Hunt I was privileged to be his pastor for many years in Dallas and Kinda tasked personally to his family's strong commitment to Jesus when his team won the AFC championship yesterday. Clark told the World World I want to thank the Lord for blessing us with this opportunity. The glory belongs to him and this trophy belongs to the best fans in the National Football League Tennessee. Hennessy quarterback Ryan Tannehill made clear his faith in Jesus over the years as well recently telling reporters I pray before every game. I spend time with God before I get to the stadium and then when I lace up my cleats I thank God for the opportunity to go out there and attempt to glorify him. By contrast packers quarterback. Aaron Rodgers has made news in recent years for the fact that he no longer identifies as Christian after meeting and being influenced by Rob Rob Bell Rogers told. ESPN I think. Organized religion can have a mind debilitating effect because there's an exclusivity that can shut you out from being open to the world to people and Energy and love and acceptance. Rogers is one of the most talented athletes of his generation like car. CONT and Ryan Tannehill. His commitment to professional excellence provides enormous leverage for cultural influence whether the person uses that influence. For Jesus Jesus or not it may surprise you to learn the Dr Martin Luther King Junior never completed high school. That's because he was such an advanced student that he skipped his first and last years of high school and went directly into college at the age of fifteen he entered seminary at the age of nineteen and graduated three years later as Valedictorian and student body. President he completed a PhD at Boston. University at the age of twenty twenty five. Dr King was brilliant in his diagnosis of the problem. Facing our nation he said injustice anywhere is a threat to justice is everywhere. We are caught an inescapable network of mutuality tied to a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly affects? It's all indirectly. He was brilliant and declaring the ultimate answer to our melody as well while accepting the Nobel Peace Prize in Nineteen Sixty four Dr King stated. I believe that unarmed truth. And unconditional love will have the final word in reality that is by right. Temporarily defeated needed is stronger than evil triumphant. He was brilliant and inspiring others. Dr King told a group of students in October nineteen sixty seven. Be Nia Bush if you can't be a tree if you can't be a highway just be a trail if you can't be a son be a star for it isn't by size. Is that you win or fail. Be The best of whatever you are today. We remember with gratitude not just his legacy but the commitment to excellence. What's that made it possible? Daniel achieved in exalted place in Babylon because an excellent spirit was in him in proverbs. Twenty two twenty nine Solomon noted. Do you see a man skillful in his work he will stand before kings. Paul was known for his is great. Learning the person who lived with excellence more than any other was of course the Lord Jesus. He's the only person in history who was tempted in every way just as we are yet he did not sin the crowds said of his ministry. He has done all things well. Now our Lord's Passion Passion for excellence must be hours. We are to seek excellence in our thoughts as Philippians. Four eight says if there is any excellence if there is anything worthy of praise think about these things and in our actions as well as Colossians. Three twenty three says whatever you do work work heartily as for the Lord and not for men we most express such excellence through service. I Peter for ten says as each has received a gift use it to serve one another and in mark nine thirty five. Jesus was adamant if anyone would be I. He must be last of all and servant of all exactly two months before he was assassinated. Dr King delivered a sermon German at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta titled The Drum Major Instinct. He described this instinct as a desire to be out front a a desire to lead the parade a desire to be I. By contrast he proclaimed Jesus define greatness as service Dr King noted by giving that definition of greatness. It means that everybody can be great because everybody can serve. You don't have to have a college degree to serve. You've you don't have to make your subject and verb agreed to serve. You don't have to know about Plato and heiress title to serve. You don't have to know Einstein's theory of relativity to serve. You don't have to know the second law of thermodynamics to serve. You only need a heart full of grace a soul generated by I love and you can be that servant is your heart full of grace today. Did you know that the daily Article podcast cast is available on most major podcast platforms. It's also an Alexa flash briefing perfect for your morning routine consider subscribing to the daily article. podcast on your preferred podcasting platform and thank you for listening today..

Dr King Dr Martin Luther King Junior Ryan Tannehill Rob Rob Bell Rogers Jesus Israel Denison Forum packers chiefs Titans Alexa Tennessee Aaron Rodgers Kansas City Dallas Plato San Francisco ESPN Clark NFC
"dr martin luther" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"dr martin luther" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Dr Martin Luther king junior day as today observing the birthday of the civil rights leader his actual birthday is January fifteenth in nineteen eighty three legislation was passed that made the third Monday in January a federal holiday in his honor marches parades and service of events are planned across the country today in remembrance Tanya drive hours fox news today is also the day for what's expected to be a very well attended gun rights rally in Richmond Virginia and that's where the legislature is planning on enacting new gun laws more with fox is Evan brown Virginia governor Ralph north on last week ordered an emergency ban on firearms around the Commonwealth capitol grounds in Richmond in advance of today's lobby day organized by the Virginia citizens defense league the governor claims police learned of other groups some from out of state intending to bring firearms and use them to legally north and claims he doesn't want a repeat of the Malay in Charlottesville in twenty seventeen of deadly disturbance and what your car was used as a deadly weapon Virginia's newly elected democratic lawmakers plan to add new gun restrictions despite widespread dislike of the idea Evan brown fox news a top Japanese lawmaker becomes the country's first government minister to take paternity leave more from fox's Simon and going to doesn't always used to teach Japanese environment minister Shinjiro Klay ceilings and outs in the first of his first child days after saying he will become Japan's first cabinet minister to take a paternity leave it's still rare Japan for new dads to take time off of this really quick urinal still go to your music off today in a New York times the file because you've been noticing his announcement was widely exported overseas including in the US and saying he hopes for the future such a decision will be the norm rather than news he says he's taking two weeks off so I'm in LA fox news president trump heading to Switzerland today to attend a global economic forum you're all set with the news of the day coming up next.

Japan president LA fox Shinjiro Klay Ralph north Evan brown Switzerland US New York Dr Martin Luther Simon Charlottesville Virginia citizens defense leag Richmond fox Richmond Virginia
"dr martin luther" Discussed on The Next Best Thing

The Next Best Thing

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"dr martin luther" Discussed on The Next Best Thing

"That reliable. In April nineteen sixty eight Betty Speights is carrying on an extramarital affair with her boss, Lloyd jars who owns Jim's grill. Early in the evening of the assassination spates is in the restaurant when she hears a spacious noise back, she cautiously advanced to the open door, and what did she see? She saw old Lloyd running toward her. Why does it ghost carrying still smoking rifle Betty is confused by what has happened until later when she learned about the killing and all of that she was convinced. Loyd had done it until she talks to pepper in nineteen Ninety-two Speights had told no one what she saw. She kept a secret she held an and it was partially out of fear Barsha of loyalty to to Lloyd. For twenty four years. John Lewis had maintained he had been in the restaurant when he heard the gunshot. In light of Speights revelations. He admits that was a lie. And in nineteen Ninety-three national television appearance tower, spins an elaborate tale that begins with frankly berto a businessman rumored to have mob ties. And I want to see if frankly Berta owned and ran a vegetable warehouse in Memphis, Tennessee, he was a member of the Marcello organization. He was given affectively the contract to kill Martin Luther King. Yes, they handle. This is the voice of Loyd jars. Handle. Monday fans. I. He asked me to handle they money transaction. From one fascinating, doc martyr, hire someone to assassinate Dr Martin Luther King. Verte told him he was going to receive a rifle from a medical Royal? And he was to hold onto that rifle. He was going to receive a large sum of money that would be delivered to him in a vegetable box, which it was John wars. Then gave the rifle to the shooter whom he does not name. But pepper sees a plot that goes beyond an alleged mobster and a small time businessman. The same year as John Lewis television appearance yet. Another revelation leads pepper to third party. The United States army. In March an article in the Memphis commercial appeal uncover sensational details about the army's vast surveillance activities in the nineteen sixties. The army like the FBI considered Martin Luther King potential domestic threat. King began giving speeches linking the antiwar movement to the civil rights are is fighting war in Vietnam and back home to politics, the nation was turning against them in the nineteen sixties. Christopher pile was an army intelligence officer. When king went to Memphis late March early April nineteen sixty eight army intelligence was watching him. William pepper is struck by one detail mentioned in the Memphis article. There was a an alpha one eighty four special forces team in Memphis on the day. And no one knows what they were doing there. Peppers suspicious about Wyan army special forces team would be a Memphis presses the reporters sources for answers. According to offer these sources former army green berets who wished to remain anonymous say there was an army back plot to kill king. He don't control riots with snipers. Snipers are put in place to kill me..

Dr Martin Luther King Lloyd jars Memphis Betty Speights John Lewis United States army Wyan army William pepper Loyd berto John wars Tennessee Verte Barsha Berta Peppers Jim Christopher pile officer
"dr martin luther" Discussed on Suicide Buddies

Suicide Buddies

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"dr martin luther" Discussed on Suicide Buddies

"Yes actually dr martin luther king you got it bad try to will that's that doctor should be fired as out of a cannon yeah into into jargon a store target store where you could get some beal's all right wow i kinda was wondering because the dating there with vietnam it's definitely still coming out of a lot of toxic masculinity still happening but just doctor being like suck it up yeah also this you really don't want let this out right you better tamp that voters get hurt your career i think it's so funny that lead with the doctor is like well i should give every type of advice including career advice catch me on your network exactly yeah so then obviously that he was like okay i should suck it up and then he kept going to the trial like going to work and doing his job what's so funny is he he had a brit he got two in the middle of the trial he had to ethiopia a story about like severe hunger and starvation problem there and that was a it was a moment of solace for him going seeing the destitution of another country and comparing him to him and also probably being able to do his job and being fulfilled in that way and being away from the trial but i do think it's really funny that going to like one of the most fucked up right right hain parts of the world he was like this is great.

beal dr martin luther ethiopia
"dr martin luther" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"dr martin luther" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"He educated me on the true meaning of the king dr martin luther king speeches and it was not just a quality and we gotta get along it was it was it was self responsibility it was responsibility in the black community for black people and i'm really really getting sick and tired of body brain and you know why folks for everything folks gave away their mantle civil rights and equality and fair treatment when they allowed every other group to co op dot com we got transgenders co op in the cod we got days co op too because we've got you know when you say ause what caused because it's simply there want equality you have to start you have to put in work and then you have to look out where see what's available for you to what happened did they turned it around so bad because now the causes now in emotion it's no longer it's accent it's emotional and when it comes to motion anyone feels mistreated is now part of the car you understand what i'm saying the cost went from let's do better let's be better let's tack better you know much elite from from that too feel and destroyed everything because now anyone kills mistreated and they you know they claim all sorts of civil justice and what it does the waters down any inkling civil rights are or or true you know the true nature the true mistreatment of black people chain occur and does on on occasion it completely waters it down and makes it almost comical to mention because so many other it all washes it away.

dr martin luther
"dr martin luther" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"dr martin luther" Discussed on KOMO

"The reverend dr martin luther king junior on the fiftieth anniversary of his death memphis police say that the department's aircraft as many about ten thousand or so people gathering for the march president trump has been told he is considered a subject in the russian investigation and not currently target a subject to someone who's conduct is of interest to investigators but prosecutors are not certain whether there's enough evidence to bring charges what is behind president trump's new border security strategy and what can the us military actually do abc's karen travers trying to answer that question has more from the white house president trump was briefly last week on the idea of using the national guard on the us southern border the white house says the president asked for a vigorous strategy to confront the security threat there yesterday he said sat down with his secretaries of defense and homeland security attorney general jeff sessions and other senior officials to follow up on that strategy which now includes mobilizing the national guard it ministration officials will not say how many troops would be sent or when karen travers abc news the white house also in our news here in the komo noon report president trump has long said he's not under investigation in connection with a special counsel probe into russian election meddling and abc's aaron katersky tells us a special counsel though is still saying otherwise last may president trump told nbc then fbi director james comey informed him he was not under investigation we had a very nice dinner at that time he told me you're not under investigation which i knew anyway abc news has confirmed special counsel robert muller told the president's legal team he is under investigation though at this point not a criminal target a distinction that signals there is currently insufficient evidence to bring charges the trump legal team said it does not discuss conversations with the special counsel the sides have been negotiating the terms of a potential interview of the president by muller aaron katersky abc news new york and oregon republican group is accusing the portland school district of brainwashing students the multnomah county republican party believes internal memos will show administrators were.

portland school district oregon new york james comey director fbi nbc white house memphis dr martin luther multnomah county republican pa trump muller aaron robert muller special counsel aaron katersky attorney president karen travers
"dr martin luther" Discussed on Jesse, Jordan, GO!

Jesse, Jordan, GO!

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"dr martin luther" Discussed on Jesse, Jordan, GO!

"Dr martin luther king junior oh yeah huge fucking nerd there is a great story about him where he is it a party hanging out and all of the sudden michelle nichols who played the original lieutenant herat on star trek is there because that is just what struck an amazing blackouts parties in the '60s look like just dr martin luther king of fucking to word kicking it over and oldfashioned or whatever but light i don't know i was the barbecue i dunno so so they're having a conversation he's telling her how much he loves star trek and she's like thank you so much i'm actually about to quit star trek so i can start on my solo album 'cause i wanna be musician and dr martin luther king turns to michelle nickels and goes okay i'm gonna do the impersonation i don't think with don't to my mom the dr martin luther king junior turns shall nicholson goes oh noel the apparently is scary ghost and he's like you can't quit star trek because we need black people in spain but so she doesn't she doesn't quit star trek because dr martin luther king junior told her not to you and so obviously obviously like the fucking death of dr martin luther king junior is a huge tragedy for a lot of reasons but one reason that none of us ever thought up with like how many blackouts careers could he have saved at dope act.

Dr martin luther michelle nichols herat dr martin luther king noel spain michelle nickels nicholson
"dr martin luther" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

03:08 min | 4 years ago

"dr martin luther" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"The night before dr martin luther king was assassinated he gave a speech that speech part of that speech has been turned into song that speech is so worth your time reading it you wanna talk about courage there was there was one line that jumped out at me reading it again over the last couple of days let us develop a kind of dangerous unselfishness let us develop kind of dangerous unselfishness now this is going to sound harsh because nobody likes to hear it about themselves but america is very selfish we all are very selfish right now all of us face book whose face you tube everything is about us we are increasingly inward focused and isolated our kids are on the internet our kids are not looking up or out it's all in we don't know our neighbours we are increasingly turning against church forget church we're isolating ourselves in little teeny communities were even our friends and our our closest friends and our family as being kicked out of that community if they disagree with us technology is pouring gasoline on this information entertainment has become art teacher and our god the more inward focus a person becomes the more susceptible he is to slip into the darkness the heart is deceitful above all things and desperately sick who can understand it when a person is too inward focused and slipping into darkness technology and the media is there with gasoline and the matches everything were talking about right now is selfish it's all about my problems my pain maya means mike 'cause my rights my vengeance now more than ever we need to develop a kind of dangerous unselfishness.

dr martin luther king america