17 Burst results for "Dr Lorraina"

"dr lorraine" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:52 min | 4 months ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Your appreciation for those working on the front lines of this pandemic WSJ's Mike Campbell talk with Deborah pash the chief nursing officer at DMC Sinai grace hospital in Detroit nursing is in my opinion the most wonderful wonderful profession never an easy job but code nineteen has has really pushed the stress and so much because not just the illness and how sick our patients are yes sign I grace has the most complex patients to start with but because the loved ones can't be with their with their pay with their family it makes it that much harder for the patients and one of the things that is that I love most about nurses is that they bring not only their brains but their heart into they become that loved one for our patients and that is added to the stress for them as well a simple question but did it did they tell you when you were going to nursing school that you know if a pandemic comes along if the world is ending you still got to go to work they don't really tell you that but every nurse I know we go into it to make a difference and we know that people come to us at their worst which means that the worst that somewhere at work right whether it's a disaster whether it's a tornado whether it's a hurricane whether it's apps where people get sick and we need nurses and you really belong yep and you guys have all been there and a lot of people have been putting out signs I see him all over saying you know thank our heroes never does that mean anything to you I have been moved to tears so much over the last few months both in and watching the tireless work of our Sinai grace nurses but also the generosity and the love that has come from the community whether you're watching a commercial on TV that's that's thinking health care workers nurses generally get that that warms and that feed our soul from the comments from our patients and families who have the outpouring of care and love for the work we're doing his is it keeps us going but it is it it's so heartwarming and it touches us that's never pass these chief nursing officer DMC Sinai grace hospital in Detroit talking about nurses week newsradio nine fifties Mike Campbell comes up jadis time three forty four will update sports coming up your iron health sponsored by delta dental coronavirus with your eye on health and Dr Deanna Lites Dr Lorraine washer is the medical director of infection control at Michigan medicine R. G. Klein he crossed the state of Michigan we are still seeing relatively large number of patients up to a thousand or so patients every day across the state.

WSJ Deborah pash officer DMC Sinai grace hospital Sinai grace hospital Detroit Mike Campbell Dr Lorraine washer medical director R. G. Klein Michigan Sinai Dr Deanna Lites
"dr lorraine" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:22 min | 4 months ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"W. J. news time this mother's day Detroit is six forty one and mother's day is sacred in Mexico bud with the expected peaks and curlers cases it's being postponed here's CBS's Adrienne bard in Mexico City there won't be any lunches with mom visiting grandma at the cemetery or even buying flowers is sailing D. as in my family but Mexico City mayor Claudia Sheinbaum admonish people not to see mom today and close the city cemeteries because because the cameras at the last minute is paid okay say will be there tomorrow that the mayor proposed celebrating on July tenth and surprising today with the video call Adrienne bard CBS news Mexico City some big changes coming for passengers on delta airlines given covert nineteen here's W. W. J. Sandra McNeil delta's CEO has written a letter to customers from now on he says passengers will have to wear a mask or face covering both on the planes and then the check in lobby there will also be a lot more room for social distancing no one will be sitting in the middle seat passenger capacity on planes will be capped at sixty percent fifty percent in the first class morning will take place from the back of the plane to the font Sandra McNeil WWJ newsradio nine fifty sports is next W. W. J. news time six forty three your I. N. health sponsored by delta dental coronavirus with your eye and health I'm Dr Deanna Lites Dr Lorraine washer is the medical director of infection control at Michigan medicine R. G. Klein their peak across the state of Michigan we are still seeing relatively large number of patients up to a thousand or so patients every day across the state of Michigan with new diagnoses of coping Dr Wasser is concerned about a second surge of the virus she says it's happened before with novel viruses like with H. one N. one flew in two thousand nine initial emergence of the virus in the spring time and then with seasonal a respiratory viruses came back in the fall and summer we saw it was about what we originally saw doctor washers as a second surge may start estates re open and there's less social distancing with your eye and health from the delta dental health desk Dr Deanna Lites WWJ newsradio nine fifty latest.

R. G. Klein Dr Deanna Lites W. W. J. Sandra McNeil W. W. J. Sandra McNeil Claudia Sheinbaum Mexico Dr Wasser Michigan Detroit medical director Dr Lorraine washer CEO delta Mexico City Adrienne bard CBS
"dr lorraine" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:28 min | 4 months ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"For you call eight five five then fights today in the middle of motor group twenty four hour traffic center I'm Marty both legally WJZ like fifty thanks Marty updating our accu weather forecast now here's meteorologist Brian Thompson or in for a windy and chilly day today with intervals of clouds and sunshine a high of fifty one partly cloudy and cold tonight a low down to thirty seven mostly cloudy for tomorrow rain will develop with a high of fifty nine that rain man the somewhat snow flakes tomorrow nights and brisk and chilly Monday is clouds break for some sunshine high fifty one mostly sunny and breezy on Tuesday I temperatures come up a little bit with a high of fifty seven but again we'll have the chilly breeze around and some sunshine Wednesday gives way to clouds I will be a bit milder though with a high of sixty two not act about the B. to religious Brian Thompson on W. W. JT ready good nine fifty Hey we've gotten up to freezing on may ninth it's now thirty two degrees at metro airport which is northwest at seven miles an hour humidity is fifty percent skies are overcast a page of traffic and weather together every ten minutes on the H. next update is less than ten minutes away at eight forty eight most of us no spam coronavirus facts first here on newsradio nine fifty W. W. J. W. W. J. news time eight forty two three inmates in the state with corona virus were sent to a virus free prison doubling doubly J. Zhang grid Kelly explained the Michigan department of correction says several inmates with covert nineteen were sent to a prison that had no coronavirus cases among their prisoner population it happen may first after a private lab incorrectly reported each inmate's test negative according to state officials the three inmates were initially held at a prison in Jackson and then transferred to central Michigan correctional facility and St Louis Michigan no inmates at that prison have tested positive for covert nineteen the three inmates have since been removed from the prison and are now in isolation others who had close contact with the three have since been quarantined Ingrid Kelly W. W. J. newsradio nine fifty W. W. J. news time eight forty three it is time for your eye on the health sponsored by new life medical coronavirus with your eye and health I'm Dr Deanna Lites Dr Lorraine washer is the medical director of infection control at Michigan medicine the numbers are declining.

Marty Brian Thompson J. Zhang Jackson St Louis Michigan Dr Lorraine washer medical director W. J. W. W. J. Michigan department of correct Michigan Ingrid Kelly W. W. J. W. J. Dr Deanna Lites
"dr lorraine" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:57 min | 4 months ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Inside a home in Inkster police responded to the scene this afternoon after the house along Lehigh Avenue in the area of beach daily and Annapolis office to search for the child's mother but descriptive discovered that she had fled the scene there are reports now that she has been taken into custody police have yet to release information about the circumstances surrounding the death keep it tuned right here to W. W. J. for the latest on this developing story are you concerned about a second surge of covert nineteen some believe you should be S. states start to reopen W. W. J. health reporter Dr Deanna Lites has more Dr Lorraine washer is the medical director of infection control at Michigan medicine the numbers are declining from their peak across the state of Michigan we are still seeing relatively large number of patients up to a thousand or so patients every day across the state of Michigan with new diagnoses of coping Dr Wasser is concerned about a second surge of the virus she says it's happened before with novel viruses like with H. one N. one flew in two thousand nine additional versions of the virus in the spring time and then with seasonal a respiratory viruses came back in the fall and summer we saw it was about what we originally saw doctor washers as a second surge may start estates re open and there's less social distancing Dr Deanna Lites WWJ newsradio nine fifty how accurate are the fifteen minute call that test used by the city of Detroit W. WJZY on do he says health officials took a closer study city medical director Dr Najeeb Rehman says they submitted fifty swabs in a double blind study with the state to verify the results to make sure they were not a false negatives forty nine were in accordance while one was inconclusive but later verified as being negative as the medical director I feel extremely confident with abit testing modality and I think that we can we can continue to move forward and feel it feel good about the direction we're going in Dr Ahmad says they're pushing ahead with testing at nursing homes adult foster care and homeless shelters with some of the city's most vulnerable residents Ron do we W. W. J. newsradio nine fifty Wayne County prosecutor Kym worthy has charts at Lincoln Park man with making a terrorist threat for allegedly assaulting and spitting on hospital staff in hopes of infecting them with a virus worthy says Richard could check go was being treated at hospitals in Wyandotte in Dearborn in late March in mid April when the incidents occurred she is not confirming that could take a heck of a nineteen at the time of the incidents the checker was placed on fifty thousand dollars bond after his arraignment today if he pulls that he will be put under house arrest in Oakland county man has been charged on your brain that is on charges for wiping his nose on.

Inkster
"dr lorraine" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

04:56 min | 4 months ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"W. J. news time is now three oh three this just in from the state health departments there are now six hundred fifty seven new confirmed coronavirus cases in the state of Michigan and seventy one new deaths that brings the total confirmed case count to forty five thousand fifty four with the death toll state wide now standing at four thousand two hundred fifty are you concerned about a second surge of covert nineteen well some believe that you should be as a states are beginning to re open WWJ health reporter Dr Deanna Lites joining us live in local to explain Deanna Jackie Dr Lorraine washers the medical director of infection control at Michigan medicine the numbers are declined their peak across the state of Michigan we are still seeing relatively large number of patients up to a thousand or so patients every day across the state of Michigan with new diagnoses of coughing Dr washer is concerned about a second search of the virus she says it's happened before with novel viruses like with the H. one and one flew in two thousand nine emergence of the of the virus in the spring time and then with seasonal a respiratory viruses came back in the fall and summer we saw a peak that was above what we originally saw doctor washer says a second surge may start as states re open and there's less social distancing her biggest concern is that there's not enough data about the number of people who are actually infected and that's why testing is so important Dr Deanna Lites WWJ newsradio nine fifty meantime speaking of testing how accurate are the fifteen minute covert tests used in the city of Detroit newsradio nine fifties wrongdoing says health officials are taking a closer look city medical director Dr Najeeb Rehman says they submitted fifty swabs in a double blind study with the state to verify the results to make sure they were not a false negatives forty nine were in accordance while one was inconclusive but later verified as being negative as the medical director I feel extremely confident with abit on testing modality and I think that we can we can continue to move forward and feel it feel good about the direction we're going in Dr Ahmad says they're pushing ahead with testing and nursing homes adult foster care and homeless shelters with some of the city's most vulnerable residents Ron do we W. W. J. newsradio nine fifty Warren businesses are being warned to adhere to the governor's order and CDC guidelines to conduct business safely during the covert nineteen outbreak in fact a letter to all businesses in Warren mayor Jim Fouts is urging them to do more than the minimum walking down the aisle it should be one way not to waste and of course I want them to have the protective plastic at all check comes in customer service and their employees need to be given facemask and I think it's important that people who shop there also were mass in his letter frauds writes quote many people including myself judge business and how they protect their employees and customers on quote meantime it's a new survey to gauge workers sentiment regarding the post pandemic returned to the office Trish upload V. with the staffing firm Robert half says seventy seven percent of area police surveyed are currently working from home for the most part they like it they're hoping that when we do get you know back to the offices that there is some allowed flexibility in maybe being in the office part time and then telecommuting part time as well for working from home a couple days a week they've you know realize that it's doable beyond the flexibility when returning moving forward employees hope for new thorough cleaning procedures at the office car and truck sales in Detroit are getting are starting to improve but we're still behind for the rest of the country we get more now live a local from W. W. J. R. beat reporter Jeff Gilbert Jeff yeah it's kind of interesting to dive into some of these statistics Jackie sales have been improving steadily across the country since I hit bottom in late March no Detroit had been lagging behind but JD power analyst Tyson Jomini says were finally starting to catch up certainly one of the biggest movers of the week is Detroit which had a fourteen percentage point jump from last week this finally started to recover sales somewhat the best market for vehicle sales last week was Tampa Bay sales were actually one percent better than pre covert forecast Dallas is also been a very solid market because it has a lot of pickup sales reporting live find Jeff Gilbert WWJ newsradio nine fifty still to come after the forecast centenarian and has been arraigned on charges of assault for allegedly wiping his face on a store clerk shirt after she asked him to wear a mask I'm Sandra McNeil W. W. J. news time is out three oh eight traffic.

W. J.
"dr lorraine" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:03 min | 5 months ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Every paycheck you know I'm probably gonna bump it up here when I would get my rate and stuff like that you do it and then over time I've built up a good amount of money and I was just trying to do something else with it biblically responsible yeah that's yeah that's great no that's that's awesome that you want to do that and and really Travis it's it's the right thing to do because you your age you have to be a little bit more aggressive and I say don't even look at it just puts our money and every once in awhile you know thirty dollars a month or whatever it is sixty dollars and not even think about it because it's going to go down and I don't want you to panic when it goes down it's going to go off and I don't want you to get overly excited about it either but in the long run you're gonna do far far far better by the time you get to retirement age then you would sit in a CD and I think it's important that you get that growth all right I appreciate it all right thank you Travis I appreciate I'm glad you found us god bless we go to eighty this call is from Pennsylvania Hey Eddie yeah again I want to get back to the corona virus and that the whole idea of it and the economic devastation that is because in the country and go to that end I'm not I'm a contractor on this there we're getting some false information and I want to ask you again if you come across a book that came out last week after years research plague of corruption by Dr Judy met so that have you I mean it would make of that I'm sorry doctor Judy make of that and at the the book dark you know what talking about I know all the ball can I know Judy all were very good very good because I'm not a medical man as such but I rely on people like Jon Rappoport we used to report to CBS health watch and the thing about your doctor of it make it make it better is that we have a problem with your policy and what we have here is yes it's a fellow that which involved as you know with using crush mice brains for some kind of a vaccine to killed a lot of homosexuals back in the eighties in the California in San Francisco and Dr Lorraine date another Christian woman that but which the San Francisco director of surgery in those years and she has a lot to say about the algae so my question you down what does Sam heck is he doing standing on on stage with our president well I've got a lot of other things to say about him too that have already said but you know that he shouldn't be there for the for only for that if for no other reason is there's a there's a dramatic conflict of interest there but him being up there and because of what he's doing through the gates foundation the Bill Gates foundation some of the research that that his organization is being give in Seoul he he may have some alternative motives there and I think there's a conflict of interest and I don't think you should be up there aside from all those things that you just pointed out there's there's a direct conflict so I don't know I can't answer the question of what he's doing up there he was extremely instrumental I don't believe he was instrumental as for instance our doctor Burks in and the work that she has done but he was extremely instrumental in aids and and the research that he didn't H. yes he had some are your kids Astor fees and catastrophic failures as as most R. and D. situations like that does but he was instrumental in you know helping to find treatment not vaccines for treatment four four eight and you know that's where he got his notoriety and so that you know we're here we are with another different kind of pandemic but none the less a similar situation and no not really similar but in many ways I helped write the it was going to have to uniquely be dealt with and you know he he was somehow referred I don't think the president knows much about him or knew who he was other than what the president has done very very well is very quick and what he did very quickly which come to the realization that this was not his bailiwick he he's a good businessman he can pull together as he did very quickly business leaders to tackle this and get on top and doing everything that we can but obviously was drawing upon outside sources which I think is a good thing for some help here and you know he he ended up with somebody that might not have been the best choice from a conflict of interest that's not his fault that's the fault of his his advisors but I can't answer the question is what he's doing there why still there I pay little attention to old to be honest with you I I pay far more attention to all the other people that that are surrounding there I think he does have a very very good team but the conflict of interest as an issue but I think that I felt she has made a calculated era thinking that he was going to benefit from it or his organization was going to benefit from it because of president trump doesn't care a lick about his organization or any other organization he cares about finding a vaccine and find your treatment and he doesn't care where it comes from so I can guarantee you is not his organization or any other organizations involved and he's not getting any kind of preferential treatment so I I I feel you know it's it is a conflict I know he should be there but at the same time I'm not concerned because I don't think that we are going to hold off on a treatment or a a vaccine from any one company human trials starting today in the UK for vaccine starting in two weeks or so with another our two companies in Israel.

"dr lorraine" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

08:29 min | 5 months ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Eight six six five oh Jimbo and as we go to some calls here Frank I think it would be helpful but the president and I've said this I don't know how many times in his presidency but if he would blurred a little bit less I mean it would be helpful to him if he would just not constantly blurred out things that are just patently not true well I think that that's part of his personality he he fights on multiple fronts and doesn't let a swipe or an offense that he takes to go on match or unanswered Richard Newstead great political scientist who wrote a book about what a similar trial to mines presidential power said that the president has to focus on a few issues and the more you focus or you don't focus you run the risk of not having sufficient power insufficient moral authority to succeed on any so most presidents who are successful tend to pick three four issues that they believe they can garner their strength and then negotiate with those with the Congress would be interest groups the American public but he's a businessman and he comes from it from a different perspective but ideally I would agree that sometimes these are counterproductive yeah I mean again taking offense is one thing and he has had plenty of reason to take offense about a lot of things but but just plain old inaccuracies that it would be adding healthier for him if he avoided those here's a call from ed in Taylorsville Utah the bull headed show with the Frank Sorrentino good evening ed yeah Jim yes Sir go right ahead okay yeah okay a couple of things here I agree I agree with you and then disagree with you in that you all right I think Congress okay look after itself they'll be asserting themselves back at Mr trump I'm a proud show trump voter and what have you but the other part though which on the funding and on a war if you will decide social distancing and all that he's not quite in that when he did the Americans react you don't even responding from the federal reserve would have you to finance all the hubris that Colin Gavin Newsom in California and even to some extent the governor Herbert right here in Utah however I'm waiting for you Jim to bring on Dr Lorraine Gary and former CBS reporter Jon Rappoport those two at a growing number of other health professionals are pushing back and called for the ouster of policy I did not elect him I like to Donald Trump it is coming up with all these guidelines of lockdown and dull soft martial law and different things to change America forever in my view and so well I mean is is no changing America forever involved here is is the terms of the certainly the lancers at the of the pleasure of the president of Frank Sorrentino your thoughts about all of that here we live in an age of expertise and this creates severe problems for democratic governance mused at how we porters were questioning president trump almost demanding that he paid the advice of Dr falcate does already visors the decision making is of the president and of the Congress and of governors we can talk about that but we moved to the point where either we dislike the president or we believe that these individuals Wells because they have greater expertise should be the decision maker but they weren't elected on top of that the question is that they tend to be one dimensional public health is a very very important area of governance and of this society but we have economic we have military we have social activities we have many many things that are critical for the well being of the nation despite fact about he's great credentials and great history he's not the president and he could be dismissed of course it would be a great political risk probably for Donald Trump to do so any of that he can be ignored I mean the president to do what he wants with the Anthony Fauci Gunda fire in beacon ignored me do whatever he wants to I mean let's face it the he hasn't issued one single order as such Tommy in the Charleston West Virginia is with us about hello Tommy hello Mr Blanton and thanks again for I have an excellent gas and thank you thank you the the civil liberties issue as a sub category of this corona viruses being not given enough thought you know sources of excellence that selection of gas do we know of anyone who's actually been pinched or given a citation that you entered this state from another state and you violated our our rough mandate to quarantine for fourteen days for anyone who has within a given state California for example where they lock some young woman out thrown a big party and violation of governors Sims orders but they had the grounds of rambunctious parties you know there was a it wasn't all corona the cop said something else to hang their hat on say they block this kid up I guess let it go the next day do we know of anybody who's actually been cited for violating the either the presidents or governors emergency mandates all right the I I we here we certainly hear a lot of of of news reports of Franco's Florentino my assumption is that that the it factor there are such people I truly can't name any of them but your thoughts will be Louisville situation I think is indicative away the police broke up an Easter Sunday service and took their license plates incited them now whether those instances are going to lead to any prosecution include all federal judges already ruled that is an unconstitutional action by the mayor of Louisville it's going to be appeal and sell bonds are there will be a little bit at the moment the first judge the first judge to speak on the subject judge Justin Walker has said if there was an unconstitutional violation of their rights well I I agree with the judge in that instance but they will appeal it and of course a lot of individuals sometimes don't have the resources to challenge it and certainly the argument could also be made that any curtailment of civil liberties or violation of the criminal code should be done by the legislature the executive is only supposed to implement the will of the legislature so here we have a I I believe it's going to be sheer who I decided to do this on his own and he is the directions also to the the mayor of Louisville so there was some potential risks here of governors and of course the the the big deal right now is that the governor of Michigan who seem to make an all whole host of regulations which certainly appeared to be somewhat arbitrary and capricious Gretchen Whitmer was saying you can't buy see you can't buy garden hoses he can this is home and it was a great protest in Lansing today and there's certainly governors edicts president's edicts they wanted to know solve constitutional power when it's not backed up by the legislature indeed more to come will be.

Frank president Jimbo
"dr lorraine" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:33 min | 5 months ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Six six five oh Jimbo and as we go to some calls here Frank I think it would be helpful for the president and I've said this I don't know how many times in his is a presidency but if he would blurred a little bit less I mean it would be helpful to him if he would just not constantly blurred out things that are just patently not true well I think that that's part of his personality he he fights on multiple fronts and doesn't let a slight or an offense that he takes to go on match or unanswered Richard Newstead great political scientist who wrote a book about what a similar trial to mines presidential power said that the president has to focus on a few issues and the more you focus or you don't focus you run the risk of not having sufficient power and sufficient moral authority to succeed on any so most presidents who are successful tend to pick three four issues that they believe they can garner their strength and then negotiate with those with the Congress would be interest groups the American public but he's a businessman and he comes from it from a different perspective but I. D. I would agree that sometimes these are counterproductive yeah I mean again taking offense is one thing and he has had plenty of reason to take offense about a lot of things but but just plain old inaccuracies that it would be adding healthier for him if the avoided those here's a call from ed in Taylorsville Utah the ball had a job with the Frank Sorrentino good evening at yeah Jim yes Sir go right ahead okay yeah okay a couple of things here I agree I agree with you and then disagree with you in that you all right I think Congress up to look after itself they'll be asserting themselves back at Mr trump I'm a proud so trump voter and what have you but the other part though which on the funding and on a war if you will decide social distancing all that he's half white in that when he did the job Americans react to him Elise funding from the federal reserve would have you to finance all the hubris that Colin Gavin Newsom in California and even to some extent the governor Herbert right here in Utah however I'm waiting for you Jim you're going on Dr Lorraine Gary and former CBS reporter Jon Rappoport those two and a growing number of other health professionals are pushing back and called for the ouster of policy I did not elect him I like to go trump it is coming up with all these guidelines are locked down and soft martial law and different things to change America forever in my view and so well I mean there's no changing America forever involved here is is the terms of the certainly the lancers that the of the pleasure of the president of Frank Sorrentino your thoughts about all of that here we live in an age of expertise and this creates severe problems for democratic governance mused at how we porters were questioning president trump almost demanding that he paid the advice of Dr falcate does already visors the decision making is of the president and of the Congress and of governors we can talk about that but we moved to the point where either we dislike the president or we believe that these individuals also because they have greater expertise should be the decision maker but they weren't elected on top of that the question is that they tend to be one dimensional public health is a very very important area of governance and of this society but we have economic we have military we have social activities we have many many things that are critical for the well being of the nation despite fact about he's great credentials and great history he's not the president and he could be dismissed of course it would be a great political risk probably for Donald Trump to do so and if any of that he can be ignored I mean the president to do what he wants with the after the fact you can fire him he can ignore me do whatever he wants to I mean let's face it the he hasn't issue that one single order as such Tommy in the Charleston West Virginia is with us now hello Tommy hello Mr Blanton and thanks again for I have an excellent gas and thank you thank you the the civil liberties issues as a sub category of this corona viruses being not given enough thought you know so if this is a good excellent the selection of gas do we know of anyone who's actually been pinched or given a citation that you entered this state from another state and you violated our our rough mandate to quarantine for fourteen days for anyone who has within a given state California for example where they lock some young woman out on a big party and violation of governors Sims orders but they had the grounds of rambunctious parties you know there was a it wasn't all corona the cop said something else to hang their hat on say they've locked this kid up I guess let her go the next day do we know of anybody who has actually been cited for violating the either the president or governors the murder scene mandates all right the I I we here we certainly hear a lot of of of news reports of Franco's Sorrentino my assumption is that that the it factor there are such people I truly can't name any of them but your thoughts for the Louisville situation I think is indicative away the police broke up an Easter Sunday service and took a license plates inside a dent now whether those instances are going to lead to any prosecution include all federal judges already ruled that is an unconstitutional action by the mayor of Louisville it's going to be appeal and so it will be a little bit at the moment the first judge the first judge to speak on the subject judge Justin Walker has said if there was an unconstitutional violation of their rights well I I agree with the judge in that instance but they will appeal it and of course a lot of individuals sometimes I don't have the resources to challenge it and certainly the argument could also be merry that any curtailment of civil liberties or violation of the criminal code should be done by the legislature the executive is only supposed to implement the will of the legislature so here we have a I I believe it's going to be sheer who I decided to do this on his own in his directions also to the the mayor of Louisville so there was some potential risks here governors and of course the the the big deal right now is that the governor of Michigan who seem to make an all whole host of regulations which are certainly appeared to be somewhat arbitrary and capricious Gretchen Whitmer would say you can't buy see you can't buy a garden hoses he can be home and there was a great protest in Lansing today and there's certainly governors edicts presidency he thinks they wanted to know solve constitutional power when it's not backed up by the legislature indeed more to come will be back in a moment this is Joe inginkan.

Frank president Jimbo
"dr lorraine" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

05:56 min | 5 months ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"For being one of those people that listen at nights and we're gonna live until two o'clock so we got another hour of the show if you want to call in or text you can at three one four four three six seventy nine hundred and Eddie is holding on in the Illinois what's going on at the yeah I'll write it up quite a bit I'm totally opposed to Mike pence in fact very much opposed to Mike pence I don't think he's the man you think here's our first of all he's the one behind the scenes and set up this task force all without empathy fallacy and Berks okay right there that's a nonstarter for me but I want to ask you are you are you familiar with former CBS reporter Jon Rappoport well I remember hearing his reports about I don't know yet what you did yeah well you do the healthwatch segment at his website no more fake news dot com Jon Rappoport along with Dr Lorraine day who figured up big in the H. epidemic crisis back in the eighties she was head of surgery at San Francisco General Hospital so Jon Rappoport I don't believe they have a lot to say about Anthony thou see and his ties to Bill Gates and the tetra who I'm glad Donald Trump cut off funding to the W. H. O. a communist organization with their ties with Bill Gates and the CDC so back to pets he set up the policy and you have to out conservative talk shows Mike savage reported that fallacy which he had to have come across a legal or it was legal but drugs that kill ten thousand homosexuals and drug users back in the eighties and somehow what was left standing like a bill we've all the boaters William to the the doctor see a lot of violence has reappeared now cancelled the one that dredged up these people that is what John Robb report saying and I also provide you'll check out our normal take news dot com because he was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize one time for his investigative journalism Hillman doctoring data now some big people from M. I. T. or pushing back on everything that this policy is pushing for Bill Gates and the vaccines and the forced testing and what have you this is much about control and the economy all the two trillion dollars and another two trillion in the weeks to come because our economy was failing so long they crash landed it using this as a family and their work we have in the hospital empty or parts of the country what nurses are being settled in north Florida and in downtown Oklahoma City all the numbers are not matching up and people are pointing that out we have been fed I haven't John well before educated me I hope you have your own some day Ryan we had a crisis on our hands here my yeah while I'm looking at his website right now I left a bit and it doesn't look like he's updated it wrong let's see because the last week teen all keep records okay so yeah I mean the visual blog things in here but that the top one is as July seventeenth but I don't look at it stop paying it with Michael savage I've I've listened to him before and he's been a popular radio show host is kind of fell by the wayside as of late he is some how to ride Michael savage is is pretty good at saying a lot of things that are true but unrelated to what's going on he's he's very good at the truth but he connects them in ways that I don't think are relevant and well I I got a look at Rapaport a little bit more old I'll take a look at some of these things but you have a great people people have their opinion sure I'd I'll take a look at it all right but they also look at doctor early day like I said she was head of surgery at San Francisco General Hospital and she was on Larry King Live herself and one sixty minutes back in the eighties fighting the horrible sexual agenda which were pushing back at her in the hospital there so I'm just saying in August some high powered people that have a lot to say although we're not hearing from we're only hearing from these two big left wing all seemingly New World order one well our government because a push in the WHL and they don't really travel through building to finances ten percent of the W. H. O. did you know that market yeah I do as a level percent again like all of our lives we gotta go but yeah thank you very much your qualities are running up against the break we don't have enough time but okay thanks for your stuff you know I can look at that W. H. show let's take a look real quick with good old Bill Gates W. H. O. funding you know it's interesting Bill Gates to to to to to at all don't take a look and see if he's donated to them or not and what ways they do it but that's a lot of stuff right there time to unpack and unfortunately when you say a lot of things back to back to back to back like that it's very difficult to disseminate it so here's what I would give you some advice at eight you gotta you gotta pick your things you're gonna talk about if you just if you have about twelve different things you want on loan at a time you got to take them one at a time because if you just do to many of these things at once you're just going to be very good and people are gonna just completely gloss over what you're saying and they're gonna ignore you totally solved that's part of the problem we run into is a lot of these things that you said sounds very conspiratorial not that I don't believe them it's just that I would have to go back and do a little bit more looking into it we're gonna do another hour of overnight America coming up here.

Eddie Illinois
"dr lorraine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

05:20 min | 6 months ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"All right guys a little hocus pocus I wish I had a that magic one of the big talk about well Donald Trump got it that's right okay we are back the magic Wade tonight let me give fast fast Eddie on here Bastet you're on a D. N. yeah listen are you a really appreciated that call were Jimmy how can calls back yeah what a great the best call of the night I want to say and he brought up Dan swan former news anchor in Cincinnati listen dance log but it's not just finance one and and I have a different point on contrary to a lot of one of her tonight and it's because apparently I track with Jimmy all we look at the numbers I'm sorry do you not to be too much longer the property is tied in to the United Nations that's why he was starting a little bit with our president a week and a half or so ago what's going on here and I can cite my sources right to the person Dr Lorraine berry she would very greatly impacted the lady she was the surgeon director at San Francisco General Hospital back in the nineteen eighties and she was on the front lines in the fight I must say against the homosexual movement in the HIV she was an immunologist and like I said a soldier in surgery they're happy although it San Francisco general she doing around for you even though she's in her eighties to talk about the fear mongering is nothing less what what's called to stop going to Florida medical martial law in this country nothing to do with the carpet about that big one trillion dollars Donald Trump reportedly and I can but we went out to a the member he went Jackie I'm telling you I wish Donald Trump had not done that she was more pressure for twenty one I don't see that and yeah yeah yeah I mean yeah you know the only thing that I'll say and Donald Trump because I didn't really like him going after mass because I heard mass to get interviewed with the filling guy from Rush Limbaugh and he just said that he was just following the constitution and trying to do something where he wanted to pin down a lot of these Democrats like that not go ahead A. O. C. because you know damn well heard a feel the Bern Bernie that the all those type of creeps they were going to vote for this damn thing and he want to do something to try and get these Democrats on record yeah what they're really all about what the real agenda is it's a but I just don't think with Donald Trump with everything he's doing I don't think he was well aware of what Massey the point he was trying to make and you know so easy he's entitled to a little bit of slip up there's not been too hard on him I want to apologize even even bigger what could be done in the Buchanan campaign okay I'm not with a lot of your call right that could be in with a little upset with Donald Trump I'm just say and my last point before I got here Washington ball was talking I'm talking a little Jimmy was talking about this we can switch we're saying that yes it's a real pirates how do you get off and using it as a smokescreen for those major bond although yes you might say it's necessary right now part of it is you have to do to shut down the other parties to the economy was crashing as it was actually kind of fun to do that again is about the international bankers subfossils would talk about some years back tell you what you can check this out not only been sworn former order John well support group reporting the rolling these findings that would she work at San Francisco general had you gotta look at the fact that I don't see how your orders are coming through the United Nations to WHL read more grown street yeah crying intrigue okay Hey as a thank you for the call you're making some interesting points for the audience and it's something to ponder but yeah I've been kind of suspicious a little bit of this doctor fatty course I don't know why he's not talking up these drugs that have been out there for a long time in like people and say if you're on your deathbed I mean that one guy down Florida were that we we've been hearing the news thing you know is forty years old and supposedly he was good health and blah blah blah well he's hospitalized for nine days one to help and some doctors say Hey wait a minute you're pretty damn set you want to try out this medication it seems like it's working all around the country I mean I don't know why I got I want to say hell yeah give me that medicine right now so there's some fishy things going on in my own humble opinion by course people says conspiracy theory but we have take low short break and we'll be back AT in right now there is a lot to consider when selling a home home equity is high housing inventory is down and interest rates are at an all time low but will the uncertainty of current world news drag down.

Donald Trump Wade Eddie
"dr lorraine" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on KTRH

"Border that you probably didn't hear much about total hypocrisy for vice president to come out and sent out a tweet calling this cruel behavior by the the trump administration when in actuality the number of migrant deaths is actually dropped about twenty to thirty percent price reported about migrant deaths at the border twenty times during the Obama years and he says he was ignored officers at one of the busiest border crossings faced on mom this morning U. S. border agents in Texas say a large unruly group of people formed on the Mexican side of the crossing and rush the port of entry at the border in el Paso early this morning Katie S. M. reports the border agents fired tear gas and the Paso del Norte bridge crossing was forced to close the port of entry has since reopened Mexico's newly formed National Guard is now on the job the National Guard is the brain child of Mexican president Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador as a way to counter violent crime across the country the force comprised of a combination of officers from the army police naval police and federal police the National Guard will total seventy thousand officers nationwide that's N. B. C.'s bills for Texas senator Ted Cruz is added his voice to a growing chorus of officials calling on the FBI and the department of justice to investigate Portland the mayor ten Wheeler is being criticized for his hands off approach to anti fur protests mass demonstrators injured a conservative local journalist Andy no who as regularly chronicled anti for violence in response to the outcry Portland police arrested three protesters conservative women are just the newest target for the national media conservative attorney Michelle Byington told you since morning news that's not fair and things have to change I think it comes down to women just being able to talk about their opinion and feel safe that it's okay to be a conservative I know right now in this environment is just not cool to be conservative and we need to we need to change that Byington says this is also why you don't see a lot of conservative women out there on mainstream media platforms Katie racism coming up on eleven oh four facing several lawsuits an attempted coup by former president Oliver north national rifle association shuts down in our A. T. V. David amaan with open carry Texas says the NRA is more focused on money than gun rights that's why the top sixteen people in the NRA make upwards of a million dollars a year really you're fighting for right and you're getting rich off of it Dan Zimmerman with the truth about guns thinks the NRA will survive but will look completely different in the end I see it as a long slow process at the end of which mark here will be gone one way or the other question is how much damage will be done to the NRA before that happens Zimmerman says there are a handful of second amendment groups no pulling in former NRA members well it's no secret medicine is becoming more and more expensive and doctors worry because patients are dangerously rationing the man's like insulin endocrinologist Dr Lorraine a right says skipping out on insulin could have deadly consequences for patients with type one diabetes into it they cannot live without can someone it is not you know and they they depend on insulin to survive legislators are working on ways to ease drug prices meanwhile Dr right says if you're in a painting can afford Mads ask your doctor if there any other options John Breaux news release some forty K. T. R. H. a recently discovered enzyme is good news for runners Lee Richardson with the brain performance center says the veal nella bacteria metabolize is the lactic acid which gives runners more ability to run and I get all worn out there that the lactate starts to build up in my book how do I take it up and so now I came from the lactate Richardson says the catch is not everyone produces the enzyme those who do will also boost their metabolism and help regulate blood pressure right now the Dow was up one twenty six monastic up ninety two S. and P. five hundred up twenty two oil at fifty eight ninety three our next update at eleven thirty.

vice president million dollars thirty percent forty K
"dr lorraine" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on In Black America

"Program and to strengthen our professional orientation. How important are these student organizations of professional organizations that augment you? All's particular work into college. Extremely important without such groups as the society professional journalists or the national association of black journalists or national association of Hispanic journalists et cetera et cetera. All acronym. Some sure you're aware of that just makes our job that much easier having them around and having them interested in the students because again, as rain talked about earlier is the acculturation process of learning to be what a journalist is, and how journalist acts with sometimes you cannot teach in the classroom, all the time that the networking, the job, contacts of students get so much from student organizations and professional organizations, and I just can't say enough, the, the scholarships the internship opportunities without. Those without those professionals out there. Our job would be that much harder. We encourage all of our students to do two things to get involved with student media and to join one of the student chapters of the professional organizations. I'm quite this is probably a hard question for you. Ought to answer. Why would a student attending university of Texas school of journalism over some other schools? I want to say it depends, but actually doesn't if you're growing up in the state of Texas, and you wanna learn about Texas journalism and journalism in general, there is no place. You should go other than the university of Texas at Austin because we have the facilities the faculty the opportunities in the city like Austin the size of the campus. Although that's sometimes it has attraction really works in our favor from that respect and the faculty here and. The students who work on the publications and do the work in the labs were all very passionate about what constitutes quality journalism, and I don't think you can find more devoted people anywhere. Back to Brian. I, I, I agree. I think George has said at all. I mean it is a great program. It's considered one of the top programs in the country, and as he said, depending upon where you live if you're growing up in Texas, and you want to be a journalist. This is the place to come for an out of state student, you may have other choices, but there's the attraction of coming to Austin and the opportunity to come and work with some of the best people in the business. So that's the top of the program. We talk about training individuals to, to work as practitioners. What about the other side of the coin of training? Individuals become a doctor, Brandon Laura doctor Sylvie, because I'm quite sure we need people of color to be in the classroom. That's a constant concern for us as well the graduate research area or the skull Leary, if you will our program, I hate to keep sounded like bragging, but we're one. Of very well nationally known program. Not terms of, of research, and our scholars in, in communication do great amounts of research, but is not really just the amount. It's the kind of research they do we've got max mccombs, Steve Reese, people of that nature who are nationally and internationally known. So we have a program that is in place to take care of those needs. But at the same time, it's, it's undergoing transition as well because of you know, generational changes and changes in the field. One of my primary concerns as a woman of color is attracting more people of color into the teaching area of journalism. I think it's one of the reasons that we've had such a difficult time in the profession growing more journalists of color, and it was certainly one of the reasons that I was interested in his jobs, because I really thought we need it to change the complexion of the classroom to change the complexion of the newsroom. And part of that start with recruiting more students into graduate school, and it remains a real challenge, for us, most of people of color, who I know prefer to go into the profession. The financial rewards tend to be better in the profession and trying to get people who are mid career, to make that career change and go back to graduate school, and get the, the degrees, that you need to go off, and teach in a university can sometimes seem daunting, the people in a lot of people not to do it. So we continue to struggle to try to get people of color into our graduate program. You had mentioned before in diff- in a conversation, we had, and also in, in a presentation a couple of weeks ago about moving into management. Are we putting that idea in young students minds as they matriculate through college at, at some point in order for the news to be diversified? And we are on. The inside making decisions on what people will see here in read at some point, one has to become half the step up and become a manager. Dr Salvi teach. Hey media management is called seriously. Not only a redoing that in that class of, obviously, we talk about that in our reporting classes, and other classes, they the university of Texas, not just because it's has a great journalism school. But because it is to university of Texas provides for many of our young Texans, their first diverse experience, and they are sort of hit over the head when the word diversity so often that, sometimes when you mentioned that word, there is glaze over in class, not to go there, they're prejudiced or anything, but it's because it's so drilled, so yes, that idea is, is definitely emphasized. But we have our students are also required. Take culture and communication classes where they understand that there's a greater society societal response. Ability to reflect society in one of the ways we do that is not just changing the colored people newsroom, but also changing some of the ideas and notions, they have about people of color in what constitutes news about people of color. When I first started doing this back in the good old days. Everything was done on analog recording tape. Now, we have digital technology. How has the technology changed the way you all go about training journalists part of it is just the analogy that you use the equipment has changed. But I think it has also made it easier and it's one of the things that I think the profession is grappling with nana's this whole idea who is a journalist, and how does one become a journalist, because it's very easy for anybody with a camera a tape recorder a computer to sit down and start doing work that one could call journalism, but. Whether or not that person has the necessary credentials. Whether or not there's a bona fide news organization behind that person whether or not they understand the standards and values that go into creating journalism remains to be seen, but I think that has become one of the challenges for the profession defining who is, and who is not a journalist and also helping students understand that all of this wonderful technology that we have out here that helps us bring information to people faster, also has its challenges, the whole twenty four hour news cycle in which people just put up information and not always have the time to verify that information is a challenge that journalists have to deal with the ability to change photographs digitally so that you know what? You know, the pitcher that used to be worth thousands words could be worth two thousand words. We're actually, as many as you want depending upon how you choose to change it or alter the figure. So I mean their new responsibilities and. Concerns that come with this technology that we need to start emphasizing in the classroom doctrine Lorraine random dean, but first of journalism at Syracuse university's s I knew how school up of the communications and former director of the school of journalism at the university of Texas at Austin Bryan died, April second two thousand nineteen. She was sixty six have you have questions, comments.

university of Texas university of Texas school of Texas Austin national association of black national association of Hispan Syracuse university Brian Leary George Dr Salvi max mccombs Brandon Laura Austin Bryan Steve Reese nana Lorraine director Sylvie
"dr lorraine" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

14:15 min | 1 year ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on In Black America

"Dr Bradley give us a little synopsis of your background. Okay. I've been the director of the school of journalism for three years now after spend. Twenty five years in the newspaper industry as an editor editorial writer and reporter. Okay. That's sylvie. I'm Ben at the school of journalism now for twelve years three as the rains associate director prior to that. And still, I teach journalism classes, and I was a newspaper business for ten years, both of you all come from the professional ranks objects. Some point view on decided to move to academia, the reasons why doc silk autonomy interested in doing more research, also, probably the pay was a little bit better than something many newsrooms were were paying at that time L seriously. I, I wanted to help the next generation of journalists not'must, miss make the mistakes that I was making Brennan, I think some of that was the same thing for me. But the other part for me as a as a newspaper editor I had become increasingly concerned about some of the things I was seeing in young people coming into the. Industry and I started to feel that we were never really going to be able to address some of the problems I was seeing in the newsroom until we did something in the classroom. And so I wanted to really be involved in helping to train the next generation of journalists, we're talk about training this next generation of journalists. What are we speaking of what actually takes place across the breezeway and see me? And that trading really wanna know that he wants our secrets. Just a little well several things take place. I think and George can add to this. I mean, part of it is helping to build the basic skills, you need to go out and be successful in a job. But it's also helping people understand what journalism is all about helping to in some ways indoctrinate people into the culture of journalism helping them understand the ethics the values the standards involved in journalism the role that the press plays in a democracy, and how they as journalists become a part of what is essentially a public trust would have to agree with that, basically, there's a major transformation going on not only from his and, and pre adults into mature thinking Dulce, but also into a vocation of sorts sort of like a seminary is like I, I like to describe it in class. They not only is Lorraine says they get. To, to become the high priests of the media, so to speak, but they also understand what their responsibilities are to society and what we do is much more than a job. I guess, to folk question personal one side, but the, the bigger concept is, how does one know here she wants to become a journalist, and then you don't wanna go one more on San wanna be, John are there other avenues in which one takes from elementary junior, high high school, and eventually arrive here, UT, I think everybody is probably different. I, I remember in my in my own case. You know, I knew that I wanted to make a difference to change the world to, to somehow, you know, right wrongs. And I initially thought maybe I'd be a social worker, or then a civil rights lawyer. And then I began to understand what journalists did, and I thought that's the career for me. This is something that I can do where I can actually. Out and help the public better understand what's happening help people make good decisions about their elected officials in public policy expose wrongs, and basically, I mean, I think there's a bit of a do gooder mentality in people who wanna become journalists. Also, I was raised, and I'm sure both of you are in, in a very religious household were, you know, the church and things that church value were very important. So I was in church, most of the most my young adult life. So I, I learned a lot about right and wrong. And what was wrong society, and what needed to be improved and journalism just seemed to be the most natural avenue that and not being able to pass physics as a college major. My problem was trigonometry. One of the things that disturbed me a little bit about some of the students, I see coming into journalism today is that some of that passion for wanting to change the world and, and do public service is not there, people want to be on TV people want to be celebrities people. I hear a lot of students say they liked to write. But then, when they find out that this is not just writing you also have to go out and report, you have to interview people, you have to work long hours, then you know, it doesn't seem as attractive to them. So I think you really do have to have some passion for public service in the students in which you all are training and arrive here on campus. Are there quip with the Bates that rudimentary of skills, the writing of the grammar of becoming reporters are you are you seeing them prepared to do college level work? Once they arrive here on campus or sorry. You asked that. Sometimes. Yes. Sometimes no. It just depends. You know, we're all living in the same environment here in Texas. We depend a lot on public school system of Texas, in general, in most of our students, I would say are have the potential, I at the same time that potential has to be molded. And you know, think basics like grammar, spelling punctuation, inquisitiveness curiosity. They come with that. But it also has to be directed when one arrives here are soon. The first year is basic general education, general college education, your math, your science, you foreign language in Dan, south Atlanta party sophomore junior, you actually get into a what you major is gonna be the pram broadcast. Archie f what have you once that period takes place? What are some of the courses in which students will be exposed to well, our freshmen? Can take an entry level journalism course called critical issues in journalism, which is the first course that you have to take it's required for majors. But a lot of non majors take it as well. And this is a electric class sort of looks at the major issues in journalism, and his an introduction to the profession. The next course they take is a skills, based course that it's the foundation course for admission into the sequence. And it focuses on news, writing and starting to develop some of those basic writing skills. Some of the courses that you teach. Well, I teach one of our introductory reporting courses, which is almost a it's actually required of all, majors, we teach near basic information gathering skills, interviewing questioning searching for information access to sources the basic skills that they'll need in, in every sequence. Wetherby broadcast photo one have you and I've been teaching that now for last three or four years, also teach media management courses is an elective, but is also sort of like an extension of reporting in, in the sense of their learning. What the coach ration- process is in media organizations, but I wanted to also add with Lorraine, what Laura said was once they take those two introductory courses, they then go into their, their various areas, but they do have courses that, that, you know, because their electives and because, you know. Were contained for the most part in one building that they do get to intermingle with other students, but their basic skills areas reporting the technology of broadcasting, for example. But also the societal things of mass media law and ethics. So we try to give them a very well rounded education as much as we can within the structure that we have as an accredited journalism school. Just a follow up on that because we are an accredited program. We are required that our students take a certain number of liberal arts courses. And we think that's important for people who want to become journalists to have a broad liberal education to understand political science and history and in international affairs. So although there's a focus on the skills classes, that's actually just a small part of their journalism education with the advent of tabloid, quote, unquote television. How has the line been screwed to a certain extent of what's real journalism is in what entertainment tabloid journalism is? And how does that affect the way you all go about teaching it? Well, neither one of us broadcasters. So we really can't really address that specifically but national requires new. Oh, yes, yes, we have our own examples in print media. Well. I belong on, I'm pretty sure Lorraine belongs to this, this national group cook the committee for concern journalists, which are which deal with one of with that issue as one in her main central tenets of their mission, which is to restore credibility and respect in large part to our media. And, and one of the reasons we do that as the students need to learn that not only are they are they journalists and they have this vocation or this mission, but they also their first loyalty is to the audience. But that doesn't mean you always cater to what the audience wants, and we have to sort of, walk, a fine line because obviously these the National Enquirer and, and entertainment tonight, in programs such as these are, are everywhere. And people sometimes that's the first thing they think about anything of journalism. But of course they learn differently once they can Torah classes is ethics say an important subject in which you all try to express to. Students. Oh, more so than ever. And particularly in light of some of the ethical problems that and credibility issues that journalism has been facing in the last few years, we teach, a course in media law and ethics. But what we've decided as a faculty is that it's not just enough to teach. Ethics. In a course we're really focused now on trying to teach ethics across the curriculum, and make the teaching of ethics apart of every journalism course that we teach what are some of the pitfalls and particularly being the director of the school that you face and trying to present a first class, a program here at UT. Is it probably money, money base space, everyone's competing for the best faculty and the best students. So, yes, all all of those problems are challenges, for us in some ways, we're fortunate because we are Texas. And we've got some wonderful alums who tend to be very supportive of our program, and we've had a strong program over the years. So people are students have a pretty easy time getting internships in getting jobs, because we have a strong reputation, but certainly more falconry is something that we all always want and spaces, a major consideration at this university, and the college is no different. There are things that we'd like to do in the school of journalism that we're somewhat hampered by simply because we don't have the lab space that we need to do that. And we don't have room to sort of one of the things we talked about, for example, is having a working newsroom, where students would go out and cover the state capital in the city of Austin and be able to go back and write stories and have an editor they in place, who would. Deal with those stories. It's, it's a great idea. And it's something that within our ability to do, but the big question for us while we're would we put it when right now, the labs that we use for classrooms or full from eight o'clock in the morning to nine o'clock at night? Go in just one thing. Of course. I agree with everything. Lorraina said, however, also would like to point out to the public that people say to school of journalism, they think of this great big monolithic than thinks the same way and acts as one when, in fact, we have several constituencies, if you will that, that encompasses, not only is, is the faculty key. But there are twenty some odd different faculty members, you're talking about six to seven hundred students. The media of Texas, the media of the country. Alumni, the administration, you got all those audiences or constituencies looking for you to do certain things. And then you've got the nature of the news. Businesses self. Which is in flux constantly and trying to get all those things to work on the same page as I've learned on the Lorraine is not very easy at all. I'm saying how important because you mentioned this in your mission statement, and also on, on the website of having faculty that have been there and done that does that lend a little bit more credibility to the course work into the instructors who actually teaching these individuals to become future journalists. We think so. I think our students definitely think so students tell us, yes. And I think almost all of our faculty have some professional experience. Some have a lot of professional experience, but most of them have been in the profession before becoming professors, and it's something that we look for when, when we go out to hire people, so having professional experiences key, and one of the things we've been trying to do in the last. Four years is to bring even more professionals into our.

school of journalism Lorraine Texas editor director Dr Bradley San wanna Brennan associate director National Enquirer Dulce George Bates Archie reporter
"dr lorraine" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on In Black America

"Emphasis, and was the driving force behind the establishment of Syracuse university. Los Angeles semester. Random was also the former director of the school of journalism at the university of Texas and Austin random passed away, on April second two thousand nineteen she was sixty six, I'm Danielle Hanson junior and welcome to another edition in black America on Newsweek program. Remembering doctor Lorraine e random journalism professional and educator in black America. One of my primary concerns as a woman of color is attracting more people of color into the teaching area journalism. I think it's one of the reasons that we've had such a difficult time in the profession growing more journalists have collar, and it was certainly, one of the reasons that I was interested in this job is because I really thought we needed to change the complexion of the classroom to change the complexion of the newsroom and part of that start with recruiting more students into graduate. At school, and it remains a real challenge for us, most of the people of color, who I know prefer to go into the profession. The financial rewards tend to be better in the profession and trying to get people who are mid career, to make that career.

America Syracuse university director Danielle Hanson Newsweek university of Texas Lorraine e Austin
"dr lorraine" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on KOMO

"Shop plans to be there later today at a rally Byron Ragland was at the men cheese. Shop in Kirkland as a court appointed advocates supervising visit between a mother her son. When employees got nervous called nine one. One officer showed up and ask raglan to leave. Kirtland city spokesperson Kelly Stickney says the city has apologized launched an investigation and plans to overhaul its training protocols for officers. So we know that this could have been an opportunity for officers to mediate a misunderstanding. The Menchu's franchise owner said in a statement, quote, I humbly apologize to Mr. raglan to this does not reflect my values, and I am genuinely sorry to former athletic trainers with the Seattle. Mariners are adding their voices to allegations of racism in the Mariners front office. Komo's Corwin Hake is live with the latest. Former Mariners trainers, Leonardo Santiago and Jose Valdez are coming forward to say they were treated unfairly because of their Latino heritage speaking through an interpreter Santiago tells the news Tribune, director of player development, Andy MacKay, and general manager Jerry DiPoto would speak personally with everyone of American descent and try to be involved with them San Diego ads but never with me. The Mariners had already declined to renew. Santiago in Valdez is contracts before they spoke out the two men are speaking in support of claims made by Dr Lorraine Martin the former team director of high performance who alleged racism in the front office after she was fired last month. Martin said among other things McKay and manager Scott service had called the teams Latino players, quote lazy dumb and stupid, especially the Dominicans. The Mariners deny all allegations. Major league baseball is conducting an investigation. Corwin hake. Komo news. Police agencies in the northwest Rabin war. And that a white nationalist group recruiting members in our part of the country. Komo's Brian Calvert reports live the group has already been connected to violence in Vancouver. It was in the parking lot of the Vancouver Washington Mall. A black teenager beaten by members of the proud boys after the teen allegedly swore at them. Also this year, proud boy members tied to an assault on a man on the street in Portland after he swore at them while they drove around town yelling at strangers in support of the president's proposed border wall. A Clark county sheriff's deputy fired in August after being tied to the group. And now that agency as well as others are being told by the FBI that the proud boys are actively recruiting in both the Portland and Vancouver region as well as the Seattle area, the FBI warning goes on to include that members of the extremist group have also attended rallies this past year with the intention of escalating violence. Brian Calvert, KOMO news extra patrols this morning that western Washington University where someone painted racist and homophobic slurs around campus. Some of the vandalism was founded on the rights. Triangle sculpture near the engineering building as well as on the resident's name tags inside Nash hall police believe one person may be responsible for..

Mariners Komo Leonardo Santiago Corwin Hake Dr Lorraine Martin Mr. raglan Jose Valdez Seattle Byron Ragland Kirkland Brian Calvert FBI director Vancouver Washington Mall Vancouver Kirtland city Jerry DiPoto Kelly Stickney baseball
"dr lorraine" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Chile has the highest rate of childhood obesity in latin america the condition affects around one in three children that because of this the government decided last year that launch black hexagonal labels hand to be put on any food or drink high in sugar salt or saturated fat and kiosks in all the country's schools have been banned from selling anything with one of the labels other latin american countries and how interested in copying chile's model but one year on all the changes actually working jane chambers has been finding out times changing at the school in legco scott says santiago it's a poor area with one of the highest rates of childhood obesity in the country since the government health dr started last year children have to eat healthy snacks like free to yoga instead of biscuits and fizzy drinks and these four year olds in the nursery did zimba claus before they are allowed to eat snacks until little have proved element of them western commend chile studies show that over ninety five percent of our population need to change our eating habits and become healthier dr lorraine a rodriguez his head of cheetah's nutrition and health department she is hosting a conference targeting a be city with delegates for across latin america if astle cl at as though he in the city there are many illnesses and conditions linked to obesity heart attacks of the number one cause of death here in chile and this is linked to unhealthy eating.

Chile jane chambers scott zimba claus rodriguez latin american legco santiago obesity ninety five percent four year one year
"dr lorraine" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"dr lorraine" Discussed on KOMO

"This is our she's health talk to tom hutyler and share of kelly we are back with more of our conversation odd occupational medicine without will reveal shadow kelly dr lorraine oh we were talking about can i occupational medicine and what it is and how you got interested in it but as a physical therapist practicing for thirty two years i've seen and dealt with a lot of patients are injured at work and you can help guide them through that process what is your role with an injured worker whether it's a muscular skeletal chemical or even working with the company i consider my role for the worker first of all to understand what his injury is how he got it and how he's going to get rid of so i guide them through that whole process of any particular test we may have to do x rays such as of the limbs if they may maybe injured but then once we've establish what the extent of their injury is we guide them to what you have to do to get it fixed sometimes you may have to be referred to a specialist like an orthopedic person if you've got a broken bone but more often than not it's it's a condition that's going to resolve with the help of particularly physical therapists will guide them to the exercises movements that they have to do an understanding that it's going to take time and give them a expectation of just how long this would be most people have a a bad expectation they think it's supposed to be done in a few days when more likely it's going to be weeks or months of recovery and just giving them an idea of what they can expect is very reassuring to people at least as to what the future might hold that's an excellent point i mean that's a point that i think people dinners dan i mean i think as an injured worker whether it's a muscular skeletal prom environmental exposure i mean there is significant exile about getting back to work i mean it's your job right in this which you're trained to do what about times where people need extensive time off i mean how do you make those decisions.

tom hutyler kelly dr lorraine thirty two years