4 Burst results for "Dr Martha Farah"

"dr martha farah" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

12:32 min | 8 months ago

"dr martha farah" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Well thanks for having me Scott. I'm looking forward to this. I am so sake. I I'm expecting you to cure me of every one of those ailments by the end of this podcast chat as well as all the listeners. Want to figure out what to do with the rest of our time after we do that. Yeah what do you do? When like you're living your life fully and then what do you do after that? Maybe we'll get into some of that today because I think I just jumped right into the deep end my my my feeling of CVT has lots of offer no matter where we find ourselves in the depths of despair or things are going pretty. Well good. Well I can't wait to get your philosophy here. Everything from your perspective today. I know it will be very enlightening to To our listeners. As well as as well as to me. So let's start with something that I thought was interesting. I read about you that you started in academia. I think you're an assistant. Professor Pen cracked me. If I'm wrong you had some sort of awakening. Could you please talk about what that what that awakening was? Yeah yeah so I I I guess what you know what really drew me to. Psychology was wanting to to be a therapist to those my initial entry inside. Did A counseling program for a couple years fully intending to Due to your program and then and then treat people clinically. But I really got pulled into the science of the brain and makes -iety and depression especially cognitive neuroscience so I decided I wanted to pursue a PhD understanding of the brain and of how these treatments especially cognitive behavioral. Therapy actually work. Why is that? They're so effective so I really went down that road for. Gosh I guess a decade or more. I guess from two thousand one or so and I started my doctoral program at Penn until two thousand twelve when I left my faculty position at Penn to start a private practice in to do full-time teaching for a while so I guess I I. I still remember. I think I was. I was riding the bus from. My internship backed my classes at George Washington University around two thousand or so and Iran American Psychological Association What's their what's their main. Emerge Heikkala. Gist yes yes. As American psychologist article about it was by Richie Davidson he was. He was receiving some by some award and writing a summary of his research. I was totally pulled into that. Added felt so much excitement right on the brink of of understanding exactly how the brain works and being able to use that knowledge to develop better treatments and over the course of my graduate career. I my my feeling came to be that. That was not the case that the the work I was doing you know. With with brain scanners and try to understand how genetics affects brain activity were not translatable into clinical treatments. They weren't making treatments better. They might understand the might. Help us to correlate it changes in the brain with assertain treatments for example. He wasn't going to change what I did with someone clinically to understand was going on in the brain and we certainly didn't know what was happening individuals brains. These were group based studies group-based differences. So so he was kind of A. I don't know if I had a but I did have one kind of pivoting at the end of a Yoga Class. Kind of cliches. One does as usually happens so lying there and Chevanton at the end of the class and I it just came to me in an instant like I can't stay in this position. This is in my faculty position a panel not the yoga position. I could have stayed. I thought you were saying you can stay in the downward facing Yoga Dog Dog Pos. The rest of my life could've stayed in Boston for a lot longer k. Is Getting out meant taking share. I'm going to work hung out there. But but yeah. I can't stay in this. This faculty position in right behind that realization was recognition. That's exactly right. Of course. Why did I ever think that I could? This was the right fit because another I can keep going on. I WANNA I wanNA give you a chance to jump in here but no I I WANNA hear this. It was a it was a gradual unfolding. I mean another. I guess moment that stood out was I head gone to classical music concerts for years. Because you don't want kids and then just didn't really stopping part of our lives and then I went to one in suburban Maryland with my inlaws one night and when the violence soloist was was playing What an amazing thing of beauty that is to create and I guess in my myself focused way then thought what kind of beauty I added to the world and I thought it's certainly not the the research that I've done. It's not adding lines to my CV four publications and book chapters and I was kind of drawing a blank but then what came to kind of this. I'm going to date myself. But but kind of a ROLODEX OF FACES OF PEOPLE. I've worked with through a awful traumas that they had survived and treated him for. Ptsd in in. I thought there was any anything anything of actual value that I've done in this world. It's been in that intimate connection of of working with people that the healing work of therapy and being witness to the to to their To their recovery and so that was another point. I was like all right. This is not. I'm not living my life though in a way that feels most true too. I am will. Yeah it sounds like you're a clinician through and through not a research academic solely or even at all yes. Yeah yeah that's exactly right and I think I'm glad I had that experience that I have the background in science and I think everything probably a lot of people can relate to this win when you're doing something at it's going pretty well. People are telling you. Oh you know this is great. This is exciting. You know you should have a real future here. You can keep doing this. It's real easy to keep doing that even if there's a part of us that saying like sure this is my destiny right. Yeah and our destinies can change our lives. Yes that's right it just about as soon as I feel like I've yes this is it. Then yeah things things start to shift so now you did your graduate work was it with Rob de rubies. Or was that your post doc. I actually I worked with ROB Clinically for three years. I did three cognitive cognitive therapy practicum with him and he was on my dissertation committee and Then I was part of his lab for my whole time. They're sort of a sit in on the meetings but we never actually did any research together. Well I suspect that that's how Beck knows you. Yes he's mentioned you a couple times and will fan of yours. It goes in both directions in and I mean more than fan he He is the description of cognitive therapy. Was what drew me to see? Bt to begin with I and again these moments that stand out remember in the Gilman Library at George Washington University late at night reading an article that he'd written an interview where he described this approach that sounded to me so intuitive and in something that So respectful of of person. You know there weren't some secrets here. Esoteric knowledge that the therapist guarded but but these basic principles that have been around for thousands of years. Anyone could understand and apply in their own life. And so so. Yeah I've been. I've been a fan of his really from that moment. And in so much of what I mean so much of the book as such nice things about Is it's based on his work. Yeah for sure but you do you. Do you know you extended in some meaningful directions. Not to sell yourself short and I made contact with it. I'm paying back cognitive. Behavioral therapy meets simple. That's the book I'm talking about in particular that he recommended. We're having lunch with some other colleagues and stuff and we're thinking how that should be a first year required reading for all incoming college students actually so there was a broader discussion about the use of that book. But then I checked out that book and I read it and I just it was so well so well put together all these different elements one element. I noticed is a common theme in that in that book as well as in your work is what some call maybe the third wave of or mindful CBT. Yeah I saw that is. I really liked that add on. I'm a big fan of that on and I was wondering if you could talk a lot about that. And what's the first and second? We've yes yeah love to. I should mention to the the COG neuroscience work that ended up doing hen. I was working closely with Dr Martha. Farah she she was my supervisor. Amazing yes has she is she is so. I mean she. She's done that that kind of work. And then obviously start out in visual work and now doing neuro ethics and really has defined multiple fields within within cognitive neuroscience. So you know. It's it's interesting because I came to see bt in mindfulness in that order initially with cognitive therapy working with rob and really focusing on on how our thoughts affect our behavior our feelings in and how central our interpretations of events are to do we experience reality and into our wellbeing into out of the conditions that people coming to therapy for like anxiety and depression. So I was really focused on cognitive therapy. And then I I did a lot of work in anxiety and in really got immersed in behavior therapy so more of an emphasis on a our our. Our thoughts and our feelings are often driven by our behavior so other these intimate connections among thoughts feelings and behaviors and faced in our fears on the most effective ways. Not only to decrease the fear but to change our thinking exterior perverse enjoyment out of facing my fears. Is that right? Yeah I feel like at this point now I just go right towards it and then like it makes me feel like overcome. Something like big. Yes yeah yeah and when we decide to do that it's there's kind of a failures. Nothing else that can stop us. Determine that I'm just GONNA face my fear than what else is there really so well said very also appreciate that be are there is. There is something I mean there are. There are some studies showing that if you if you change we focus on changing behavior and then you compare that to focus and changing thoughts about things that people are afraid of Saudis. Find you actually get more more change. In thoughts. People have changed their behavior versus trying to directly. Change their thoughts. I love it. I love that. I love that about your book. You talk about behavioral activation..

George Washington University Bt Scott Ptsd Maryland Boston Professor Pen Richie Davidson -iety Yoga Class Beck Heikkala Penn Chevanton Iran American Psychological As private practice Dr Martha Farah rob
"dr martha farah" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"dr martha farah" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Yeah and i think that they could tell it was doing something but again this identity question of how much is me how much is the drug and how much is it really helping it seems like the study that's talked about in the film and which study was that this is dr martha farah study at u penn it was done in the two thousands and what's amazing is that one of the effects of adderall which is an phetamine mixed amphetamine is that it makes you feel like you are doing better but the idea that these are smart pills or that their cognitive enhancers is a little bit misguided come away with this film with kind of mixed feelings on the one hand a lot of people don't like to think that they need something that they need a drug to ace attest or finish a work project on the other it isn't clear what long term harm these pills due to most people you know unless you have a serious medical condition they're rarely deadly unlike things like opioids what harm do you see here i think the harm that is maybe most urgent that applies to the most people is what the film focuses on which is a little bit more of the identity questions of you know what is lost if we are all in an adderall world what does it mean to feel like you need it to succeed from my reporting that seems like the most widespread applicable sort of risk and and question that needed to be discussed more in the open director alison claiming her new documentary take your pills is out tomorrow on netflix thank you.

u penn adderall amphetamine alison netflix dr martha farah director one hand
"dr martha farah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"dr martha farah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The drug yeah and i think that they could tell it was doing something but again this identity question of how much is me how much is the drug and how much is it really helping it seems like the study that's talked about in the film and which study was that this is dr martha farah study at u penn it was done in the two thousands and what's amazing is that one of the effects of adderall which is an phetamine mixed damn phetamine is that it makes you feel like you are doing better but the idea that these are smart pills that their cognitive enhancers is a little bit misguided you come away with this film with kind of mixed feelings on the one hand a lot of people don't like to think that they need something that they need a drug to as a test or finish a work project on the other it isn't clear what long term harm these pills due to most people you know unless you have a serious medical condition they're rarely deadly unlike things like opioids what harm do you see here i think the harm that is maybe most urgent that applies to the most people is what the film focuses on which is a little bit more of the identity questions of what is lost if we are all in an adderall world what does it mean to feel like you need it to succeed from my reporting that seems like the most widespread applicable sort of risk and and question that needed to be discussed more in the open director alison claiming her new documentary take your pills is out tomorrow on netflix thank you.

u penn adderall alison netflix dr martha farah director one hand
"dr martha farah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"dr martha farah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Yeah and i think that they could tell it was doing something but again this identity question of how much is me how much is the drug and how much is it really helping it seems like the study that's talked about in the film and which study was that this is dr martha farah study you pen it was done in the two thousands and what's amazing is that one of the effects of adderall which is an phetamine mixed amphetamine is that it makes you feel like you are doing better but the idea that these are smart pills or that their cognitive enhancers is a little bit misguided come away with this film with kind of mixed feelings on the one hand a lot of people don't like to think that they need something that they need a drug to ace attest or finish a work project on the other it isn't clear what long term harm these pills due to most people you know unless you have a serious medical condition they're rarely deadly unlike things like opioids what harm do you see here i think the harm that is maybe most urgent that applies to the most people is what the film focuses on which is a little bit more of the identity questions of what is lost if we are all in an adderall world what does it mean to feel like you need it to succeed from my reporting that seems like the most widespread applicable sort of risk and and question that needed to be discussed more in the open director alison klayman her new documentary take your pills his out tomorrow on netflix thank you.

adderall amphetamine alison klayman netflix dr martha farah director one hand