33 Burst results for "Dr Lisa"

Black Doctors Use Social Media To Share Accurate Information About COVID-19 Vaccine

All Things Considered

04:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Black Doctors Use Social Media To Share Accurate Information About COVID-19 Vaccine

"The American public is hesitant to get a covert 19 vex. That number goes up to a third of Black Americans, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation poll last month. Hesitancy is rooted in real mistreatment and fanned by myths and misinformation, as NPR's Ping Wang reports some black doctors or finding creative ways to encourage vaccine acceptance. Well, very few vaccine safety problems have been reported. A lot of rumors are still floating online doctor Krista Marie Coleman has been tackling Cove admits on Tic Tac. She's the family physician in Orlando, and she describes one of the recent short video she made to counter misinformation. So yeah, so with the video I I'm using a trending song that people can relate to and as we can here with the song, it says, no, That's not true. So I say the covert vaccine will make you infertile, and I say that's not true. She posted the top second video in early December, and it's been viewed more than half a million times. And then I do a dance at the end, which people can relate to as well. A recent study published in the annals of Internal Medicine, like that public Health Message is geared at communities of color. Learn. It showed that black Americans are more receptive to information. If it comes from black doctors like Coleman. For some people, it means a lot when it comes from someone who looks like them. When it comes from someone who speaks like them. But only 5% of physicians in the U. S are black. Robert Drummond is another black doctor that's turned to social media to share accurate information. More broadly, he's an urgent care physician in Los Angeles, and in a recent Instagram live chat, he noted another big reason why people are wary of covert vaccines. With TV actor Dondre Whitfield's first Let me start by acknowledging the mistrust and acknowledging and understanding that there actually is a very real basis for that mistrust Well, said this deep distrust because that to the history of medical experimentation on slaves. It also goes back to the mid 19 hundreds when black men were deliberately not treated for syphilis. So researchers could see what would happen and it comes up to the present day. Just last week, a black doctor named Susan Moore died from covert 19 after alleging poor treatment at the hospital. When she asked for more pain medication, she said her white doctor made her feel like a drug addict. In the Instagram chat. Drummond pointed to a survey a couple years ago showing that a lot of doctors still wrongly believe that African Americans have a higher tolerance for pain. Everything from the top. We have thicker skin than two. We have a reduced we haven't heightened pain threshold so we don't need as much medication. This thing This is not from 19 hundreds. This is right in the 19 sixties. This is from the lake to thousands right now. As a black man, his part of the medical establishment, Drummond says his job is not to tell people to get vaccines. And said he wants to help people make their own informed decisions. But not everyone lives online. Alison Matthews, a sociologist at Wake Forest University, is researching how to increase trust in covert vaccines. In addition to the Internet, we've used conference wines as well, Azaz Mailed stuff out to people. You have to meet people where they are, in whatever level of communication is the most convenient for them. Matthew says that beyond black doctors, there are other community leaders that are trusted for advice. She works with black church leaders and sororities and civil rights groups. To generating trust in the health system is not a new challenge in the black community, says Dr Lisa Cooper, who directs the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Equity. Even before Cove, it 19 came up. A lot of the work that I did to try to address disparities in health care was focused on Having African Americans and people who are traditionally not given the sense of power and control in their healthcare play a more active role. For Cooper. The challenge is not just about overcoming vaccine hesitancy. It's for the medical community to learn how to build real trust. Ping

Ping Wang Krista Marie Coleman Robert Drummond Dondre Whitfield Kaiser Family Foundation Susan Moore NPR Drummond Orlando Coleman U. Alison Matthews Syphilis Los Angeles Wake Forest University Dr Lisa Cooper Johns Hopkins Center For Healt Matthew Cooper
What Your Brain Needs Right Now

Untangle

05:11 min | Last month

What Your Brain Needs Right Now

"Hello everyone excited to bring you another incredibly special. Untangle as we know in untangled we love to talk about your experience of the world. Unpack it both. What happens emotional perspective a psychological perspective and and narrow scientific perspective and there is no one better that i could bring on to help you understand the experience that we're all going through right now. And why your emotions in your brain be reacting. The way they are and what you may be able to do about it today. We have dr lisa feldman barrett. She's an extraordinary neuroscientist with multiple awards. She's a distinguished professor at northeastern university with appointments at harvard medical school and mass general hospital. And she's also author of bestselling in very surprising book. How emotions are made. And she's a different way of thinking about your emotional experience than you may have considered before she also has a great book. That just dropped seven and a half lessons about the brain and here is dr lisa feldman barrett to share with us her insight on. What's going on inside your noggin. Welcome lisa hake you so much for having me on your show My joy and my pleasure so when you think about the brain you have kind of different perspective on the brain than most people do. Tell us what is brain. How does it work. How does it drive us. I think most scientists for a long time assumed that the most important thing that human brain does is think because thinking is something that humans are very very proud of and people assume that in brain evolution that there was this striving towards more and more and more complexity with the human brain at the very top so of course the thing that we value ourselves thinking in rationality at least in the west. This would seem to be a really good candidate for what brains the most sophisticated brains which people assumed for longtime hours would do but when you look back into evolutionary time which you can see is that and actually when you look at the structure of the brain. It supports this idea that the brains most important job isn't analogy. It's not feeling or thinking or even seeing your brains. Most important job is regulating your body and all the systems in your body and everything that you can you feel and you see and you hear and you smell and so on are in the service of regulating that body now. That is not the way we experience ourselves in our lives but that really does seem to be. What's going on under the hood. Very different approach so our perceptual experience of the world is in service of helping us regulate our body. Yeah pretty much so even vision for example is not free from the influence of. What's going on inside your body. There are many many experiments showed this that. What's going on inside your body influences sometimes. Literally what you see. And if you look at the connectivity in the visual system and its relationship to other systems in the brain you can see really clearly that vision is not like an objective window on the world by any means we have a sense about how our pre existing perception of the world can continue to shape our perception of the world. This is the whole echo chamber of the news that he thinks that everybody else's and currently i'm not an echo chamber but clearly there an echo chamber because you have a preconceived notion of what's going on and then you read information that with what's going on and that creates your tunnel vision of experience. Can you talk to us a little bit about how that's formed in maintained however echo chamber chamber. Yeah wow well. There's a lot to say about that. I think the thing ariel is there are two ways to answer it. There's a superficial way to answer it. Which is to say brains. Don't just react stuff that's happening in the world we're selecting would signal in. What is noise. Nuts i mean on a moment to moment basis and that certainly is true interesting but i think to me the more interesting the answer it has a little bit of setup and that is that your brain runs a budget for your body. What's the most expensive thing that you can do that you can spend on. It's either moving your body or learning something new especially when things are uncertain and so if your body budget is running a deficit you're not gonna spend as much and so you will be comfortably in a silo because it's more metabolic expedient for you and it will feel more comfortable that's why imparted feels more comfortable. So there's a superficial answer but there's also sort of a deeper answer that relates more to the larger culture that we live then. We have to design a cultural context bankrupt. A body budget would be the one that we live in.

Dr Lisa Feldman Barrett Mass General Hospital Lisa Hake Harvard Medical School Echo Chamber Ariel
Lisa Feldman On What Your Brain Needs Right Now

Untangle

04:56 min | Last month

Lisa Feldman On What Your Brain Needs Right Now

"Hello everyone excited to bring you another incredibly special. Untangle as we know in untangled we love to talk about your experience of the world. Unpack it both. What happens emotional perspective a psychological perspective and and narrow scientific perspective and there is no one better that i could bring on to help you understand the experience that we're all going through right now. And why your emotions in your brain be reacting. The way they are and what you may be able to do about it today. We have dr lisa feldman barrett. She's an extraordinary neuroscientist with multiple awards. She's a distinguished professor at northeastern university with appointments at harvard medical school and mass general hospital. And she's also author of bestselling in very surprising book. How emotions are made. And she's a different way of thinking about your emotional experience than you may have considered before she also has a great book. That just dropped seven and a half lessons about the brain and here is dr lisa feldman barrett to share with us her insight on. What's going on inside your noggin. Welcome lisa hake you so much for having me on your show My joy and my pleasure so when you think about the brain you have kind of different perspective on the brain than most people do. Tell us what is brain. How does it work. How does it drive us. I think most scientists for a long time assumed that the most important thing that human brain does is think because thinking is something that humans are very very proud of and people assume that in brain evolution that there was this striving towards more and more and more complexity with the human brain at the very top so of course the thing that we value ourselves thinking in rationality at least in the west. This would seem to be a really good candidate for what brains the most sophisticated brains which people assumed for longtime hours would do but when you look back into evolutionary time which you can see is that and actually when you look at the structure of the brain. It supports this idea that the brains most important job isn't analogy. It's not feeling or thinking or even seeing your brains. Most important job is regulating your body and all the systems in your body and everything that you can you feel and you see and you hear and you smell and so on are in the service of regulating that body now. That is not the way we experience ourselves in our lives but that really does seem to be. What's going on under the hood. Very different approach so our perceptual experience of the world is in service of helping us regulate our body. Yeah pretty much so even vision for example is not free from the influence of. What's going on inside your body. There are many many experiments showed this that. What's going on inside your body influences sometimes. Literally what you see. And if you look at the connectivity in the visual system and its relationship to other systems in the brain you can see really clearly that vision is not like an objective window on the world by any means we have a sense about how our pre existing perception of the world can continue to shape our perception of the world. This is the whole echo chamber of the news that he thinks that everybody else's and currently i'm not an echo chamber but clearly there an echo chamber because you have a preconceived notion of what's going on and then you read information that with what's going on and that creates your tunnel vision of experience. Can you talk to us a little bit about how that's formed in maintained however echo chamber chamber. Yeah wow well. There's a lot to say about that. I think the thing ariel is there are two ways to answer it. There's a superficial way to answer it. Which is to say brains. Don't just react stuff that's happening in the world we're selecting would signal in. What is noise. Nuts i mean on a moment to moment basis and that certainly is true interesting but i think to me the more interesting the answer it has a little bit of setup and that is that your brain runs a budget for your body. What's the most expensive thing that you can do that you can spend on. It's either moving your body or learning something new especially when things are uncertain and so if your body budget is running a deficit you're not gonna spend as much and so you will be comfortably in a silo because it's more metabolic expedient for you and it will feel more comfortable that's why imparted feels more comfortable.

Dr Lisa Feldman Barrett Mass General Hospital Lisa Hake Harvard Medical School Echo Chamber Ariel
Protecting Your Brain from Alzheimers Disease and Cognitive Decline

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

03:54 min | 3 months ago

Protecting Your Brain from Alzheimers Disease and Cognitive Decline

"In this mini episode, I speak with Dr David Perimeter Dr, Lisa, Mosconi Dr Dale, Br Edison about why Alzheimer's is a preventable disease and the lifestyle factors that can set the stage for Alzheimer's years from. Now, we also talk about this disticts of Alzheimer's disease and its impact on women, and what you can do today today to prevent cognitive decline in the future. Let's listen in starting with interview with Dr. David Pearl Mutter, a board certified neurologist and four-time New York. Times bestselling author, we do know that a for the most part Alzheimer's is a preventable disease. This is a disease costing Americans two hundred and thirty billion dollars affecting five point four million of us. That is dramatically exploding in terms of its incidence and prevalence globally, and yet you know the notion that our lifestyle choices are not relevant is it does take my breath away. You know it's all about living a life that is less inflammatory and that certainly transcends are narrative as it relates to Alzheimer's but. Involves Parkinson's and involves coronary artery disease diabetes and cancer, and all of the chronic degenerative conditions, and you know what really is so very important and I think sort of stands in our way of getting this information to really have traction is the time table that this is effective over for example, you tell somebody wear your seatbelt that'll be good for you. They get in a car accident they're wearing their seat belt and they say, Hey, I get it that worked yesterday I was in that accident worked. But the inflammation issues that are relevant in terms of causing the brain to degenerate or narrowing the coronary arteries. These are issues that are beginning to take shape ten, twenty, thirty years prior to actual disease manifestation, and therefore it makes it very challenging for the consumer to connect those dots. Let me give you an example. In the journal Neurology, which is arguably one of our most well respected neurology journals on the planet period viewed. There was an interesting study that was published and it measured in a group of several thousand individuals who were in their forties and fifties. At the time it measured markers in their blood of inflammation and the study then came back and looked at the same group of individuals twenty four years later, the study again was just. And what it found was really quite remarkable. There was very direct relationship between risk for developing Alzheimer's disease and having had higher measurement of blood inflammatory markers twenty four years ago. So what does it say? It says that if you? Elevated Markers of inflammation in your blood today, you are setting the stage for Alzheimer's years from now and so that your lifestyle choices today whether you choose to eat low carb high carb high fat low-fat whether you choose said integrity vs physical activity the amount of sleep that you get. Hopefully that is restorative the amount of stress in your life, etc. these are all extremely important variables. Which you have control that clearly are connected to your brains Dini. This is not live your life come what may and we have a pill for you. If you're suddenly cognitively impaired is the other story. The story is that you make lifestyle choices today that will dramatically impact how your brain works to three decades from now

Alzheimer Alzheimer's Disease Dr David Perimeter Dr Dr. David Pearl Mutter Neurology Dr Dale New York Br Edison Parkinson Times Lisa
Atlanta Public Schools could have students return by end of October

Von Haessler Doctrine

00:30 sec | 4 months ago

Atlanta Public Schools could have students return by end of October

"Atlanta public schools could have some students back in the classroom by late next month. Students with special needs and ingrates pre K through second would be the first to return in person learning Beginning October. 26, a PS superintendent, Dr Lisa Herring says parents will receive a survey giving them the option. I know that there are those who have been ready for return, and that there are those who desire to wait even longer. Under the reopening plan, students would attend in person classes Monday and Tuesday or Thursday and Friday, depending on their last name.

Dr Lisa Herring Superintendent Atlanta
Atlanta Public Schools begins school year with virtual learning

Dana Loesch

00:37 sec | 5 months ago

Atlanta Public Schools begins school year with virtual learning

"24 hour news center. It is back to school Monday in the city of Atlanta, with virtual learning on Ly, a PS superintendent, Dr Lisa Herring. If it were our preference, clearly, we'd be face to face. But even during this virtual time, we're going to focus on teaching and learning, she tells Channel two action news. It's going to be hard not seeing the Children in class. We missed them and we want them and we're looking for it today or Rockdale County also begins virtual learning only schedule on Monday in person and virtual learning begin Monday Monday for for students students and and Carol Carol Hall Hall and and Newton Newton counties. counties. It It is is also also the the first first day day of of fall fall

Carol Carol Hall Hall Dr Lisa Herring Newton Newton Rockdale County LY Superintendent Atlanta
"dr lisa" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

Raising Good Humans

08:03 min | 6 months ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

"Today's conversation is with Dr Lisa d'amour clinical psychologist and New York, times, bestselling author of two awesome books will put in the show notes. And tangled and under pressure. So I wanted to get Dr Moore's take on how older children adolescents are doing. And what are the proactive things that we know from science that we can borrow from science to make what is inevitably a difficult time a little bit more manageable so I am thrilled to be back with you I love your podcast. Thank you I'm so glad that you took this time because I was like I knew I needed to share you with everybody. I appreciate that I will say that in my twenty five years of workers a psychologist I've never seen anything that can even be put on the same yardstick as covid nineteen. This is deeply upsetting to me personally and also unbelievably fascinating to me professionally. and. I have found actually a lot of hope and inspiration in the science that we have on how people get through hard things because we do have science of how people get through hard thanks. Yes. Let's hear it. So let's just start with things eighty. Let's start with things because. Everybody's feelings I eighty right now and they should. They should. It's the right reaction they're having the right feeling at the right time. So you know that since before covert nineteen I have been banging the drum brings ideas a normal and healthy emotion only occasionally derails. So here we are. With a real test, a real test of a real sort of. Worldwide example of how it operates and just to recap anxiety is an alarm system. It alerts us when something is wrong, it is there to protect us. I think about it all the time. Now as the emotional equivalent of physical pain response we feel pain when we have an injury or touching hot burner or something's wrong, the pain is unpleasant. It is fundamentally protective. We feel anxiety when somebody to close at the grocery store or when you know we have touched something and don't have a chance to wash our hands It is unpleasant. It is fundamentally protective. And that's the piece I just want all of us to start with is that the anxiety is a sign of mental health right now it is valuable and useful it's exhausting. Yeah and we need to find ways to get reeks from it. But what I think about like what good could come from this pandemic? There is part of me. That hopes that we as a culture renegotiate the relationship we had with anxiety because as the culture we were under the impression that you're not supposed to feel anxious. Yes. That has never been accurate or helpful I and I'm not. pollyannish about it at all like if everyone's feeling anxiety then in thanks eighty is. Not. The great pathology we thought it was right. It's. Okay but Kennedy get out of control. Can you feel anxious at the grocery store having a panic attack at the grocery store? Right? You don't WanNa. Have a panic attack at the grocery store. So the law has always been true of the distinction between healthy anxiety and unhealthy anxiety is unhealthy. Anxiety is when you're anxious and nothing's wrong which right now we don't have that problem ever. Or you're anxious edit is grossly out of proportion to events. So that would be the panic attack at the grocery store versus Samir Laser of heightened awareness and in no kind of tension, we feel at the grocery store which does help us to actually. Avoid degree. Careful. Be careful. Not Touch our face I. Hate going to the grocery store now. I realize retrospect. It, it was kind of an adventure. And how athletic hate the grocery store because I feel anxious the whole time. Yeah. Stuff on and it depends also where you are because there are some environments where it is just it feels threatening and that also really place something else which is the anxiety of covid nineteen and then we'll talk about stress they're not distributed equally. Much. Driven by the context in which you existence. Okay. So it is normal until it's not. The stress is expectable until it becomes really toxic. So. Let's start with WHO. We need to worry about the most from this point. Great people who were already stressed. We have always known in psychology that stress is dynamic. And there's a couple of ways. This is true. Put One way it's true is it accumulates that the stress of a new thing only layers on top of whatever stress you were living with before? So I'll use myself. In this example my life was really very comfortable before covid nineteen. My family like husband we we live in Shaker Heights Ohio. Space Despair covert nineteen is very unpleasant for me, but it's utterly bearable. You know I can totally manage it. I have days that are not my favorite. But in the grand scheme we're doing just fine. Yeah. When we think about people who either were having very difficult situations at home before this or were on. You know faced with structural inequities poverty racism. Lack of access to. What should be utilities like the? Internet. That means that the stress of covid nineteen has only taken. What was already difficult circumstance and for many people actually made it devastated. and. So we cannot talk about the stress of Covid nineteen without talking about the stress that predated Cova maintain for whoever we're talking about. It is one of those things where actually no matter how much empathy you have it does become very hard to conceptualize remy like I. Think there's some thing I almost in my own mind can watch defensive process, take hold where I go there and then I find it really hard to wrap my head around it and. I don't feel good. About That I I I watch myself. Take advantage of my ability to think about it, and then not think about if I don't want to. That's right. Yeah, and that's some I think. Something to be honest about and then to not allow. And Not not adult if if I can help. In other words don't shut down that uncomfortable thoughts. Yeah and then. You know the best. Defensive Response is actually. Supplication where you turn it into something useful right? So if I find it unbearable to imagine. How bad. This must be for people who are already. Living or marginal or marginalized lives then I need to get myself to the soup kitchen or get not. You know to the Food Bank and. And contribute and do what I can with what I have which. Most and to that point, activating our kids to do the same thing to take them out of.

Covid Dr Lisa Dr Moore New York WanNa Samir Laser Shaker Heights Ohio Kennedy
"dr lisa" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

The Path Distilled Podcast

03:50 min | 6 months ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

"You're good at this like. Maybe you can feel like you are actual professional and as. We have the unique experience of. The court that we came through Grad School. webs. Tremendously impressed with my personal growth, but also your growth. I think they've. Know ten years a better scholar. Paul's improved. APP alward. They've ankles with the first person I mentioned and I think. In analyzing myself and you said recognizing that you actually do have something to offer aloe back at where. Paul was. Dr Paul Ward Ten fifteen years ago and at the time I thought he was perhaps super human. A lot of respect now back and if you take the the place that he was in his career. I was probably not where he exactly where he was, but I was lot closer once I advanced additional ten years. To make up the ground that he had in the career, so he's ten years ahead of me in the career, if I were an additional ten years. I can see that I was much closer. Ten Years in than I recognized that would be. Our when he had that now he advanced in years as well so we're not. Looking back where he was at that time I just made us to on to understand but looking back. It kinda. Give me give me a sounds. Avenue proved. To the point that was pretty close to where he was. Powerful though what she shared to about Almost like what comes to mind. The work is never done so when I used to students that I would say, but it's not like I got ten years in lead. Cool. I can feel good about this like it's sometimes. I feel like I'm the worst person at this job. Another N. Phantoms like you realize like Oh. Wow, there are actually things I need to work on. Improve you know an. It's good like I i. enjoy that stuff, and I enjoy picking apart and thinking about how I'm to continue to grow, but now now that I recognize that.

Dr Paul Ward Grad School. Avenue
Atlanta Public Schools moves opening day to Aug. 24 with all virtual classes

Handel on the Law

00:35 sec | 6 months ago

Atlanta Public Schools moves opening day to Aug. 24 with all virtual classes

"It will be online virtual learning only for Atlanta public school students for the 1st 9 weeks of the school year, New superintendent Dr Lisa Herring tells CNN. They didn't make that decision lightly. It's not just an isolated decision, but a complex one that we also believe require the expertise and recommendations and oftentimes opinions of experts in the field of public health. The plan aims to mitigate the impact of covert 19 on school. Cool. Atlanta Public schools will also delay the first day of school from August 10th to the 24th

Atlanta Dr Lisa Herring Superintendent CNN
New Atlanta Public Schools superintendent sworn in

Atlanta's Evening News and Rick Erickson

00:36 sec | 7 months ago

New Atlanta Public Schools superintendent sworn in

"Georgia native and Spellman Alarm has sworn in is Atlanta's new school superintendent. She says she's ready to do what's right for the district's Children. I'm both honored and excited about the opportunity that is ahead of us. Dr. Lisa Herring says she's motivated by the board and the embrace she's already received from public officials as she steps into the role of Atlanta public schools superintendent Although no one can never predict the future, I can speak to what my focus is and my greatest concern. Turn that is tied to the wellness of Children and being able to make those most serious decisions. Collectively, Doctor Herring's already considering options for students and staff to reenter school this fall Post pandemic Veronica

Superintendent Dr. Lisa Herring Atlanta Spellman Alarm
The Latest: Arizona hospitals brace for COVID-19 case uptick

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 7 months ago

The Latest: Arizona hospitals brace for COVID-19 case uptick

"Hospitals in Arizona have begun activating search plans to increase the capacity for treating corona virus patients Dr Lisa Goldberg is the emergency room director at Tucson Medical Center once you start to have every hospital full old ICU beds full all the hospital bags full I'm and you have a virus that is spiralling and spiralling with more and more people becoming positive and therefore at risk inherently of getting sick it's always concerning because watch do we do where do we put those patients Arizona health officials on Saturday reported another thirty five hundred plus confirmed cases increasing the state's total to more than seventy thousand health officials attribute the additional case counts to both increase testing and community spread it's difficult when you when you're watching your people on VHS people and restaurants and everything open up as if nothing is wrong when you know exactly what this virus can do I'm Ben Thomas

Arizona Dr Lisa Goldberg Director Tucson Medical Center Ben Thomas
Governors who quickly reopened backpedal as virus surges

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 7 months ago

Governors who quickly reopened backpedal as virus surges

"Bars are closed again in the states of Florida and Texas two of the hot spots were virus cases have spiked again health officials are attributing the spikes in corona virus cases in about sixteen states in part to young adults flocking to bars when they reopened weeks ago so Florida's governor Ron DeSantis has ordered bars closed he will not order people to wear a facemask but says it's recommended to do police input criminal penalties on that is something that is it is probably going to would would would backfire the governor of Texas as closed bars and scaled back restaurant dining even stopping rafting companies from booking events Arizona is also opposing efforts to lift restrictions at Tucson Medical Center Dr Lisa Goldberg says they're worried about bad spilling quickly with coal bed patient data spike in patients who are coming into the emergency department sec I'm Jackie Quinn

Florida Ron Desantis Texas Arizona Dr Lisa Goldberg Jackie Quinn Tucson Medical Center
Local health leaders discuss Washington DC area reopening

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 8 months ago

Local health leaders discuss Washington DC area reopening

"Working together and crossing the borders is crucial in controlling the corona virus in the DC region that according to a group of local health experts we need a new way of acting and behaving in two and mitigate the risks Dr Lisa locker Markakis senior director of infection prevention for the Johns Hopkins health system was one of five local health experts on a video panel Tuesday Dr Georges Benjamin executive director of the American public health association everyone who gets inspected on average and thanks to other people and if you think about that is it creates a chain of sex to break that chain Benjamin says fifty to seventy percent of the population needs to be impacted or there needs to be a combination of infection and the vaccine that Reebok

Senior Director Executive Director Reebok DC Dr Lisa Locker Markakis Johns Hopkins Dr Georges Benjamin
"dr lisa" Discussed on Strong By Design Podcast

Strong By Design Podcast

03:36 min | 9 months ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on Strong By Design Podcast

"Com rejuvenate is also the name for the instagram the facebook But rejuvenate dot com the website. Probably has the most information to dig deep or You know we're always available for you on the phone Our clinic numbers two three one. Four eight nine eight zero six zero. So that's fantastic. So what would you like people to? I mean there's so much there's so much but What is like one for sure if you have a few more but one big takeaway that you would like listeners? Today take from this and tomorrow wake up going okay. What what would that be okay? I've to okay. Great the first one and they're both repeats of what we have that in here but the first justin no that really in the next six or seven years. You're building the new you. You're building this future vision of yourself so my body. So you're all of is involved on there's to to Great Amazing Researchers Bruce Lipton enjoyed. His benza slipped. Yes which if you want to dig into how. The biology of belief spoke over here. Both is books on my shelf. Here somewhere affects. Yes yeah I am books. The biology belief was my. I don't know how many years ago I read it. My I like all my lightbulb amazingness on Vancouver at a conference in two thousand and maybe seven and I walked out of there like I know what I WANNA do. Oh Na but I. I'm a huge huge fan of him. Huge Fan of what? He teaches what he does. Yeah Yeah and I guess we didn't talk too much about mindset but so important in your health and your wellbeing so that's a good one and the other is that you know really controlling these levels of inflammation thinking about health from the basic unit of life a cellular level. How can I support my cells because they may ask up? You know they are in control of my being so Just reducing levels of inflammation improving the cellular health Taking care of your Mitochondria which are the energy producers of the cell These things are you know that's GonNa make sense to a lot of people mitochondria so Getting you know co Q. Ten supplementing with an A. D. These are things that are very beneficial to our mitochondrial health. And as we age the Mitochondria Age and they get a lot of damage. Because as they're making energy for us they're creating reactive oxygen species which are much like a pinball inside of your cell very short acting but anything they are bumping into such cell membranes or LIPIDS PROTEINS DNA. They're damaging and so The as the Mitochondria age become less efficient at their job and create more of these reactive action species. That's why I love molecular. Hydrogen is an antioxidant and think major cellular as in to help balance out some of that oxidative stress awesome awesome. I so I am so grateful that you were in Florida and I am so thankful that you agreed to come into the podcast. I can't thank you enough. I would love to have you back. I would actually love to go and see her clinic. but Thank you Dr Lisa. So much for taking the time out of your holiday to come in here and sit down and talk with me. I think This is This podcast can do a lot to help a lot of people so I hope you're paying attention. I hope you took some notes But you can always you know rewind and listen to it as many times as you want so. I am coach Tonya here with Dr Lisa from the rejuvenate.

"dr lisa" Discussed on Strong By Design Podcast

Strong By Design Podcast

06:49 min | 9 months ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on Strong By Design Podcast

"Us reach more listeners and continue to change Let's get back to the show. Just how impactful Diet Diets? Yes and But with food being legal you can have as much of it as you want or as little of it because some people Harlem cells by lack of. Oh it's itself. Police itself regulated and we can abuse it as much as we wish consciously or subconsciously and yet it's it really is like I call it like like a ground zero. It's really ground. Zero bars are cellular health. And how our body functions and operates and ages and you know and it's it's difficult that's why you need to hire a healthcare. It's so difficult to sort through. I mean if you go to a grocery store most of what's on the shelf is going to be pro inflammatory. Yes really need to do reading labels getting used to what your body can handle and in moving forward but takes you know it from my husband and I. We've been doing this for about fifteen years. It's I don't love the term biohacking but really that's what it is for hacking our biology and figuring out what works for us And it's been a long course. I mean I started. I used to have ice cream all the time meal fudge cookies. Whatever that's how I grew up and to learn about these things what what is it doing to my body you know and then to eliminate that Now if I if I were to eat a tomato It's it's really my body really responds negatively to that. I'll have one joint which will inflame for twenty four to forty eight hours could be the middle finger joint in the middle of. Its or you know something or my big toe somewhere. It's really inflamed and intense on this is what arthritis feels like. I know you know what it would feel like to be all the time inflamed by the food choices. I'm eating but not having the knowledge of that until you know you don't know why you don't know why you're having these symptoms and I always tell my clients Now if your knees hurting and it continues hurting. It's not a tylenol deficiency. I mean you'll be thankful your knees hurting because it's telling us is fever. Something is wrong. Mainly that flip side of what you said that if you eat a tomato now Your body goes whoa bad veteran very badly very bad yes whereas a lot of people just kind of it's become are familiar. It's what we know is our normal You know my hip bombers ear. I get headaches if I if I don't get six hours. Sleep are normal the world our health world that we've created and the story were telling ourselves about why things are the way they are y. What causes the aches? What causes the pains? What causes all these things and yet if we hired the health coach or got the help and did the whole like recycling of old sales really an optimal healthy internal biological physiological emotional spiritual environment inside the shell. When we did something that was off your it would be like how. How mazing would that be? Just completely flip all of this so instead of well. That's our normal. It's like Whoa. I just had a salad and oh I didn't even notice. There was the tomato in that salad. That's what did it because your body's to get people there. I think would be incredible. It would it would flip the nick pharmaceutical industry on its head for starters because all of a sudden we're using let food be using using food and Just like the knowledge that is out there to Keyhole to fuel optimize. Yeah our mission statement for the clinic is that we wanted to provide the tools necessary for you to repair regenerate thrive in fuel your own mission. I mean you don't even understand how amazing it is to feel good every day. You know when we started our clinic. I was chief of Radiology at the hospital and my husband and I were going back and forth so we do this clinic. We just seen radiology you know. I had a very Stable predictable career and was really excelling in that career and We chose to do that because I felt. I really can help a lot of people with this and I was doing a lot of steroid injections and the more. I research steroids You know it's good for symptom management. They work well. But there's you know repeat steroid injections you could further degenerate that joint home celebrated rate. So I said you know why do I want to change damage acting what I'm holding in my needle from something which is degenerating to regenerating and But able to for six months Managed Being Chief of Radiology at the hospital and start my clinic part time and I have four kids. We home advocate. I mean like you can just feel your mission right. That's amazing. What a great great storm so glad you did that too because I think we need more of that. And where do you think like the potential for this lies because like to me wig? We haven't even. We're we're just getting started. Yes you know. It's Kinda like that How we know we're not using the full pass it like our full brain capacity and if we could a once were able to really tap into that like we're GONNA in being pretty amazing so where in terms of this kind of therapy and you know really like medicine You know where we at. And where do you? Where do you see the potential for this? Yeah I think they're With regenerative techniques will see less than less joint replacements necessary. I think if we can get a handle on inflammation will seal a lot less degenerative diseases or diseases with aging general People are going to look and feel better and that's GonNa make for a happier world right when people when people feel better. They're just nicer. Yes yeah I mean. Pain pain is for anybody. Who's experienced pain back pain nipping whatever? It is so limiting. You know it is and it's draining. It's fatiguing so to to help people get out of pain. I mean it's very gratifying. And you can see them. Come back to life. They're hiking again. They're getting exercise again. All their whole health is going to their mental health. The association there because again all of a sudden like they can move their body which we say it. I keep saying loser's GonNa hate me for it but your body was meant to be moved. Yes it was meant to be moved but was also meant to be able to look after itself and do what it knows how to do if we do the right things by it You know I think you the podcast you have mind body spirit encompasses all of what could improve once. We get a handle on this in the fantastic so Dr Lisa. What one more time? Where can we find you? So at rejuvenate dot.

chief of Radiology Harlem tylenol Dr Lisa mazing dot Keyhole
"dr lisa" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

07:56 min | 9 months ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

"Two years and ten years for assemblyman and the change could be gradual in mile or can be quite the same experience in that could lead to mood swings in the symptoms of depression as well so it's really important to interest in if you are feeling depressed why we have enough insight to see a Sunday happens in your life that could cost the pressure or could it be monolith. Could it be something else? Because the treatment should be differentiated based angle root causes of your symptoms than fighter. Disease is Sunday's a surreal important to address because he can lead to brain fog and dementia like syndrome symptoms and is obviously addressable by appropriate medical care and we know that hypothyroidism particular can increase your risk of on accelerated aging in some people all of them and finely ornaments. We need to address are Mormons and Suman Women's cement of a patient's as me about her monotherapy and there's a lot This being discussed right now because of bio identical hormones which are becoming quite a thing so in the book I have an entire Chapter Goes into Ramona therapy? The history book monotherapy in research. And what we know what? We don't know sure price there just to give you a quick. Somebody are Dan. Monotherapy can be very helpful to alleviate symptoms they hot flashes but is not currently recommended for dementia prevention. Women said it doesn't mean that it wouldn't work. The point is that the research is not there so clinical trials have told us not to do when it comes through therapy. You don't want to start taking hormones. More than six years after menopause. Because that can actually increase the risk of dimension. Something if you start taking hormones within six years menopause there just seems to be no side effects in terms of dementia risk but also we didn't find benefits to mammoth performance or performance. Would we are just trying to do now? Is to test whether starting Ramona therapy at the right time. Which is prior to menopause row can actually provide benefits especially long term for the prevention. I recommend everybody actually gets two. Copies of this will be one for themselves and then one to be able to gift To to a friend or family member Kim on your sister defend. There are so many women who really need have been done over to start. There's so much confusion I think is really up to women to to make their brains part of their thoughts daily. Something like your brain your best friend. Guess what how you move and how you think and what you eat and how you sleep it all matters especially for your fear gray matter you know. One of our things is just building the warentest we created the show not only inspired by the three traumatic brain injuries. I've had come in to to your clinic to get a scan also his Entered the reason why I always pointing to my brain wearing brown shirts is just we what we see we take care of. You see your hair you Manica your your nails or your your skin. You take care of the things that you your muscles you take care of it but we can see are the most important thing that we have. Which is our brain so I put it on the shirt where people have their emotions on their sleeve. You have your your brains on your chest just to say. Hey this is important. You know to love your brain and part of love your brain self love and self care does not selfish and these things are just solid teams. That that that I would recommend anybody just start in the area because in their all important because you could be eating the best food and actually if you're not sleeping that's going to affect everything else or if you're doing all this and you're stressed you know there's challenges and we have more control and influence You know with when it comes to our our genetics and how it expresses than we think. Lisa how do people stay in touch with you? My website is a great way to get in touch. Is Lisa Mosconi DOT COM and instagram? Yeah don't do twitter. Instagram handle is doctored. The are underscoring Mosconi. All S seat. Oh yes definitely definitely follow her And actually take a screen shot of this episode as we do with our associates or this video whenever you're connecting with and you could go tag Lisa tag myself. Share your big. Ah Ha out of these eight pillars. Which one do you feel like? You're doing well in in. Which one do you feel like? You need to put a little more attention to be able to do that. And that's great because when you share it other people could benefit and you could be answering even saving a life. Be because of IT and again. We'll put everything in our show notes. Jim Quick Dot com for slash notes including links to your book and And to your your work and your social media and thanks for being on the show once a double your brain speed and memory power if you'd like to learn rapidly and get ahead faster. I'd like to give you my brand new quick brain accelerator program. You will discover exactly what I teach my clients to learn. Read and remember anything in half the time. There is no charge. Is My gift to you for. Being one of our subscribers that's K. W. K. brain dot com or simply. Text the word podcast. Two nine one six eight to two seventy two forty six and will send you directly at nine one six eighty two grain growing up struggling with learning challenges from childhood brain injury. It's been my life's mission. Help you have your very best brain so you could win more every single day. Now one more quick brain here four ways to fast track to result in lock in which just learned into your long term memory. Remember Fast F. A. S. T. F. Stevens facebook. You're not alone on this journey. I invite you to join our free private online groups dairy connect with me. Your fellow brain lovers links to resources and even some major questions for meeting answer in future episodes. Go TO QUICK BRAIN DOT COM. That's paid W I. K BRAIN DOT COM A. Stands for apply hacked on what you learned today? Remember knowledge is not power its potential power it only becomes power when you use it and so use what you learn the S. stands for subscribe. Don't miss the next episode in other free brain drain and finally the t stands for teach. You WanNa learn faster now the keys to lock. It'd right away by teaching. It's someone else when you teach something you get learn twice. Here's a simple way to do that. Lever Review on I tunes leave review with your biggest takeaway from this episode. You could also post and share this podcast on your social media could help us spread our mission of building better brighter brains and of course tagged us to our team could properly thank you hashtag. Quick Brain K. W. I. K. Brain Mine is at Jim Quick Kwh instagram facebook and twitter. So what does fast and for facebook apply subscribe teach? I'll see our next episode of quick brain until then remember. You are faster and smarter than you think..

Lisa Mosconi twitter Suman Women dementia menopause facebook hypothyroidism Dan Kim Jim K. W. F. A. S. T. F. Stevens K. W. K.
"dr lisa" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

11:04 min | 9 months ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

"Back brain to part two of the conversation we're having about. How do you protect the female brain? And if you haven't listened to the previous episode make sure you do so. This is a very special two part episode We're here back with neuroscientist. Dr Lisa Mosconi. This is our fifth episode. Now our most popular guest and we are having a conversation about her brand new book called. Ex- ex- brain and so in the previous episode. We talked about how women experience more anxiety depression Brain fog insomnia always tied for Alzheimer's diagnosis. So headaches and Migraines and depression and anxiety and Meningioma road so we had to serve in depth conversation and we started to go through her acronym on how to protect your brain. We went through the first three or not going to review it right now. Should go back and read listen to that or listens episode but we left off with With S S. FOR SLEEP. We had a double F. Right and stroke yes. Thorough eighties accepted that women than men and again is not about comparing women men deployment Women don't sleep well overall. We have a hard time falling asleep and staying asleep and the problem start. Distracted sleep has been associated with all sorts of medical issues and more recently also the higher call assignments or dementia. Later on in life. Sure we source of understanding. The connection in dire as sleep is that stage of your brains lies with the brain his a chance to just south of toxins and waste products. So if you sleep is impaired. The brain just doesn't have a chance to take care of itself. An indie end their lease to oxidation. Information accelerated aging. So it's really important to try and get sleep. I know youth densely aloft road race and people can get by with vetting. Lido sleeps and people like me. Just can't so it's important. I think to prioritize sleep as well which goes in tandem with stress. Stress is a major issue in this really a major cause of all diseases that could be your career stress financial emotional relationship. Canley stress Ramona's shorts stress extremely initially a for men and women of course although there is evidence as a consequence is more severe for women's banks. This big Bro. So the Atkins says that with brain scans if you can the brains men and women under chronic stress over time. That seems to really correlate with increased brain shrinkage before you even turn fifty only for the women. The women seem to be more vulnerable to stress. I think one connection stand Stress is basically just this hormone cortisol. Which is the main stress hormone? There works in tandem with your estrogens courses up here estrogens go down if your Cortisol Gazon. So you're constantly under stress. The body will try to steal the precursor to both cortisol and estrogen treatment alone and shipped metabolism towards courts production so seeing restaurants to make more at the stress hormone which is fine as long as distresses. Stanford I once it becomes chronic. Then you start your body of your sex. One method is so important green energy by talented team. And so as part of self care what what. What do you recommend things people could do to the COPA stretch? Yes they're actually. Sometimes that are scientifically driven to work. Which was surprising to me like meditation. Scientists things. Some very foreign to me. But there is quite good research showing that having a consistent meditation. Practice engineer lowers cortisol levels in normalising normalizing brainwaves in a way that turns out to be cannot sure antidepressant. Amazing so let's review the the acronym so far. Saturday ackerman through the afternoon is men's Saana. Yeah it comes. From the Latin is Latin expression is very popular move. Vinnie and men's son are in court but ASANA which makes a healthy mind healthy body so I thought that using the first barth men's sonal could be helpful to provide an action to describe a decent as this eight peelers to Alzheimer's Prevention for women. Sure so M was for mental stimulation. E foot exercise and nutrition. Now we're talking about sleep and stress use and then we're going to move on with a avoided talk since avoiding toxin. Yes this is something. That is a scientist. I kind of underestimated little while when people would come into me or should I eat organic. I honestly saw. It is just marketing. It turns out. It's not so now. Actress solid evidence that there are endocrine disruptors Emmanuel Chemicals. This they're called Sinoe estrogens. And even the American Endocrine Society has put out a warning label for many of their sin of these compounds because they They mimic the action of estrogen started borders but they have a disrupting effect which is especially toxic for children on children and women especially pregnant women but also women across the board sure. And where? Where's that often found in so plastic would be the number one thing that we should stop using not just because of the environment but also being helped the problem is that most plastics contain composite beach a DVD leap into your foods or beverages? Or whether you drink especially when you heat up the plastic and we all know that people do it all the time. We have ready to serve foods to come in plastic containers than you put in the microwave. And you just keep them up. Plastic leaks insider foods rate or have plastic water bottles where you put one order. T. Rowe not seen ones by the actual bothers. The people use all the time at the gym or just do severely not much better to use a glass bottle sake. You can't you invest in a glass bottle and then use it for life and that is much safer. Sure Spirit for your food. The kinds of styrofoam great go or takeout comes in plastic containers. Misset a time in this hot Basically something really helpful district as Dick out of discontinues containers. Put them in a plate and then use the plate for eating to serving in reheating if needed and so avoiding avoiding. The plastic is not good for your the the environment but also your internal environmental so as well and your brain and your yes that is important and at the same time I think. Food is a major source of pollution than other county our sprayed with pesticides all the time and we know that pesticides Heaven effect on your body brain okay. So that's the FAA don't have an end use put networking that workers networking study importance. Important plant yes also for men. Manu women should all really benefit from this lifestyle practices avenue however the desert particularly potent Raymond's banks socialization socialization in really feeling supported. What the research has shown is just not. My research is more or less psychology but with with this field has shown his dad. Women tend to give a lot of provide a lot of support in day. Don't as much support back for example in transit caregiving right. So many women provide care for a family member affected with some disorders including dementia and they tend to become very isolated because just so overwhelming. You have young kids. Your parents are sick. You're working fulltime two times. You can't even hold onto your job. You may have to create it so you lose. Finish to -bility in quizzes trust enormously and then you end up being you taking care of other people so it's really important thing for women to a knowledge will not superhumans that we need have jobs and finally a is for assessments. You need to go to your doctor. There is many medical conditions that are known to affect the brain in a way that can be just accelerating brain aging called the way to actually increase in based dimension cocoa and what we usually talk about is heart disease really important to really prioritize. Has this well Diabetes is elite. Deal for men and women as busy of course for women. However depression tends to be a major medical factor they can increase to decline and dementia. They ended in life especially depression in metlife. Which is something I would like to talk about for just a second because we talk about depression as if you were just one thing however the root causes of Depressive Syndrome or symptoms can change it can vary for some people is genetic by some impart genetic unfairly but there is strong and component for some women or men situation on Santa happens in your life that makes you feel depressed for many women is Mon and would we would. We tend to do is to wait until women are menopause and say O K menopause. That's that's why you're depressed again. He is the antidepressant budding. Truce become a menopausal takes ears right. Could take between.

cortisol Alzheimer depression Dr Lisa Mosconi headaches Diabetes Ramona Migraines Atkins FAA American Endocrine Society Stanford anxiety Saana ackerman scientist engineer Manu Vinnie T. Rowe
"dr lisa" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

09:45 min | 11 months ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

"Sure now recently you and I were speaking at an event Women's move move for Mine and I believe Maria Shriver actually wrote the foreword of Your Book at Exciting. It's wonderful she's such an incredible wonderful Just honesty wonderful person inches. So invested in in women's health and women's brains and the signs prevention and there was such an honor for me to she. She agreed to to ride a forward and then she had a fly over to La Brain Health. And your wonderful magic techniques to yeah. I tried to actually have my parents go through the whole thing so as soon as I sat. Just give me the the elements from ready. It's amazing now. You're sharing some of the things that people Women could do to be able to protect their brains. You go into a lot of detail and again what I love about this book. It's it's science and evidence best yes. It's a conservative book. Because I am a scientist and accuracy is really important to me so much. Rather be more conservative and say these may work for you. But there isn't a lot of science to respect his own however there's a taunt science showing that doing this eight things which I call the eight peelers Alzheimer's Prevention Women actually work. So if your new today's and you're just starting stuck with something has been shown to prove would just really been shown to work in hundreds of thousands of women through because chances of getting a benefactor higher according to the thing that just came out in the news two months ago road so for me is all about we lean how strong the evidence is which doesn't mean that other things can work. It's more like let's start with him with a strong solid review of what's been proven work stuck from that and those selects Lucas Safety. Okay we'll hear times and not just short term but long term is important especially for signs of course of course so when we're thinking about those foundational pillars where do where do we start so as the scientists that have a tendency to get lost in detail as you know So I find the good way to summarize into eight an actionable items that any woman can just make parts of the lifestyle today routine and in order to remember them. Learn from your. This is wonderful strategies I found is Latin expression. Any time you make sense to me. Which is men's Saana in court? Quit Asano in English traveller. Manson line could for summers but the point is so you spell it. The first part Manzana means a healthy mind in court sun in a healthy body. The good thing is that you have eight things that you can. You can choose from sometimes to get overwhelmed because we're like. Oh I have to do all the different things but I think it's best to just choose one really. Make a solid dutiable. Changing ben addressed the other ones. Or if you're ready stage just three start with three good what does the NCAA for them in? Your honor is for mental stimulation. There's a ton of evidence in Notre Science that you really have to stimulate your brain and you have said something that really resonated with me. Which is that learning is for your brain but exercises for your muscles and that's such an arrogant and accurate way to put it so we know from Frisk Theatre in college than the more to noodles are active together and the stronger. The connection is bill to. That's the first principle notice signs principle of have which also means that you really have to stimulate your New Orleans in order for them to remain. Active in plastic. Bait IS A. How do you do that? The key is learning. You have to challenge your brain in other words. If you're fantastic playing chess playing more chess will not help you. Nearly as much as for example played bridge road so you have to learn something have to keep challenging your your skills and capacity number two would be eastwood exercise. It is really important is a study of hundreds of women followed older forty years which is incredible in. This study showed that women who lead a sedentary life thirty percents rate of declined to Alzheimer's disease which means that this third of all women who don't really move their bodies Mega Simon's at some point in their lives would as women who have heart higher level of cardiovascular fitness in need life have beautifully no rates of dementia the rate of dementia close to zero. That is astonishing. He'd think radicalized heading explained so is it is it because generally what's good for the heart like exercise is good for good for the. Yeah I think in flow blood flow is crucial road brain health. They must happens if you do not exercise heart that your circulation slows down which is normal with aging. But that's really when you should try maximize your aerobic performance. Which doesn't mean you have to do jumping jacks that. You just need to make sure that your heart that stimulate your heart muscle right. It's a kind of use it or lose it after that you have and it's been nutrition so Dietitian and I often recommend to start with that if you had to choose one of the eight letters nutrition is really important because most people eat three times a day so you had three chances doing something good for your body and your brain at day of your life. So that's a good start and there are many diets out there and they will not attend people walked they should do in their life and diets of Eddie Choice but from a clinical perspective. It is important to me that women no condo nutrients have been shown time and time again to really supportive of women's banks ready so you you just try to incorporate more this nutrients in your diet. Whatever your diet might be so fiber is a big one. Antioxidants are really important like to meet a C. N. e. been shown to really a boost brain energy in women and less when it's southern. Eddie acids like Omega three fatty acids from Solomon their vetting for the olive oil and flax seeds that are a lot of different sources and they. They've been associated with a much lower risk of dementia women as well as the base of depression infertility postpartum depression and lower levels of anxiety. And he's also really important to know what not to eat right if there's one thing if there's one changes easy to make sort of is to stay away from processed foods there's these people such a fast. Food is a major issue but packaged foods trip. Here foods. Sometimes takeout. Food is not that healthy so really being careful with wally of food and trying to eat fresh if possible homemade but as C. An absolute so tagger follow her tag myself. Jim Quick and and Sharrad when you share it you get to help other people. I believe that in everything we're here to do. In this hero's journey we learn so we can earn meaning we get benefit out of it and we return. We share that and And that's part of our way of doing that. And when you US Some favorites share your big. Aha description. What what's the one area that we've talked about so far? That was kind of kind of lit up your your brain and that you're gonNA make one little decision on moving forward because little by little little becomes a whole lot and I'll re post some of our favorites. I know you post them also. Well you are sat. I've had in that and yes and we'll see you. We'll see our next episode. Want to double your brain speed and memory power. If you'd like to learn rapidly and get ahead faster I'd like to give you my brand new quick brain accelerated program. You will discover exactly what I teach my clients to learn. Read and remember anything in half the time. There is no charge. Is My gift to you for being one of our subscribers that's K. W. Hi Kay brain dot com or simply text. The word podcast two nine one six eight to seventy two forty six and we'll send you a directly that's nine one six eighty to bring growing up struggling with learning challenges from childhood brain injury. It's been my life's mission to help you have your very best brain so you could win more every single day. Now One workweek rain here are four ways to fast track to result in lock in which you just learned into your long term memory. Remember Fast F. A. S. T. ESPN's for facebook. You're not alone on this journey. I invite you to join our free private online groups. Dairy connect with me your fellow brain lovers links to resources and even submit your questions for me to answer in future episodes go to quick brain dot com. That's K..

La Brain Health Maria Shriver NCAA Alzheimer scientist Jim Quick Lucas Safety Frisk Theatre facebook Eddie Choice Alzheimer's disease ben New Orleans T. ESPN Manson K. W. wally Mega Simon Prevention
"dr lisa" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

08:19 min | 11 months ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

"Hi this is Jim. Quick and I have a quick update for you on proud to announce my very first book limitless upgrade your brain. Learn anything faster in unlock your exceptional life. Miss Book is not only based on the latest neuroscience in his field tested for over twenty ears of working with some of the most amazing minds on our planet. Just go to limitless book Dot Com and enjoy. This book welcomed the Quick Brain bite-size brain hacks for busy people who wanNA learn faster and achieve more. I'm your coach Jim. Quick three you could access one hundred percent about brains capacity and I wasn't high wasn't wired. Just clear I knew what I needed to do. And how to deal with food show..

"dr lisa" Discussed on The Model Health Show

The Model Health Show

15:32 min | 11 months ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on The Model Health Show

"I learn a lot and I'm truly inspired. Keep it going. I love it. That is so awesome. That's exactly how I want you to feel is like you're going on an adventure of discovery of learning of fun and thank you so much for sharing that review over on apple podcasts. I appreciate it so very much and listen. If you've yet to do so pop over Apple. Podcasts leave review for the show. Let everybody not think about the show. And no matter what platform you're listening on or if you're watching on youtube make sure to engage. Leave a comment. Ask a question maybe get the guest pop in and answer some questions for you but please make sure to let me know. You thought about the episode. Appreciate it so much and on that note. Let's get to our special guests topic of the day. Our guest today is returning for a second time on the model host show and her first appears to one of my all time favorites and today's guest is Dr Lisa Mosconi. She's the Director of Women's brain initiative and associate director of the Alzheimer's Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medical College where she serves as an associate professor of neuroscience in Neurology and radiology addition. She is an Adjunct Faculty member at the Nyu Department of Psychiatry and the author of Brain Food and her new book which is now available. The ex- ex- brain the female brain and in this episode. We're covering some important and powerful insights about the inner workings of the female brain. I think you're really gonNA love this so jump into this conversation with the amazing Dr Lisa. Mosconi we recharged by ourselves whiter. Definitely thing I'm situational extrovert like if I need to you know but I would much rather be myself and my wife is the opposite. She likes like she'll charge being around people but we've rubbed off on each other to. He's a social butterfly and one hundred percent extrovert in. That's interesting. It is so funny. Is that people. They see people in in these types of lines of work where you're in the public eye doing in there just assuming like you must be very outgoing not really. I'm going a little bit but I mean I definitely I have my time but I just like if I'm by myself with a good book or you know even if I'm just by myself meditating or whatever it is I really like it gives me the fills up my tank. Yes you same I. Now we got to a point where I tell my husband to. Just take my daughter to karate Four and she goes to karate is the funniest thing she broke the tablet. You know how to have the tablet and she has to punch it in break at sheet in homework. Surcharges the yellow belt which is defined as they should a teddy bear. And you should just say you take her so I can get two hours thing you know they need from me. Yes that teamwork is super important. You know and I love that. You said tablet break attack aboard but this is cuter. How you you know. House pitcher like Moses with a tablet and good good so again I would four years old little teddy bear. Break Your pinks. If she likes guys I love I love you so your book is just amazing. As I mentioned I didn't know I'd tear through it so quickly. But information is so important and so poignant and so. Did you know about how women have been excluded from reasons? Some people don't say most people don't know that so many scientists are not either. I never thought of all the thousands of studies. I've read. I never thought about that distinction and you mentioned it very clearly that the medical system is kind of uniformly excluded women and basically treating women as just smaller men. We're talking about the medical data can talk about that a little bit. Yes Oh the first part of the book is really a description of how women have been systematically excluded from medical which is not to say is a conspiracy against women with is just something that happened as a result of a number of biases if you will and so I use this term medicine which is an unfortunate theorem if you will but is quite to the point Describing how historically most medical professionals really actually believed that men and women would essentially the same person just with different reproductive organs setting those parts of the body assigned exit. One could meant that most professionals most doctors with diagnose and treat both sexes the same exact way and basically there's a whole world view that got derived from that model which makes women's health the field bias to start with. Because if you go to a doctor and say can you look this female patient? Through the lenses of women's health they're going to pop test to check your cervix for cancer. Going to Mama Graham. If you're over. Forty to forty depending on the doctor. They might do a blood test to check your sex hormones for fertility or menopause and whatnot but again. Women's health is confined to the health of reproductive organs. And that's really a direct consequence of very reductive understanding. The woman is to start with because clearly women are not the same as muller men with different reproductive organs were somewhat different systems and is not in any way to exaggerate deficiencies. Suze is not like women has some parts that Mendel. Well except for Oregon's rebbe when we're thinking about for example women's brains which is really the focus of my research on atomic. Were basically the same but the functionality of the brain is different and there are so many things that can happen in the brain happen more to women than to men only two women not to men and all new to man and not to women right but we understand. Man's risk factors a lot better than we understand what can happen to women. So that's really why I'm doing this in so important because as you outlined The first thing I want to make clear which you alluded to already is that. It's not like some spiracy but there was some early reasons. Why this kind of evolved into this? Which is women's bodies? Tend to create some curveballs win. Doing clinical trials like fame. Pregnancy was a big one. So what's happened was Dan. There was a drunk slider might it was given to women including pregnant women to deal with symptoms like nausea and then it turned out that the drunk actually had a terrible impact on the baby and many babies were born with the former days with severe medical issues and so the drug was re evaluated and was banned in the United States but at the same time the FDA really took a cautious stance and decided to exclude women of childbearing age from experimental clinical trials. Where you're still don't quite know side effects as well as you should right. But then the women law but that's excluding allow the women because it's any woman from puberty through menopause right so with happened. Dan Is Dan just. I think it was really out of concerns for the babies and the women to some extent the new mothers that women were just excluded from all clinical trials. Non-defense one clinical trials for just all medical research in by doing that. Women were no longer participating in research but they will also no longer informing research and it is true than our bodies are more psychological in nature. That A man's body and if you're a scientist you have to deal with that. But that's not that hard to do right to be honest and instead decision was made to just focus motormen assuming that especially when he came to heart lungs and brain that would also whatever results investigators found would also apply to women and that turned out to be not the case even when women are included in again. Just thanks to your data and we learning this F. It tends to be everybody's lumped together. All data's on together is not giving a distinction between this is something for women's health specifically. This is something for men's health. And with that said we parlay into this discussion of the female brain right and how different it is under these different measures whether it's like some kind of a nutritive intervention or medical intervention. It's going to impact women's brains differently so I wanNA talk about the difference with the female brain because is fascinating so first of all this talk about number one. Physical brain itself is different in the bed too. So I've D- Anatomy is not quite different like if you look at brain scans and you don't know the gender of the person that you're taking a picture of e there's no way of telling this brain belongs to a woman. This other brain belongs to and then either that on average women's brains a slightly smaller because we are just smaller That man but once you adjust foot head size pretty much value metrically. Speaking there are no strong gender differences. The difference as commander most are in the functionality of the brain in the biochemistry of the brain in been looking into that for a really long time because of personal reasons. I have a family history of Alzheimer's disease that affects the women in my family. Quite a lot so my grandmom grandmother it was one of four siblings and there were three sisters and one brother in all three sisters got dementia died of dementia whereas the brother spared and that was quite shocking also because from Italy is from Florence Italy and especially back then. There was no assisted living. So your grandparents live with you and then the family especially. My mom became the primary caregiver for my grandmother and then my aunt started taking care of the other. Sisters Got Dimension of revenue was like ten years process and it was very painful as anyone can imagine and that really let me to think about Alzheimer's disease as a connection with sex and gender which was really not a topic of conversation back down. I've been doing this for almost twenty years really in there. I've seen the field just changed so much in something that many people are not aware of is than women's brains have very specific risks. That we usually underestimate and Kinda put down to perhaps to having a bad day or maybe your pms but in reality. Women are twice as likely as men to have. Anxiety and depression were three times more likely to have an autoimmune disorder including those that attack the brain like multiple sclerosis were four times likely to have headaches and Migraines as any men were more likely so even get meningioma which is the most common form of brain tumors especially injury menopause. And we're far more likely to die of a stroke and on top of all Dan. Siamese which is the most common form of dementia on the planet affects more women than men so every three Alzheimer's patients to women Which means that for every man suffering from Alzheimer's disease that are two women and that's an enormous amount of women in the United States alone at Siamese disease affects almost six million people. And if we don't find solutions by twenty fifty is going to grow to fifteen million which is like for context as the population of New York Chicago and Los Angeles put together. It's a huge amount of people. In two-thirds of on this people might be women so we had some province here and it's important to find solutions. So this is really what I was trying to do with the book. Not just the super depressing data from its empower their knowledge in the problem explaining how we got ourselves in this situation in what we can do to relieve verse this problem and and optimize cognitive health and brain health in women desert discounts There are some wonderful brain imaging. Scans in the book as well just to kind of highlight some of these things. We LOOK AT PRE. Menopause postmenopausal the brain really does change but one of those physical aspects of Pivot. Back a little bit and it just of course makes much sense when you talked about it. Dad. The one of the physical is still be difficult to see. If you don't have the train. I looking forward but the I guess the hemispheres of the brain for women. It's more What's the what's the right word for it in to connect to interconnect? Well I think. The technical word the structural connectivity. Yes inserted with happens just taking a step back. Just a quick is that women are born. Two X chromosomes and men are born with an ax in the UAE indoors. Genetic differences do matter also in terms of brain development in. I think it's important to clarify that. Because most people think of this execs X. Y. Is on the involved in reproduction. But in reality there are many genes and chromosomes that are directly involved in brain function and sending his acutest factors that the x chromosome which women have to of much bigger than the Y chromosome. Each one has a thousand in ninety eight genes as the Y chromosome has only seventy eight. Yes Emmanuel this. Extra one thousand chromosomes women. Carry a veal involved in brain function. So there's something there the starts immediately at the time of conception because the fell that is born with the sex is going to develop immature migrate differently than the other sounded is with an X. Y. And one on the big differences as the tie in quality of the hormones that are going to be produced in those brains. The X Y chromosome dictates that that baby is going to start making on regions like Which are male hormones?.

Dan Alzheimer's disease Director of Women menopause Alzheimer Brain Food Apple United States youtube Dr Lisa Dr Lisa Mosconi Oregon Moses UAE Adjunct Faculty member Mama Graham FDA muller Suze
"dr lisa" Discussed on With Whit

With Whit

09:33 min | 11 months ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on With Whit

"And we've talked about so many ways especially on this podcast how to alleviate stress. I mean. That's something that we talk about all the time whether that's through physical activity. Communication meditating getting outside eating appropriately. I mean they're all part of the same equation. Yes absolutely I think it will really need to have a holistic approach to lifestyle and it's it's important to think about your own self care and and wellbeing stresses such a big problem for everybody. There's actual evidence from the from the center of Disease Control and Prevention women suffered the most stress between the ages of twenty five and forty four interesting as a peeks around three or four. Well that's a Ron made. Oh my gosh. I'm going to tell my husband that explained to him. Why Benedetta Monster Lately? I mean I can understand. It's a time in our lives. When so much is expected from us were expected to start to be mothers to be married to. Have you know successful careers to have beautiful homes to look a certain way even though we're starting to look old you know? There's all these things happening at once. That totally makes sense to me. Medication is really proven to be important for Brain Hill Gazelle raise the people who feel like they have a good strong support system have the lowest rates of dementia relative to people who do not feel their support in their society interesting death and is not about the quantity of supporters right. About how solid your your. Yeah I get that okay. So did we go through all eight of them. That was physical tight. Booed were missing. Learn more address slower just mention networks which is another one of your your support system and just feeling part of society over the society and enhance humour. Okay one is just regular medical assessments. Okay especially for those who either have a medical condition could potentially affect brain health like Marta. Z's diabetes obesity entire disease for women and oppression as well especially for women in those might be risk and then the last point would be of winning toxins. Okay that's what I was going to ask next was. What can we take out of our? Yes he lives in my books. Processed food is considered a potential toxin. Okay 'cause all these chemicals that we know have a negative effect on health adjust bodies but also for their brains and those Ashley for Women Tone Studies showing how our consumption of processed food really correlates with a much higher risk of cancer example breast cancer higher risk of dementia disease stroke depression infertility. So that's GONNA go. I would say right. So what specifically in processed foods should we not be looking? You know she'd be looking for like when we're looking at the back of a package of something Should we not even be looking for anything packages? I know do processed food as much as possible. However there are different degrees of processing right. Even just dried. Apples are processed in a way because the apple. That's been changed however that's minimal Read the problems fathom added. Murphy Rain when you get a box of something. The expiration date is thirty years from now right canned soups pasta. You're supposed to be cooking in this little plastic containers and then the chemicals in the plastic are going to be leaked during a leak inside. Your food is microwave. The plastic which is the worst thing you can do Rossellini Service say. Try to avoid processed foods and fast foods as much as possible Those so stay away from plastic okay. You're finding that the earlier that people can lead these kinds of healthy lives that the less chances that they have for dementia are absent. Actually less I mean. It seems to really seems to help with just published a clinical trial from our cleaning the Alzheimer's Prevention Clinic. Welker now showing how. This risk reduction techniques really helped avert at least maintain cognitive health over time And they're also really reduce biomarkers of future Alzheimer's risk. Like all the things that we can measure in your blind cognitively through cognitive testing really improved in the patients really follow did action. Yes and not improve nearly as much richly cut. Worst in those two pretty much didn't do. We were suggested to do right right so I I see happen. I mean we have patients who come to us the first time you can tell. They're not healthy. They can't think straight and in reform terribly on college testing and then our doctors will come in and do all the suspects perhaps do grant scancen me. They want to reach. Its recommended they will do. Brands can win with us. And then they they get put on the treatment plan which is individualized we use precision medicine approach. Which is very fancy. But it's really nice ending. It makes a lot of sense. We try to make as possible for heavily one and then we see the patients every six months for clinical followup slogans every once in a while and over time fairly often they walk in the door. You're like WHOA LOOK. They have transformed. Wow not all of them Before those where you can actually see transformation and they talk to you and you're just sharper You know that something is really really working. The more women demand information about their brains. The sooner would be able to really come up with a solution. Not just as well. Alzheimer's disease but for just women's brain health Is a hold. And they do strongly believed in brain. Health is women's health So where can we find more resources on brain health and learn more to know what we actually should doing empower ourselves with this information did are quite a few resources? Thank the my new book. The accents brain in my opinion is a very comprehensive resource because was really really a summary of all the knowledge that we have in the field in Israeli based on my own experience as a scientist neuroscientists devoted to timers and women's brain end of the woman in a really wanted to to have the right information for myself and write a share with others and then I really took the research out of the lab. Immediate actionable inaccessible to everyone. So that it isn't so scary and his Naral accessible and it empowers people to actually make changes so that they don't have to one day work backwards right anything. Their National Institute of Health a lot of good resources of the women in the American Society of the North American society menopause. Okay and my disinterested in menopause. They have fantastic resources. Biggest Star. Yeah we'll put links for all of this in the bio of this podcast episode. But I guess I would just leave off on. What are you know some of the symptoms that we can look out for you? Know what if it does run in our family if we know our our mothers are possibly prone to this or have the mutation or even if not what are some things that are symptoms or signs that you know as their children we can be looking out for to take in order to Are Yeah absolutely so for the parents. I would say Memory lapses in that many people are scared. All been very often. It's just a sign of aging ray. So the real problem since to a when you're forgetting with thing for that the problem is not as much if you lose your keys or misplace. Your keys problem is really when you forget what you're supposed to be doing right. He's Kinda lose the connection with the reality of your surroundings. You mean that the keys are meant to be to convert driving right. Not that you've misplaced them. Alright okay there seems to be the turning point. That's a little late Honestly so would I was suggest if any parents are open to these. If there's any concern because of family history was leg tested right okay. There are many research centres to do comedy testing in people without any symptoms of Alzheimer's. And the thing. That's a really good way to start. Yeah I mean I think that's important no matter what. Is that any time that you find anything missing whether it's in yourself or not even missing but something different whether it's in yourself or in a parent or a loved one that there's no harm in just going to get it checked. Thank you so much for coming in. Who Leaves Much Work Important? So we've in Beijing. Where can we find your book and more about you? My book comes out March ten and can be found in. Amman and whatever books are sold okay must bookstores and about me Anybody will to connect them on instagram. I always say I'm too sensitive for twitter really other. But what's your instagram account It's Dr D. R. Underscore Mosconi M.

Alzheimer center of Disease Control and Brain Hill Gazelle apple Ron Alzheimer's disease instagram Amman twitter Beijing menopause Murphy Rain Ashley Rossellini Service Welker scientist Prevention Clinic National Institute of Health Biggest Star Dr D.
"dr lisa" Discussed on With Whit

With Whit

15:31 min | 11 months ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on With Whit

"So before we really get into it. Can you explain to us? A difference between Alzheimer's and Dementia Dimension is an umbrella term includes different forms of diseases and Alzheimer's disease the most common form of dementia But then we have other forms as well like Lewy body dementia warm frontal temporal dementia is a big one last killer. Dementieva's one and sometimes they overlap so dementia is more likely general term to define a decline in mental capacities. But then once you specify the actual pathology you're more specific Louisiana's a very kind of very specific form one dimension and it is a very genetic disease correct like if our that so. I thought that's what I thought when I started looking into that. I really started looking at biology and genetics. Lean what in your DNA could potentially explain family. History of Riley's for thirty turns out Ben. Less than two percent of all Alzheimer's patients are genetically determined. Only two percent or less so there are genetic mutations that cause signers okay. Those are very rare refund on one of three genes. And if you do. Have the mutation with happens is you. Tend to develop Alzheimer's at a very young age. Like in your thirties and forties. But that's really only found in less than two percent of all of his patients. Okay for the other ninety percent. There is no specific mutation. That is causative of Alzheimer's. We have risk factors without genetic risk factor. Right and then there's a whole invite them into life style component which is good news right because we have control the things. I can do to stop it from happening. Are there tests that we can do early on to show? If we have those mutations or not yes if one If family member has the mutation yes. The tests are available. Okay for a number of reasons. The range from ethical to practical to a medical insurance coverage. And put it you as in known symptomatic person if you don't have Alzheimer's but family member has an early onset form of Alzheimer's Dan. The family member with Alzheimer's disease needs to be tested first. Okay Day show that it turns out the day heavy genetic mutation then you can also request to get tested okay. If the information is not available in your family you are not really in a position to take detest unless you have the sentence so I find bizarre right so if my grandmother had it then my mom take test to see if she had tender new curtail right. You know it seems like there's so little research in this and that you started getting into this and you were really overwhelmed by how very little research there was and why this wasn't something that was being studied and explored so much further. So why do you think that is I mean especially when it affects so many women you know? Jeff tell you what? I've spent my lifetime out and it is really bizarre. I think it's in part. Because people really believed the higher prevalence in women was just a result of longevity And now it turns out is not in that we need to really look at specific risk. Factors that set off Alzheimer's in women in their most slightly different from those relitigate Alzheimer's man. Okay how do you feel you are catalyzing a change in women's research? How how are you making a difference here you know? What is the mark that you're trying to leave? Especially in in terms of dementia and Alzheimer's. I'm really focused on women's brains. We should think is quite unique in just a couple of years ago. I launched the women's brain initiative it while coconut medicine which is a research program entirely dedicated to really understanding. Her brain held. Plays out differently in women. An-and we work with women. We we work with men and I think it's really novel about art approach. They would return a brain. Scans embrace cancer really so important. I believe for prevention and starting at what age she recommend getting Brain Scans. We are just now starting thirty five. No Way Get for this year counting the clinic. Fan Wow okay used to be forty okay and now you finally decided what you're GonNa go younger because it's just so important it's really important. And what can brain scan tell you? Besides either having the mutation or showing certain signs of of what will soon to be dementia Alzheimer's. Like how does our this medical report card then affect our chances of getting dementia? You know like what would you tell me on my not that you've seen obviously my scan right now but what are you looking for and then after that water some things that we should be doing in order to prevent these things from happening I had to. I love the brains during for literally twenty years. I was eighteen when I started. Wow was fortunate my my mom is a nuclear physicist and so she put me in touch with a nuclear medicine department in started looking at brains and would I think the best thing to do. And that's actually what we do with all their patients and discipline. The move is that we're looking at a number of things. We want to get a really strong baseline especially for the younger participants. Just this is your brain at your best year to make that it stays like that or the the changes are minimal and we look at the torn things very quickly which I love were now able to condense the seven different. Scans in almost one. Hour is very quick We look at things like well. Brain shrinkage Is a big thing. There is a risk factor for time is a red flag. Okay looks like you. Neutrons are not there anymore. And that's quite important. Okay we cut and then when you're comparing the real quick. How often are we now supposed to be getting these scans every year every five years in order to or maybe it's dependent on what the first brain skin shows point I would say your age every three years. Okay is plenty of time because the changes are going to be very very slow. Evoke any Perhaps they're in. Yeah exactly but in order to catch a change it takes leave the white so a Saint. Three years is the amount of time okay for older patients. Sometimes it's two years depending under baseline right. Sometimes they're going to try to do one year. Okay yes. It's really really try to personalize where we're doing all the assessments and really also make them sustainable mega. I can't ask people to come to us. Every six months right there needs to make sense right to be right so we look at that. We're looking inflammation in the brain. Look they don't either. Thanks that can happen to brains. The nobody usually talks about and there are quite coin. I can't I can't even begin to tell me how often people have brain tumors. And they don't know older people right right right. Yes h fifteen with menopause. The chance of a woman getting a brain tumour popping in the brain is much higher than prior to menopause and is higher than in. The House is something that we always cream for because depending on the location or does meningioma. They're calm it can really impact your cognitive performance. And then maybe a woman is terrified. Timers and stand is something pushing on your brain that we can just remove or treat So that's a good thing to screen for okay. Vascular damage is a huge one. Stroke Microbe leads white matter lesions. There's so many things that we look for in they. We can treat immediately right. So that's a great thing and then we'll do more research. Scans say we went to look at brain energy levels of sending a find fascinating blood flow to the brain which is really important for completion. A memory performance. We look at connectivity in the brain. So how well your brain regions are talking to each other and then we do. Pet Scans positron emission tomography. Scans to look at how fast. The Brain is burning glucose to make energy might Kanji activity. Okay and then we look at whether or not the person held Siamese plaques okay so we do a tornado skins what are some of the lifestyle habits that you feel. Women should really incorporate in order to maintain healthy brains. Assuming I get the scan this year and everything looks okay. What are most important things that we really should be doing? I think there are eight main feints then. Everyone can do okay in choosing which one to start from his very personal. Okay based on the type in the MON to physical activity the really benefits the brain virus age especially for women right and they gave. Menopause is a big thing because before menopause. We have a lot of estrogen and estrogen set. Activating energizing hormone. So you can go faster and longer after menopause which is again around age fifty. It is okay to slow down in the brain is the brain and those of the body are kind of asking some women all right. Just do perhaps Santamaria Gentlemen. If I'm of exercise is not really the intensity. The seems to matter is much as consistency. Okay immersed researchers point into three to five sessions a week of about three forty five minutes that make sense. Yes I think silly. Keep your body moving and it's not about necessarily going to the gym. She didn't like to many European countries. Nobody goes right and isn't about just keeping your body moving. They take the stairs instead of the elevator. Walk home instead of taking the car. Just run up to your kids or go for the walk in the park. Just keep your body going right so that seems to be a big vegan okay so vs physical activity and then Diet Dia so just baseline diet recommendation. Now there's a lot of research and a lot of information on diet and there are so many trends right. How many can get confusing people? And that's why I feel like it's so great to have experts like you can really simplify it with really important is understanding. What kind of nutrients Most supportive a women's health overall and I think the research has pointed to three million nutrients that I don't care what kind of Diet anybody's on. It is really important to have these nutrients in the Diet and believe it or not. Number one is fiber interesting. Yes five super important for hormone health across five regulates a molecule this call the sex hormone binding. Globally in this molecule is in charge of regulating or hormone levels in blood. Like estrogen says well so it really has a good stabilizing effect on the hormones. So it's something you want to have and is good for you. It comes mostly from fruits and veggies. And if you eat grains whole grains you don't need then try to go to sleep more `tatoes the fibrous something really important for for women. Okay number two is anti oxidant Blueberries blueberries chocolate. You know blackberries actually have more antioxidants than blueberries interesting. They don't get enough attention. John Kerry's take all the antioxidant spotlight is true. Good varies a really good. I was actually eating dark chocolate. Go Gee Berries for dessert last night? Yes and they say on the package. It's a superfood snack so I said okay. I don't feel so guilty about desert go. She is incredibly concentrated source of Vitamin C. O Okay Great. They get the antioxidants to unwind and vitamin E. is really really important for any woman. Who's over forty? It's going to start thinking about well. At some point go through menopause. Vitamin E. IS actually scientifically proven to really help with hot flashes. Rule is the only vitamin that was shown in clinical trials to really to benefit surgery for other kiss. Somebody still maybe your mom. You know right through that right now. So what? Kind of foods would vitamin E. B. N. Or is it something that we should be taking a supplement for I think foods at all with better than supplemented almonds had it gets okay? Flex it said an excellent source extra-virgin olive oil. I guess now for Yes. Those are good easy things that we can definitely put into our diet on a regular basis for sure. I mean the is long as we just cook with olive oil. We're still getting. Yes oops knows absolutely okay. So physical activity diet mental stimulation. One say there's just a saying they really like that. Learning is to your brain would exercise to your body So the brain does act like muscle and you really need to stimulate neurons and made them fire for them to remain strong and resilient in the best way to have your Newton's fire to learn something new so for example if you like to watch movies watch documentary or a tedtalk where you're learning something new or read a book Creator Book. If you're good at playing chess for example lay more. Chess will not help you nearly as much as learning another game. We'll right to just challenge your brain. Okay being mentally active. What about just conversation with other people. Yeah if you're learning something from their conversation I think that's good to qualify justly Cherry Aldo. Okay all right then sleep and stress. Okay really big ones and I would point out to. Stress is a problem for everybody. Of course that is perhaps even more of an issue for women that we just don't talk about because there is there a brain image Steiner's showing how if you have chronic stress in your life really starts taking a toll on your brain and memory performance as soon as you turn fifty however that's much more pronounced in women than men. Women were very very stressed either. Just have a lot of stress in their life. Their brains shrink much earlier on in life even if the men are experiencing the same amount of stress or more the stress actually affects women more. It looks like that. Yeah interest if you have very high cortisol levels in blind owes you can measure okay just to know. It's something we do. All the time Syria protein and cortisol levels because cortisol can literally steal your hormones because they're working balance so if your cortisol goes up your estrogens go down if court is goes down as your stress. Lease your body then your hormones go back up your restaurants backup so it's really important to reduce stress and doesn't just save your day. The right really helps your brain right..

Alzheimer menopause Alzheimer's disease cortisol Louisiana Dementieva Riley chess cancer physicist Newton Jeff John Kerry Cherry Aldo Steiner Santamaria
"dr lisa" Discussed on With Whit

With Whit

06:28 min | 11 months ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on With Whit

"With wet. Last year I attended the amazing event. Move reminds which is put on by the Amazing Maria Shriver and the women's Alzheimer's Movement. This event educates the public on the latest and Alzheimer's Research and provides information on lifestyle changes to optimize brain health. I unfortunately lost my grandmother to Alzheimer's disease and it was completely devastating to experience and to watch her decline. Once I learned there were preventative measures. That could be taken. I knew I had to educate myself further for me and for my family and for all of you guys my guest today. Dr Lisa Mosconi is another admirable woman working hard on Alzheimer's research. Dr Mosconi is a director of the women's brain initiative and associate director of the Alzheimer's Prevention Clinic at the Weill Cornell Medical College where she serves as an associate professor of neuroscience in Neurology Radiology. She is the author of the new book. The ex- ex- brain the groundbreaking science empowering women to maximize cognitive health prevent Alzheimer's disease. I know we are about to learn a lot so without further. Ado here is Dr Mosconi. Hi Welcome to Los Angeles. Thank you for having me. So I'm I'm really happy to be talking with you today. You know. This is something that actually runs in my family and something that I think runs in many people's families unfortunately and obviously affects women the most. I WANNA start off by talking about why it's happening in women the most. Why why are we prone to this more than men? So that's a really good question. And there is no universal consensus on the answer. However I've been looking into this for about twenty years because I have a family history Alzheimer's disease so my grandmother was one of four siblings. Three sisters and one brother and all three sisters develop dementia and died of it whereas limb rather the not so interesting third terrifying. And I'm I'm from Florence needling of and especially back then. We do not have anything like assisted living right or your grandparent sleep. We do you pretty much. That will come see your entire world than becomes really did the thing you have to address in. Of course my mom was the primary caregiver in though on her. But you also think is a granddaughter. You experience that you're trying to help your mom and you worry about your mom and you forget about your grandma and then you worry about yourself Right and thirty eight assigned to look into that and back then. No one was talking about Alzheimer's Disease in women He'll them though. We have known a long time. Doubt signs disease affects more women than men. Kartli on the two-thirds of all Siamese disease patients are women at least in the United States which means that for every men softening from Alzheimer's that are two women and obsessively off for a long time. People would just kind of explained it away by saying dent well leave. Women live longer than men and Alzheimer's Disease of all day certainly makes sense the more women than men have siren right. That's just not a question worth studying right but do women leave that much longer than I don't know right if you think about it. Not really they. In the United States women tend to live four and a half years longer than men. Not Twenty Years. I A half right. Any gleaned dejeuner despite this just two year oh wow but dementia is the number one cause of death for women and not for men. Even though the difference is about two years in the under things that outside is not a disease of all day we tend to associate it with the elderly because of symptoms. Develop as people get older but in truth. Alzheimer's starts to negative changes in the brain ears not decades prior to clinical symptoms. And will we have done using brain scans was really to show? How if you look at the crucial Peter the midlife which is forty to sixty women with an Alzheimer's predisposition. Start TO SHOW THE CLINIC. Medically but the the brain symptoms. The brain changes are Alzheimer's earlier than men and specifically during menopause interesting. So it's more of a hormonal thing that is causing this that so kind of our theory of something they were trying to really explore more It looks like the changes that take place in the brain during. Menopause may kind of set off the Alzheimer's processing in women. Okay so it gives a bit of a timeline to really start looking for signs of higher risk in women to which really shifts nay the age bar from famine t all the way back to fifty right average age of menopause fifty however almost ten percent of all menopausal women go through menopause in the forties before age forty five. Wow Sir there's a big range of when the symptoms can occur and now word from our sponsor you guys. I'm obsessed with socks. I don't know if you can tell that from my instagram. But I wear socks with everything. I have this weird thing where I don't really like my ankle showing even if I'm wearing pants like I just always wanna be covered in a recently discovered campus and I'm obsessed with them. They are so cute they come in like really cute colors really cute patterns there super comfortable. They had this special cushioning. That really just feels good on my feet. They are real real real good quality like you can just feel it in the stretch and they also have a philanthropic mission. So they're basically the best they're made from super soft natural Katainen. Every pair comes with arch. Support a seamless toe and a cushion foot bed. That's comfy but not too thick. It's really really amazing on the field. I know I sound like overly excited about socks but I just love them. I can't I can't explain it for every Bomba's purchase you make Bomba's.

Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer Dr Lisa Mosconi Menopause Maria Shriver United States Los Angeles Bomba associate director associate professor Florence Neurology Radiology director Prevention Clinic Peter Weill Cornell Medical College
How Do We Fall Asleep?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

08:20 min | 1 year ago

How Do We Fall Asleep?

"On this podcast. You take questions from kids just like you all over the world and we find answers. We've heard from a lot of you who listen to podcast when you're winding down and getting ready for bed so it makes sense that a lot of you are inspired to send. Us questions about sleep. Flooded people toss and turn on the Risley when new getting into the deep sleep. You'll Buri somehow wakes you up but kicking and it feels like you're really hot. Why's that I don't want to get out of bed in the morning? And when it is nighttime I don't want to go. She read in this episode. We are answering your questions about sleep. Did you know there are doctors who focus specifically on helping kids sleep better? We found one of them at national Jewish health. That's a hospital in Colorado. My Name is Dr Lisa. Meltzer and I am a pediatric sleep psychologist. Which means I work with kids to help them sleep better. Do you feel like you sleep. Pretty well do you think. Oh Yea when the adults in your life tell you it's bedtime or do you struggle to get ready for bed and maybe even struggled to go to sleep or to stay asleep. Dr Meltzer says there are a few things that all of us can do to help us on the path to good sleep. Kids have a very consistent bedtime. Wake time so that means you go to bed about the same time every night. Wake up about the same time every morning. We recommend things like not having any screens in your bedroom. Having a bedroom. That's nice and cool and dark and a place that you like to sleep things like that that are very consistent. What we call sleep health. Let's jump right into some of our questions because we have a lot of kids who have sent us questions about sleep or we're going to start with the basics. Hi My name is and I live in South Orange New Jersey. I'm Steffan and my question is why do people need to sleep? Thank you I love your show similarly from Jordan in Vermont. Why do we really need to go to? Here's one from Maria and five years old and I come from Ottawa Ontario. And my question is why people need to sleep and we also got this from five year old aiden in McKinley Bill California. Why do have to sweep? 'cause I don't will you get and by the White Cornyn Swe We book. That sounds like a lovely way to fall asleep. Aiden so Dr Meltzer. Why do we need to sleep? These are great questions that scientists are spending a lot of time trying to better understand and we don't have one particular answer but we have a lot of different reasons that people think are important for why we sleep. The first one goes back to how humans have developed so there was a time when humans didn't live in houses but lived out in caves. Lived out in the wild and at night when they sleep they were inactive and that made them vulnerable so that predators. The big animals might come and attack them during the night. So you sleep to stay away from those animals that might come and harm in the middle of the night. In other words people were possibly safer tucked up in a cave or shelter sleeping through the night instead of being out and about in the dark when there were big animals with better eyesight also roaming around but being asleep doesn't mean your body shuts down completely. You can still be somewhat alert to danger when you're sleeping you do notice a little bit of the world around you. You can hear certain sounds and things like that and it same thing back in those times where you would want enough of a consciousness enough of awareness of what's going on around you to protect you from those Predator so we call that the evolution of why we sleep so another theory why we sleep is to conserve our energy. I mean we use a lot of energy during the day when you're running and you're playing when you sleep. These things changed the number of calories that you need reduce your temperature drops down your body is basically given a time to rest and relax. So that conserves your energy while you're sleeping and along those lines that allows your body to restore itself so again you're working your muscles all these types of things when you're awake and when you rest it allows them to heal sort of like when you get a cold at night it allows your immune system to fight off those bad germs to help you get better again really interesting one of the first things that happens when you fall asleep is growth hormone is released in growth hormone helps you grow so you literally grow in. Your sleep. So that's another reason. Why Sleep is important. I knew it. I knew I felt taller when I wake up in the morning. Okay maybe it doesn't work that way for adults but that's pretty cool isn't it? You grow while you're sleeping kind of make sleeps on more appealing more like something you might. WanNa do doesn't it? But it's not just your body that gets to rest and recover and rebuild from a busy day of running around. Your brain also need sleep to stay at peak performance. We know that children's brains develop in different ways as they get older so in very young children. The areas around language envision are the parts that are the most active during sleep. Because that's the part of you that's developing during the day and when you're in school aged the parts of your brain that start learning all the different things like math and reading those parts of your brain start to develop when you become a teenager the front part of your brain that helps you with decision making and keeping your mood. Nice calm. That's the part of your brain. That's most active during sleep. So your brain is also developing during sleep. Here's something else you might like to know. Sleep helps you remember what you've learned you take in information while you're awake but it sets in your brain while you're sleeping so if you're studying for say vocabulary test you. WanNa go to sleep after you've because it will help your brain remember. Those words in the morning same goes for all kinds of memories and other things. You might want to be able to repeat like that joke. Your friend told you that you can't wait to tell someone else. Hello My name is Shaun. I live in San Diego. My question is what is sleeping. Get rid of toxins in your brain. Why does sleeping get rid of toxins in the brain? It's a great question so again during the day. Our brain is really busy with everything that we have to do to help us get through the day but when we're sleeping our brain is less busy with all those activities so it has time basically to clean itself out and the toxins build up as we're active and doing all the things that we're doing so sleep gives a time for the brain to relax and sort of take care of itself. I like picturing little cleaners with brooms and stuff inside my brain going in and sweeping and scraping things off. That don't need to be there. That's perfect I mean. It really is a time. It's kind of like when you leave school overnight. They come in and they clean all the rooms and they get ready for the next day. It's the same kind of thing going on in your brain. We have some questions for you. Dr Meltzer about movement and Hello. My name is emily now from Brisbane Australia. Seven and my question is when you sleep. He'll but we're new getting into the deepest sleep your body somehow wakes you up but kicking in feels like you jump really hot what I want to know. So this is something called a hip nick jerk or asleep twitch hip nick jerk sleep twitch. I love that name. Do you ever have a hip. Nick Jerk happen to you. You're just falling asleep and then you feel like you're falling and your body twitches and it wakes you up if you watch babies. They do this all the time when they're falling asleep as you get older you tend to do it a little bit less and there's again multiple reasons why people think this happens. One of the reasons is that as you're falling asleep all of your muscles start to relax and your brain may think oh those muscles relaxing. They must be falling. And it kicks you awake and that causes you to jerk or jump high into the air. It could make maybe even scare you that feeling of

Dr Meltzer Risley Nick Jerk Aiden Dr Lisa Growth Hormone White Cornyn Steffan Colorado Mckinley Bill California South Orange New Jersey San Diego Jordan Maria Vermont Ottawa Ontario Emily Brisbane Australia
Vaping-related lung transplant performed at Detroit hospital

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Vaping-related lung transplant performed at Detroit hospital

"On October fifteenth a team at the Henry Ford hospital in Detroit perform what they believe is the first double lung transplant for vaping injury victim Dr Lisa Alice park is a pulmonary specialist they described a sixteen year old with vaping induced lung injury there was no longer able to access any doctor who Sunday may a cardio thoracic surgeon said the patient's lungs were like nothing he'd seen in twenty years of performing long transplants inflammation and scarring in addition to multiple spots of dead tissue the sixteen year old patient is off the ventilator but weak after being integrated for almost a month doctors say they're bringing this case to public attention because they and the patient's family are worried about the preventable epidemic of it being long injury I'm Jennifer king

Henry Ford Hospital Detroit Jennifer King Dr Lisa Alice Sixteen Year Twenty Years
"dr lisa" Discussed on A Doctor's Perspective Podcast

A Doctor's Perspective Podcast

13:51 min | 1 year ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on A Doctor's Perspective Podcast

"I'm not that person can. Can we get a clean sleater right right. Sometimes you're bullied by that older sibling. Labeling or by that you know hateful person in your family just like they are doing everybody else. Let let's bridge into a said we mentioned before the chicks with. MD's give us a little a little taste of what's that all about. What's the mission and in the beginning of the show and introduction? You have lots of different topics topics that you can talk about like contract negotiators to me is really that's important and If you don't know about that stuff man the hospital will take advantage absolutely so Just give you a brief background for me of how it chicks with these came to be I was was in private practice in central Illinois for about four and a half years and my husband and I had a young baby and we were living apart so so I moved to Chicago so that we could live as a unit and when I got here like literally within a month of me getting here and starting you know contract. Negotiations Asians were hospitals and getting a private practice loan. And all this stuff I was diagnosed with ms and that kind of everything came to a crashing halt. I had to figure out how to evolve as a physician and a healthcare provider and a parent and a spouse and a community member with this new diagnosis. Because I couldn't work the way I was previously. I was working myself to literally to death and I created chicks with MD's because still wanted to serve the medical community as still wanted to get out and work in whatever capacity. I couldn't and most most importantly because going through this process of becoming a patient I started identifying things that were detrimental to patients. It's that were detrimental to physicians and other oxen administrators and people who were trying to engage the healthcare community and most importantly I realized that there was a significant divide between what physicians were trying to get across to patients and what patients were were interpreting or receiving so I wanted to try and bridge that divide and I thought that I was in a very unique position because I had been a physician in for so long and now I was a patient and I wanted to relate things to people that I found were absent in my experience as a patient and the frustrations that I had dealing with my healthcare insurer and getting my my health insurance getting dropped by the Medical Center senator and then me getting a surprise bill for twenty six thousand dollars in the mail. And how do you deal with that. And who is your support. And so. That's where aware that all came from. And when I started thinking about wishing I called this entity that I have and I thought about like who I was and the fact that I didn't want to separate make this like some corporate entity but that I wanted to make it engaging I wanted people see it and and immediately be interested in what I might have say didn't like what I called it or because they did like what are called it or because the logo engaged aged him or whatever and so that's where chicks with MD's the title came from and then the logo kind of evolved from there. But it really is my personality. Like this is just to buckle I. I like to go out and ask people questions I get. People say things I may or may not like and answer questions and most most importantly inform and educate and empower folks. And I feel like I've been able to do that. And every year the platform evolves involves and. I do a little bit more do things differently. But I've found that people are utilizing the information that I have and I I feel like I need to do more and more and more because the you know you had a post one of your podcast was talking about Chiropractic hell and that when people have health insurance how their hospital stays go down and how they perform and how they recover is improved those things are essential and also you talked about that. We're like number one in healthcare cost. But We're like Fiftieth Concert concert performance. Yikes right so that's what we're trying to work on you know like how do we improve people's outcome. And how do we improve their quality of life which is so essential because we shouldn't just be treating disease. We should be focusing on how to make people's existence better on a day to day by treating their illnesses but not just focusing on something that is a pet peeve of mine is when like a students or residents or whoever presents on rounds and they. It's like this is a we have a pen decided. We don't have decided we last name. Bob Like before person would appendicitis came in. They were a nurse a doctor. A teacher an accountant of the maintenance guy here at the hospital. You know they have a major presentation traumatic. Come on Gimme a break you know because when you to when you don't When when when the when the patient loses their humanity sanity in your regard that changes how you treat that patient see have to focus on folks remember who they are and remember? Keep in mind who these people are before they come in the door and present with this acute illness and that will change how you treat patients and it should a change how you treat patients so that's kind of tricks within base that's wild because ms is not something that is easily taking care of these. There's there's lots of of visits that go along with that. In many doctors typically lots of different avenues of between diet and medicines and finding a balance. So what what an eye eye-opening experience to really haven't flipped on your head where you're the patient and it's not an easy diagnosis is not just cut out your appendix and you'll be better for us you know director market the waist right. Yeah No. That's a big hurdle to have to jump. You mentioned that the stat. I WANNA see America in developed countries. We're we're not so great at keeping mothers alive. Oh the maternal more a roof. Yeah Yeah you don't think about it but apparently it's a thing and it's the thing that we should not be boasting about American. I can't believe it that's actually the next campaign I'm working on is maternal mortality so stay too. Yep Yep okay. I wasn't sure what you know when you look at your social media and you're looking at things and I wasn't completely sure what chicks within these dead I wasn't more for it was like an advocacy group or it was more like a ladies. Let's get together. A lot of the food always bind together to become stronger and all of a sudden the guys like I wanna be a part of something that sounds like every other organisation. Okay right so yes so are you are. How are you getting your message? Are you having market two different major medical associations in different states or they people find. How does that work well? You know it's been a blessing because because people Because I do a variety of different articles and because of my post people find me like you found beyond like that and so I'm just on social media twitter instagram length in facebook Abba Apple website and one way or another people. Find me and I think it's because there is a critical need for for this type of information in there aren't enough platforms that are really addressing it and the platforms that are addressing it exceptionally a a lot of times. They're not on social media so a lot of times we as a cluster of women coming together a lot of times as we social media folks will come together and do things to just try and get the word out so like if you're okay with me doing it. After we get done with this I would like to share a link on my flat form. So that people know about you because I was going through your smell like how dockage all over the place I mean like you have all your. Would you Kolya your chiropractic moments. Would you come. It has a catchy term. Look it up. You're looking at my clinic site that I really don't play with the alight but I was playing with it for a long pause. He's very engaging and people love that type of information the other the thing I liked about it like your podcast is at their short. And so it's like a quick blip of information so because you know people's attention span is like not the life for me my attention spans not there so I've started to do very shoot video clips because I'm like I know I'm not the only one short attention span. Would I want to give people a lot of information in a short in a very short amount of time and I think that's critical to just know how people are communicating nowadays this and make sure that we get the information out in a format that is appealing to them where they get the most out of it is. I can appreciate that in the marketing of the PODCAST gas marketing of blog posts. Your liking this redbook over here. I turned into a book. So it's not like a brand new for this call repackaging but but that's smart but you know you listen to Gurus and they're like sometimes you need three to five minutes. If this post on this website you need like seven to nine minutes. It's and I'm thinking I'm like I don't have enough time in the day. We want seven minute videos of anybody. It better be a really good funny youtube clip or some I like sticking around and Internet's are so crazy wall. Sometimes you get good Internet and other times you like I can barely buffer through a minute and so to have that variety and I think we attract to we like a right quick videos we get quick radios right and then you have blockposts if you want to read you can read and just kind of go down that rabbit hole and you're trying to you want to attract so okay. I think this is a fun question are there any any misconceptions conceptions about what you're doing is there any kind of given couple takeaways whether it's the patient advocacy part or the doctor advocacy for the patient. Kind of keep in mind. He major takeaways that we should have a just from listening to this episode You know the misconceptions aren't associated with chicks with MD's I would say like at the beginning. I did a like a women's wellness some type of expo and a man like all take a. It was a women's expo and so like all of these women all day like sign for even all at the end of the day this Older guy came up and he was like. Don't you think that women would be insulted that she had this entity called chicks with them beans now. Wow and and do the only one all day. He's really the only one who has ever related any that that he was insulted by the name. The only issues do people in terms of misconceptions is really about plastic surgery and plastic surgeons surgeon because most of the time will approach me or when they find out that I'm a plastic surgeon is like oh boots or oh but and that is like like for the average plastic surgeon at goes to work everyday and sees patients boobs butts. They're you know they're thrown in there with the majority of people are coming to you because the have hand surgery complaints or they have skin cancer. Or sometimes you're fixing a baby's cleft lip and palate pallets or a a large percentage of plastic surgeons out. There are doing breast reduction breast reconstruction for for cancer We're doing saying you know what we call bread and butter stuff and so it's not that we don't enjoy doing boobs inputs but that's really not. What comprises plan surgery? So if I can talk about misconceptions it's really speak about what people how people perceive plastic surgeons in. This is another another reason why I like using social media because it gives the international community another side. Another view of what plastic surgeons are that. We do advocate for our patients all day. Every day that we go to multidisciplinary breast conferences references every month every week to advocate for our patients that this is how we need to approach doing breast reconstruction. WHO's a good candidate who isn't a good candidate? And so.

MD private practice Illinois Chicago cancer Bob Like facebook America accountant director senator Medical Center twenty six thousand dollars five minutes nine minutes seven minute
"dr lisa" Discussed on A Doctor's Perspective Podcast

A Doctor's Perspective Podcast

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on A Doctor's Perspective Podcast

"As we get behind into curtain. Look at all types of Dr. Get specialties let's gear doctors perspective Welcome back to the days of bitter sweet episode. Because this is the last time I can say live in China. Because we're moving. We've broke down our house. We've got four suitcases carry. It is stressful. But we knew going in that it wouldn't be permanent so we didn't buy a whole bunch of stuff that you can imagine and then we're gonNA move to Cologne Germany in January so an exciting finding time to spend the holidays with the family. Two of them. Actually that's fantastic to holidays. You heads up. The third book is coming out before Thanksgiving orcas because getting finished right now pretty much. If you want to do business in China you gotta be able to handle the dinners with a round table and the drinking and the losing phase gaining phase in. So I'm going to walk you through how to do that. So you can gain phase not lose face and not look silly and know the nuances really impress your clientele so that will be available Amazon and the webpage and the relationship book. That's not going to be until late. Twenty twenty I mean I got stage one done compiling but mixing it all up and editing it and and all that bridge and the things together so stay tuned. We'll let you know of course when it comes out but that his episode is Dr Lisa. She's a hand surgeon fellowship trained and and she has an organization called chicks with. MD's and it's really it's like an advocacy group for patients and for doctors. So doctors could communicate better with the patients and the patients can understand what the doctors are actually trying to take because she got a condition that is incurable. When it's a long term process you've seen all these pitfalls and the dysfunction that the patient and just was Like I'm a doctor. I should should be the difficult right so now. She's got programs where show go around and talk about these things in as well as like contract negotiations and for the doctors doctors as well as patients understand what they're getting with their insurance where you can find a pitfalls plus we actually talk about race relations and from where she was raised as reflect the south and people of Color and and we don't really get political with it is just sort of her life experience. What she's seen and the changes that have occurred Definitely occurring now presently so. This is a really good episode even at the end she's got amazing tips for relationships because her husband live apart for a while she was Doing doctor stuff and then they came together and anyway. It's just a good episode. I'm really excited that the final China episode is this one we did have some. I wanted to go a hundred Gordon. Fifty two more episodes but one guy scheduling conflicts. The other one. We just couldn't get it on the same page before I decided to stop recording episodes so it is what it is. We're gonNA take a break..

China Dr Lisa Germany MD Amazon
"dr lisa" Discussed on Reboot Revolution

Reboot Revolution

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on Reboot Revolution

"Because although I as much as I want everybody to stay I know that there's everybody has a different journey as different their own journey and so We look for his trainings in the spring to send teachers to And then we also are looking for on off years to bring someone to our school and invite right other Campuses that are interested in this process to come in and learn with us. That's fantastic Talk about the results. You've seen through project based learning and the culture that you've built an that you and your team have yells. Their team is built. Yes so one of the things that I love is when kids yes. I love when parents. We have parents who come to the school. And they'll say we heard you were project base learning schools. Such as says to us that parents are looking for. We are all looking for experience in school. It's not just about attending school. It's about the experience and knowing what's valuable and what's valuable has been the idea of learning and not just this paper pencil. What's on being able to write an answer questions correctly but to think and to develop thinkers so parents who come knowing that no that that's what they're looking looking for kids know it when you say when a teacher says okay we're GONNA be working going into? Are you hear every classroom. Just kind Donovan joke because we want to hear that throughout the day but when we's here Pete when they hear it's project based learning time or get your workout kids are excited and so that's us that culture that we wanted to create where kids are. They know what that means. They know they're going to have to think they know their ideas are going to be really important. And and they're gonNA be valued There know that they're going to be able to collaborate with their peers. They're going to get feedback. They know exactly what that means even though it may look different every day. They they know they're going to have a chance to create something And take what they've learned to create something brand new. They know they're going to have to work hard and there they love it And so for teachers to I think it's it's it's pushing them in terms of how teaching looks. What does it look like when you're facilitating learning in a process where students students are asking questions? And you're wanting students to ask questions In dive deeper and really think about critically think through what they're learning and what they're wanting to really produce as a result of that learning that they've that they've gone through. Yeah that's remarkable That authentic learning I think is what gets the students so excited. They're doing these projects that are authentic. They are and they're not. Just you know Rita Rita Story and answer some questions. They're actually engaged in. They're owning it. They're fully owning their learning which is so exciting. They believe in it and I have to share. There's a couple of projects that we've done that I still have this. I have in my room in my bedroom. Headroom at home. One of the Projects that was done by fifth grade was two or I'm sorry by fifth grade. They had to. It was a advertising housing and they had to create something based off of Something that they were passionate about and it had they had to be able to sell it and then the the sales so eh. Actually the showcase was selling beings whatever they created in the sales of that benefited sunshine acres. So I have one of our groups created Are recycled pillow. Pet Puppy pillow that my dog sleeps on every night. And it has the Falcon Hill. tee-shirt it's made out of the dog and Hill t shirt and other recycled products. But I mean at one it was that was one of the winners that year and they may they were able to raise money for sunshine acres so it was again that dual purpose of in the real world. What what is your purpose for working? Do you go to work just to get a paycheck or are you going to work doing something. You're passionate about. An how is is it benefiting the community around you. You're teaching your students to serve the community. That's fantastic. Do they come up with that. Or was that a brainstorm from the teachers. They started with students at Sayaka. Actually League decided one year they were like. What can we do to impact our community and they were like we wanted to help? We WanNA help kids and sunshine acres became our partner night with that and so they between the teachers and the students. They they did that. That's fantastic. I'm so proud to work in a district that just highlights these kinds of remarkable places and If my kids are still little your school would be exactly where I would put them. Even though is happy with the school they were now. I would want them doing this kind of work so Thank you so much. For being a remarkable and revolutionary leader and taking the charge and stepping out and doing something different. That not every school is doing. And you're really really leading something and modelling a system. That people can do this very doable. So so thank you thank you thank you for having me. Thank you for showcasing schools leaders. I think this is awesome way for us to hear about one another because there's a lot of amazing things happening in Mesa and it's always not always easy to find those find out about what's going on across the across the way so thank you point. You're welcome thank you. For listening to reboot revolution. If you something on today's show that you like more information about or if you know a teacher who should be featured on the show please contact up at VIP dot L. Y.. Flesh lead the reds..

"dr lisa" Discussed on Reboot Revolution

Reboot Revolution

11:09 min | 1 year ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on Reboot Revolution

"There's something that I don't know if any other school has an Arizona. Well let me say this party is we do have snow days so that was one thing. We call snow days when we need a snow. Day and only people at Falcon Hill. Know what that is and so we're going to keep that okay but the other thing that we That I learned was is that you know there was. There was a commitment to the community and to the kids that are coming to our school and so how to preserve that through traditions that were allowing parents to come and celebrate those Those opportunities together as a community so anything that would bring parents on our campus was considered valuable. And so I I noticed that was the trend in every in even though they may have been different in different Events are different things that that the staff had valued what seemed to be consistent. Was the community piece. What are we doing as what can we do as a community to to celebrate accomplishments and I think that the changes you've made in the things that we want to focus on today in this conversation or totally feed that You have you've done a fantastic job of transforming that school into what we would call a project based learning school and you've worked really hard to get your teachers trained and supported and and we were lucky enough to have cherise on threes Nunez on the episode last year and before four we had her. We went to your school. And we saw your showcase as that. One hundred percent exemplifies that community that you're talking about all the parents were. They're looking at their students and what they had created and done and I think that's such a remarkable piece of what you do. Can you talk a a little bit about project based learning and how you've Sort of brought your teachers to that place because it's not an easy thing to do so one of the things I would says I didn't do any of this by myself so yes it was. It was an idea. The idea came Initially it was an idea that I I had. I would say thought about process through when I was over at Guerrero as tap teacher and it was really because of some of the Learning about what what learning can look like. Yeah and the idea of collaboration and cooperation. We first started talking and speaking about common core or in the goal of common core. And so when I was able to get over to When I moved over to Falcon Hill and I was walking through classrooms? One of the things that yeah I noticed was that there seemed to be a lack of engagement and that that lack of engagement was very clearly can clearly be described as young boys. He's in grades. You know those grades in elementary grades. Sir Being able to answer questions but not really caring. Yeah knowing the right answer maybe but it didn't really matter and just kind of being passive in the in the learning process and so so The other part was the discipline. So I really believe in not just going and making a decision and saying this is what we're GonNa do or this is what I want to do because because this is what I wanna do I really had to look at what. What are some of the things I'm noticing and so the discipline data for boys was significant? Our boys were. I mean it was ridiculous the the the not only the number of incidents but it was all Gresham and it was happening in class so that just told us a story that we couldn't ignore what's going on in the costuming. They're learning that they're not engaged in the there. Have all this energy that they're not getting out and and so it was really looking at at at that And once this we kind of had that to look at I gave this staff survey and I just wanted to know like how they viewed learning and what they saw learning as as in the twenty first century century and that too became a made it very clear those that were really interested in an understood that learning is collaborative elaborated that it is creative that it is requires us to be able to communicate and it also allowed me to identify teachers who wanted to be teacher leaders and who wanted to be bring about change so they recognized that they wanted to do things differently they may not have had all of the skills of the learning to do do what they want what they envisioned in their mind but they knew they wanted to and more importantly they were. There was a group of core teachers who said and I'm willing to go the distance and learn this and be able to come back and bring it back to the to our staff and so we had a group of teachers six teachers who six of us who went to Napa. And we're trained trained by project by against PB L.. World the Buck Institute. Who really is the gold standard on project based learning? So that's where that's where where we started. Yeah so tell a little bit about that process for the teachers. What what kind of pushback did you have also? Did you have some teachers who were. Oh why do they get to go or do they understand the process that you take in identifying those six you know. I believe that there was probably some of questions in mind not a lot that were brought to me to be quite honest but there was probably some questions about how people were chosen. But I communicated that that there were an it really was you know and those teachers were expected to and they knew if you this is something you're wanting to do your are. What are you willing to do which meant changing grade levels levels in some cases because we knew we needed to focus on third through sixth grade In order to really see the impact to an end to see it A lot of times you hear a project based learning happening in the middle and junior high middle schools junior high and high schools and so we wanted to see. Okay we're GONNA look at it l.. Mary let's start with the with you. Know Our third through sixth graders and so I hadn't really kind of make sure that we could be a team. It could be a team which would mean people would have to be together so those six now I had to create teams where they could work together because this is what they wanted to do and we didn't we wanted to be able to ensure that if we're going to roll out project project based learning for kids the biggest part is Howard teachers going to experience that type of learning in their own learning journey. Yes so oh if I isolated them and had them be one person at a grade level than they really wouldn't be able to fully understand what it means to collaborate and communicate and be Kurt used. Does that creative thinking to develop planning the planning process in their for their instruction. Yeah so that was a really important part And so they're there there. I wouldn't say there was a lot of pushback. I think what it was. It was it's fear of the unknown sure and that's change and change is not easy easy especially when it's something that you haven't seen and so it was really important. We went on a tour the first time the first group The pilot group went and we visited schools in Napa. That had been doing project based learning that. We're familiar with it. We saw across K.. Twelve and it was a powerful experience. We came back excited and couldn't wait for the training. The training was exactly what it should have been. It was Training that allows us to learn brainstorm collaborate communicate it create develop try fail come back reflect do all the things that learning should be and so by the time we then rolled it out to the the next the next year we brought the initially. We had two grades. We brought the next grade two grades on board and so the intention was really that we would have to shoe grade levels that had piloted it and could speak to it both the failures and the successes and help those coming in Better understand and be better even more prepared than those of us who tried it in the very beginning. Yeah and at this point. Have you brought all. Did you take all of your staff so so then we started because of the number we were able to bring someone in from from the Buck Institute to train US two years in a row so again of the beauty of that was it was brought to our staff aft- two and we were able to invite other schools who were interested kind of spread that spread that that passion in that love for project based learning and The all the teachers were trained have been trained. We have a couple of new teachers at were. Were going to have to get trained this year But what they they now are able to do. is they're able to take that learning and they're able to through our reflective our reflection days which we build into our calendar they don't just get at once once when we go into. After after a project teachers take a day half a day two a day and they work together improving making improvements movements on the unit that they just finished and then taking that and going. Okay now what do we did. We learn from that. And how can we apply it to the next project based unit that that. We're GONNA be launching in the next few weeks. Yeah so it's very cyclical in in terms of the process and learning. The creative process usually is isn't Smith. Yes set I love how you mentioned failure and I. It sounds like that's embraced. It's okay to fail it has to be. You have to make mistakes and your or you're going to make mistakes leagues you have to be able to reflect on that and go back in improved from there and I think that is a huge part of learning that I I know in my own practice. They could have improved significantly on I would love more teachers to take on. It's okay for For students to fail. Yes okay for those Kiddos to make those mistakes sakes let's learn from them and teachers are okay. I think a lot of teachers most teachers. I would say we're probably a little bit more comfortable with the students. Failing Lingyu than we are with ourselves writes. The challenge really became creating an environment in our school creating an environment in the classroom room and outside the classroom. We're planning to know that we're not working towards perfection. What we're really working towards is learning and growth? And how do we. How do we show that you know products show that talking shows that conversations show that growth ideas are where that where that comes from? Yeah how will you sustain this as your stuff changes. It's a really good question. So there's a couple of ideas where we're actually in the process of developing that right now I had a a very strong title. One foolish mock. He'll I have another new strong title one with Stacy Dixon Zenden so really. It's about again. There's that so we've gone through. Staff changes even at the Admin or coaching level And so it really becomes important. That is. I'm going to a training the spring. I need to stay fresh in. No it's going into those classrooms and helping develop teacher leaders that can help support the teachers at their grade levels..

"dr lisa" Discussed on Reboot Revolution

Reboot Revolution

11:10 min | 1 year ago

"dr lisa" Discussed on Reboot Revolution

"Welcome to reboot revolution. I'm your host carries ether producer Kane Reagan welcome revolutionaries today. AM The show. We have Dr Lisa Canon. She is here from Falcon Hill elementary in Mesa Arizona and she has Talking today about project based learning inning. And how her school is a project based learning school and not just about the school but how that schools transformed into that and what I liked. I think the most about this conversation conversation is it's her humility and it was so nice it was. It's refreshing anytime. I get to talk to a leader. Who says it's really not me? It's my team. And she had a whole lot of that today. Yeah and I'm just GONNA pick up on that idea team carried. I thought Oh what I loved about this this interview or this conversation was the fact that she really solicits her teachers and she listens to their ideas. You just go on and say hey. This is what we're GONNA do. Do you get behind me. She really listened she she she. I'M NOT GONNA I'm not gonNA give it away here but but she did one party really did have a really creative idea let our listeners. I listened to that one. Yeah sure how let her. Teachers have have the power of input is really fantastic I'm super excited about this episode episode. Because I've known Lisa for a long time so without any further ado enjoyed this episode of reboot revolution. This is reboot revolution a podcast. Four teachers by teachers bringing you innovative ideas to engage your students. Here's your host carries. Either Sir Hi Dr Cannon. Thank you so much. For being on reboot revolution. Thank you for for having me. I'm excited to be here. You are are second revolutionary leader that we're having this as part of a series that we're doing four episodes a year with leaders who are changing aging the way their campuses or environments. Look so thank you for inviting me. It's definitely an honor to be here paying so let's talk a little bit first. I about your career. I kind of want to know a little bit about your background where you started and how you got to be where you are today Well it's funny because I was actually actually listening to one of your other episodes in heard that Dr Conley had started as a coach so there is a little bit of a similarity there. I started as a dancer in became a dance teacher and in throughout those the time I was teaching dance to younger students little kids I just really loved spending my time in my day with with kids and thought how could I take what I love and do this all day long and so at that point I thought well you know what I have still still not done with all of my college credits so I decided to go back him or and finished school but to add another major and so I went finished. I with English and dance my dance majors and then I decided to go right into teaching into into get my masters in education so I I grew up in Seattle and I taught Junior high started out as a junior high teacher. There is no other group I could ever see myself with so I was a writing teacher and a dance teacher Anything arts related. I wanted on into be around and I wanted to be with the kids and that just kind of grew in parlayed into different experiences. I eventually moved to North Carolina and was able to teach there in a military retail on rural town which was quite different from being in Seattle and learned a lot growing Growing as a teacher with a very veteran veteran staff at the school their military town so there was a black and white. How you did things As well as even the population it was very You're either military leterrier. Not Yeah The student demographics or African American and white and so it was very much different from where I started in Seattle. where the diversity? Let's see within the Asian population was so was so great and significant And in the Eastern European Community as well so I've been able to kind of go around the country and then when I circled backed and came to Arizona to teach It was I. I used to compare my to rosters the roster from North North Carolina and my first roster from her elementary which is where I started teaching here in in Mesa and it was just always thought it was kind of fun funny and Ironic. That could you could go from one place to another. And just the demographics of in the and the kids we serve name sound different But the experiences nces and the things that they need from the adults that are there to serve them just as has been my guiding passion and Kinda got me to where I met now so Sollozzo kind of like background in teaching and eventually at her I really developed and desire to help teachers and to support teachers I I I felt like there was a need for that And so wanting to try that I went into basic skills and spent several years learning curriculum. Him and Teaching learning through the Lens of a specialist and then was honored to be able to have the opportunity to go over to Guerrero and be a tap master teacher which which I can honestly say. It was probably my most significant learning as a as a learner. Adult Learner really understanding how to better support teachers teachers and adults based off of their strengths. And what they're doing and their passion and had no desire to be a principal and somehow how just it came knocking and when it did come knocking I knew it was time for me to take that plunge and I ready not not regretted it a day since that's nice. I do like how you know. Sometimes we start off not knowing where we're GONNA go in life and things take a turn and we end up right where we're supposed to be. I know my story also also as a teacher I did not grow up wanting to be a teacher I wanted to go to Hollywood. I wanted his center contention. No I wanted to go and be in the movies and it was having my own. Children and volunteering in their classrooms is where very learned to love the environment of school in love to Work with students and that is taking me to where I am today. S Not at all what I dreamed of as as a child. But it's the best place to be absolutely so I really am so happy to have you here because you have been such an influence on my career. 'cause through your journey and my journey Ernie is where we met and I won't go into a lot of detail there but I just want people to know how grateful I am for you and for the I've seen firsthand hand-held you feed into teachers and that's a really important leadership strengthen. I think it's important for people to know that. Thank you. Yes thank you so. Let's talk a little a bit about your school. Your Falcon Hill Elementary. Yes I'm so firebirds. Yeah just go ahead and Brag on your school for a few minutes. Oh Falcon Hill. It's an amazing place. We are just tucked back into this community that some people don't even know were there and we are a diverse community Diverse in ways that I was even unaware until every year I learn of a new Aspect of our school and so we are title school. We have mm-hmm about five hundred fifty students and a lot of the teachers there. There's teachers that are brand new to teaching and teachers who've been teaching for almost thirty years so in almost every way shape and form we Are Definitely a showcase Mesa and the city of Mason. What Mesa has to offer and what our district has So it's it's a great. It's a great place Our kids come in they. I know you'll probably ask me some questions about at this. But they do come ready to learn wanting to learn. I shouldn't say readiness wanting to knowing that there's an expectation and desire to learn and and excited to learn that's great You have done some remarkable work over there. How many years you've been principal? This is my fifth year fifth year. And when you first got there tell tell me some of the things and Tell me what your first impressions were of the school when you first got there and some of the things where you're like room. We can make some improvements in this area. I think the first thing that I recognized right away from the school was that it was a community and it was a community that I was unfamiliar with I had worked in high poverty schools also for so long my entire career and so to go to a school that was not high high poverty that also was not In terms the ethnic diversity a majority minority school there was some there was some unique differences just initially for me because it was a different environment and so it really allowed me to just learn. I got to learn from the staff that was there at the time And and get to know the parents and what they were are experiencing as parents in that community. we are. I learned right away that it was a choice school even though a based off of just just again our open enrollment so we are about thirty percent open enrollment which is pretty significant for A squawk community school And also that there was this The recession had definitely hit that neighborhood significantly. And so I was coming in right around the time that you know. The recession had was start. We were starting to come back achromatic and so parents families were moving back I remember the first time a family came. That was moving into the neighborhood and the MOM had. I've been a student at Falcon Hill and hearing that was just like wow. I can't imagine having moved away from my home and not gone back what it would feel like to move away and then to come back into a neighborhood and to have your child register your child at a school that you yourself had attended and so at that point it really. We made me think what does really look at. What does the school offered over the past two decades? What what has the leaders before me been able able to offer? And what can I do to add to that. Not Take away should not diminish in so one of the first exercises the staff and I did together was really looking. We created plates. Can I ask them. What's on your plate? Do you want to keep and what on your plate. Are you willing to let go of because I needed to know what were those things. Those those The history that was important to them than on negotiable those non-nego shows of things that were really important in had been ahead value because as a a new person. There is no way for me to know I might have my opinions but those are opinions. Those really aren't about. It's not about the value of that the history or some of those traditions nations that they had come to really be proud of yeah So as you did that exercise with your teachers. What are some of the things that they wanted desperately to hold onto well?.

'Crowd-diagnosis' thousands seek out diagnoses from strangers on social media

KNX Programming

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

'Crowd-diagnosis' thousands seek out diagnoses from strangers on social media

"More more and and more more people people are are turning turning to to social social media media when when they they won won a a medical medical diagnosis diagnosis instead instead of of going going to to the the doctor doctor it's it's become become known known as as crowd crowd diagnosis diagnosis when people seek out medical answers through social media researchers say the number of posts regarding sexually transmitted diseases on reddit has doubled in the last year unfortunately at thank you bye and our culture and people may feel embarrassed to talk about that with even their own physician Dr Lisa nobles is a research fellow at UC San Diego she does know this word of caution never dying to deliver healthcare so we're not sure how well that can be done on that platform Dr noble says people are increasingly going to social media for help with sensitive medical issues like STDs because they also want a sense of

Reddit Dr Lisa Nobles Research Fellow San Diego Stds Dr Noble
CDC activating Emergency Operations Center to aid vaping crisis investigations

WBZ Afternoon News

01:06 min | 1 year ago

CDC activating Emergency Operations Center to aid vaping crisis investigations

"And health officials in Washington state have confirmed two new cases of vaping related lung disease the latest CDC numbers show that there are at least three hundred and eighty cases in at least thirty six states and the U. S. Virgin Islands now the CDC is stepping up its efforts to crack down on the vaping yesterday the agency activated its emergency operations center giving more resources to experts looking into reported vaping related illnesses and deaths doctors treating the younger trying to catch up with the vaping crisis Dr Lisa Casey a pediatric poll monologist Boston children's hospital says medical professionals don't fully understand the scope of the problem out of nowhere we knew that the kids and teens and and use and young adults were all many of them are back tickets a beating and kicking **** and more recently we've seen many acute cases of lung injury but were also concerned about the long term I thank god that are totally unknown doctor Casey says it's important for parents to educate themselves about the dangers of vaping she also says flavored vape sought to be banned

U. S. Virgin Islands CDC Dr Lisa Casey Washington Boston
Mixed breeds and health

Animal Radio

07:55 min | 2 years ago

Mixed breeds and health

Dr. Moses Angell Animal Medical Centers Friendly Magazine Nissan Los Angeles Nate Dexia Myopathy PEC Boston Tober Tito Rossi Hagen Dr Lisa Chicago FOX DAN Eleanor Carlson