25 Burst results for "Dr Lynn"

Pawan Dhingra, Amherst College  After-School Academics in an Era of Remote Learning

The Academic Minute

01:57 min | 3 weeks ago

Pawan Dhingra, Amherst College After-School Academics in an Era of Remote Learning

"After school education is taking hold during online learning at schools. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute ponding gra professor of american studies at amherst. College wondered if it helps or hinders children now. The remote learning has become the norm peres increasingly worried that their children may not be learn as much as they can. This anxiety has fueled an already growing interest in for profit. After school tutoring companies as kumaon math nauseam and others even for children performing well in school visit. Despite many educator says that such learning can limit children that it works as educational inequality what drives parents to invest your time and money after school education. And does it make sense to do so. During my research. I spent time with more than one hundred families who pursue supplemental education for their young children and talk with teachers called emissions officers and others. I found that parents whose children are doing fine in school. Still seek out after school. Academics were to make them competitive often worried about entry to college parents. He neighboring kids in such spaces and so worried that their kids won't be able to keep up. also learned. That tutoring works better under certain conditions and that respect not all companies can provide those conditions. Instructors need to be able to connect the content children's experiences to make the children more interested. For example what's more classes are most effective was smaller tutor student. Ratios parents use outside. Learning centers should ask how those businesses incentivize learning ask for references. If she doesn't prove resistant stop you want to instill lifelong learners. So their interest is essential education landscape is changing and private companies are playing more of a role we to understand their popularity and their effects nor to create the learning environment. We want for all children. That was tallin dhingra of amherst college.

Dr Lynn Pascarella Association Of American Colleg Amherst Tallin Dhingra Amherst College
Brandi Brimmer, Spelman College  Black Union Widows and the Battle for Survivors Benefits in Post-Civil War America

The Academic Minute

02:10 min | Last month

Brandi Brimmer, Spelman College Black Union Widows and the Battle for Survivors Benefits in Post-Civil War America

"In college week black union widows had trouble claiming their benefits after the civil war. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute brandy brimmer associate professor in the department of history discusses their postwar battle after the american civil war. Newly freed black women made up one of the largest groups of union widows across the south yet their struggle for recognition by the federal pension bureau remains an understudy dimension of the war and its aftermath. My research analyzes the processes by which black women in eastern north carolina their views a citizenship in worthiness to the us pincher bureau their petitions for survivors benefits and the first person testimony of those who supported them painting vivid picture of their survival strategies free labor society in claiming the pensions to which they were in principle entitled. These women challenge the bureau's definition of union widowhood and expand the boundaries of us citizenship. The pension bureau distributed monetary resources to widows children and other dependent relatives of soldiers through a legal structure that required proof of marriage in evidence of war related that since marriages of enslaved people were neither authorized nor effectuation through legal routes. It was nearly impossible for formerly enslaved women to secure pension benefits federal lawmakers eventually address this problem through the supplementary pension act of july fourth eighteen sixty four which retroactively recognize the marriages formulates lay people within the pension system still a tedious and complicated application limited economic resources and competing definitions of what constituted. A legal marriage made security pension difficult. Maintaining they're standing on the pension roster could be just as intense scrutiny over how a widow earn wages notions of what constituted a proper family and sexual respectability became central points of contention at the end of the war. Freed women across the south said about filing petitions for survivors benefits with great frequency. They rested their claims on their contributions. To slavery's demise and their loved ones military service shining the light on their struggle for recognition underscores black women's legal acumen and understanding of the pension bureau as an arena of activism and redress. That was brandy bremmer of spelman

Dr Lynn Pascarella Association Of American Colleg Brandy Brimmer Federal Pension Bureau Department Of History North Carolina United States Brandy Bremmer
George Cunningham, Texas A&M University - Physical Activity and Climate Change Attitudes

The Academic Minute

02:04 min | 8 months ago

George Cunningham, Texas A&M University - Physical Activity and Climate Change Attitudes

"Changing attitudes toward global warming is hard. I'm Dr Lynn Pascarella. President of the Association of American colleges and universities and today on the academic minute George Cunningham professor of graduate and professional studies details one surprising way to do so. Being active as a number of benefits, including better fitness and cognitive functioning reduction, various diseases, and improved, physical and mental health. Our recent research also points to another outcome of being active climate change attitudes. There are certainly exceptions most fiscal activity takes place outdoors. As. A result exercisers are able to enjoy nature and become more connected with their surroundings. At this is the case exercisers might be especially aware the ways in which climate change could hinder their ability to be active. When they arrive this conclusion then might also advocate for new laws and policies that would serve to protect the environment. To examine these possibilities, we analyzed data from over thirty one, hundred counties across the US. And addition to collecting data related to fiscal. And climate change attitudes. We counted further factors that might impact the results. These included the county residents access to physical activity demographics education in voting patterns and the two thousand sixteen presidential election. After, accounting for these factors, we found that his physical activity increased so too did county residents conviction that climate change personally impacted them. Personal Harm believes then related to their preference for stronger climate change policies. based. On these findings, we concluded that activists, scientists and policy makers looking to shape public opinion around climate change should consider this sport and physical activity domain that was George Cunningham of Texas. Am University.

Dr Lynn Pascarella George Cunningham Professor Of George Cunningham Association Of American Colleg United States Am University President Trump Texas
"dr lynn" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

11:37 min | 1 year ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"Today we have returning guests. Dr Lene Gruber who is one of Australia's founding coaches an accidental academic and an award winning author and university Electra. Lynn Kolzov a pragmatic futurist coach. She also helps people to future proof. They careers in an ever evolving workplace. Lynn is coming to us. Live to die from Sydney Australia. Now it's important to note as you record Saturday. Twenty first of March twenty twenty. It's fair decided on both sides of the world. We're living in completely uncharted waters here in the UK pubs clubs Churches Museums Cinemas. Theatres and schools are now closed. The government is just offered to pay up to eighty percent of workers wages while these companies have shut down and everyone I know is working from home and last night. The streets here in London would deserted. I've never lived through World War but many are saying this is a similar time highly and first of all. How are you and how your family are? They safe and healthy yet. Where all siphon health healthy I moved to working from harm From Tuesday of this last week We went live with everything we were doing in a virtual world from Monday so we did Chinese for Monday and so we're just practicing really good processes of you know keeping things clean making sure that everything that comes in the house is clean and kept clean and so it's all good for us that just for some context. Those didn't he lost your on season. One you'll university lectures explain way you lecturing lecturing so I work at the University of New South Wales which is one of the top universities in part of the group of universities in Australia and a we have the number one business school in Australia. And I'm part of that school and so we have a number of international students as well as local students. What about fifty? Seven thousand students on campus is full so This week we've made the decision to put all our lectures and everything online and work with students in a virtual space which is very exciting. Because I've been teaching online for sixteen years and I think that this may actually be the future will never wanted to have a study about the future work and lock. Y'All been working remotely for many years on the nomad. I just need Wi fi coffee in a flat surface. What's interesting a lot of my colleagues? That have been working at home first. Time actually help one of them like a monitor up of the stays the other day they finding it really really arresting to to work first of all on their own so mental health issues but also getting work done What tips could you give someone who has all of a sudden main told Guy Heim and wet from high and what? What are some things that can be doing to ease into this because it is very very uncomfortable environment? I'm sure a lot of papal use their workplace as pseudo family spice and I think that that's the first thing that we need to acknowledge that we spend a lodge amount of time at work and work as a very for many people social environment My pitch they looked at what happens to people when they get retrenched. And so I've heard all the stories of isolation and not being in the office at citrus. So the first thing that people need to do is recognize that just because you're used to having a lodge monitor. Aw traveling somewhere for work doesn't mean that that's what you need to do for the rest of you life. The second thing around this is that people often focus on what's different rather than focusing on. What's the same so you need to Cape? A routine routine is absolutely kate. If you think about how different for many people if they work say Monday Friday they will often find that on the weekend not aging at the same time then excising time than getting up at the same time so what going to. The office provides structure. And so if you can make a structure about being at home and tried to create the similar structure. You would have as if you're going to work so if you normally get up at seven you should normally get up at seven if you normally get up at six and go to the gym. Maybe your gym workout is now at home. There is so many great apps to be working at home. So and you can look at it harm Ryan shine whether it's forty degrees in Australia. Role minus four degrees in London. So the thing is created routine that you can replicate anywhere and this is one of the foundational things of being able to be flexible and work from anywhere. So one friend of mine was talking about Having to have facetime so a lot of these things are on voice coal and apparently They've also said well. Once a week we have to have quite facetime and now talking about how they then had to quit my cup on and and the hair and everything else Is this the right thing? Should WE FORCE PEOPLE TO BE PRISON? I was actually saying to them that probably after if this goes on for months we weren't k. What we look like in six months we will just go on with their hair. No makeup or whatever Just to to be present but is an important to see other colleagues. I mean I'm seeing lots of photos on social media of all these like the Brady Bunch squares all these people I why having and happy Let's fast forward six months. How will it look in six months when this is the new normal so actually connecting and however connecting works for you? If that's about seeing somebody if it's about texting somebody so if it's about being present you know I always remember when my daughter was quite young That I'd often ring a friend on Friday about five thirty and they also had small kids and we would havoc foreign conversation and share a glass of Wine and Sofa may the whole idea of virtually meeting up. I mean look here we are you and halfway around the world and this conversation wouldn't be that different. If we were in the same room the difference would be that we can see each other. If we really want to see each other now we could turn on a medium that would allow that. But I don't feel that are necessary and to your point about paypal feeling that you know. Do I put my Cup on? What do I get dressed or not now the the ritual of getting dressed into business? 'cause there's lots of studies that talk about when people dress casually they act casually so there is a really good rigor about getting up in the morning and getting dressed for work particularly if that's what you've always done and then overtime being careful that you don't start to become too casual and your work colleagues like you might treat your friends because there's a different set of engagement so it's not about whether you wear makeup or don't wear makeup where a social don't wear a suit. You should be dressed in a way that makes you feel professional so a lot of people where this falls down for them is that they would prefer to where they're jim gear. Twenty four seven and this is awesome. Why we he at New Moms? Say All you know. I just don't get dressed up anymore. I just don't feel like myself anymore and I say well I need dressing the way you were when you went to school when you went to work. And they say why. Don't need to and I GOTTA. You might be surprised how that affects your psyche. So there is a real thing about you know. Get up turn up show up you know and do these a way that makes you feel professional because clubs are often are Armagh to the world. Now I'm sure a lot of people whether they waking from home or freelancing. This is a time of uncertainty. And you said you. Phd cover these thriving in on uncertainty. Let's assume as the government is trying to tell us. This could last for months not weeks. How do we thrive in uncertain times like now the thing that happens with the human mind is that when we are uncertain we try and solve that problem we are problem solving being and so with uncertainty? What people try and do is imagine how to create certainty from the time? We're very little each have to think about what's the first thing they tell you with a young baby get in a routine so it knows what's coming next so it understands the system the passion the prosise so when we break those patents and processes people become very uncertain then they seek ways to create certainty. His thing I'd say to just about everybody today because a lot of people have asked me this week. You know you'll very happy and I go home happy as a clam because I had predicted that we would move to a work from home model and I had predicted we would do that around mid to late. February. So I'm a little bit out. I was a little bit ahead of myself but none the less. What we do know is is that for now. Most people who've got a job doing that from an isolation perspective. Whether that's at harm or distancing social distancing so that is annoying and that's not going to change for the foreseeable future now whether that's a couple of months many months or more than many months but it certainly isn't going to change in the next week or two so you can know physician that how you're setting up to work you should set it up so that you're comfortable to do this for an ongoing period and if that's a couple of months or more than a couple of months that should be arcade don't make do instead of make it what you want it to be for that. Focus on all the things that you know. So if you've got a job you know what that job looks like how you go about. It might change. But the job itself hasn't changed. Your family hasn't changed. Your living situation. Haven't changed so focusing on what you know rather than what you know and keep your mind coming back to. I know these when somebody says what about this darn dwelling the. I don't know because as soon as you go there you'll mind will try and solve it so focus on it. Make a list of all the things you do know and when somebody says what about the actually what I do know is this and keep talking about we know and focus on what you know and what you can anchor to so for those out there that managed teams and I used to majority of them having the taming the office and being able to see them and talk to them and have team meetings. How can manages really get the best out of teams when they dispersed like by? Now you know I've been working with and INA virtual team for asset over sixteen years and I think it's about making sure that you'll communications a frequent and actually thinking about with our way you uh so sharing the having starting an email that he's at the beginning of each day high. All these are the things that are on my desk and what I'm thinking about you know. Hit reply all and tell us where you are if you don't have a more sophisticated system than that that's a good start. Do a check in at least once a week by voice whether that's a group skype chat or group Zoom chat or whatever you're going to use but find ways that also paypal acknowledge. What else is happening for them? So just as if you're at work you would say you know so if you and I worked in the same office we would talk about. You know our families what we did on the weekend at such an make this space to do that. Even when you're not all city seated together or seeing each other physically. Say No hype. Everybody had a great weekend dark. Know about you. This is what I got up to. Somebody might come back now. Actually mine wasn't so good but that's a really insight. Two-way mental health is and often. That's the launch point for you to be able to say. How can I help? What can I do to support? A mental health is going to be a real issue for a lot of people because they now in this new environment again friends of my saying..

Australia London Lynn Kolzov Sydney UK Dr Lene Gruber Churches Museums Cinemas University of New South Wales facetime Guy Heim Wi Cape Ryan Armagh jim
Thriving in a time of uncertainty with Dr. Lynn Gribble

The Practical Futurist Podcast

09:59 min | 1 year ago

Thriving in a time of uncertainty with Dr. Lynn Gribble

"Today we have returning guests. Dr Lene Gruber who is one of Australia's founding coaches an accidental academic and an award winning author and university Electra. Lynn Kolzov a pragmatic futurist coach. She also helps people to future proof. They careers in an ever evolving workplace. Lynn is coming to us. Live to die from Sydney Australia. Now it's important to note as you record Saturday. Twenty first of March twenty twenty. It's fair decided on both sides of the world. We're living in completely uncharted waters here in the UK pubs clubs Churches Museums Cinemas. Theatres and schools are now closed. The government is just offered to pay up to eighty percent of workers wages while these companies have shut down and everyone I know is working from home and last night. The streets here in London would deserted. I've never lived through World War but many are saying this is a similar time highly and first of all. How are you and how your family are? They safe and healthy yet. Where all siphon health healthy I moved to working from harm From Tuesday of this last week We went live with everything we were doing in a virtual world from Monday so we did Chinese for Monday and so we're just practicing really good processes of you know keeping things clean making sure that everything that comes in the house is clean and kept clean and so it's all good for us that just for some context. Those didn't he lost your on season. One you'll university lectures explain way you lecturing lecturing so I work at the University of New South Wales which is one of the top universities in part of the group of universities in Australia and a we have the number one business school in Australia. And I'm part of that school and so we have a number of international students as well as local students. What about fifty? Seven thousand students on campus is full so This week we've made the decision to put all our lectures and everything online and work with students in a virtual space which is very exciting. Because I've been teaching online for sixteen years and I think that this may actually be the future will never wanted to have a study about the future work and lock. Y'All been working remotely for many years on the nomad. I just need Wi fi coffee in a flat surface. What's interesting a lot of my colleagues? That have been working at home first. Time actually help one of them like a monitor up of the stays the other day they finding it really really arresting to to work first of all on their own so mental health issues but also getting work done What tips could you give someone who has all of a sudden main told Guy Heim and wet from high and what? What are some things that can be doing to ease into this because it is very very uncomfortable environment? I'm sure a lot of papal use their workplace as pseudo family spice and I think that that's the first thing that we need to acknowledge that we spend a lodge amount of time at work and work as a very for many people social environment My pitch they looked at what happens to people when they get retrenched. And so I've heard all the stories of isolation and not being in the office at citrus. So the first thing that people need to do is recognize that just because you're used to having a lodge monitor. Aw traveling somewhere for work doesn't mean that that's what you need to do for the rest of you life. The second thing around this is that people often focus on what's different rather than focusing on. What's the same so you need to Cape? A routine routine is absolutely kate. If you think about how different for many people if they work say Monday Friday they will often find that on the weekend not aging at the same time then excising time than getting up at the same time so what going to. The office provides structure. And so if you can make a structure about being at home and tried to create the similar structure. You would have as if you're going to work so if you normally get up at seven you should normally get up at seven if you normally get up at six and go to the gym. Maybe your gym workout is now at home. There is so many great apps to be working at home. So and you can look at it harm Ryan shine whether it's forty degrees in Australia. Role minus four degrees in London. So the thing is created routine that you can replicate anywhere and this is one of the foundational things of being able to be flexible and work from anywhere. So one friend of mine was talking about Having to have facetime so a lot of these things are on voice coal and apparently They've also said well. Once a week we have to have quite facetime and now talking about how they then had to quit my cup on and and the hair and everything else Is this the right thing? Should WE FORCE PEOPLE TO BE PRISON? I was actually saying to them that probably after if this goes on for months we weren't k. What we look like in six months we will just go on with their hair. No makeup or whatever Just to to be present but is an important to see other colleagues. I mean I'm seeing lots of photos on social media of all these like the Brady Bunch squares all these people I why having and happy Let's fast forward six months. How will it look in six months when this is the new normal so actually connecting and however connecting works for you? If that's about seeing somebody if it's about texting somebody so if it's about being present you know I always remember when my daughter was quite young That I'd often ring a friend on Friday about five thirty and they also had small kids and we would havoc foreign conversation and share a glass of Wine and Sofa may the whole idea of virtually meeting up. I mean look here we are you and halfway around the world and this conversation wouldn't be that different. If we were in the same room the difference would be that we can see each other. If we really want to see each other now we could turn on a medium that would allow that. But I don't feel that are necessary and to your point about paypal feeling that you know. Do I put my Cup on? What do I get dressed or not now the the ritual of getting dressed into business? 'cause there's lots of studies that talk about when people dress casually they act casually so there is a really good rigor about getting up in the morning and getting dressed for work particularly if that's what you've always done and then overtime being careful that you don't start to become too casual and your work colleagues like you might treat your friends because there's a different set of engagement so it's not about whether you wear makeup or don't wear makeup where a social don't wear a suit. You should be dressed in a way that makes you feel professional so a lot of people where this falls down for them is that they would prefer to where they're jim gear. Twenty four seven and this is awesome. Why we he at New Moms? Say All you know. I just don't get dressed up anymore. I just don't feel like myself anymore and I say well I need dressing the way you were when you went to school when you went to work. And they say why. Don't need to and I GOTTA. You might be surprised how that affects your psyche. So there is a real thing about you know. Get up turn up show up you know and do these a way that makes you feel professional because clubs are often are Armagh to the world. Now I'm sure a lot of people whether they waking from home or freelancing. This is a time of uncertainty. And you said you. Phd cover these thriving in on uncertainty. Let's assume as the government is trying to tell us. This could last for months not weeks. How do we thrive in uncertain times like now the thing that happens with the human mind is that when we are uncertain we try and solve that problem we are problem solving being and so with uncertainty? What people try and do is imagine how to create certainty from the time? We're very little each have to think about what's the first thing they tell you with a young baby get in a routine so it knows what's coming next so it understands the system the passion the prosise so when we break those patents and processes people become very uncertain then they seek ways to create certainty. His thing I'd say to just about everybody today because a lot of people have asked me this week. You know you'll very happy and I go home happy as a clam because I had predicted that we would move to a work from home model and I had predicted we would do that around mid to late. February. So I'm a little bit out. I was a little bit ahead of myself but none the less. What we do know is is that for now. Most people who've got a job doing that from an isolation perspective. Whether that's at harm or distancing social distancing so that is annoying and that's not going to change for the foreseeable future now whether that's a couple of months many months or more than many months but it certainly isn't going to change in the next week or two so you can know physician that how you're setting up to work you should set it up so that you're comfortable to do this for an ongoing period and if that's a couple of months or more than a couple of months that should be arcade don't make do instead of make it what you want it to be for that. Focus on all the things that you know. So if you've got a job you know what that job looks like how you go about. It might change. But the job itself hasn't changed. Your family hasn't changed. Your living situation. Haven't changed so focusing on what you know rather than what you know and keep your mind coming back to. I know these when somebody says what about this darn dwelling the. I don't know because as soon as you go there you'll mind will try and solve it so focus on it. Make a list of all the things you do know and when somebody says what about the actually what I do know is this and keep talking about we know and focus on what you know and what you can anchor

Australia London Lynn Kolzov Sydney Dr Lene Gruber University Of New South Wales Facetime UK Churches Museums Cinemas Guy Heim WI Cape Ryan JIM Armagh
Your Coronavirus Questions Answered

Short Wave

09:11 min | 1 year ago

Your Coronavirus Questions Answered

"So our first question comes from Amanda in Chicago. My question is how does the corona virus spread and can I catch it from simply being the same public spaces someone. For example airport. We got a lot of questions. About how the corona virus spreads so talk taping. I talked to Dr Lynn Chen. She has up the Travel Medicine Center at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge Massachusetts and she says it mostly spreads person to person through droplets. Let's and Snot so for example of somebody is coughing sneezing and the lands on your face or near you or Liana surface. Where are you then touch? And then some help bring the droplet close to her face nose and mouth. That's how it can spread. It seems to be you less contagious than the flu. Or measles which you can literally just like breathe out and it hangs around in the air and then somebody else breathes it in Yep so if outside or even inside at a place like the airport. You don't have to be awkward about it. You don't glare people for sneezing but just try and keep some space between you and someone who looks sick she says the CDC puts that distance at about six feet away and as always good hand. Washing is really really key. after touching anything being before touching the phase before touching food. You gotTa wash those pause paying. Yeah Mattie it's a germ and like most germs. You can kill it or you can wash it off with soap and water but if you absolutely don't have access to a sink then you can arm yourself with some alcohol wipes and some strong hand sanitizer but what about the people that can spread read it without seeming sick or even knowing they're sick themselves so there's been some debate around this as symtomatic transmission. It's the idea that people could be walking around. I'm feeling totally fine. And still giving it to other people which is kind of a scary thought and last week there is a paper and the New England Journal of Medicine. It was a bad case in Germany. Where or woman who didn't seem sick still gave the virus? Her Co workers but the problem was that the authors didn't actually talk to the woman right and win other people did talk to her. It turns out that she actually was feeling sick. She just took some medicine and went to work. Yeah so it's not actually clear yet whether a symptomatic transmission is or isn't happening but but even if it is happening health officials say that it's really not a big driver in this outbreak. And they're actually much more concerned about people who really are a little bit sick but are still going to school unto work right and then. There's the question of masks this one came from. Alex in Hong Kong are surgical masks or and ninety. Five masks can help us Out at all. Yeah and I would say if you're going to be that person who goes to work sick and I am not naming. Any names would probably help. If you wore a mask. Logic would suggest that it probably does decrease some spread of germs from somebody who actually is ill. That's Stockton Mary. Beth sexton At emory university. So if you yourself are sick mask maybe a good idea right and so in hospitals at least wearing a mask helps catch sputum and Snot and keep it from spreading and like Alex said. There are two types of masks right. Yeah let's right. Mattie that is the end ninety five respirator mask ask which fits tight to your face and it blocks. Most airborne particles among their surgical masks. Are these gauzy rectangular pieces of cloth or paper and you loop them around your ears. Here's and cover your nose and mouth okay. So those end ninety five respirator masks kind of the stiff ones. That have kind of like little half dome. They're recommended for hospital settings but but not for the general public yeah. They're said to be pretty uncomfortable and they might make it hard to breathe and for people who want to prevent themselves from getting sick masks might not do a whole lot. Sexton says it depends on the setting like walking around outdoors with a mask isn't really helpful. It's really going to be an enclosed spaces with people who are contagious that you have the most risk of transmission and so those are probably the situation where you might see some benefit from wearing the mask but again. I think that the emphasis officially on the mask could even be counterproductive because we really need people to wash their hands and to not expose other people if they're symptomatic so so like people might put on a mask and be like Oh. I'm protected and give you kind of a false sense of security. Yeah right in a bunch of people who really aren't used to wearing them they might be touching their faces a lot or they may keep wearing the same mask over and over and that could actually do more harm than good. Another thing that we got questions about a lot is this thing called an are not. It's a number. It's super complicated and it's something that people get wrong. All the time and Christine Garzke from Columbus Ohio O.. H. I hi L.. She asked us about it. Do we know what the are not of this. Current Corona virus is. Okay here we go you ready. Think so so so are not. Is the number of people one sick person could infect on average and that's in a population that's totally susceptible that's important so a group of people in which nobody's vaccinated or has gotten the virus yet. You can kind of think about it as contagious nece but a little more complicated. How so lots of things go into into this intense calculation slash mathematical model? That spits out this number stuff like how long a person's contagious. How likely am I to pass the virus to you do if I'm sick and we've made what's called effective contact with each other right and it's not actually necessarily a constant exactly in multiple ways as we learn more and more about the biology the virus the number will change and it also changes based on the population? You're talking about so factors like the way People Act Act. How many people come in contact with each other? In that population think super congested city versus a rural population. Okay Mattie but back to Christine's original class who what is the actual number fine okay. It's actually a range. Here's Marina van Kerckhove Atop World Health the organization official estimates the reproduction number range from one point four to four point nine so above one where we see human to human transmission but again these estimates maybe refined as more data becomes available. Okay so that actually sounds kind of bad and lake one person getting five. More people sick is a lot of people. Yeah Yeah I hear you but the first thing to keep in mind is that this number was calculated based on the population in China. Right so not the states and again we need to learn a lot more To feel super confident in that range or that number in the final note. Hi are not doesn't mean that. A virus super deadly. It also doesn't talk about like how fast it will spread. It's not a rate calculation. And no doubt this is a cause for concern but I don't think it's really a cause for panic at least not for us here in the. US US okay. So keep calm yes a little bit for now and so are not. Let's leave that right there by itself. Okay Okay Mattie I've left it all right last ask question yell at a lot of people asking about how panic shabby. Why is the media so all over this? Yes we did. Here's one from David Kessler Antler. Why is the corona virus being reported on so much? I do not intend to be callous or obtuse. But I'm curious what element is here. That makes this virus so alarming coming as compared to Cardiff's the US deaths by gun or even our current flu epidemic. That has taken so many more lives. Yeah I think this is actually a pretty great question like one that I actually think about a lot as a human scientist and journalist what do you feel about paying so I think I think it's a fair point that there's a lot aww breathless coverage going on right now about the corona virus and I know that we're contributing to we've been talking about the current virus a lot all the time and it's everywhere and so that it might give people a feeling that we might be dying of it at any given moment sure but the fact is that in the United States the actually really low right and I think it depends on who you are. So if you're a person in China this probably doesn't feel like too much coverage but in the US it could seem overkill. Yeah and something else I think we you need to be aware of in the. US pass is not to vilify the people who are the victims of the virus when he talked about the markets where the viruses thought to have come from and what people eat in China. Yeah I mean we've even talked about that stuff on the show and I feel like we could do better but in the defense of this abundant media coverage. Here's the thing we don't. I don't actually know that much about this virus in that is scary and so I think from a public health perspective. There's a good idea that we should take this extremely seriously really that we should have a strong position. So that we can stamp it out because there are legitimate fears about this getting a foothold and becoming. You know like a new flu Lou. That's always around to deal with over and over again and part of the way you contain potentially global threat like this is to have a lot out of coverage to hear from experts and to share information as much as you can

Mattie United States China Beth Sexton Christine Garzke Dr Lynn Chen Liana Surface New England Journal Of Medicin Alex FLU Amanda Germany Stockton Sneezing Travel Medicine Center Chicago CDC Cambridge Massachusetts Hong Kong
"dr lynn" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

11:50 min | 1 year ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"And you want to do it in the industry model or in this our studio model by orthodontist that that's where we are in we want to just keep heap Beating that drum so that Is many people in the United States will understand that that who we are in in again being very candid being very straight-forward about you know what what the reality is of treatment because you'd be surprised the our the number one reason for negative comments or social media are it's for patients that we that we tell them we can't treat them. Those are the people that are most upset in that. I've never. I've never experienced that in private practice before. So so it's it's a it's a different a different world. It's a different space but where it was going on. I mentioned where you used to have textual dies I was GonNa ask you If you did one hundred clear liner cases how many of them would be tele- tele- dentistry you tell orthodontics versus seeing the patient physically in person when I was at Texas orthodontics for the last for the last year and a half to two years years. I was treating my patients like it was a tele dentistry practice. I would gather the records. I would do the diagnosis and treatment. Planning running. I would have an in office consultation with them. We deliver their liners in then I would put them on dental monitoring and and I would view their Here's the good part. I went from twenty five team members down to five. Because the the amount of support as you need when you when you don't have people patients coming back into your office every week. It changes changes the whole in. I had a nineteen share orthodontic practice so I need about three of those when I moved into. A clear liners ears in in the kind of the Tele Dentistry model. So I was doing that before. We were doing it at Camden. So For candidate I'm one of the visas. Visa's bobby go shell right bobby. Are you friends with him. Do you know him my God. He's he's got he's with. We work work life candidate. So what's what's the all excited about these days. He he's he's if you if you kind of look at our Brandin are look. He's responsible for that because he's the he's he's the chief design officer he kind of gives us the look we have the colors. You know the just the whole feel of what that looks like A. I like to think in in in and I tell my close friends that I'm a really good orthodontist so but don't get me into the marketing in into the design. Zayn his. That's not. That's not what we do you know. Sometimes we is is as healthcare providers we sometimes because we're good in one thing. We're good at everything again. I'm I'm I'm really good at at like one single thing in this whole world And I know how to slalom water ski so there's two things. Oh My claim find defame as I held university record southwestern for one hundred yard dash which I will always hold a reason Campbell. Is Your name Earl Campbell. No no no no. I was actually probably faster than a row Campbell but he was a lot tougher than I was are you. How are you serious? Your fast. I nine seven five hundred yards not meters in nineteen seventy nine now. I always hold the one hundred yard Dash Dash record because they do one hundred meters now so nobody will ever beat me and But you know when when you're going to a college that has a student body of less than twenty five hundred so nobody really cares. Well you know what my my only claim to fame as was my only record. I'm the only person on Earth Who's listening to all twelve hundred ninety four shows of dentistry and censored. Nobody nobody that you. Oh you are incredible. Are you a hundred. You know what you know not not much not much of one no I don't I don't like things dying in front of me okay It seems like every time I got on Texas. It seems like every Dennis I meet down. There wants to go pay cotton year hunting. Yeah I I saw my son is looking for another another dead because he he thinks failed him in that particular arena. Oh my gosh. It was so great though. Hey I I just saw i. I'm so honored for you to come on the show today. I love your entrepreneurialism. I love it in dentistry. I can only imagine what all the colleagues saying I. I've seen Scotland where he tries to do something new and on cutting edge and all all that stuff and oh my gosh the best way to the best way to not ruffle any feathers is do nothing. Say nothing hide in the basement and Michael Michael Shear anything but that I remember next door to you. My Gosh you're in Texas was in Arkansas. Were a dentist. Were north. Arana's just wanted to have a hygienist because because patients were coming in and they thought why not just have a cleaning. I mean my gosh. She should have just climbed up on the top of the tree and shot himself. I mean I mean I mean that was I mean that was like like he was trying to sell drugs or something. Yeah Yeah it's what I our our profession I can get a little. stodgy sometimes in Young entrepreneurs forward thinkers are are not always right. Okay but we've gotTA have people who step out of the way. Things are always being done in in giving her try and you can you you. May You may take. You may take the you know the death penalty for doing it but you know what we get one chance to go around this life. You've taken a lot of You've taken a lot of risk going out and doing what you're do. I applaud you for that You kind of keep the conversation in dental medicine. Listen Germain in active and alive in. If you weren't doing this who else would be doing. Nobody and I and I can't really. They were ten minutes in overtime. Finish one last thing. If you have those entrepreneur thing there's two million dentists in the world and they all no matter where where you go in the world they got four five six seven eight nine ten eleven twelve years of college and Europe has this America every state has their around meeting. I mean fifty states fifty meetings national meetings. Europe does one massive meaning every other year in Cologne Germany. Have you ever gone to that one. I have not but some of my colleagues did this year. I need to go next year. They said it was incredible because see. It's a Korean dental company and they're starting to crush career well they they don't have time to go to Russia candidate and so there's just people all the time saying I'll take the distribution and use the contract. You say okay but within a couple of years you gotta be selling so many dollars a month or we're not going to do what I love. The most about that show is. It's the same reason I love architecture. Hitech sure it's not like I love a bathroom or window sealer door church what I love the deal is that okay. You have to have a bathroom. You have to have a place to shower and all that kind of stuff like that and just how they slightly made it different and Germany versus Ukraine versus Polo versus Russia. And it's the same something about dentistry. You got eight billion people and only basically You know so many dentists and they all all trying to do the same exact thing but they all do it slightly different and I I remember I was laughing in last time is there it was would I saw Dan Fisher from alternate and I mean we were just like couldn't believe how all these dentist from Lebanon and Iran and Korea and Brazil old trying to extract a tooth. I mean they all just want to extract it but they do it one hundred different ways. They do Ortho one hundred different ways. Blonde ing bonding branding bleaching veneers. It is just amazing. I would love I. I can't wait until maybe a tele dentistry starts taking off at the next Cologne last clone meeting at world it wasn't about Tele Dentistry but that is the next frontier. I mean we all got iphone. I mean I remember with the when the Motorola the role of flip phone and the Nike Afon were everything and then in two thousand seven all the sudden you could see the person you're talking to and what I can't imagine is And all the pharmacists. In my tell when someone comes up Nash. What's different seeing Ibuprofen? or I got a toothache amber saul or Sitek buffering or this or that I I say we'll point you're damn iphone facetime e and what's amazing is they'll do my buddy brattle say aid. This guy just asked me. He should say Amazon. I'm busy can you talk to him for a second any polls cheek back and I'm looking at. It's like I feel like I'm sitting on his lower incisors. I I can see and so tell. Dentistry is going to be just big. It's going to be the next big thing. And congratulations for you to being an entrepreneur for Noor and climbing the flagpole and letting everyone have target to shoot at you why you try to pioneer this dentistry. Because I think the meaning of life is very simple I mean we live in the present and who built this present the hundred eight billion humans who have lived and died before represented in your local cemetery and and when I was born I never built an interstate or a dam or bridge or any and those were all presence left by the one hundred ten a hundred billion that it left the day before and only meaning to your life is that when you die I'm the Peop- The what you leave as a present to the next generation and I think You mentioned black and you mentioned here for Charlotte and we're going to leave a lot of really nice presence to our replacement sapiens pins and dentistry telemedicine. Tele orthodontics is going to be one of those big huge gifts. So thanks Lynn for all that you do. Thanks so much for coming coming on this show today and if you're ever want to go get some real barbecue and be bill. You just come down to the next time. I'm there cooking when you when you come to be. We'll see your grandkids. You have to come. I'll meet you and be Ville and we'll have a barbecue or I'll take you to Franklin's here in Austin well if you take your furniture you're gonNa have to take four grandkids. Let's go to do all right. Well I'll be there two weeks over Christmas or any of that opens up. Let's do it pushes assuming an email I love to do that. And thank you for your time and appreciate the platform in your car buying a lot of things in video when audio that That our children and grandchildren great grandchildren are going to be able to to to redeem. So thank you. I have a great day. Okay.

Texas Earl Campbell Tele Dentistry Germany Europe United States Russia Camden Michael Michael Shear Visa Motorola Arana
"dr lynn" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

12:10 min | 1 year ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"You know records. CBS diagnosed dream planning the Treatment Monitoring Juryman measuring treatment outcomes and Post treatment retention. But let's start with digital orthodontic corrector a record. This is Dennis Fan Center. We like to talk about. What's the most controversial? Some people are saying that. CBC is a standard of Care or other people are saying saying no. It's not some people are saying. Well you should do it if you can We've had two oral radiologists on the show saying she doesn't like the amount of radiation radiation compared to a piano and she's also she's seen way too much of people getting CBC tease without thyroid. Callers on So my first question much of its CBC standard of Karen Ortho in two thousand nineteen. No absolutely not the challenge in the radiologists that you spoke with because when I was in academics I was a big proponent of pushing. CBC T in Bill Madison Not just orthodontics but in dental medicine awesome. However as as we're starting to look at the amount of radiation to get volume image to get a high quality volumes? Because what you're doing is you're getting three dimensional images in extracting in looking at two dimensional images. Most of the time. So if you you can get a panoramic x Ray And or a supplemental x Ray or you can get period buckles in bite white wings in you can do it at a lower dose of radiation and you're not using the three dimensional features of the cone beam. CT It's it's come to me. It's conquer indicated because of the amount of radiation versus the What you're looking at if you're taking a three D. damage in your only reviewing two d images that makes no sense To me for the patient so I would when I talk about digital Israel radiography digital records. I'm talking about digital photos to to primarily two-dimensional X Rays. In you can you can then take the The scan of the teeth in a a three-dimensional model out of that. So you know you you. You can actually articulate Dan you can make them look like you know the orthodontist you know look look like plaster models You can put them on articulated if you want to. You can do all that basically putting everything in ones orange in Zeros so that you can review all this stuff in front of a nice monitor in computer in so that you have instant extend access to all of your patients records. That's what I'm talking about in digital radiography but I'm I'm backed off of my. I'm I'm a a little bit more skeptical. What we did in academics we would take the three dimensional model and then and then we would send that to a radiologist for them to review review it because at that point There was some concerns about the dentist. Who is going to be liable for things that we weren't looking at and In so you add all of those things too. You're just increasing the cost of care. And if you're not looking at anything this three dimensional I. I just don't think that that's the best to if someone It seems like I- podcast. A couple of hundred Ortho seems he's like almost everybody says it's the twenty year old. They're eighty percent fix wire twenty percent. Clear liner you. There's is another guy in Canada or a one hundred percent way. Do you think the majority of orthodontists are still eighty. Twenty clear liner and why they're wires after a couple of people like you that are more all clear liner the the only rationale. I've come to is the they don't WanNa they don't WanNa take aide printing wheels off in figure out some of these nuanced tooth movements that or or a little bit more of a challenge. Now if you if you subscribe to everything that a line technology or embezzling tells you. There are a number of limitations particularly related to extractive movements in the Indian excessive need for catchments in. That's because part of that in part art because they have a scalloped cut in that scallop cut does not grab the to remember and removable partial dentures. What we learned is the only way you're gonna get this partial partial denture to stay in the mouth is what undercuts we in fact we would even go in and we would remove some of the the tooth either on the patient or on the plaster so that we could get those little class to fit in under their in lock in? So you know when you're moving teeth. Steve It's the same thing you gotta grab it. I don't have a bracket now so I have to use my tooth is the bracket in. That's the it's just. It's just comfort level. They fall back on the comfort of what they know to do with bands and brackets. So what percent of your practice. I mean you you're you're the clinical director of candid and you own Texas orthodontics right. No longer in private practice. I no longer. We're Texas orthodontics under longer with. I sold the assets of Texas orthodontics back in twenty seventeen. Okay my bad. I am sorry for giving that missing misinformation but I'm glad I I know but by the way a lot of people When you say you want to write that for an arc on dental town or you have to post that on social media why? They're so afraid. That the I you know. I'm afraid I might be wrong. You know. I've had a monthly columns columns since one thousand nine hundred ninety four. And of course I've ceremonial magazine. Because no one else has published me. But it's funny. What what everybody is afraid of Iowa's enjoyed the most? I mean you could be wrong something and all these people for free volunteers editing. You're incorrect thought and sending can you a letter or a phone call. I remember one time I was doing a working on a patient. This is back in like ninety four ninety five and in and they come back out and they said there are some Dennis on the phone in your office. He says it's urgent. I went back there in the end. I said hello this Howard. He goes what did he say. It was Who was the Eisenhower in World War? Two who is the big general patent. He was tat was is not a five star. General you it. He was a four star. General Eisenhower was a five star. And I'm just like okay. WHO's about dentistry? But it. It was so funny because like I'll never ever forget that patent was only a four star general. So when you're wrong people it's just so nice to say all your your thoughts so if you're thinking something incorrectly So someone's got to tell you about but I wanna go several dealers. Seems like I've been to do this thirty two years. I'm fifty seven years old. Seems like whenever I talked to a patient about Orthodontic Susan in under twenty five. Do I need braces. Am I going to get braces. But man whenever you're talking to anybody mile my age. They've already had Ortho a couple of times they're only thought is retention. It seems like seems like everybody thinks orthodontics is really neat thing. It seems like I've seen a lot of people have had Ortho two or three times and and high school and when they first got because then they go back the the big surge and design all that is when you're back on the market and you go post your picture. You're on a tender plenty of fish. Do I put my picture up on plenty of fish and they took it down. They said Dude. You're awale you're not a fish. And they said lose fifty pounds and resubmit but the bottom line is when these ladies and men are coming back on and there there on the market that they had braces in grammar school. They had braces and they're twenty and these young dentists that are getting an Ortho. I tell them all the time. I said straightening the tooth is the easy part retaining being. How much do you think what do you think is harder straightening or retaining retaining kanter? And how many. How many ladies have you met in your lyft by sixty hit? Had Braces three times it. Yes it's it you know I had again. It's a good thing. I'm not in private practice anymore. Because because he's probably politically incorrect. But I always tell my patients children adolescents adults. Here's the dirty little secret of orthodontics retention and is for ever. So here's our agreement you're gonNA have to wear a retainer until I die or you die because one of us have to exit is it because that's the only way that we're going to get closure on this thing because the teeth are always moving and in in your I went through a phase about ten years where I put permanent retainers on my patients because I got tired of them coming back in. They didn't wear the retainers. I stopped that because then the general dentist and the hygienist were saying you know what these patients aren't taking care of these permanent retainers in there. We're getting some ginger recession in their their hygiene is in gray comparing all concerns and I was like Oh my Lord and then you know fortunately came long because I was talking about the old plastic ones. I still have mine with the wire that came around loops and stuff like that when we got to wear clearer liners in. I saw all the patients would we would use the Essex retainers for you know for a bit like a clear liner for retention. They didn't really didn't complain about those. Does the problem was. They were so rigid that if they didn't wear them like they're wire and plastic ones there they put it in after about two or three days in in their eyes would cross so now we have some little softer materials I don't you you still remember. The tooth positions organized went through this. I you would just give him his big mouth guard at the end and they had to chew in it four hours a day and in that was for the orthodontist didn't know how to get the teeth there you're in. They would just crossed their fingers and praying. That was gonNA chew him into inclusion so so anyway but yeah it's it retention is forever it forever and ever so do you think candid will try to do an IPO visit line. Stock has been crazy. Small clubs having a bunch of problem it's got a venture capital backing. What is the what is the next? Move for candid candid it is. We're we're very comfortable where we're at continuing to Innovate in this space of Tele Dentistry tell orthodontics creating our own systems so that we have control over the things that we're doing In and the you know the NFL is we walk down this road. I don't see that on the horizon for US anytime soon. Particularly in light of of of what happened with smile. Reck Club So you know what we're wanting to do now is separate ourselves out as the the the the choice. If you're interested in getting affordable accessible quality safe clear liners.

Karen Ortho Texas Steve It CBC General Eisenhower Dennis Fan Center Bill Madison CBS US Ray NFL Dan Tele Dentistry Canada Dennis Iowa
"dr lynn" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

13:27 min | 1 year ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"American entrepreneurism I mean really. It's largest economy oil. How do you draw the line with the orthodontist who late dentist? I'm they're not they don't like change How you're a board certified orthodontist in Texas? which isn't a liberal state? I mean that is a very conservative conservative state When I go down there to be though I mean I mean Shoutout to Tim Raining all those guys. But how did this go over with your your redneck. Conservative orthodontist in Texas. I mean are you are. Do you have any wounds. You can show me or I have. I Have Kabbadi Guard and I wear a flak jacket so I'm in a special witness protection program. So are you in there with Scotland running the same bodyguard. We have the same guard. No My colleagues leagues when I first started approaching them about this. They're like Dr Hearst. We thought you were crazy in your officially praising so But again as as you talk through the taboos in the norms in any Unin they understand really what we're GONNA do okay. We're not we're not doing quackery in we're not. We're not about trying to do something. That's not already a proven even more or I mean there's there's still eighty percent of my orthodontic colleagues who don't even think. Clear liners work so for them. It's a very tough conversation. For the orthodontist who treated a lot of patients with clear liners in understand the pitfalls and the challenges in the work around in in in. How you you design the case Then it starts to make sense but you know as as we in in the world of dentistry particularly cheekily orthodontics we. I'll take my last CAM cases that created in anybody who's listening you bring your last in cases assist in you know what. Let's just put it on the table and let's see who can do it. I don't care if you do it with braces. Do it. With clear liners so so. It's a comparison. I always look at is Michael Jordan. I can both be handled handed the same basketball the things that he can do. That basketball are are intimidating to what I could do that basketball. It's the same basketball Tom. So what I like to think of. It's not the basketball. It's not the clear liner. It's the doctor. It's he's the knowledge is the wisdom is the experience behind the scenes that makes someone an expert or excellent. What they do? It doesn't necessarily make them any smarter. It just makes them the expert. I in two thousand nineteen can do pretty much anything with clear airliners that I could ever do with brackets and bands in traditional orthodontic. Okay and that's I'm not saying that to Brag I'm just saying I put in the energy and the effort to figure it out in. It's not easy but it's possible and if you tell me it's not possible in you've never done on it or you've only done a hundred or a thousand of them then that's doesn't really have much weight to me because it takes a a lot of mistakes to get it right and we is this know that because that's why my mom God bless her God rest her soul up until she passed away she kept asking me in Bellville Texas. Every time I would visit her son you've been in this profession for a long Tom. What they say you're still practicing? It was a good question. Okay because that's what we do all the time we practice every day. We learn something that we didn't know the day before so that we can get a little bit better the next day so I think we all just need to keep practicing every day. We're going to get a little boot better. You know we. We started off talking about Zia. Who started this clear liner deal and you were saying that you the patients that are so glad they're not all branded ended up There was another ordinance back in the fifties. I'm Dr crabbing Kurds. Who invented invisible braces in beverly hills is by going with lingual? Braces is lingual braces. Still thing or is that is that really not a thing I mean I mean Ah The few times I run into it. The issue was their tongue would play with it until their tongue was hamburger is Leo. You know they don't want people to see Their their their their braces is lingual braces. Still thing there is still. There are still several society's most of the lingual orthodontics is going going on in Europe or in outside of the United States quite frankly In maybe that's because clear liners have not penetrated The market in the same ways it has here in the US but my experience you know. I'm a young orthodontist. I get out Vince Kelly who was one of took I three and guys who was involved in the in the lingual orthodontics one of my instructors in Oklahoma and I was like okay with you. You know what I'm GonNa do this well first of all. I wasn't a very good orthodontist with brackets on the facial of the tea. So I'm not so sure what I thought I was going to be great about putting. I'm on the inside of the mouth and in then I realized why I had become an orthodontist. Because you're upside down working upside down in their mouth trying to put these brackets. Put a wire in there. It was it was very difficult. I abandoned it in favor of clear brackets which was problematic in and of itself. In the reason the patient complaint you put lingual on the upper and lower many patients can tolerate the lingual on the upper but when you consume tongue space on the lower It got really ugly in so I have patients ever just like you know what you gotta take these off so for for a season I did lingual on the upper in In facial brackets or buckle brackets on the low or traditional rackets on the lower but that there's a small small segment of the population. Who still doing that but I mean you can? It's in the hundreds. It's just not very many people particularly with clear liners around. Yeah so so there's so many So when asked You well what is the unique selling proverbs jobs. I mean I I don't know how many are but I mean there's There's candidate small clubs. Sam Cracks Smile of crystal braces from home. Dental easy smile dental lab Dirksen Accent in Texas there in Dallas. or or th-. -Ly what do you say. What would you say to Mr Wonderful? He said what is your unique selling proposition. And then this other long list. Well it's IT'S A it's a commitment. It's a commitment to equality outcome in whatever that takes so in in my private practice in San Antonio something that my parents always always taught me might my dad in particular. He's like son. Whatever you choose to do just do one thing in be the best fast at it okay? Well I don't know if I'm the best at it but I've always tried to follow that that. Mo in so in whatever. I've done in private impractical. I I always wanted to have the nicest office I always wanted to have the best team around me because we in practice no that that's ultimately silently our success in your failures can come from there and then I wanted to be high tech so I wanted to use a wanted to use technology. I remember when I started my practice in San Antonio ahead an IBM xt And it had a sixty four K ram sixty four K Ram. I mean there are. There's nothing that I even know of any more runs on that little ram so I was like okay. I need to network this so I put slave cards in the In that's probably not appropriate term erm these days but big. They call play cards at that time they were they were. PCI boards that you would snap in in. You could make a connection in make a network I loaded an excel spreadsheet. One time that was so big it consumed all of the Ram and it just froze up the computer that was running my Home Office so that you know. There's there's if you do that in any space that you go into your committed to take care of for your patience you're committed to take care of your team The that's really the candidate model. We we have great support. We WanNa make sure that our patients We're not perfect. But we're in it but we're certainly in search of not perfection but excellence wants in in the care of the patients from how their teeth are aligned. How they fit together to how they are addressed in communications communications? And I think that those are the things that are currently differentiating us in ultimately Will will be what brands us is candid. So when you're learning braces What will first of all orthodontics is different different? Because I mean ended. Honest to Georgie of Mo- I mean do Muller Indo but Dennis to some Dennis General dentist who some and specialists do anywhere from you know the most difficult to allot would what is the general thoughts of orthodontists. There's ten one thousand eight hundred of them in America. What do they think of when they see a dentist doing a clear liner case orthodontist? I generally don't think general dentists should be doing any ORTHODONTIC treatment. Okay now I I will differ a little little bit there because I have worked with in known some general dentists who have made the commitment and the dedication to really figure this stuff out in in lieu of having the formal training. They spent time and in some cases. I've had some general all dentists who were better at orthodontics. Some of my own colleagues now. That's not the case if you look at the if you look at everyone that's not the case because it's very difficult in general dental practice to jump from Indo to extractions to a class one. I Makarius prep in restoration over to a A pediatric patient jumping over to a patient embraces in the the reason that that is challenging. Is that as you build your orthodontic patient population within your Own Practice the chair. Time in traditional braces is very is very loaded in the return on dollars. Isn't there air. So it's better for the general dentists from an economic standpoint to do that unless they're really going to focus on it and it's a very big part of their practice so just to blend it in that that that those chair dollars are very low compared to almost every other procedure that they do so I'm I'm I'm not against it. I just want if your general dentist and you GonNa do it. Invest the energy in the time to figure it out in provide provide excellent care in that means that you need to you need to monitor your treatments in the beginning through route treatment and at the end the only way that we learn is to look at what we did at the end and then we assess ourselves in. That's that's the definition of a professional. You don't need somebody looking over your shoulder to tell you that you need to get better your education in Europe the perseverance in your continual of desire to understand your your your trade your profession and is really. What makes you an expert in any one in our profession who chooses the path can be very successful in whatever they choose? Choose to do. But you're just not going to be great at everything okay. The next six questions. I'm GONNA ask her going to be clinical nature. Lets.

Texas basketball Europe San Antonio Tim Raining Scotland Michael Jordan United States beverly hills Dr Hearst Tom Zia Bellville Oklahoma Dennis General Vince Kelly Mr Wonderful IBM
"dr lynn" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

13:05 min | 1 year ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"I I don't know how we're maybe he'll be wrong. But I you just wouldn't have attacked seventeen percent of the US economy unless I really had to. But so so what is the one said. Well what's the difference in candidate and and smiles club or invis- line. What would be is I was mister wonderful on Shark tank isn't that filmed in Dallas? Yes yes so pretend were in Dallas. And I'm going to be the beautiful Mr Bald wonderful from Canada. He would say what is unique goodbye. I think he's GonNa WanNa do you have any protection. You just said that all Zia stop so Mr Wonderful is gonNa tell. Make Me Make Mr Wonderful Happy Right now. What you're better looking than he is but I was still do my best to try to make that happen candidate? Initially he was again. A orthodontist rebuttal to what we feel in my specialty is weak. You know we've kind of Sometimes we feel like Maybe stepchild in the we've we've kind of been pushed out of Tom You know pretty much all we do in history is GonNa say that. There's some good reasons why we have. We've done that. However however is an orthodontist who is used to working with my colleagues? Because that's what we do. We work hand in hand with our our our our the general dental colleagues. We work with other specialists every day all day long in our practice. So you know for us to come into this space in want to punch everybody in the face that's just not that's not in our DNA OUR DNA is to be part of the team and back when you and I were in dental school it was. We were always taught that the general dentist is the quarterback of the team. And you know the the indeed honest in the periodontics contest in the orthodontist oral surgeon pediatric dentists and the process. Everyone has a role to play in providing great care so so the first thing I would say is that I wanted to choose my colleagues who are specialists in. Let's let's approach Tele Dentistry in do do just what we do in our practices using the tools and the technology of dentistry. That's really what we did for for example when Whether it's a patient at home or patient who comes into our studio the first thing we do is a notice of privacy practices. We developed a doctor patient relationship relationship and we get a thorough medical dental history and a beginning of the informed consent sand that so that they understand what relationship they're getting into. We all agree that that's the standard of care. The the next thing will do is that we will get a an eight series photo individual photos that end up in a collage in into what we call the American American board of orthodontics. So when we go showcases or we go and sit before the board for certification it's it's a standardized format three extra oral photos in five into oral photos that we will present a that we present to our worth so that for for the for them to be able to diagnosis in treatment. Plan if their home they'll get a pbs in what what's one of the things. I'm very proud. We now can get photos from from patients through the technologies that we have That will rival. You can get in your private practice in. I'm GonNa tell you it wasn't easy but with a lot of hard work in a lot of smart people. We figured out how to get those photos in. I'll put output are put our records records up against anyone. The next step is at at home. Is the PBS impression. Okay now getting a good p full mouth. PBS Impression in an office is a challenge. Another thing I'm proud of is the ability through our training tools in You know through a a lot of hard work by a lot of people in in in me just a bunch of people in through trials and tests and in studies. We we figured out how to get a really good. PVs impression from our patients who don't have access to office or to a studio okay in the studio it's simple we get the photos By train people we get the info oral scans and that those come come great The next thing we're rolling out right now is Getting digital radio digital x rays In the studio here in Austin Austin where I live we have an x ray machine so we're operationalizing that we think did did While there are some cases that it may. I'm not require having an X.. Ray We want our patients to always have that option In in treatment in but it so anyway so we got we. We'd go through and we we do all those things that information is put together it sent to the orthodontist. The orthodontist at that point can make a decision Asian of go or no go basically in treatment is the patient someone that we can free in our space or is it someone who has has to be referred back to a general dentist and second has to may be Might need to be referred to an orthodontist because of the severity of the Malik. Collusion doesn't fit in. Our model is when I say model and be very careful here are kirk pricing model. It's not that we can't treat them. It's that we can't treat them at the price point that could we only have one price point right now. So that will that mean. There's a lot of kids. Listen to what do you mean you only have one break point. We only have where it's nineteen hundred bucks. Okay it's in so one thousand nine hundred bucks when you look at in our in our business model when you take the cost of the alliance the cost of marketing all those things and you put everything together just like you would your office. There's only so many sets of liners that we can use. Who's right now in that in the in in that model of nineteen hundred dollars? Now I from the beginning just like I didn't practice I always had different price points for my patients. I would have kind of the basic care in and I would have Kinda the middle package because you can call it the bronze the silver and gold package for treatment I think that that's always important to give the patient those options at this point. We only have the bronze package Again I don't run the company I encourage as an orthodontist and his chief dental officer that we provide a more robust choices for for our patients. But that's not what we're at right now okay so when that information is into the orthodontist they make a decision about can we treat Denver. Mr Not treat them right. Now I can tell you that our numbers are right at the twenty five percent one of every four people who come to us we have to send them back for dental care or we have to send them refer them to north. Because it's something that we're we're not at the point that we can treat them so so. So that's I mean that's what we do in then after that we go through the process of getting the the three D. S. t. l. foul converted into segmented in we designed the treatment and that treatment then is reviewed by our orthodontist again with the other diagnostic records in. Then we make a decision about Do do we need to revise. The treatment plan Or is that treatment plan good. Once we approve the treatment plan it goes back to the patient and the patient has a chance to review. That and make a decision is is he gonNA give them the outcome That they they were looking for in as we know. We know being dentists that the first thing we question we always ask is. What's chief complaint? So if the patient comes in in they say I have. TMD problems or they always call a team. Jane I have Kim Jane Okay. Well that's probably not gonna be a patient that I'm GonNa want onto step into because we know that that is such a multi to`real area at the diagnosis and the treatment plant. It's all all over the place it may not have anything to do with orthodontics so I is an orthodontist. I'm not comfortable treating those patients Just just because I may you open up a can of worms that there's something else going on that I that I may not want to get into okay in my practice. I had no problems Dealing with that. Ah because those patients require a lot of one on one communication. So anyway we use that and we If the patient Approach approach treatment we manufacture the liners. And we sit you know and then we we send them to them. We have a day one check in with them. We're we're now moving into technologies where I can actually get a visual scan of my patients teeth in how they're tracking India. Nia Liners every ten days. So I actually can see my patients more intelligent than I did in my own private practice. So It's it's There's there's just so many opportunities out there for us to provide affordable accessible a high quality and safe care to patients that are just a little bit out of the traditional model so you so basically do so would you say that like Smiles direct clubbing. Crystal braces. Or more. Do It Yourself D. I Y. Do It yourself self dental offices that really and you're trying to loop in the orthodontist. I mean is that would that be the cleared differentiator. Yes I I again. I have to be cautious about speaking for other companies. Because I don't know really where we're at is. I'm not internal with them. All I know is that for us yes. The Orthodox is Dr directed it's orthodontists directed personalized care throughout the journey of treatment. Many of our patients will get you know as as he. I don't know if your practice with Treatment but if you do oftentimes you don't get it in the first set of a liner so you have to go back for a refinement in do additional treatment We we as orthodontists no that. That's that's going gonNA happen in. We provide that care to our patients. Now we do ask them to be Just like I didn't practice if I give a patient a simple. Oh case a clear liners. They don't wear them as prescribed. I'm probably not going to get the outcome that Either one of us want any more or less compliance between the boys and girls. I mean I I just can't I can't imagine that the average Boy Boy in highschool in Texas would wear as clear liners when he's been wearing the same Texas. A&M Shirt for three days in a row. Do you have any more combines. Wrong wrong boys or girls are not really. The only compliance problem I have with teenage boys is not that they don't wear them. It said they don't take them out to clean clean them because once they put it in there like so thankful that they don't have braces on there like if they ever pick them out that this You know this gift from up above or wherever is going to disappear and It's the there's there's a big. There's a big chasm between parents in the understanding of their children particularly the males if the males wanted not for some reason they will do anything. If they don't want it just happens that most of my male T. adolescent patients. They actually really want to clear liners if they don't want him. What you said is one hundred percent true? It's GonNa be it's GonNa be a train wreck so how do you. It's so oh tough on the one hand you want invasion you want everything to go faster easier higher quality smart. I mean this whole country's Vesey America. There's something renton the secret sauce about..

Dallas Texas Tom You US Mr Bald Mr Wonderful WanNa Canada Zia Vesey America Austin Austin Ray India Jane I Denver D. S. t. l. Kim Jane
"dr lynn" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

14:36 min | 1 year ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"With the mission to provide accessible affordable quality and safe all healthcare to everyone. He desires a beautiful smile. Dr Early Research Interest was is in biomaterials currently is interested in practice based research networks and clinical trials and. He has several peer reviewed publications. Dr Member of numerous as professional organizations. The listened to long to read in his spare time enjoys automobiles. Football's movies off road motorcycle on and on I they wanted to get you on the show so bad. The biggest anything new is the most controversial. I mean. Humans one everything the same. How they'd be driving Fred Flintstone winstone call car If they could still have it. But my Gosh ORTHODONTICS IS I. It's it's one of the most changing changing professions. You saw Smiles Direct Club do an IPO and that went over like a lead balloon in churches lawsuits everywhere LEGIT start there What did you in my lifetime? I guess start there when I lecture around the world my Gosh. Wouldn't you tell someone your dentist first. Question out of their mouth is in line. And it's like when I started lecturing around the world in my in the one thousand nine early nineties the big brands were colgate aicraft and listerine and all that stuff and then invis- lying comes out of nowhere takes complete mine share if you go to Vietnam or go anywhere anywhere on earth and say you're a dennis that the waitress says you do invis- line and then the smiles direct club the tallaght dentistry thing. I don't even know where to start. But let's start the smiles direct club. IPO because you're a founder of candidate that very well may likely could do an IPO. Someday I mean I don't know but what what did you think of small's drug club. Well candidate in in in many ways is really a an off shoot of the small Beret Club. concept in my own practice in twenty fifteen late two thousand fifteen twenty sixteen. I hadn't I moved completely to a clear liners in the reason was I needed to find out. How far can we go with this tool as an orthodontist? So when you take the crutch of braces away you find out really quick. What kind of training wheels you need in what it's GonNa take for you to be able to treat every case With clear liners so when I started that journey it was bumpy. I was actually doing it with invisible. Line what I learned during that time is that I learned what the weaknesses were of Align technology or the embezzlement product In my opinion they we- they push a lot of things that make week That are proprietary to them attachments. They asked dentist and orthodontist to do a lot of PR I'm not a big fan of either one one of those. So he went through that journey Then a mob club came along and in I was was interested in having an orthodontist only version of that because as a specialist I am as an academic individual I think that there are certain of people who have the proper training to do certain procedures. A you know in school there were two things I didn't like Wedding like blood. For one reason I went into medicine and turned out that there was blood in dental medicine. Listen so that created a problem for me Into Donnie treatment was was not something that got my attention. extraction of third. Molars didn't get my attention I did. I hated period of surgery. It was way too bloody in and When you know when it came to growth and development that seemed to be something stimulated my mind so go again going back to small direct club? Candidates is really the and is intended to be let the specialist deal with a challenging space of Tele of telemedicine. Tell IT industry and We've got a great Great core of orthodontists did that work with with with our patients and You know it's an it's been. It's been a fun journey. I've I'll I always like stepping out and doing things a little bit a Different than had been done in the past. What I have found out is that in order to really address in alertness in academics to address the access issue hugh access to care? You can't keep doing things. The same way in expect access to care to follow is not GonNa Happen so you have to change models models about how you provide care what you know what we were what we were looking at doing. At all of the university's I've been involved in is creating creating opportunities back into the community so that we can build networks of professional colleagues to help help us brainstorm in figure out ways to do. This candidate is just one of those things where using using modern technology to to really Open up this access to care issue in in we know in the brick and mortar stores. What affixed call star in if you maintain that model? You're you're at some point you you're limited as to where you can bring your price point down so you have to change. Come turn that upside down. And that's what that's what we're doing. So what year did you get out of. Ortho school I got out I completed my residency in In one thousand nine hundred eighty six okay so nineteen eighty-six you're an orthodontist and it was not even about ten years. It was ninety ninety seven when Zia Christy started a line technology and now is an all those patents. Kind of expiring. Isn't that the majority of his patterns are expiring. It's opening up this because you see a plethora of all these clear liner companies is that because was was Zia. The the guy that actually invented it was he was a graduate student at Stanford not had nothing to do with the dentistry uh-huh and in he He one of his colleagues. They started thinking about you know some innovations in they came up with this idea of getting impressions and getting these models in you know we we as dentists were Kinda doing old school way I remember my students in. Even when I was with my residency. We'd get a model and then we have to. We had to section all the teeth thou like what we were doing. You know we were going to die for crown or something and then we would move them around and use wax to to fill a man he he just took the technology that was available at that time in building into a kind of a digital format. And you know it's it's sad but a lot of times. Some of the innovations in our profession. Come from people who you have a different Lens on in. They just see things that we kinda get buried worried in in the weeds because we oral healthcare providers. We're very detail oriented people and sometimes we have to. We have to force ourselves to back up a little bit and look at the big picture in in find myself having to do that often. Wow and and and it's also not only do people make all these innovations from That weren't even from orthodontics or dentists but then they're also so Immigrants he he was from Pakistan. And I it's just amazing when you look at all these IEP in Silicon Valley. It's only when the Boston when Boston. Oneday Sunday. The the Stanley Cup. It was so interesting that not one of their players was even born in the United States. It's always like when everybody Americans always tell you that America went to the moon. Yeah with a bunch of stolen scientists from Germany after World War Two. I'm pretty sure that the people got us the mood. Not One of them spoke English. They were all German speaking physicist. But Yeah American. Went to the Boston won the Stanley Cup. But the so would you say zia started the genre of clear liners. He got in for starting clear. Light Sheet He. He's he's he's the he's the original founder of a line technology technology. Which is the company behind the line? So yeah he's he's You know our history books are going to show that Not Edward Hartley Angle Shar You know we're the great. Innovators of clear liners. It was it was someone that wasn't even a dentist. That will go down in the history books now since since that particular time in my profession of dental medicine is a whole oh really kinda rejected this upfront myself. I mean I started treating patients with it in it was horrible and it was horrible because I was horrible The technology was horrible. And we were. We were still trying to implement the exact same You know movement moment Techniques that we use with bands and brackets when because when you take a bracket it's away from the tooth and then you put a wire in it. You have apply couples in in a bunch of other different forces in order to move the root. The way you want to. That's the way we were trying. Well it actually had to kind of unwind unwind net in when you put clear plastic over a tooth you your tooth now becomes the bracket in so you got to think of the tooth is the bracket and you now apply forces to the tooth that you need to do in order to move it around so in some ways. It's easier but it's you just have to kind of rethink the process and Clear Liners CA- quite frankly. I don't think were of significant penetration in in the market or to general dentists or two orthodontists up until the Inter oral scanner came along in about ten into twenty eleven twelve to two in that area when we got to where we could get a digital scan of tea. We then started. GETTING LINERS LINERS THAT FIT Much better and And that was kind of weird things have taken off going back to your previous question. The a eleven of the foundational patents for align technology expired in these were kind of again they were. They were the a building block from all of their other patents that has opened up a floodgate of of opportunities. And that you know. There's a a good reason our country has this kind of the seventeen year head start window for someone to develop some technology because there's a lot the research and development that goes into that But what you know. Align technology took this very aggressive approach in me and they just just went after anyone who who came into their territory and you know my personal opinion there. There's going to be the price to pay for that and not just in the market but from the from the dentist who were kind of under the thumb In creativity was Kinda Siamese I therefore that window of time so right. Now there's a plethora of things going on that are just all over the place. Every major company in dentistry to stream is coming up with their version of this can't candidate is in like an summering is is really a Tele Dentistry D.. Yes Oh in. We're we're doing the exact same things that I did in my office. Were just doing them in a telemedicine tele dentistry industry manner Or they can come into one of our studios in the studio is very similar to an office experience so in in summary of smiles direct club. They tried to Bypass a doctor. They using that was their biggest mistake. Is that they like because when you look at Invis- line I mean they court ordered on us. I mean the big relations were would you say that was small drugs. Biggest problem album was that they tried to bypass the orthodontist and go around him. You know I can't get into their mind and I I don't know enough about them to be very intellectually critical but the they they have taken a little bit of an adversarial Cereal approach to the to the dental profession. And I can tell you candidate is one hundred eighty degrees away from Najib it just it. Just interrupt you I. It's so insane. I mean healthcare is seventeen percent of the US economy. That means seventeen cents at a rebel. Well it's the most healthcare's the biggest most entrenched it's regulated from fifty states fifty different state boards and that Guy Strategy was to start attacking attacking and suing dentists and dental boards. I mean you'd have to be delude. Dilute I mean you're not GonNa see me go to the Phoenix Zoo and say let me in the cage with those lions all show them. WHO's boss around here? I mean to a it was just crazy. I I don't know how we're maybe he'll be wrong. But I you just wouldn't have attacked seventeen percent of the US economy unless I really had to. But so so.

United States Boston Smiles Direct Club Fred Flintstone Football Dr Member Phoenix Zoo Zia Christy embezzlement tallaght Zia Edward Hartley Pakistan zia
"dr lynn" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"Peers and potential new patients. It's just a huge honor for me today. Hey to podcasts. Interviewing or Lynn her. She was born in Corpus Christi in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven the middle of three children to Reverend Chester. All all of hers and Dorothy may hearst. He graduated from. AC Jones High School in Beaverton Texas where four out of five of my grandchildren lived and nineteen eighteen seventy five and southwestern university Georgetown Texas and seventy nine with a in biology minor in chemistry in one thousand nine hundred eighty four. He received does Dr Dental surgery with honours on on on the Krahn Capela obsolete. And you know I didn't get it 'cause I can't even pronounce it from the University of Texas Health Science Right and center San Antonio in Eighty six received a specialty certificate in orthodontics and dental facial pigs from the University of Oklahoma Health Science Center so so I wonder if he's a Texas football fan or Oklahoma upon completion of his education in eighty six hundred private practice in San Antonio were Scott loon practices right so where. He practiced orthodontics off for twenty years. After one year in practice he joined the Faculty of the University of Texas Health All Science Center in San Antonio and is involved in orthodontic education research ever since Doctors completed phase three aboard certification in orthodontics nights and cheating the status of diplomat of the American board at orthodontics in two thousand three was one of only thirty orthodontist to be recertified as a diplomat. I mean his resume goes on forever and ever and ever in two thousand seven accepted the position as professor and Founding Dean for the College Dental Medicine at Roseman University. That's in Salt Lake City right. Stolen city campus in Henderson Nevada Henderson Nevada in two thousand eight..

University of Texas Health All Lynn Henderson Nevada Henderson Nev University of Texas Health Sci San Antonio Texas University of Oklahoma Health university Georgetown Texas Dr Dental surgery Roseman University College Dental Medicine Salt Lake City AC Jones High School Reverend Chester Corpus Christi hearst Scott loon Oklahoma
"dr lynn" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

15:23 min | 1 year ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"And as you say you can spend more time thinking and enjoying life than booking restaurants. I say that the hardest working people in my heim <hes> my robot back in and google <unk> surrey alexa so we do have all of them and i have all of them because at the moment not integrated well enough. Technologies does not quite developed enough but with all those extras doing that. I'm freed up probably for two plus hours a week so i just think about being up to magnify that end right down to the fact that were pulled change because you no longer have the receptionist sitting there it meeting you and saying okay. Let me check if so-and-so's in so they'll be making you they'll be the face of the company in the director of first impressions but what they will be doing is managing multiple digital assistants to make the whole pice run so they'll become more technology enabled and this is going to change those jobs and then think about how far work has changed in terms of there are very few hustle assistance where it's one person assistant to an executive these days we say it at the very very top of the trade but we said the rest of the way down when that was first <unk> been around while andrew so we remember when it was you know you had a team assistant paper went. Oh one instance or twelve people now looking at week. I probably you don't even need that. Technology's going to mean that those jobs are actually free to go and do valuable work and that money that expenditure that that space is going to be adding different value. The machines can do all the stuff. That's just the day to day. I think it's chewy robin the threat you'll p._h._d. Thesis look at the psychological underpinnings of the effect of retrenchment and so i want to explore that forbid. Do you think the stigma retrenchment has been reduced recently because it seems to be happening more and more companies companies need to cut costs and technology and some of the girls are being taken is on. We'll have to thank you for not falling to sleep as you said that very very long title and there there is a difference now because we have fewer people who apparently employed and so now we have a couple of changes we have millennials who've never seen a recession and therefore data to know what it is to not have work or to fred about work or to worry about will will there be another job data's pack up and i moved next job so i think until we see a global financial situation again that impacts this retrenchment at the moment is not being talked about at the same level it was but it is a cyclical thing and unfortunately companies companies still use retrenchment imply solve performance management so instead of saying look. This is not a match for our business and having a proper compensation. There's a papal management thing for you really thinking about. Is this person despite their best. If it's not just be a good fit for the company the company might not be a good fit for them. Before whatever reason they get a little bit paralyzed and they stay there and then the company says will we will force the hand by giving you a retrenchment and that's where we still say. It's got a bit of a stigma because people know aw that if that happened. Why didn't you say the writing on the wool so i think it depends on what industry you're in. I was joking say if you haven't got at least three retrenchments on you save so you probably not trying hard enough and at the same time because of this change to gig economy. We're not seeing at the same level we were the you mentioned the em would millennials. I'm gonna touch from what we hear a lot about the fact that millennials expect a different way of being managed actually had first hand experience that they signed to train actually try and selenium team about simple business business etiquette like not criticizing your boss in front of the client and these things since when i provide constructive feedback to this particular person they actually thanked me. They said no one had actually told them. This is the way to behave so perhaps a loaded question but should universities be teaching these skills before students hit the workforce well in the classes that i teach that all of my focus is all those softer skills and on how do we present and how do we influence and how do we think about ethical dilemmas and i we information literate literate and things of that nature so but i teach in the management space i worked with undergrads in post grad. I'm always saying to them. Don't just look at the company when gophers interview you go to show how you going to adding credible values this company that no other candidates going to do. I think that the greatest challenge is that with title the rise of technology we've got an inflated distribution effect and so if you've ever sent an email and oops or posted something going oops that decision distribution of fake <unk> at it's sort of hot and so what we save paperless they've grown up with a bible find in the pocket and if it rings sti- to stop what they're doing an answer that phone nobody's ever said to them. Actually that's really rude so when you do site for the first time sometimes they'll look at you quite incredulously insight insight. We'll have date you. Tell me that it's rude so i think you could handle the feedback really carefully but having just come from attained wait professional skills program and i was really interested how often i had to remind people i can see you with your phone in front of your face between new and may while we're talking king and they would look at me really stunned like. Can you really say that. I'd say think about the message that sending so it's as much a case of that we've got a new way of working that a people before them didn't know so couldn't help them to guide that change change in protocol and i think that it's not just about millennials being managed differently. It's about the fact that we are seeing situations nations now. It's less clear what the protocol so if you don't take some time to learn those protocols <unk> become observant of how is it done here and if it is he's done in a certain way. That's not getting you where you want to go. Then think about what we would opt to see. We're not allowed to have you fine on intimating today. You said that somebody somebody tell you crazy but i always remind people that probably don't need. They find on for that if dane thirty minutes unless there's an emerging crisis yes yes. They're even people now that have like a fine seen being when you walk in but i do remember in fact one of my colleagues at telstra after optus we use to take stage other across the table almost like a running commentary autry how the meeting was going these days us what set but i think you saw and even in the millennial situation i had i would have won meetings like a review meeting and they'd have they find nine out. I would actually not slam it down but i look and you place put you down because you need to be in the room if you're in the room being the room as my friend najjar is mrs now. I've known you for such a long time. I'm one thing that many people might not know about. She is the who wants an international. I skied. That's a random facts in an amazing one. I mentioned this helped prepare. You well fillet corporate life as you're able. You're upon your dedication greeters escada. So what lessons did you learn from this period for korea and what do you pass on to your clients. Skating teaches teaches you that no matter how hard you work something still on the diet can go role and so you work lists from his face of perfection and more of a spice of recovery which is what do i need to do to make it happen so he does. The first thing that skating really teaches you to do in skating makes you incredibly resilient. Trust me. Nobody gets up in the morning at three thirty or whatever and basically pounds your body against something. That's hotter cement minute off minute after minute and you keep getting up and you keep going because of that ultimate goal of when i masterpiece and so the other thing is getting teaches you to do is to kate working towards mastery and it doesn't matter if you can do something then keep practicing it because it will get better and better and better for if you push for that and i think there's a lot of joy when you realize that you can actually i've aecom. Come just about any huddle so. I think that we need to really look for things that we can draw upon us strength since i this is what i'm really good would at the analogy i used recently. Was somebody asked me. How did i go and i used a skating analogy. I said i went out and did what i had tried to do. Do and they looked at me and i said all i could do was what i had in my bag and i tried to do and i then use the analogy about hadn't plan to do squad. I don't even have one in my back so i just went out and did all my triples really well. I executed really well and i'm happy and i realized that's a very valuable thing to know yeah. Yeah you're different academic. You'll not just teaching all the time you have what in corporate life span both so you'll be more pragmatic like magic beat more practical in your approach. I am so what organizations getting wrong in terms of how they managed talent is call myself an accidental academic because this was auto out planned but it sort of evolved but what organizations often can't tell the police that they technical skills may be breen lenient but they might just be approaching a situation in a way that's not helping so often what organizations it's very hard for them to unpack the banta so the compensation that you and i might have socially as to is that what's really happening when they with the client will when they're at work nick so as the boundaries between work and heim have blurred and we have more social time at work at cetera organizations are struggling to know how to give that feedback and how to mentor and how to help people to look beyond the day-to-day. They're so busy and it's all about absolutely free delivery delivery. If you don't get some space to think beyond the delivery then you'll have nothing to deliver tomorrow so we've got to ensure for organizations that allowing allowing encourage risk if they punish risk then you'll get knowing i should this is something that's keeping me awake at the moment because i'm actually doing my fifth ticks about the culprit spark of innovation and when i go into boards they're all saying you know what we do and i say you need time to think you need time to allow people to file oh. We can't do that because finally is bad dad and so. I'm slowly slowly trying to encourage people to take more risks final question before i ask if you three tips next week. This is a biggie ethics in business is something it comes up a lot with my audiences. Are we adequately addressing the question of ethics in business at all levels and vocal organization and how can manages lynn to be more ethical ethical. Fecal question comes down to fundamentals. Would you do this to somebody else. How would you feel if somebody he did this to you. So we often set us out should be buyer away by beware and i go but if the by doesn't know and it's outside with a conscious competence to ask did we have a responsibility and saw to be ethical is to be able to put yourself in somebody else's shoes and think about the outcome for that person think about what would happen. If this affected my family my friends my loved ones would arrest.

Skating so-and-so director executive andrew telstra korea lynn kate optus autry breen heim nick thirty minutes
"dr lynn" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

12:23 min | 2 years ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"To coast. Dr Lynn key tied. Linda were two other sightings reappearance in two thousand seven and eight. What were they all about? Actually, there's been. Again, if you get into the photo page on on the Phoenix lights network website. They continue to come back. There is there was one actually a year after the same object. Yeah. I year after the the mass sighting, which we have some of the footage in our documentary, which is pretty amazing because it's very very rare. Are are you Midi here is very low, and it is extremely rare to have Bob here in especially the Phoenix area are usually around ten or fifteen and this is in January of ninety eight. There was a wall of fog. You could not even see beyond our street. It was really eerie and my husband knows kidding around. They could be there watching us, and we don't even see them. But at any rate, I like the third or fourth day, my husband, and I were out on the balcony, and I see. I hadn't seen the light since March thirteenth year before during the mass shooting and suddenly I see like faint amber lights behind his head. And I had already met with the university of Arizona optical sciences department. And they had said because I was using cannon instamatic camera. I can't believe the pictures. I caught on this cameras. But I didn't thank goodness. And but they said to me, you know, the lights come back. You must get better equipment. So I called them the next morning. I said look, I don't know if they're back, but we're kind of muted Fahd. But if they are I really do need to get equipment, and they advise me, and I went out, and I got a top of the line Pentax camera with a towel. Star filter and that night, they did come back. I have those pictures on the on the website on the photo page, and I alerted village labs again, I was a non enormous. I mean, even the other videography didn't know who the person who had the pictures that. I was just letting out there. So people could see what we had seen. And I said, you know, alert the other people which coincidentally again were situated north south east and west they had taken the video. There's only a handful of videos from the night of March thirteenth, and they did and lo and behold there was a sighting, and I really was like close encounter. It was miraculous. I mean, we're talking straight lines and mirror images. Twenty like twenty minute array forty miles apart. The final thing was this giant pyramid of three lights again in that same location where the native Americans believe that there's a porno. Or gateway? If you look at the pictures, but none the less we all caught it from north south east and west it was spectacular. And so they're around and by the way. Also on the photo page. There are two sunset pictured. I collect. Sunsets. Beautiful sunsets in Arizona and into two separate months November and December of two thousand in the picture. I did not see these when I was taking them, but they're in negative thirty five millimeter negative are these giant rod shaped objects cigar shaped objects that some would call mothership and not only are they seeing over superstition mountain here. But also on over the Navajo rain, which is really interesting one of our speakers, we have speakers after we show the documentary, and then a and A at our event this coming Sunday only mainstream about of its kind at the Scottsdale hockey and chase theater, and they just moved us. Others tickets available. I urge people to get them before that's sold out two. But any rate the native Americans there's Navajo Rangers. Have you ever met them, George? Rangers. They are fabulous. Actually came up to me, one of the conferences and I shared that. They had a sighting which they thought would be like big news the day before our mass sighting of these ores going around in circles, and clockwise counterclockwise. And they're so open to these phenomena and welcome them. They I mean, it's amazing. They all took their lawn chairs out to watch for over an hour, and they to have shared that. These rod shaped object season, huge cigar shades, craft has orbs and guess coming out from them over the Navajo Rangers a lot going on over the Navajo range. So you know, there's things happening all the time around here. Some sometimes you hear about it because the media picks up on it. But certainly there's there's things happening here all the time and pilots sightings all the time as well. And as I mentioned, number of, retired pilots and military or. Now sharing their their sightings with me because I feel more comfortable because they've been threatened with their careers. You know, second okay to the phones. Again, we go Mark truck driving in the state of New York. They Mark go ahead. Thanks for taking the call a longtime listener, call the several things. Listen, I gotta tell you. This topic really hits me in it solidifies what I've seen one night. This was about seven or eight years ago. I was gab driving. And I was picking people up at bingo hall, and as I came in on the highway I seen there was three orbs blue orbs in a triangle, and then one by one more came in are you there? Okay. One one by one more came in. And they were there was seven of them. When all was said and done, and as I'm pulling up to pick up, the spare the bingo hall, they start dispersing. And I said, you know, nobody's gonna believe me by the time. These people got in the cab. There was George last and they seem them. And I said do you see that makes it what is that? They were the size of them. They were low that they were, you know, the lower something is the bigger it appears to these things were low, and as we're going one takes off. And then there was one remaining. And it was almost like the thing knew we were looking at it. And then out of nowhere. I've never seen nothing. Like this. It just. Clash with a flash. It was gone speed that you I've never seen in my life. So the next day I Google this and on that same night, but I seen them. There were sightings over Russia over England over France all that same berry night. There was all these articles were coming up, and I just couldn't believe it. Now, I never put this together. But you guys have mentioned it tonight. At Utica is ten miles from Kris Jenner base, which is a defunct airbase. But they're still NORAD is up there, and they have labs up there. And there are silos up there. There are nuclear silos on that base to this day. Even though it's close, and I, you know, just just talking about it gives me chills because you know, I've always believed there was something out there. But that an and this was nothing that our government has or just the speed at which that last one soak off it was just unreal. Unreal. That's a great story. That is. Thank you. So much for sharing. And and that's the thing. When people see these he's nominee is they just know. I mean, it's just not from here. It's just so far advanced and so outside our reality. I I would love it. If we have something or if there's there's private companies that have this kind of technology. I would love to see it because it's just it's mind boggling, and and you know, on the other side, it's they're here. Just trying to get us used to there being here until they are fears. I mean that seems logical to they they it really is a this is we've been in Dade for for many decades since Roswell with with the possibilities of of visitations and very slowly. And now they're talking about habitable planets out there, da, you know, we're we're we're slowly being initiated to the fact that we're not alone. And and I think that's part of it. Just what you're describing. You know, wakes us up. To there's something out there that that is not from here. And and yet we are you still on the line now. And yet, you know, like he like he said, he wasn't you know, we didn't really mention it. But I assume that he wasn't scared by it. It's just wondrous. And it makes you think about what what those possibilities could. They don't you think George. I sure do Tom. You've got a text or tweet for Lynn. Yeah. This went from genie in Atlanta. Please ask Dr Lynn if she in any way thinks the crafts could have meant harm to our earth. That's that's you know, that was one of the main reasons I came forward because consistently consistently whatever these phenomena weren't and I can't speak for other things. But whatever these phenomenon work or allaying fears were letting us know that they and people had telepathic messages. I talk about it in the book. They they not to worry. We're not here to harm you. I mean, whoever was doing. This was absolutely touching people to the core with the comfort actual comfort and and off. And wonder of of who they are. And what they are and the possibilities in that. There wasn't one report, and that's really telling in and of itself of harm cetera deduction associated with these phnomenom, we're talking my all and like I said from the national your reporting center, Peter Davenport said that one of the artists was eight miles wide. I mean, that's like the most awesome thought something so humongous right over people's heads. And yet people weren't scared and it didn't harm anything. And it didn't even thinking is a public public safety issue is the councilwoman Francis. Barwick did to me mentioned it in the council meeting later. There wasn't anything that was harmed. It wasn't any. Sequentially at all after all this time. There hasn't been one report of of any of that. So you know, again, that's that's telling in and of itself. Let's go to Edward in Portland. Oregon. Welcome to the program. Hi, edward. How you doing George? How you doing doc? Lynch grade. So I was coming off a sophomore one evening with my son and all the was evening time darkens. We're kind of wondering what was going on? We got out. We pulled over got out of the car, and we looked up and we could see the Phoenix. One one no front and it of taper off forty five degree angle about four or five on each side. We're looking at it at all, well, maybe it's still planes lined up to go into airport. Look north, and I just see the playing lined up going through airport we'll playing so we looked up and we just observer from wild. And the strange thing was. I look through Sunday was huge. Deceitful one craft or separate, and it was black. But it seemed to build take like you really couldn't see the sky was almost couldn't differentiate between the night sky in what was in the center, but it seemed to me to be paid. Craft. Right, right. Did you happen to see because some people described that when I looked up? It looked like it was like when you look through water like that kind of a shadowy thing. Did you see anything like that? Or was it black because other people said that it it will shimmery shimmery right black? You could tell shimmery Bill Baker. But you could not see through to this guy. Like, the Terminator that kind of look that wavy. Look, exactly the way we look, and it was very close. And it was huge. It was very big. How big do you think? It was..

George Phoenix Dr Lynn key Navajo Rangers university of Arizona Bob Linda Pentax Rangers Arizona bingo hall Google hockey Kris Jenner Peter Davenport Bill Baker Oregon New York NORAD
Covington school cafeteria worker diagnosed with hepatitis A

America's Truckin' Network

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Covington school cafeteria worker diagnosed with hepatitis A

"News, New York. It confirmed case of hepatitis A in northern Kentucky. A school cafeteria worker in Covington has been suffering from hepatitis say since last month problem is that they are infectious for a period of time before the symptoms actually start. So from the point in time that they're diagnosed working backward could be several weeks. Dr Lynn Sadler with the northern Kentucky health department people who worked with this employee at John g Carlisle elementary are encouraged to get a vaccination as far as students. Go. It is Kentucky law that kids. Get a vaccine before

Kentucky Dr Lynn Sadler John G Carlisle Elementary Covington New York
"dr lynn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:58 min | 2 years ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome to forum. I'm John sepulveda's in today for Munich, Kim, the accusations against supreme court nominee Brad Kavanagh that at age seventeen he sexually assaulted a fifteen year old girl at a high school party are the latest in a string of metoo stories that have many people reexamining their own high school sexual experiences in this hour. We're going to have a Frank discussion about what it means to revisit and reckon with our sexual pass. And we want to hear from you has the metoo movement caused you to see some of your early sexual experiences in different harsher light. Do you? Now regret your sexual behavior at a high school party or on a date did you fail to speak up when you should have? And have you taken steps to make amends? We want to hear from you. We also want to hear from the folks that were who are joining us Peggy Ornstein, she's a contributing writer with New York Times magazine her books include girls and sex, navigating the complicated new land. Scape? She's working on a forthcoming book about Voisin sex. Hi peggy. Hi, Dr Lynn pontoon. She is a child and adult psychiatrist and professor at UCSF author of the romance risk and the sex lives of teenagers. Hi, how are you doing? I'm doing wonderfully this morning. Looking forward to this discussion. I am too actually. And I I think it's so critical that we get calls and folks who want to talk about this. I'm going to give the numbers now. Eight six six seven three three six seven eight six that's eight six six seven three three six seven eight six if you wanna get in on this discussion and talk about how you've reevaluated your own behavior in high school. We want to hear from you. But pick y'all want to begin with you if you don't mind, this seems I hear two things when with regards to break Cavanaugh, I hear two things wine. He was a long time ago. We shouldn't judge someone for their sexual behavior into this is our ages, and he should be disqualified. Why do you think that this type of behavior can inform who a person is today? Well, I suppose, you know, there's larger ideas of right and wrong. Right. I mean, if he had held up a grocery store or attempted to hold up a grocery store, I think that too would be something that would bring us into question. But you know, I think that part of the issue is that. The behavior of young boys against girls, and particularly sexual violence, and attempted assault and assault has been so normalized in our culture and for the first time. Well, not for the first time. Actually, I think that we've had these waves with Bill Cosby with Harvey Weinstein with all of these people of of finding on how pervasive this is on the culture and being sensitized to it and saying, you know, no more times up me to all of these things, and it's time for us to make change and we have to make change from the bottom up, and we have to make change from the top down. You know, Rebecca Solnit wrote in her book men explain things to me, she talked about how there was a huge are kind of Twitter wave after the killing of UCSB students in Isla vista about. How many people started speaking up then about this intersection between sexual behaviors and violence in the context of today? We saw a lot of. That movement kind of halted it stopped. It went for about a year or so it does me too. Is that looking at the same fate. You think gosh, I mean, I don't have a crystal ball, actually. But you know, that's the thing that really that really worries me is that we do have these moments over and over again of reckoning, and we wring our hands. And we say we have to change. And then things kind of go back to normal and with each wave. Whether it's, you know, pussy grabs back or whether it's going to say that I'm ready. You know, whether it's whether it's Brock Turner. You know, we have these moments, and what we tend to do is take those people these men that do this turn them into some kind of other some kind of monster some kind of isolated case and put our anger on them. And then expel them almost like, they're, you know, the the remains. Out out. This is not normal. But the fact is that it is normal not normal, but it's been normalized behavior. And with every person that comes up with every case that comes up, I hold out hope that people reckon with this. And that we start talking not only to our girls. But to our boys in a very very different way. It's interesting then that she was talking about boys because your study of teenagers really kind of gets to heart of this. When we were talking the very first example, I gave about the UCSB shooter. We see often that that mass shootings are intersected with misogyny in some way. And also with us case of this alleged case with Brad Kavanagh you seventeen when it happened. These are behaviors that are being exhibited by older, boys. Young men. Why is that? Well, I think Peggy given us some good ideas about it that it's normalized in our culture, but it actually. Has changed over the last thirty to forty years. So there's been dramatic awareness of the fact that youth involved in violent activities toward women and toward other blaze. That's a big group to boy on boy violence, there's been normalization of that. But also in the nineties there were a lot of laws that came down. It really said youth shouldn't be engaged in these activities. There were prevention programs that were begun the misogyny kind of hung out. I think through all of that. But I agree with you Peggy it seems like threw me too. We're seeing argument after argument come up and then be shot down. But these things take a long time to change some of the normal behaviors that we see anatomy lesson boys. Are they do engage in some violent activity? More commonly boys engage in group activity, and we're thinking about the cavenaugh situation. Boys are more high. Highly regulated. I just wanna make the alleged exactly very important, but a situation like that where boys in groups will initiate sexual activity assaultive activity against girls and other boys. So that's an important area to really look at to be aware of. And I think for the parents out there to really be educating themselves and their boys and girls about this. You know, I think about my own experience. I grew up with a single mom head of household. And so there was a very different tone. I think than many of my friends, which did make me part of the out group growing up. But there were many young boys. I knew in teenage boys who engaged in everything. You just talking about gun fights group. Kind of this group thought group think pack mentality still did not sexually assault. People. What are the things that parents should look for with regards to behaviors toward their children to help identify? Whether they might be someone who is pre disposition to act that way. I think really important red flags are these behaviors cluster, they often take place with alcohol involved so alcohol in groups of boys, large amounts of alcohol, alcohol and girls who are within or exposed to those groups, and that's a recipe for this kind of sexual assault of behavior. So I think look for clusters talk to your children really developed the ability to have conversations with them and pay this book, and my books really talk about how to talk to your children about these behaviors that's really really important. And I think also the police they flag it, and if your child is identified by the police, I think listen to what the police and the schools have to say 'cause they're also out there looking they do have a bias. We know against African American youth of color, but they are trying to help parents in some way does this behavior. Happen with young women and girls because I've known many young women who engage in packed activity, and at least where I was growing up was very they could be violent and getting in fights in the hallways and things like that too. Is is it is likely to happen with women it's less likely, and this gets I think the position that girls have in our patriarchal system in Owen how girls are raised but girls do engage in violent activities. They're much less involved in sexually assaulted activity. So that's important to keep in mind, IDC girls and women who sexually abuse both boys and other girls, but it's a very small group. So the sexually assaulted behavior. Again, ninety five percent of it is conducted really by the boys. And finally before we get to this big idea of reevaluating sexual behavior that might have happened for the adults who are listening when if let's say, I was a policeman, and I came to you. And I said, I'm sorry. But your son Johnny is doing this very disturbing behavior you as the receiver of that information. How are you? Based on your time in psychiatry, how are you likely to react to this policemen coming to your door saying this exactly, and I think why I brought this up early on is the police are out there flagging this behavior, but the interaction between parent and policemen as a parent I had four kids, and I had I was out there and have the police come to my door. So I had somebody experiences, and how did I react around that, you know, I'll admit it takes you aback. You know, you really have to rethink it. You wanna protect your kid, you're in a different situation as a parent. But I think you also have to listen to the information they're giving you about the activity that they are seeing very important. So for some reason, our brain essentially just doesn't want to accept that. That might be possible about our kids. Exactly. And Peggy do you think that that has to do with the fact that while this kind of a leading question, I'm going to be honest. But I've heard from a lot of friends who say, you know, when you consider the United States in comparison to other western countries, we have a very different view of Saxon the way in. So when somebody does something like this. It's I've heard in in perhaps, you can you can crack me, but just on a gut level people are less likely to talk about it openly because it's so shameful and disgusting and you get to outed. But yeah, you know, I was going to say that I'm saying it's worth seeing. We're talking about violence. And and I think that you know, one thing is to to to define what that means. Because when we say violence, it sounds violent, you know, it sounds very aggressive. It sounds very painful and active and so much of what I would hear from girls. And what is described by boys is not only assault that that we might recognize but also really heavy coercion. And and is supposed to be specific about that. What do you mean? Come on. Why not you know, a lot of just begging a lot of not accepting. No for an answer has terrain and house during all of these things, or or, you know, getting people drunk, and then they can't they they sort of say, yes. Or or when we talk about consent consent. I always say consent should be a baseline like that is not a definition of a good sexual experience. That is that is you know, I was not raped is is a pretty low bar for your sexual experience. And so what we really need to be talking to kids about when we step back. Step back. Step back from the get-go is what a positive sexual experience. Looks like what ethics are what reciprocity looks like all these things. So that it's not only about not committing sexual violence. But also what it means to respect, see and humanize your partner. I want to go to. I'm looking to our producer to make sure we have her in Q. It's sheerly. Yes. I'm getting a thumbs up. Shirley, Abney who rode actually talking about this. You were talking about the peg you were talking about how we can recognize in how consent is just a baseline. But a lot of how we look at things now are kind of changing, and we're realizing things we might have seen when we were. And I'm thirty nine so things I might have seen twenty years ago just one in fly today, and Shirley talked a lot about that. We're going to go to her. Now, Shirley, can you hear me? Yes. I can. Well, thank you very much for.

Peggy Ornstein assault Brad Kavanagh Shirley New York Times Dr Lynn pontoon Voisin Frank professor John sepulveda UCSB Rebecca Solnit Bill Cosby Munich writer Kim Cavanaugh United States Brock Turner Twitter
"dr lynn" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"Welcome back again to the moving body with optimistic rich, and Dr Lynn here. Open again for your calls five to one eight three eight three is the number. We've had terrific calls and really had a good focus on knees. But we'll talk about any of your joints or anything that could be happening for you. So so do I, you know, we get to the, you know, we've covered a lot of good common topics. And and then we always have to get back to the the nemesis. The arthritis. So kind of tie that in maybe tied in and talk about how we've talked about some things that are a little bit peripheral to that. But tied into how that's going to present just give give up a real basic history of what the real common now, again, everything could be a little bit different. But the real common history of arthritis. So people start to understand. You're talking about a lot of ideas, this morning precise and tendonitis and arthritis refers to anytime, you're ida's, of course, that's inflammation, or swelling. So arthritis is referring to swelling pain coming from the joints. And I think traditionally we think of a couple types of arthritis. There's there's the type of arthritis that happens. If there's an infection is the type of arthritis happens if there's gout, but. Pardon me, the most common type of arthritis. We treat in the office is going to be wear and tear arthritis and the interesting thing about that. Is you have to ask what causes that is it because of work is it because a sports we wear down the inside the joint will lose the cartilage, or or is it because there are certain proteins that are active certain cells that are active causing that need to be swollen and painful, and that is related to genetics. You know, we all know folks, who do heavy work, and they don't have any pain. And then we know other folks who don't do much and they have trouble with knee pain. So when you ask when you talk to experts about it, and you say, hey, what what's what's the cause of.

knee pain Dr Lynn tendonitis gout inflammation
Study estimates Puerto Rico deaths from Hurricane Maria at nearly 3,000

Fresh Air

01:02 min | 2 years ago

Study estimates Puerto Rico deaths from Hurricane Maria at nearly 3,000

"Puerto Rico's official death toll. From hurricane Maria is no longer in. The dozens it's in, the thousands two thousand nine hundred seventy five people estimated to have lost their lives in the six months since the category for, hurricane level much of the US territory and left millions of Americans, without power clean water. Or food the Puerto Rican government commission independent researchers from George Washington University to estimate the death toll the numbers twenty two percent higher than the number. Of deaths Puerto Rico would. Have expected the same six-month period had there not. Been hurricane she. Ws. Dr Lynn Goldman says the elderly in the poorest were most. At risk we feel very strongly that lesson from this is that efforts for assistance in recovery need to focus as much as possible on lower income areas on people who are who are older people who are. More vulnerable even though it's been nearly a year since Hurricane, Maria struck the islands still in recovery mode. And this year's, Atlantic hurricane, season does not officially end. Until

Hurricane Maria United States Puerto Rico Jim Mattis Hsieh NPR Hurricane Tom Bowman North Carolina Rusty Jacobs Washington UN Congress Puerto Rican Government Commis University Of North Carolina C Ryan Levi California Yemen Lakshmi Singh FCC Dr Lynn Goldman
Pot Breathalyzer: California Company Creates THC-Detecting Breathalyzer For Safer Roads

Weekend Edition Saturday

07:33 min | 2 years ago

Pot Breathalyzer: California Company Creates THC-Detecting Breathalyzer For Safer Roads

"Is weekend addition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon The group Nexium says its mission is to quote raise human awareness and. Celebrate what it means to be human based in Albany it's attracted wealthy. Clients over the, years and promised personal and professional development. But federal prosecutors say the group is a criminal enterprise several members, have been charged with sex trafficking, racketeering and other crimes and, this includes the group's, leader Keith Rene and Allison Mack the actress last week four more women were charged and fluting an. Heiress to the Seagram's liquor fortune for. More about Nexium we're going to turn to Vanessa Gregorio she's been. Reporting on. The group for the New York Times. Magazine this Gregorios thanks. So much for being with us thanks for having? Me, so what are what are they promise which alluring well Nexium on the face of it is one of these intensive therapy outfits. That offers courses maybe. Last a. Weekend or several days twelve hours. A day very wealthy. People were involved in this rate you. Could spend too Eight hundred three hundred thousand. Dollars on. Their classes no problem they claimed that. They could help people. Overcome childhood trauma, a divorce by integrating? Is what? They, called it those experiences into their lives and they were using a form of hypnosis to help people see their way through these, terrible events in their. Lives and. It worked for a lot of. People by many accounts Yeah and, I mean? It's it's tempting to see if there any illusions? I, guess both, with s and let's say even Scientology do you see any I think this is squarely, in the tradition of on, self help, and certainly there's, a secret side to, it much like. Scientology where we are, now learning that there were some things going on in. This group that were. Extremely unsavory like what according to, the federal, prosecutors in your, own reporting. Well you know it's clear that the, group was demanding fealty not only to the ideas that they had but also to the leader, Keith Ranieri middle aged guy lived in. New York. All his life they called him vanguard and they believed. He was some sort of all being so behind. The scenes there was also, a lot of you know he had many many girlfriends and in the last couple of years he was using some. Of the women in the group to bring other women too His bed with what we think are pretty coercive tactics which, of course of tactic the women claimed to, other women that they could kind of move more quickly down their personal growth path if they joined this women's only international, self help? Group there was a man who is involved in. This, group and, it was the leader heath who knew much of what was going on he was in, at least one case if, not more, those women were, coming to his bed, and he was. Then seducing them additionally, of course the New York Times Brooklyn us that they. Were branded with a. Symbol that looks kind of like, a hieroglyph, indeed they actually, were his. Initials k. and r. and women were, not told that how how does this boorish in reprehensible behavior become sex trafficking sexual The argument that the prosecutors are making is that there, was coercive sacks here that. Some of the women were actually acting or specifically Alison math this actress she was coercing women into having. Sex with him and that she was indeed kind of, a Madam where she was bringing in these women and she was also getting some sort of financial benefit within the group from Keith. Himself to financial reward for sexual favors, financial reward for sexual favors exactly even after these charges, the group still operating well they've. Closed, down all, of their classes you cannot go to them anymore and try to work out your problems but even after the. News, came out of the New York Times about women being branded at least one hundred members stayed with the group they think that they have not Done anything wrong, and they believe that they'll be vindicated. Vanessa Grigory Addis contributing writer for the New York Times Sunday magazine thanks. So much for being with us thank you Scott police across the country are growing concerned, about stoned drivers behind the wheel thirty states and. Washington DC of legalized medical marijuana Nine of those plus the district have legalized recreational pot one California company now says it's made a major breakthrough in creating. What some thought of as a kind, of unicorn a marijuana Breathalyzer NPR's Eric westervelt has our story in, his downtown Oakland office Mike Lynn hold his creation in the palm of his hand device about the size of a large. Mobile phone with a small plastic tube and a slot for. A cartridge this is this, is a disposable cartridge. And there's a whole bunch of science in this in this Partridge but Lynn is not some, pipe-dream Stoner inventor the entrepreneurs also a. Practicing, ER, trauma, doctor in an active swat team medic he's seen. Firsthand sometimes devastating impact of drunk and. Drugged drivers. The CEO of hound labs the scientific device company he founded slips a new, cartridge into the pot Breathalyzer since starts to blow Indicator Barr show whether the machine detects any THC the psychoactive, component in pond tools now, on the market to German marijuana use tests blood saliva or urine. Those devices can take days for. Result and they can't tell whether a person has smoked a half. Hour ago or eight days ago THC dissolves in fat so it can stay in your body up to a month, after us but Dr Lynn says his company's device detects whether someone has smoked, pot in, the last two hours what's considered the peak impairment window it accurately does that he says by measuring the mere presence of THC molecules in parts per trillion in. Your breath and that's in contrast to, alcohol which is parts per thousand THC is something like a billion, times less concentrated than alcohol that's why it hasn't been done before because it really is hard the company hopes to have. The Breathalyzer ready for sale by early next year a handful. Of police departments including Boston, plan to work with. Hound labs to test the device starting this fall for law enforcement there issue Is trying to figure out who's potentially impaired versus hey. Who somebody who smoked maybe yesterday, is not impaired they're interested in it providing objective data for them at the roadside just. Like they have for alcohol but a big problem there's still no. Scientific or legal consensus on what amount of THC equals functional impairment that matters, to the courts only seven, states have set basic legal guidelines as to how much THC in. The system makes you dangerous behind. The wheel Harvest a stylish dispensary in San Francisco's, mission district David downs. Does some market research Roma which is really scrumptious the California bureau chief for the cannabis news site lethally has. His nose in a jar of Indika dominant hybrid buds.

New York Times Marijuana Mike Lynn Scott Simon California NPR Seagram Vanessa Gregorio New York Albany Racketeering Keith Ranieri Keith Rene Allison Mack Boston Vanessa Grigory Addis San Francisco
"dr lynn" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The Phoenix network website it has visual he says first of all and he was the first one to notice that the same, exact line of lights the phenomena at a distance it was. Overclass be, restricted airspace that I would capture, two months before the mass eating, and? During a mass citing within the same spot they are in ninety five and as, I mentioned earlier some people saw these words detachment and they'd object out into the environment and. Then re with it maybe that's what happened. But at, any rate you, know as he says to? Me you? Know please, confirm with your husband, I, did I went. Back to, Maccabi he says not. Only, is the same phenomenon, in the background he says the, look at the, skyline and I had no idea what. He was Talking about he. Said there are many lights groups of lights on in the first picture that are off groups in the last picture but that doesn't happen. In a couple of minutes. I'd like you to do, an experiment by the way he wrote up a twenty one page report that's on our website and. I talked about it. In the book as, well I, go out on the balcony, one night, every hour the next night. Every half. Hour also did every fifteen. Minutes sent, him the pictures heated meticulous analysis to see when. The lights, started going out now I usually take a bath between seven and eight We're just about time Dr Lynn The the upshot of this is is that he actually presented at the nineteen ninety nine new. Find international symposium as the first, it's not the only photographic evidence authenticated photographic evidence of missing time with a lot more to this story that I hope. People will check out the book Phoenix..

Overclass Phoenix Dr Lynn two months
"dr lynn" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Night. And military jets were sent out, to intercept it and get gun cameras from. What would you heard that they did and as they approached it the light started to them and then. The entire, thing blinked out and. Disappeared and, he said he was, one of the people that helped one of the pilots out of aircraft because he was, so shaken up I would happen and there were civilians actually saw this happen and. Reported later that after the military left the craft reappeared and, continued gliding very slowly towards the airport and we have reports from air traffic control that, they saw to in fact I was communicating with them for. Two months because two months before the mess it was the exact same formation of lights that i would capture on video one of the signature videos handful ensure videos of that night head on turning v-shape you can see that on the on the photo page and it was so unnerving because i had a very close eating and not for off again in ninety five with my husband who's also vision and i had a very close leading to our home in paradise valley we live high in the mountains and have a panoramic view on the city skyline you know we were very familiar with what planes and helicopters three lights and car lights and so forth and look like this is right outside our window in a no fly zone so i can say firsthand i've seen this up close and personal definitely was not from here and and it was some kind of advanced technology and seemed to have an intelligence behind it and i got thirty five millimeter pictures of them two years before the mess Fighting right if you look at those pictures the same exact phenomenon. Doctor that, we've got to take a timeout for and during, the mass citing are in the same location all right Dr, Lynn we'll take a quick time we'll come back and continue. To delve into the Phoenix. Lights and Dr Lynn will be at the move on symposium twenty eighteen down in cherry hill New Jersey near Philadelphia July twenty seven twenty.

Dr Lynn paradise valley cherry hill New Jersey Phoenix Philadelphia Two months two months two years
"dr lynn" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Hello welcome to another pursuit of the weeds on the box media podcast network i'm maddie place here with dr lynn sarah cliff threatened threatened to have baby on us and not show up today still here unfortunately we did not sadly pick today's episode for alternate drama if sarah in the middle of the episode i think that'd be trauma yeah fair enough ready ready to move on without you but we i am also share this tuesday there where a lot of elections primaries in new jersey south dakota california big state a lot of important stuff for the midterms happened but there was also a vote that was not that important for the midterms but is interesting and gets us into some interesting terrain and that is that aaron persky said judge in california was successfully recalled basically over a single case and not over you know classical misconduct and which is this is part of the california recall process like gray davis the governor was we called basically for raising taxes on car permits a state senator in california from swing district who voted to raise the gas tax got recalled because people don't like paying gas taxes so it's not like out of the scope of things that happened in california for somebody to be recalled just because the judge to be recalled that is quite unusual.

dr lynn sarah cliff aaron persky california senator gray davis
"dr lynn" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

07:11 min | 3 years ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Bob dan here take my mind yes she that dr lynn friend andy on me she number she number get down down i'll go ahead full beautiful beautiful and the real the building meaning not.

Bob dan andy dr lynn
"dr lynn" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Wow that's great but this tv cameras and there's not one or two there's a dozen you hope family the college the university you'll future is an mba play and they're all screaming at the topa voice amiel head and you're trying to put the roof through the hoop while you want here's what you start paying for it oh okay all right we gotta go distinguishes the really the best athletes that it's not just the physical prowess or their agility or their speed or accuracy it's that plus the ability to be able to perform under pressure ups menda is level is probably what distinguishes i mean those people that can't get over that hurdle and they always crack even though they might be the best in terms of physically speaking if you can't get over that psychological aspect you not gonna make it to the big leagues so i think that's critical in being an athlete it's not just the physical but it's the mental aspect is well that you can master oh my god that is in perfect segue because we're going to now talk to a sports psychologist dr leo logos and so you have given us the perfect means or entry point to speak to her so thank you so much dr lynn as always thank you thanks it's a pleasure joining us now in the studios to leeann legals welcome thank you for having me pleasure welcome so and you are as clinical sports psychologists rex right cool picking up from.

dr lynn
"dr lynn" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

StarTalk Playing with Science

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"dr lynn" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

"Wow that's great but this tv cameras and there's not one or two there's a dozen you hope family the college the university you'll future is an mba play and they're all screaming at the topa voice amiel head and you're trying to put the roof through the hoop while you want here's what you start paying for it oh okay all right we gotta go distinguishes the really the best athletes that it's not just the physical prowess or their agility or their speed or accuracy it's that plus the ability to be able to perform under pressure ups menda is level is probably what distinguishes i mean those people that can't get over that hurdle and they always crack even though they might be the best in terms of physically speaking if you can't get over that psychological aspect you not gonna make it to the big leagues so i think that's critical in being an athlete it's not just the physical but it's the mental aspect is well that you can master oh my god that is in perfect segue because we're going to now talk to a sports psychologist dr leo logos and so you have given us the perfect means or entry point to speak to her so thank you so much dr lynn as always thank you thanks it's a pleasure joining us now in the studios to leeann legals welcome thank you for having me pleasure welcome so and you are as clinical sports psychologists rex right cool picking up from.

dr lynn