35 Burst results for "Dr Lewis"

"dr lewis" Discussed on Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

04:23 min | Last week

"dr lewis" Discussed on Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

"Your body may be telling you something you know. Y'all have enough to decide right now. What's going on if you wanna shortcut this. If you get a symptom like this and you're thinking. I don't know where to start for those of you. That don't know what we do. We actually can run lab work. And help you take the guesswork out. Show you what your body's doing because we're looking at optimal levels were not just looking at Crisis situations we don't just run a couple of panels a lab based on your crisis. Were were running. Twelve fourteen sixteen panels lab. So we don't guess at what's wrong. And then we shore up the weakness with good nutrition and amazingly a lot of these symptoms. Were getting tell you about start to disappear not overnight not like madison but slowly. So if you've had these symptoms that we talk about for a long long time you can figure it takes three months. Minima minimum with nutrition to start changing the speeding bus. That's going down the hill and backing. It backed up and then it's a month for every year you've had it so you have to give nutrition a little bit more time to work not like medicine where it just catcher in general right absolutely so our first symptom to watch carefully for which many people have our headaches and migraines. She's going back to the spouse now. Oh no no. Sometimes it's things. Readings i dunno. Dr lewis is gonna explain it but if your head's tossed gently throbbing implementation may be the cause not only your migraines infrequent headaches painful but they can also be precursors to more serious conditions. So doctor liz. Please tell us about headaches. Well you know one thing once you start on a program to try to get your body back to normal where it can get itself healthier..

madison Dr lewis headaches migraines liz
What's Causing Your Swarming Summer Allergies

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

02:17 min | Last month

What's Causing Your Swarming Summer Allergies

"Dr lewis. Can you tell us why allergies or here. Why are people having runny snotty sneezing snorting things happening to them. I don't have a clue. But i can tell you. Some of the root causes in the pray people can figure it out. Yesterday is doing a consultation with katharina. And she's very interesting lady and she was talking about the different immunoglobulins and she's asking some incredibly brilliant questions. she's very very educated and she was talking about the immunoglobulin a g e etc etc. And she says well how come this. How come i said. Let's let's boil it down. Because i'm good at that for example What happens is and we'll talk about all kinds of things coz normally do Most of the time. It's microbiome induced inflammation. That means you have a gut flora. That's not what it should be and it can to a very large degree disrupt your metabolism which can cause weight gain folks if you're five ten pounds overweight or more you have despite houses. Gut inflammation The tendency toward well allergies if nothing else are histamine reactions or asada kane storm and what happens is and she was asking. Well why do we have this The problem is it's normal for the nutrients as you digest to pass through the line of your intestinal wall and that's called epithelium But what happens is we have most of us have low stomach acid not enough digestive enzymes because of the interference with the heavy metals and plastics and pesticides. So we don't get Complete digestion then. The partially digested food. What happens is it seeps through the epithelium and since it's only partially digested it's a molecule that your immune system doesn't recognize and so it starts putting out antibodies or immunoglobulins against this and it it detects it so to speak as an intruder And thinks it's toxic and baiter and that's where the antibodies come

Dr Lewis Katharina Asada Kane
"dr lewis" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

05:46 min | 2 months ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Is. Tom Jones. Welcome to the World Cafe. Thank you. It's wonderful to have you here, Dr. Lewis. Nice to be here. So we're talking over video chat. We're recording this April. 2021. People around the world have been in lockdown and quarantine on and off for over a year. Now, first off. Where exactly am I speaking to you right now I'm in London. Okay in England. And how are you doing? Oh, everything's fine. Everything's good. You know, it's I've been busy because I do the voice UK, one of the coaches on on TV, so that's sort of that's got me through the the lockdown situation. Because I have been able to do life shows like Like all entertainers, we we can't get out there and do what we do, but we will be shortly, hopefully. Tom. The idea of quarantining isn't really new to you Take us back to when you were a young man. When you were 12, you've got sick. What happened? I had to Google office, which was Not a pandemic. But there was a lot of it around in the fifties in Great Britain. I had it when I was 12 1st of all they wanted to You send me away? They wanted me to either go to Switzerland or Scotland. You know, for the for the clean air because in Wales, where I come from coal mining, you see But when they came to see the house that we lived in, we realized it wasn't close to a coal mine. It was up on a hill. So they said to my mother, if you can give him his own room. Keep the window open. You know like that, and we get it And we've got a two during so well, you won't lose any of his schooling. And that was it. So my my mother and father bought me a television set. 1952 you see, That's when we first had television in Great Britain. So that was a big deal. I think we were the only ones in the street. Now that it was was thanks to having to Bigelow, Sis. It was just me. Good. But then they used to come in there with the first year I was quarantined. Um, it was contagious. You know the tuberculosis so nobody can come and see me for the first year. Then the second year they could come in to see me. I feel sorry for kids now with this pandemic because they need to be with other with other people on by know that feeling. So I think the good things that came from it was because I had a spot on the lung. I wasn't allowed to go and work with my father in a coal mine. So that kept me out of the coal mines. U C s O s. Oh, that was a good thing on it, And I learned that not to take life for granted. Talking to Tom Jones on the World Cafe. We're talking about his new album surrounded by time, I'd love to kind of take a look at the album on Sort of Ah, bigger scale. You were lucky and that you finished recording it before the pandemic hand Yes, before the part that's just before it. You mean, your last record was six years ago? Why was this the right time? Tol a canoe one? Yeah, well, my wife passed away five years ago on I was just about getting away with a life shows. You know, I was I was doing life shows it took me a while to get back on the stage. That was that was part of it. I didn't really have anything to say New or new for me. Anyway. I know the songs have been done before, but they knew to me Yes, so that that's the reason there's a guy up there, But I wanted to use Ethan Johns because he had done my previous three albums on My son. Mark was always involved with Missy. But this this one. Now he's even more involved with Ethan, the co produced ID. Together. Right, So he's like You said you've worked with Ethan a few times before on for people listening who might not know Ethan Johns. He's produced for tons of artists, kings of Leon Ray LaMontagne, all sorts of familiar names. What is it about Ethan? That keeps you coming back for more? Well, the initial thing when I first met him, he said. I hear stuff in your voice that I don't think has been explored before, because all the recordings that I've done They've always had big arrangements on them. You know up temples all ballots like it's not unusual at brass on it. You know, it was a big punchy think and then the green green grass of home. Was a lush, you know, with strings and voices and but always big C So, he said. I'd like to take you into the studio and with a few musicians and just kick it for things around, and I said, Well, I said I started in Wales. I have something you know few positions that we were gonna do Two shows like that so So we said, Well, I'd like to take you back there and I remember recording a Bob Dylan song called What could've my and Ethan said. Don't don't try to sell it. You know, because I'm a performer. You see, So I'm so used to sort of, you know, getting in a song and getting as much out as possible. He said, Just sing this one to yourself like you. You're thinking about it, even and then the words will just get him out like that. So I think it was the first time that I never really Were constrained. You know, I held The volume down on purpose. And then I thought, well, this this is great. This is new on I like trying new things You see? Let's hear a little bit of.

Great Britain England Ethan Scotland London Bob Dylan Switzerland Wales Lewis Tom Ethan Johns Mark Tom Jones six years ago Google Leon Ray LaMontagne 12 five years ago April. 2021 two
Washington, DC teachers’ union votes against authorizing strike

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 6 months ago

Washington, DC teachers’ union votes against authorizing strike

"In D C. Where, Despite safety concerns, teachers will not be walking out. In a letter to schools Chancellor Dr Lewis Fair being mayor Mariel Bowser. The Washington teacher's union says its decision to vote against a strike makes clear to desire to work with district leaders. The union says it would now like to work with officials to create a situation room to help better identify and respond to emergency issues. They'd also like to see reassurance safety guidelines are being followed. The union's president, pointed out numerous reports of violations and a recent death as her main concerns. Over the weekend, A cosmetology teacher died of health complications.

Chancellor Dr Lewis Mariel Bowser Washington Teacher's Union
Washington, DC teachers’ union votes against authorizing strike

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

Washington, DC teachers’ union votes against authorizing strike

"Some D C. Public school students are back in the classroom, and teachers want to make sure schools they're safe. But we're learning that despite concerns over safety from some staff members, the teachers union will not strike in a letter to schools Chancellor Dr Lewis Fair being mayor Mariel Bowser, the Washington teacher's Union says its decision to vote against a strike Makes clear to desire to work with district leaders. The union says it would now like to work with officials to create a situation room to help better identify and respond to emergency issues. They'd also like to see reassurance. Safety guidelines are being followed, the union's president pointed out numerous reports of violations and a recent death as her main concerns. Over the weekend, a cosmetology teacher died of health complications. And so far, 107 D C. Public schools, employees and 34 students have tested

Chancellor Dr Lewis Fair Mariel Bowser Washington Teacher's Union
Arbitrator clears way for Washington DC to resume in-person learning despite union concern

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:51 min | 6 months ago

Arbitrator clears way for Washington DC to resume in-person learning despite union concern

"The D C. Government is Father temporary restraining order to prohibit the Washington teacher's Union from talking about any type of work stoppages and connections. A D. C schools reopening tomorrow. Seven page filing was submitted to D C Superior Court in a news conference today, Mayor Bowser said any teacher absent without leave would be in a workplace violations. Just like anybody who sitting here when your boss tell us you that this is your location to go toe work, that's where you gotta be. Well. That quote came following a question from Perry Stein, Education Schools reporter for The Washington Post. She joined me earlier tonight to talk about the battle between D C teachers and schools that he has been trying to reopen its schools and by reopening in there is Partial reopening. Still only 9000 out of 52,000 kids are expected to return tomorrow. But the city has tried twice now, once in the fall and once in November, so this is the third time to reopen schools and both the previous two times a failed and now they're getting close to the start date, which would have been today But it's no day so now tomorrow, and they want to make sure that when the teachers show up now, the union says they still have a lot of safety concerns and they don't feel ready. At least some members of the union say that Have you talked to any teachers yourself without naming names? You say I'm not showing up. They have an address our concerns about safety, So I'm not going any general sense of who might not show despite the government's actions illegally forced him and what kind of action could the union take going forward? The union right now. I did talk to President Elizabeth Davis of the Union today and she said, you know, she made very clear that they have not voted on a strike. They have not decided that That's the direction that they want to take. And it's unclear if that's what her members want. What she did say was that they were going to take it to a vote. So they have 5000 members that includes some retired teachers, I believe and They were going to vote this week on what kind of collective action if any, maybe they don't want to take any They want to take and you know, there's what we call work stoppages or strikes and second range from anything from a sick out to staying remote when you should be going in person to what you would traditionally think of that the strike and just quickly But any action like that would be illegal, wouldn't it? In D. C. You are not allowed to public employees Public government employees are not allowed to struck. That is correct. That's Perry Stein Education in Schools reporter for the Washington Post, D. C. P S Chancellor Dr Lewis therapy, telling our news partners and NBC for that quote, D. C. PS fulfill this health and safety commitment to students and staff and these measures were reaffirmed by an arbitrator's decision made over the weekend. Our schools are safe. And we know the best place for students to learn is in the classroom. Our students already our building's already are stamp is ready. DCP s is opening our doors

D C. Government Washington Teacher's Union D C Superior Court Mayor Bowser Perry Stein President Elizabeth Davis Washington Post Perry Stein Education In Schoo D. C. P S Chancellor Dr Lewis Government D. C. Ps NBC
Washington DC schools to open for CARE classes Wednesday

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 9 months ago

Washington DC schools to open for CARE classes Wednesday

"Now in the district, where the spread of Corona viruses described his moderate D C. Public schools say they plan to bring kids back to class. On Wednesday, the students in 29 schools will learn virtually with a staff member there to help them in what are called cares Classrooms. Schools Chancellor Dr Lewis Fair be says it will help students who are having a hard time learning from home. We believe that we have done to due diligence with health and safety up to 600 students will be able to return on Wednesday. Teachers will not be The classroom. Meantime, D c Mayor Muriel Bowser says new cases of coronavirus air rising in younger age groups, especially those in their mid twenties to mid thirties. As for new restrictions, she says, none yet for D C. We see a number of rollbacks and jurisdictions that surround us, and we're happy to see that putting those places more in line, she says. With DC's restrictions. Mike Murillo w T O P.

Dr Lewis Corona Muriel Bowser Mike Murillo
Washington DC schools to open for CARE classes Wednesday

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 9 months ago

Washington DC schools to open for CARE classes Wednesday

"Now we're the number of coronavirus cases has topped 19,000, even though moderate community spread remains in the nation's capital to school system says it's ready to move ahead with bringing some school kids back to class. Starting this Wednesday, students in 29 schools will learn virtually with a staff member there to help them in what are called cares. Classrooms. Schools Chancellor Dr Lewis Fair be says it will Help students who are having a hard time learning from home. While we believe that we have done to due diligence with health and safety up to 600 students will be able to return on Wednesday. Teachers will not be in the classroom. Meantime,

Washington DC Public Schools to start limited in-person classes in November

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:09 min | 10 months ago

Washington DC Public Schools to start limited in-person classes in November

"The latest twists and turns and parenting in a pandemic. Next month, D C families will have the option of sending their students back to the classroom. The superintendent, explaining today how the city will open his public schools to pre Kane Elementary school students who want to move away from learning at home. As W. GOP's Megan Clarity explains a lottery will decide which students get class time with the teacher, D C. Public schools Chancellor Dr Lewis Farabee estimates 75% or 21,000 students will choose to return to in person learning next month. But only 7000 of them will get a seat with a teacher, and we can offer 14,000 teeth for our cave, his academics and real engagement. Classroom care classrooms will allow those students not selected by a randomized lottery for class time with a teacher to learn virtually as a cohort with supervision by an adult so they can have tech support, recess, meals and socialization. We will also be able to provide a sibling preference, he says. Grade six through 12 will return to a similar three option model. Term three and all returning students must be up to date on immunizations. Meghan Cloherty w T o P News

Dr Lewis Farabee Kane Elementary School D C. Public Schools Meghan Cloherty Megan Clarity Superintendent W. Gop Chancellor
Washington DC Kids Back in School on November 9, But Only Some of Them

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:17 min | 10 months ago

Washington DC Kids Back in School on November 9, But Only Some of Them

"This hour comes from D C, which will welcome some of its youngest students back to the classroom. November 9th But only some pre k through fifth graders will return full time and parents can still choose toe have their kids learn virtually and home T o P is making clarity breaks down. What's happening? CPS Chancellor Dr Lewis Farabee estimates based on the summer survey of Families that 75% of students or 21,000. Kids will choose to return to in person learning when term to begins. November 9th However, not everyone will get a teacher. He has to me that we could all for approximately 7000 in person learning classroom seats on 14,000 for our campus academics and real engagement, classroom canvas academics, real engagement or care classrooms are cohorts of 5 to 11 kids monitored by a trained adult who virtually learned together. Therapy says schools will reach out to let families know by October 23rd if their student was chosen at random for in person learning in the lottery process, You may not receive a offer for in person learning classroom C grade 6 to 12 will return in term to Farabee says UPDATED immunizations are required. Meghan Cloherty. W GOP news to a four If you're looking to cast your ballot early, there are

Dr Lewis Farabee Meghan Cloherty GOP CPS Chancellor
Select Washington, DC schools welcoming some students back this week

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 10 months ago

Select Washington, DC schools welcoming some students back this week

"D C. Mayor Muriel Bowser's education team announced. Some students are already back in class at select schools, making the announcement before actually outlining plans on how the district schools will safely reopen. Come November. Some students are back at Blue High School for cosmetology and barbering career technical education classes. DCP S chancellor, Dr Lewis Farabee says 11. Other schools will also offer support like tutoring and phys Ed. To supplement students, virtual learning When average, they'll serve about anywhere from 20 to 50 students a day we'll have a slate of schools that will start this week and then we have some schools that will start next week. D CPS is expected to announce a detailed plan next week for return to in person learning in November. Meanwhile, fair B says it's upgrading elementary school H Vac systems in preparation to receive early learners first.

Mayor Muriel Bowser Dr Lewis Farabee Blue High School H Vac Chancellor
Select Washington DC schools welcoming some students back this week

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 10 months ago

Select Washington DC schools welcoming some students back this week

"While schools have not reopened in D. C. Some schools are opening to small groups for extracurricular in person learning Starting today, City leaders say they're continuing to prepare to bring kids back safely. In November, some students are back at Blue High School for hospital. Logy and barbering career technical education classes. DCP S chancellor, Dr Lewis Farabee says 11. Other schools will also offer support like tutoring and phys Ed to supplement students, virtual learning When average, they'll serve about anywhere from 20 to 50 students a day we'll have a slate of schools that will start this week and then We have some schools that will start next week. DCP S is expected to announce a detailed plan next week for return to in person learning in November. Meanwhile, fair B says it's upgrading elementary school H back systems in preparation to receive early learners.

Blue High School For Hospital Dr Lewis Farabee Phys Ed Chancellor
Washington DC Will Reopen Recreation Centers, Indoor Pools This Fall

Rush Limbaugh

00:31 sec | 10 months ago

Washington DC Will Reopen Recreation Centers, Indoor Pools This Fall

"Schools as well as rec centers and city pools in the coming weeks. There are some schools in the District of Columbia that already have in person learning. 13 Mohr Coming darkness with D. C public schools proud to welcome students back on our campuses as select disappear. Schools beginning this week started Blue State High School D. C. School Chancellor Dr Lewis Fair be meanwhile, 29 recreation centers across the city will reopen on October 13th. As well as fixed indoor pools. Barbara Brit W M

Blue State High School Barbara Brit W M District Of Columbia Dr Lewis Chancellor D. C. School
How Much Vitamin D is Right for Me?

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

05:39 min | 11 months ago

How Much Vitamin D is Right for Me?

"Hello and welcome to this week's edition of the Green Wisdom Hell show I'm Janet Lewis after Louis and we are going to educate you today a little bit of `Bout Vitamin D. a lot of you already know about vitamin D or You're beginning to learn it. But I think that you know one of the burning questions that we seem to be having is how much vitamin D is right for me and there's really It's different for everyone and there was a book called optimal dose that Dr Louis Read. There was some other of our. Clients that ask about that book they wanted to know well, how much do I take because? I think it was very high levels and Dr Lewis is going to answer all that for you. Today he's going to help you discern how much is right for you because there are other factors involved as I just loading up on a bunch of D. and he's going to tell. You what can happen when you do too much of that, and we are also going to answer a whole lot of questions that we've received from our audience via our shooting straight with Dr Louis facebook group, and if you're not a member of that, all you have to do is go there and ask for yourself to be invited in either by email or send him A. Message on facebook and he'll accept shooting be part of our community. You can also answer or ask US questions online. There's an online forum for the PODCAST. So anything we don't cover here today that you still want to know or any other topic Please reach out to us that way we try to work it all in and make it a very enjoyable show. So Dr Louis. Vitamin D seems to be the thing immune system right now can you tell us how much what the difference is and is there anything wrong which is loading up on it? You ever been just one drink away from telling people what you really think. Never. have been quite often Yeah, you know I'm GonNa talk a lot about this, and you know it's absolutely amazing facebook The shooting straight has been a good thing. There's people that follow me there that actually work for some really big. Supplement. Companies. Which is afforded US Janet and may an opportunity to do some really big things I was called salt of the Earth yesterday which I thought was funny. In longhorn Texas as well as we thought, that was even funnier. We've renamed our town from Longview to Longhorn now I I love it. I guess SOCI- eight that we owe steers and Texas I. was kind of funny Yeah. But I've got lots of and this all started about five years ago when I was on a podcast as guests from Jack, Speer Co, the survival podcast, and he is crazy crazy smart, incredibly intelligent. man he he really knows what he's talking about and he's tastes certainly blonde by giving his opinion and you need to listen to him. But I got a lot of people from being on his podcast and people would say there I'm taking five thousand or ten thousand years and you know of course I'm looking at Lamma. It's not working. But I'm taking over ten thousand I said, it's not working MO- supplements don't work. And some of them are actually very toxic to you and there's reasons for that too. I finally did the percentages on it with the help of my count it because I'm not good at percentages good Lord I skipped that class in high school probably when fishing or something and ninety three percent of what people were buying and taking not working ninety three percents your odds of getting something niche. Good. Yeah and Jack Speer Co was talking about it and again spare 'cause a really crazy smart guy. You check him out he's he's really good he. He'll tell you what to do during times of stress and trouble where I'm just good for telling you how to be healthy, which is not bad too but. And I was in Tulsa. and. He he was talking about that Nina is getting involved in his facebook group and he said, well, you ought order this book and you know it'll change your per-. Paradigm about what you think about bottom of day and I said with the books already been ordered. It's on the way coast read books all day long. And Yeah, I don't know this change paradigm I try to push it in any way but I do think what this book outlines, which this guy says take thirty thousand a day. It's like one Manana don't do that not without testing and that this is from the book. Now from Jack Sparrow one of the things that people talk about is I can't sleep dog do you have any kind of thing for sleep? Well, if you're low in Vitamin D. That can cause you to not sleep well. At date threes plays a very pivotal role in the body achieving the state needed for deep sleep and very, very important and I have people at tight. You know five, thousand, ten, thousand and some it gets them up for you need to be I think the sweet spots hundred. Seventy, five or this book says more than that, and there's no evidence of it being toxic, but there's more to that some teach you that. But when you're three levels are optimal, you your your immune system, the depth of sleep in the rest that you get there and your metabolism, your metabolism becomes primed to function more edge greatest potential.

Dr Louis Janet Lewis Facebook Jack Jack Speer Co Jack Sparrow Longhorn Texas Texas Longview Speer Co Lamma Nina Tulsa.
Experts predict active 2020 hurricane season

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Experts predict active 2020 hurricane season

"Fight fight fight to to to defend defend defend James James James Phillip Phillip Phillip in in in New New New York. York. York. We've already had nine named storms during this year's Atlantic hurricane season. The head of the National Weather Service Dr Lewis you, Cellini says this year is now forecast to be one of the most active on record. The chance for an above normal season has now been increased 85%. On DH. There is also a much higher potential, but this season to be classified as a

James James James Phillip Phil New York Dr Lewis Cellini
A COVID-19 Vaccine: What You Need To Know

Short Wave

10:33 min | 1 year ago

A COVID-19 Vaccine: What You Need To Know

"Joe you have been reporting on the pandemic for months now and specifically one crucial part of this story vaccines right I think vaccines are pretty much the way out of this. Most people agree it's been so far the most successful tool in preventing infectious disease. But, of course we don't have a vaccine right now, and so that's why we're doing all these other things like shutting things down and social distancing and wearing masks in washing hands, etc, until we do have a vaccine that safe and effective and available right, and we're basically hiding from the virus in the meantime right, but I've heard that vaccines have traditionally taking years to develop. So, what are we doing to speed up the process well quite a lot actually and just to give you one example. Example a couple of weeks ago. I got a virtual tour of a vaccine facility in Baltimore. What you're looking at here is one step of multiple step process. It's run by a company called emergent bio solutions, and Sean Kirk overseas the manufacturing and technical operations and what he's doing, he's he's pointing a cell phone camera through a glass window into another room with several large stainless steel pieces of equipment. You can see the banks taken out. Talk you, so what's going to go inside? This bag is actually. Believe it or not insect cells that have been modified to make proteins from the coronavirus. That's going to be used to make the vaccine. The technicians are loading this bag into a fifty liter stainless steel vessel. That's part of what's called a bio reactor around the outside of this is the vessel itself it provides. The heating cooling. And with the inserted agitator, the mixing the cells, spitting out a protein that's going to become the corona virus vaccine. All this is being done with the strict standards of the Food and Drug Administration. The vaccine is from a biotech company called Nova Fax, and emergent says they're ready to make hundreds of millions of doses of it on a short timescale. Hold up Joe. Because I thought there weren't any approved vaccine's yet. So what's happening here with this manufacturing? Well, you were asking what's going to speed up the process and this is part of the answer. They're not just waiting to see if the vaccine works. They're doing what's called at risk manufacturing it. They're getting ready to make hundreds of millions of doses of vaccine. And when they finish testing it, it might not work okay, but the government says we don't have any choice because we can't wait until we find out of it works to start manufacturing it. Because that'll just add months and months to the process, so they're getting going right away. Sounds like kind of a gamble, but we don't really have much of a choice. Is that right well? That's what people are saying. I mean it's a gamble that health officials say we have to make if we want to have a vaccine that's GonNa be around in time to put a stop to this pandemic. Okay Today on the show what you need to know about the virus vaccine from how it works to the challenges of disturbing it to. The world. This is shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. Okay Joe Palca. Let's start with some vaccine basics I read. There are over one hundred vaccines in development for this corona virus, and these vaccines are trying to do the same thing trigger an immune response from your body without actually getting you sick. Yes, I've been thinking about it as a little bit like showing a picture to someone and say if this person comes to your door. Don't let them in and and that's essentially what you're doing with a vaccine. Right and I guess there are a couple of different ways. Occur virus vaccine can maybe trigger that response. Tell me about a couple of them. Well one thing you can do is you can actually kill the virus. What does that mean well? It's not really alive, but let's say treat it with heat or formaldehyde. It's no longer working and you inject into somebody well. It has the shape of virus and the look of a virus, but it doesn't do it. A virus does so the immune system can respond to that. That's kind of how the polio vaccine that Jonas Salk came up with. Or you can take the virus and modify it so that it's no longer able to make someone sick That's basically what the Sabin Polio vaccine did. It weakened the poliovirus. Immune system saw it made all the right responses, but didn't Cause Disease Gotcha. Since those two, there have been married of different ways. It's just the idea of getting the Munin system to recognize parts of the virus so that it'll have an immune. Without actually making somebody sick all right. Let's talk to about why vaccine development takes so long because we mentioned earlier, it's normally very step by step process and I'm guessing that's why it takes a while right well. Yeah I, mean there are lots of steps in the process. First one is to make sure that the vaccine is safe. You're GONNA, be giving it to a lot of people, so you WANNA. Make sure it doesn't cause any problems on its own important, and then you want to make sure it has an immune reaction immune response, so you measure the cells that people make are the proteins that they make from the immune system after you've given them the vaccine. And then you want to make sure it prevents them from getting sick from the coronavirus. None of these sound like easy tasks I gotta say Yeah No it's. It's all time consuming. It's all difficult. It all requires a lot of people and patients and coordination and You can't really speed it up I. Mean if you WanNa, see if something's going to work for six months, you kind of. Of have to wait around for six months to see if it's GonNa work right, and so with this coronavirus receiving manufacturers trying to compress the time line, but this takes a lot of money and a lot of financial risk, so does anthony. FAUCI of the coronavirus task force thinks we can develop a vaccine by the end of this year, because the government is helping these manufacturers financially through. An warp speed. Here's vouch speaking with NPR's Rachel Martin. It's risking hundreds of millions of dollars, maybe a half a billion to a billion dollars. The government isn't destined that taking that risk way insane precede, and you'll save several months, so joe aside from this. What else can be done to move the process along well I mean one of the things you can do. Do is just get a lot of people working on the problem at the same time, and then you can also do things that will make sure that the regulatory processes smooth so the food and drug. Administration is coming along with you in every step so that they don't have to review everything. After you've done it, they can review everything as you're doing it. But. This idea of having a lot of labs involved in something that's going to really be helpful and I talked with Dr Lewis Fellow over at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School his team is developing something. It's packed with micro needles that contain tiny bits of the coronavirus, and the Niger needles are so small that you don't even feel them, so you while slap on the patch and wait a few weeks and boom, immunity corona virus. Virus Patch. It works if it works, but this is just one approach, and I think that they will basically feed off of each other This is GONNA help us to do these trials both quicker, and to find vaccine. That's most effective when we start to be to be able to compare these different approaches seven Joe. Let's say sometime in the future we have a winning vaccine or a few vaccines that are fully approved. How on planet, Earth Are we going to distribute them like who's who is going to get it I i. m Evi one vaccination. Are Those people born on March tenth? This is a scene from the movie contained I know we promised we wouldn't play this movie again on the PODCAST, but. This scene is kind of how vaccine was deployed at least in the film. So Joe is there massive lottery drawing in our future to decide who gets the CORONA VIRUS VACCINE? I don't think that's going to be the actual way that it's going to be ruled out. Okay. Most of the people I've talked to suggest that it's going to go first to healthcare workers and people who are on the frontlines of combating the disease, but then you want to think about the sort of the societal infrastructure. I mean who makes things go and. I think a number of years ago. People wouldn't necessarily have thought of delivery truck drivers says people who are crucial to the infrastructure of the country, and yet more and more people are now relying on deliveries to get stuff, and so they may be considered critical people who need to be vaccinated or their people who are at high risk for the disease. But the fact is that at some point, we're going to have to figure out a way to get this to everybody. Right Seth Berkley, for the CEO of an organization called Garvey. The vaccine alliance put it really well. We're not going to be safe as a world unless everywhere save so even if you know, we had parts of the world that would have a low spread or no spread. If you had large reservoirs of the virus in other places, of course, you have a risk of reintroduction I like that we're not going to be safe. As a world, unless everywhere is safe. Okay, last question Joe. Will the corona virus vaccine be one that changes every year because the corona virus changes every year. If we know that, or will it be more like the measles are the polio vaccine? We don't know we don't know which I could give you a better answer. But the answer right now is. We don't know so. There's not enough experience with this virus yet to know for sure, of course what's going to happen? It's possible that they'll be a different version that they all need to make vaccines against for every year. or it's also possible, and this is probably more likely that. They'll need to be boosters from time to time, maybe not as infrequently as measles, but may be more frequently that some so that the it's not clear how long the immune response that you get from. A vaccine will work so. The trouble is just I mean it's so new. The understanding of this virus that the people aren't saying

Joe Palca Polio Vaccine NPR Food And Drug Administration Sean Kirk Baltimore Jonas Salk Rachel Martin Seth Berkley Fauci Anthony Dr Lewis Fellow University Of Pittsburgh Medic CEO Garvey
Are Vitamins Just Expensive Urine?

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

06:42 min | 1 year ago

Are Vitamins Just Expensive Urine?

"Hello and welcome to this edition of the Green Wisdom Health. Show I'm Janet Lewis Sir. Lewis and we're here to give you a very informative show today, Hopefully we'll try to keep all this straits can is going to be a bunch of information and we hope all of you enjoy it, and we hope all of Y'all are doing well out in green wisdom land. this show is going to be called our vitamins, just expensive urine, and for those of you that are taking vitamins and know what they can do. There are many of you out there. That are new to listening to hell shows and are taking vitamins at. Maybe you're buying a big box store, and you don't really notice any difference and could say well. Maybe they're just expensive urine, so Dr Lewis is going to dispel some of those myths. He's GonNa tell you the differences. He's going to tell you. What a good vitamin and a different! Grade of category will do on lab work. What it what it can move for as far as lab value numbers, which is why we run lab and what a bad one can do as well but I I think we WANNA. Start this show off. We've got a bunch of questions but we have got a letter from one of our very loyal patients for many years at was kind enough to refer his friend to us. Who in turn had his wife do her lab with us? Michelle and so. Eric the one that actually did the referring to start with. Thank you very much Eric we love you. wrote a very nice letter to us over the weekend. And you guys as much as we try to inspire. You really helps when you inspire us as well and this did that for us, so I'd like to read that letter to you and then I'd like Dr Lewis to comment if that's okay this. He's ready to comment I know he is. So he wants to pass on, Eric wants to pass on some really good news Michelle did her lab with us and followed our instructions after a doctor visit that said her blood was out of whack, and she needed a bunch of prescription medications, and honestly that's when we get. A lot of people is when they don't want to take all these prescriptions. They Kinda. Wait until they've been hit with Oh my gosh, you're you're really sick, so let's lay all these drugs on you. So she got scared and her lab with us. Fast forward to this week when she went back to the doctor and told him well I. Did this Doctor Lewis Thing, and he looked at seven labs of panels and gave me some supplements to take. The doctor looked at the nurse. They chuckled and said you're peeing that down the drain, and they don't work, and you just need this ten dollar prescription and your cholesterol and triglycerides and blood pressure will be fine. So. He ran her blood work again call two days later and said he apologized I. Don't know who this guy is, but keep doing what you're doing and don't take these prescriptions. had better than fifty percent improvement in three months. How cool is that? Thanks for all you guys do. And you know the basics the. Of this I guess. The doctor actually wanted to know who Dr Lewis was so that was pretty cool. So Dr Lewis you want to tell us a little bit about What made you different? What made you do something different with her lab? Been What? Anybody, else would do I. Guess Well, because I'm a car proctor. I wouldn't prescribed drugs. Even if I could which I can't, but and I'm not against drugs, at all I love her medical profession, and but I've seen many many years ago where the medical doctors and osteopaths. they got were. They cannot really practice the the the and they have so called standard of care, which is not necessarily what's in the best interest of the patients, and they're frustrated, too. I've never seen an MD or do that wasn't just a wonderful person and had good intentions. But they're not trained that way. You know. I'm a contractor I. think everything's nerve supplier nutrition and he know sergeant everything's What can I do surgically to fix it, so we're all good people they're trying to help. Just you know one has opinion you like and so. Eric sent this email and he told me said. Don't let Janet Reba below the line. He had a little colorful remark about what he had to the doctor to see it at all. Eric, actually, she didn't until I pointed it out your Eric you're funny. I'm going to go down to port. Nitrous Texas wherever that is southeast. Texas Word Northeast Texas I'm. Go visit them sometimes. Some David I talked to Michelle. and. She's a sweetheart and she told me the story also and you know I'm not anti medical. They've saved my bacon more than once, but here's the problem. And unfortunately I'm pretty simple guy. Maybe unfortunately but. Since. When do we think that God is not involved in this process and why you know this thing, Oh, you just have expensive urine and I said on this one huge huge podcast I was a guest in. This guy has like quarter million listeners. Said something about expensive year and I said well. I just had a forty two dollar rib. I do. I have expensive excrement? You know it's foolish to think that your body doesn't take what it needs from that and use it for good. you have to take vitamins. You have to take good ones I've seen vitamins. Put out by famous doctors. You get famous by paying somebody ten or twenty grand route a book you know. Most of these books are not even written by the doctor. That's the only reason I could write a book. Have somebody do it better than me, but what happens is. Are The reason why you need vitamins and they have to be good ones. You know I've had a good wife and a bad one, so there's a difference in women. There's a difference in vitamins say. one of the things you have to realize that God's in control and he works in your body. Whatever you think God is, but North America is probably the most well fed, but undernourished people in history, the the souls been depleted of this nutritious at least for one hundred years. and now we're saturate and it with chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and it's Kinda. Killed The microorganisms that allow the nutrients to get up into. into the plant itself, and then we're feeding mannerly in inside and vitamin deficient. Food to our livestock, so they're not what they should be.

Dr Lewis Eric Janet Lewis Michelle North America Janet Reba Texas David Michelle.
The Kidneys Connection to Our Emotions

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

09:48 min | 1 year ago

The Kidneys Connection to Our Emotions

"Today. We're going to go off on a different subject here about kidneys. You guys haven't heard us discuss kidneys very much in the past episodes but we thought with everyone being a little bit on the fearful angry side we would address kidneys because they very much have to do with those emotions. So the name of this show today is called the kidneys connection to our emotions. And we're going to tell you a little bit about what to look for when you might suspect it your kidneys what you can take to help. Get them better and we also have a question at the end that we're going to answer. So Dr Lewis. Could you tell us why you have chosen to discuss the kidney connection today on our podcast? Well Yeah I'd love to. I chose to do this because Janet wanted to. That's right that is true. You know I think the main thing is is because the throughout this Kobe stuff that I think is you know crock. Crap but You know we. We've been told things so long so loud. You know you can tell a lie long enough and loud enough people begin to believe it and so saying stay safe Co home. Stay home be safe in. Its implying that US people like me. That think it's a crock that get out or sinful and where. The enemy were being brainwashed. Folks you've got to think past that and I'm absolutely amazed at the people that choose. It's a choice. They choose to cower down in fear and and we've noticed that people are more agitated more irritated and that's me because I can't believe that idiocy that's going on like trying to get into home depot and his lap. Geez there's one hundred and fifty feet between everybody but you're worried about how many people walking in the store and one of the reasons that we as a society besides the mental spiritual they're throwing at us is because we're eating incorrectly. We're drinking to excess with when it talks when you talk about alcohol. Excessive to me is very little but Done tight much and we get irritated because we're putting our her kidneys under stress. One of the worst things you can do is have high blood pressure that you don't take care of either medically or naturally or both because at high blood pressure can really calls all kinds of problems with the kidney so please please please take care your kidneys. It it's incredible is super important but kidneys are their damaged from all sorts of things like certain drugs are really really tough on the kidneys and you have to watch that and you know. Have your doctor that puts you on the medications to monitor that but heavy metals our society full of heavy metals. It's full of solvents. It's of a chemotherapy. Does that Different Benham's snake insect spider and I went through a lot of that after God only knows how many Brown recluse spider about gotten and it will wreak havoc on your kid. He's poisonous mushrooms. I don't know anything about that because I don't experiment with those mushrooms that grow on cow patties like some people. I know Do it because it's a psychedelic psychogenic psychotic or something Pesticides and we know we've got pesticides all over the. It's really really really common in our food. Which is a sad thing and herbicides and people say but I'm not around our besides York Janet. I was coming to work two days ago. And there's the Texas highway department spraying herbicides. Oh Good God but you know us a goat to eat but we have done that to ourselves with the poisons in our society and renal failure and not even failure but when you put your kidneys in stress it can add to things like congestive heart failure diabetes or diabetes slash Metabolic Syndrome. Can put pressure on your kidneys. It can go both ways and lock said before the chronic hypertension a bad thing liver disease liberal ever you got. The liber is like a woman. The Lib rain happy. Ain't nobody happy. And then you have diseases. The autoimmune diseases like Lupus and sickle cell. Things like that There are people that have genetic tendencies the have issues with Kidneys like poly cystic. Disease and kidneys. Are They Tennessee to have mineral accumulations that she usually calcium? And we see that into your analysis. It'll say crystals calcium oxalate. Now you know. We can't make any claims about supplements but if you're having calcium oxalate stones that usually means you have a lack of magnesium or potassium to offset because we get minerals that out of balance. And that's the problem with our society mentally and physically because we get out of balance we forget to laugh. We forget to you know have a good time and I just love people that come in here and I'll go hug their neck and watch them freak out or I'll shake their hand and it's like you know we've been doing this for tens of thousands of years and it's not an issue in. Don't you enjoy the HUG and s? You're actually I do I. I like the way you social distance dot because I don't social distance. That's one of the things we're missing. Now is the social interaction. That is way way more important than any other thing now again. I I said disappear. Podcast AGO that they're scripture somewhere to Bible. I forget probably proverbs but is a wiseman foresees danger and takes precautions K. And I think that's a smart thing to do but the Bible also says in Titus very plainly. God didn't give you a spirit of fear so quick fear crap You talk about stones oxalate downs in nineteen seventy four when you say stoned rattling talking about oxalate stones. The ones that are GONNA be urine. Just what would those manifest in normal? Layman's terms that someone might understand that. They may have a kidney problem. Kidney Stones you know very sharp pain in the back and you know This is because one sweetheart of a sweetheart patients or no the different parts of magnesium and we're getting people that say well. I have this symptom and they want me to diagnose Office set a symptoms everytime time Janet. I give a list I say. Be careful though because these same symptoms can go with a different organ. Be careful how you diagnose off of just symptoms but one of the things That you can bet your bottom dollar as you're deficient in magnesium so I had this sweetheart patients they can you explain the different types of magnesium. I'm saying that because there's plenty of research says if you take magnesium it buffers The bad side effects of calcium or calcium oxalate stones that that's research that and it says be six. Pp and potassium so let's talk about. Magnesium purchased a little while because magnesium can take the anxiety irritability that we are feeling and. I think is obvious in my voice. It's like oh good. God quit despair crap but if you take magnesium there's actually research says magnesium if it's the right form can work even better. I'll stress anxiety. Depression era ability and anger than many many many drugs and again we can't make claims that but the research says it so let's talk just briefly about the different types of magnesium if you poop once a day or less unietd magnesium citrate now. We have that for people. They say about once as normal permissiveness common. But it's not normal. He got three trains in three trains. Out Is Janet says about three meals and three meals out so citrate because it was bound citric acid. And that's a pretty large molecule. And that's why you don't get enough in a multi vitamin or multi-mineral. Because it's a large molecule. Takes up too much. Real Estate It's a mild laxative. And so it's it's a great choice. Then you've got magnesium oxide folks it. They're putting oxide in your multi-donor multi-mineral throw it away. Because that's the cheap crap that yes it works as a laxative. But you don't really absorb it where you can absorb more the cows of magnesium citrate then you got the magnesium glassy night and it's a pretty gentle form that's what I'd generally suggest for people that have hypertension It slower going through the system. It absorbs a little bit less water. So you end up. Absorbing more of it It glasses night. Actually it's Connected to an Amino. Acid glossing blessing is incredibly incredibly incredibly important amino acid to help form neurotransmitters and calms your nerves.

Janet Bible United States Dr Lewis Different Benham Liver Disease Metabolic Syndrome Lupus York Texas Kobe Disease Tennessee Layman Wiseman Titus
You Cant Outrun Your Fork

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

11:53 min | 1 year ago

You Cant Outrun Your Fork

"And today. We are going to cite you with a show about gluten called. You can't outrun your work. Dr Louis came up with that. Catchy Title I think he stole it. Perhaps from someone else but We liked it so extra. That's right but so we're GONNA talk to you about foods that might cause you to want more of the same and some very exciting testing information that we have been waiting very long time for Where it would be convenient for you and great reports and ways for you to determine gluten or wheat sensitivity so to day Dr Louis Would you explain to us about gluten and why it such a big problem? And why would someone be intolerant to it and you know what does it? 'cause what's the big deal with gluten gluten free so big deal right? I think it is a big deal. some of the research says is one out of one hundred or two out of hundred. That has gluten intolerance ILIAC disease. You know if you have that kind of Gi Issues go see your Gi doctor. So you're in tarnished Get the test made. Although we're going to tell you about tasks that you can do with us that I found to be. Oh my God blow you into new reality of knowledge and understanding again. I'M GONNA go down too much rabbit. Trails You know when I read this thing in interior. Was you know everybody should follow Tara? She really good health coach and she rat some pretty intelligent newsletters. Just like brandy does for Janet May You know I think anyone that puts beans chiles kind of a heathen might not love the Lord. But it's not just about beans beans can have issues too but mostly we don't talk about. Grind grain is not good and some of the myths. 'cause I I really think Janice going to get into more detail than me but and I hear this all the time but I'm eating whole wheat bread because I'm getting whole grains well usually Whole wheat break usually doesn't contain very much of the whole grind because the number one ingredient he's usually called wheat flour There's nips but I love my oatmeal. It's like well. I two or three bowls boat meal per year and I think it's the most nutritious thing you can eat breakfast. I personally think that's very very not true. And I think it's better than a breakfast. You know of sugary cereal but OATMEAL has a pretty high glycemic load. And so I don't think that's a good thing because it generally means when you have a high glycemic stuff. It usually means that you're going to spend the rest of the day over eating because you're hungry because of glycemic index Well you know I think we need to back up a little bit here and tell people why we got so involved with gluten you know before we we tell people. Don't eat gluten you know. It's not good but at the same time we didn't have a personal experience with it or where we could relate to own my goodness. That's what's causing it. If it's many of you have been listening to us for years. Thank you so much or someone that's new. You know the personal history there with why we found this out is because Dr Lewis was experiencing severe stomach pains to the point. He thought he was going to die. I mean I was bitterly I. I was giving him everything that I knew to give him. And you know we know all about nutrition for those of you that don't like me Janice WanNa keep me alive so ninette and happy but he I would give him so many things and it was like nothing was making it right and it got so bad. He tried to take out extra life insurance because he was sure he wasn't going to make it. And you know how God works. He sends people longer path. When it's just your bleakest darkest hour and shows you something you would not have listened to previously and incomes a Representative or actually. We had a a one of our bottom representatives. Tell us about this country. This company called vibrant labs and they did A lot of blood work with just a little bit of blood and we were very excited about it because we thought well you know. We don't really know what we need to have run. We've got a pretty good deal going with our lab companies. Now you guys get great pricing on the labs we you know. I don't know how this is going to help us. And she said but they'll do a gluten test on you and wheat sensitivity and food sensitivity testing and and maybe Dr Lisk and find out what's wrong so when we did the testing at that time it was a blood draw and it had to be a person that came to your office or they came to your house and they drew the blood and then it was sent off Which we did and Dr. Louis came back that he was not only gluten intolerant but he was borderline Celia disease. Which is what that turns into if it's uncontrolled so you know telling someone to quit eating gluten and then seeing it on a on a report where it's glaring at you telling you this is the result of you. Eating gluten is two different things which made us want to start offering this test. So Dr Lewis Stop Gluten. He thought well that's the issue. I'll stop it. He did and immediately. He started feeling better and I thought so. I did the test mine. Wasn't that bad. It wasn't great turns out that anybody who lives in the United States has it to some degree because of the Chemical crawls and the increase in gluten in the grange compared to what it was a few decades ago right and so we both more so than I will make sure he does not eat gluten in a meal and I cannot tell you the difference in how you feel with your digestive system. You know if you're suffering from you know things like bloating and brain fog and and you eat something that you just feel like it. Just you can't. You're not gonNA ever process it. It's probably because you have some sort of an allergy to it But belly pain diarrhoea. Muscle pain anxiety. Headaches nausea confusion numbness. They're all signs of it. And frankly with the lab testing the way it was at the time. And I know many of you and I'm sweating explaining this many of you've been asking us when you're GonNa get this going because we really want to do this We couldn't count on having a person that would draw the blood all the time everywhere because we are able to to draw lab across the United States. It's not always convenient place for someone to get drawn so vibrant look really just came out with The ability to have it as a finger prick test in your home so the way it works is we've said everything up on our website. It's under Specialty panels tab at the top and it explains to you. What all is in this test? And these tests that we've seen before because Dr has looked at them many times from different companies there about three thousand dollars to run what we're running for six hundred dollars and the fact that it can be a finger prick test in your home so you're secure. You don't have to go to a lab which a lot of people are scared of now and it doesn't take that much blood to do. All of this is just. We're just so excited to be bringing it to you But they have what? You're what you'll get for that six hundred dollars as a wheat. Zumur panel a leaky gut panel and a food sensitivity profile panel of ninety. Six foods Where'd you fill out the Hell Star Bay? If you've not done our health survey it'll ask you it. It includes Wheat Gluten and electons. And then you'll be able to pick two more primary foods that you eat the most of and those are added but it it detects wieght and gluten related disorders it aids in this specific recognition of antibodies to wheat peptides including gluten and non gluten components along with intestinal permeability. It allows detection of protein. Antibodies associated with wheat and gluten sensitivities. Were information to reduce monitor and manage the inflammatory effects of those sensitivities. So you'll be able to tail and it. It gives it to you in beautiful reports. It tells you what you may be missing nutritionally not specifically our products but just in general which Dr Lewis will turn around and come up with products that are ours to correlate to these tests. So that you'll know which things you need. So Dr Lewis. Can you explain to us? How Leaky Gut. Why why would we test for that so much? You know what? What is it? We're trying to see with leaky gut. Well the Gluten Causes Zanjan Zanjan opens up the gaps and then the leaky gut can absorb poorly digested food. Proteins back to our microbes and it gets things in your blood stains bloodstream. You don't really want It's just a bad thing. A you know anybody. Listen to enough my podcast. Now that I get in different moods well. I'm in a different mood today. You know you know my main thing I want to say. Today's it's you know we. We named this thing. It's hard to run your Fort It's also hard to lose weight when you have overactive knife and fork so folks you've gotta take responsibility Lake Innis is very very very common number. We'll get into maybe a little bit of detail but you know I looked up. Some research and it said leaking can be reduced by Herbs Courson Journal and Pharmacology And we have had trouble keeping our courson slash Brahma Lane in stock although we have in stock now because there was plenty of research that says corser tend to really really good for things that are Respiratory illnesses you. Draw your own conclusion there but It's really good because it has not just the Carson but rude and Brahma Lane. Pat Pain Pancreatic and which includes lap as protease and analyze. Because you need the enzymes and it's really really good. My Barranca have always always been a my weak area and I've been talking to in the morning to at night and you know it also lowers inflammation because that shows in your c reactive protein. Her chance heart attack and stroke and I've been taking it home I got. I feel better than I felt in years but given up. The gluten was good thing so think about the gut leak in this can be reduced by taking a course. It's not just about lowering your c reactive protein. It's about all kinds of other things. I'd say get away from grains I have plenty of stuff here depend on how much you WanNa get into but You have to you know. Had One patient says well. I did a test and I learned to get off of whatever food was bothering her. The number one is weight Number two is milk like if you have colitis or IBS and again if you WANNA really

Dr Lewis Dr. Louis Food Sensitivity Janice Wan Herbs Courson Journal And Phar United States Headaches Dr Lisk Zanjan Zanjan Tara Representative Pat Pain Janet Barranca Brahma Lane Bloating IBS Carson Corser
Time to Reset Your Health

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

13:10 min | 1 year ago

Time to Reset Your Health

"Hello and welcome to this week's show. I'm Janet Lewis and Dr Louis and we are here to bring you another exciting show about your health We are calling this when it's time to reset your health because as the country resets their clock and gets back to business and a new normal. It's time that we do the same thing with our health we've Been home many of us and not doing things that are real great for us There are many of you that have we're going to address that as well But there's a whole lot that's been maybe overeating overdrinking doing some things. That might not have been as conducive to your health as what it should be. Even our little dog gained a half a pound during it eating wrong thing so well. She's actually eating right thing. She just ate too much of it. Which is a possibility as well and so Dr List today is going to educate us about What happens to deliver whenever that kind of thing happens The you know the dangers of what drinking too much does to deliver how to get some of that back. We're GONNA talk about doing lab work. Which if the people out here are new. And they don't know about lab work now is the time to get started with finding out. What's going on with your lab will address. That will address. What's in the lab work that helps us to know whether your liver is having an issue and those of you that are needing to do lab work again. Maybe this will kind of prompt you into knowing it's time to get started and kind of getting a new lease on life. So Dr Lewis. Can you guide US and help us with this new normal and help us find our way back to hell or start our health walk? Yeah well I hope to You know first of all you have to know route from wrong Wrongs the fun. Yep Got US in trouble We're GONNA talk about all kinds of things and you know I have people that come in. Well I can't lose weight or this or this. The problem is they're focusing incorrectly. And it's really hard to sometimes get somebody to understand. It's really about your focus and where you're putting your energy Only when you see the wellness that you won't rather than illness that you have. Will you heal? It's really that simple. But that's not simple today The the fear weakens your immune system and we've seen many many examples of that so we're mostly Gio. Janet wanted talk about liver She didn't want to because we she was reading. An article says Drinking you know kind of decreases. Your mental function is like well battering now. I don't drink habe never have but Sometimes people have a better liver than others. And you know I learned when I was not paying a slow metabolize. Alcohol therefore can do much but some of the liver symptoms that you may not think about could be dizziness. Dry Skin barring feet Itchy skin blurred vision. Some people take labor stuff and say well. Yeah I don't know it's weird my Beijing's better Excessive hair falling out Skin Rashes Metallic taste exam for example. But you know liver gallbladder feeling queasy or headaches over the Is or after a high fat meal. You're having issues burping belching bloating WanNa throw up can be a liberal slash gall bladder and you know if you think you have a bad issue you should always see a GI doctor in tarnished. If you're stools get light colored or Greasy Green he to use laxatives all the time. It could be any to be a lot of other things but Livers really important and I say this about the liver and I said about the thyroid. It you know it's L. saying if mom ain't happy nobody happy The liberal functions about pretty high select. I think it's a court and a half of blood it filters per minute and that's a lot so it has to convert things conversion of Glucose And actually protein into fat It acts as a storage storage unit for vitamins minerals. Sugar aren't and other needed compounds. There's so many possibilities and pretty much Janet. I don't have any notes for the show so forgive me if I really go down the rabbit trails but I think maybe he's been drinking too much. I'm not really sure now. Just kidding not yet. I wish you know we're talking amount of Munich system too and we're GONNA get into that cows. Brian Ask something about what did I think was best You know one thing you have to do to build them in house. You have to reduce inflammatory triggers and that could be many different things you have to build a metabolic reserve and the reason I went. There is because I just told you that the liver is a storehouse for many of those things You have to maintain barrier function EMMYS. Gi Track those at have constant chronic diarrhea Or even constipation the Abbey S. thing Many have all sorts of food. Sensitivities Gluten is probably the biggest one dairies probably number two. It it's easier if you avoid or eliminate the antigens or are the things that you're sensitive or allergic to an you once I got up gluttonous like holy cow. I feel so much better. But you have to create a healthy microbiome and and it's very very important so I'm really proud. That Big John. Sort of encouraged me to make the Combo. Chico's it really does help and I take massive amount of our encapsulated probiotics. Janet puts a lot of work into you. Know getting the best and at the at the best cost too. There's many many many things that you can do So you have to think about the GI essentials the glutamate immunoglobulins which would be the FBI. The probiotics And I had a guy here yesterday. Real young happy guy at remodels houses and he says you know I went for two months hurts about. Couldn't even work and now I got on this to merit complex and one other thing I can't reverse it in Bronwyn. Yup Okay Karston Brine and then to Mary Complex he said. I don't hard it. All of vitamin D is very very important. So laborers very important One of the things you know with a drinking extra during this time in our livers being affected by The drinking a whole lot. You're actually at risk for a niacin deficiency which you'd never do think about Niacin but that's It's a very big conversion factor that turns into trip to fan so you need to Maybe increase your Nice in which we have nice and slow release so it doesn't give you that fleshed feeling helps lower cholesterol to And then the other thing and what you are doing because of the alcohol Steph is actually shrinking your brain to some degree and causing Alzheimer's Type Symptoms. But one of the things to help with that is called in a see it snack itself form of an Amino. Acid is another useful tool is actually known to reduce alcohol consumption and withdrawal symptoms in rodents and cut down cravings in humans. So don't be a rodent. They had a steady a people who averaged one drink a week. Or Binge Drink Zero point three days a month knack increase the likelihood of alcohol abstinence and reduced drinks per week and drinking days per week in a sees. Also a huge mucus thinner Which we always give to people for lung function because that helps them expelled. The Mucus And we carried here. It's called in a C. But it's very beneficial for brain function because it may decrease levels of oxidative damage by protecting might Akon drill function and in doing so reduce. Alzheimer's risk especially when you combine it with poet asset. Dr Lewis is big fan of lap. Oik ACID SO. I thought it was very interesting that you could actually have something the helps detoxify your liver help with your brain and help reduce cravings for wanting the alcoholic in the first place

Janet Lewis Alzheimer Dr List United States Dr Lewis Niacin Chronic Diarrhea FBI Dry Skin Dr Louis Bloating Acid Munich Brian Mary Complex Chico Steph
"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

Conversations with Rosh Review

14:48 min | 1 year ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

"The houses that we lived in my kids became expert in historic preservation and archaeology. Because of the things that the earth found metal detecting in the art of Coin Tunis Seventeenth Eighteenth centuries and bottles and things like that so either of those. They go hand in hand. Whatever you do. You've got to do well and got to do with the involvement and so we all live down the kids First House. Croton and ossining. We lived in leading lived outside for the first year year. And a half. Because the house was unlivable lived on a porch winter and snow but learn to love the place they liked it and they all worked on doing stuff several woodburning stoves ultimately to make it work. But those were fun those were A. We could have our family experiences in solitude in the countryside and learned joy. What we're doing. Is there something that that's true that nobody agrees with you about something that you believe in that people don't agree with you? Well I mean. Everybody has their values on a scale so Several Times already. I have a son say pathologic optimism belief that you can always accomplish something. I think every patient has something to teach learn every every problem has a solution and we just haven't found it yet and I think you get people who who buy into that. Who agree that. I mean that we shouldn't have the world could be pretty idyllic place. Sometimes I feel you know I'm GonNa go home to the countryside. It looks idyllic. You can make it work and I think we should be able to do that. There are lots of people are doing pretty well with some much simpler environments that we have and enjoy what they're doing in their many ways to have some guy in the remote countryside of Romania or the rogue countries ever. They have house and they have something they do and is education better or is it not. I mean what is good and what is valuable for people so each person we see as a different need and we have to find out what they need and maybe we can help them. Maybe we can find the key to let them live a little better. I don't know but I think we'll do better. Maybe more heterogeneous staff were sociologists. Are more social workers are more people who are trying to? I mean if everybody's entitled to Palliative Care at whatever stage of their disease we can alter the course of their relationship to this medical problem. We can do better. We work on you know going back to finding people magazine's places to live or better education about how to take care of their kids. Maybe new stuff people would say that socialization of everything we do. Well the social. It really is everything we do is the socialization of the relationship to the world. I mean many people don't have a chance or don't have the capacity to live the fullest their lives and sometimes out of ignorance sometimes out of poverty sometimes out of abuse. There's lots of problems though so I think things can be better for everybody. We've got to find a way to do it. And if people headed things a little better the world would probably be a little better but takes time other than the walk to and from krant central station. That you chopping you. You mentioned the work of the garden. And but you've never formally exercise have you you get your exercise from get useful of doing something. So the walk or the or the raking of leaves or going digging in the garden transplanting. Stop for cutting that Branca. You know do moving a lot of stuff around. I don't know did the old days I mean I did. It was a tennis court near where I play tennis player. Who knows her stuff? I do a lot of hiking. The Woods With grandchildren her wandering and discovering things looking for things and I don't do anything though formal exercise. I mean get to You know when you're out doing stuff you do a lot of lifting and pulling and things so it's not as organized protection of your muscles is right. Probably the same things that you know so called. Man was doing thousands of years ago. I like to do activities that are productive as opposed to when I'm out cleaning up if whether it's weeding or cutting down stuff. It's very peaceful thanking relates. Lots of things that and get up first thing in the morning before it's light and work at my desk doing something and then when I go outside work in the yard. Let's weekend all the things that I left that I hadn't solved. I really solve all out there thinking very peaceful and other ideas that you wouldn't I mean it's a treatment for the chaos of the to see the order of plants animals during their thing figure out for meditation Yeah what about your Diet Eating Habits? I don't think I've ever seen eat anything I eat everyday. Has Your Diet changed over the years? Do stick to anything in particular You know when you're in Europe you have a lot of you go to the market. Every single day is to go to the kids before they went off to school you went down to the farmers market or knows. Block F. Away. We picked up a lot of vegetables. We picked up. We didn't have refrigerator for also get a piece of fish or meat for the day always had fish fresh fish. You Know Today. I go to find need vegetables. Go to the farmers market on the weekend on and Get some fish for a few days and I get some other meador. Nothing special I go to the my wife. Susan used to make bread scratch learned in Belgium win. So it's all that so now I go to there's Someone who else is making good homemade bread. I place in grand. Central Station is a Norwegian shopper. Swedish shopping tremendous Brad. The same kind of bread that Sudanese to make our make. That's everything so you stick to simple stuff a lot of cheese all sorts of being in Europe. You have just one hundred different remarkable cheeses and probably glass of Belgian Beers and we may have some for after this scenario. What advice would you give to a smart driven? Maybe medical student or resident about to enter the real world. Say maybe a resident who is finishing up residency. Not necessarily. What advice would you give? I want to hear a little of that. But also what advice should they nor think thing I tell lots of that? There's no way that the amount of money for the job is not going to help you very much. You have to enjoy the job you have to feel it. I think that to to avoid burnout and avoid new. You have to have a passion for something you really have to feel that. This is the one of the luckiest jobs. Imagine when you get to help people get to understand science you get to understand people understand the world and you get to be disgusted about the way it is and you can change things you have to find something that gives you remarkable pleasure and it's available in medicine. It may not be the kind that you ever been taught but you gotta find a way to feel that it's exciting. Otherwise it's it's not gonNa be good job for you. You're not going to be able to do a good job. You GotTa get pleasure by talking to people about things that are meaningful to them and maybe not to you. It's got to be seeming meaningfully. You gotTA help understand it. So I think we earn A lot of money as doctors and so that you don't have to take all that money and you have to preserve that some of the time that you will be spending on it. You can do things that are really meaningful to you so you try to tell people that sometimes fellowship is very good for some people sometimes job but sure that you have enough time you don't injure yourself psychologically or physically by the amount of clinical work. You're doing so you have some time to be doing something else. That's really powerful for you and there's no shortcut to that. You can't just because you can earn a lot of money so it would be you know the way. The university is giving everybody a free tuition. I mean I think that at least should be in the country for everybody. Who'S GONNA DO ADDICTION MEDICINE GERIATRICS FOR PALLIATIVE CARE? Primary Care Medicine or pediatrics? Because they're not those odd jobs are essential or the people working on health manpower deprived areas or Indian preserves. Reservations have to those jobs have to be filled than we have to find a way to do that. Maybe those should always get free tuition and then maybe whatever. The new specialty that becomes vital for society function but the things. No one's doing geriatrics. Not Enough people doing palliative care or hospice work or you know addiction. Medicine is going to need a ton of people for the next twenty years. It's greatest need especially demand so you're going to need something special to do and you'll feel good you just the way you know this woman. Abby Zuber who devoted her life to caring for people with AIDS I mean had started out with a disease that was lethal. And she let everybody's GonNa die in six months or three months. And she gave lots told me then recently oh she gave a lot of people that these chronic pain and were terrible shape. Gave them all opioids. And now they're all alive and their dependents. She still gives them opioids. Because it's too late to withdraw from the processor. But she was dealing with people she thought at the end of the life and now they're leading normal lives so they're great stories about things and things will change. I still use a lot of NALOXONE. In high concentrations now use a lot of an oxygen and low concentrations. Ed because we went from people who are using heroin and it overdose professional people using method on. And it's probably not the method on brought him to the overdose. It's the next over. No so the things that even simple principles that you change over time. But you've got to have a you have an open mind and you have to do something jubilee. Like and the advantage of for example emergency medicine is really do anything with it but people who are looking for an easier way to do it. I think the only way that's fun is when you really seeing the patients who were in desperate need. You can really feel good some days. You'RE GONNA save people's lives some days you're GonNa Begin the course of saving somebody's life someday. You're going to just get to talk to the family and you're GonNa do wonderful things so a lot of ways to be happy about it but it is demanding to keep up and is demanding. But you know one of my greatest pleasures. I'm sure as I'm in the Emergency Department tomorrow and so I do it and I like to go the same things. I've always done the only way I know how to do it. You know it was going to talk to the person and go and bring that person the student and the resident of the bedside. Look at something that we all missed the first time I read that. There's a quote by Abraham Lincoln. That says you can't escape the responsibility of tomorrow by aiding today. That's what I mean Many people have said that. That's you know people are dying and people are getting lousy care because of the way we do it or have done it and we can do much better can do it in a way. That's pretty exciting. And there are a hundred examples or thousand examples out of doing better in every place. So you've gotta take some of those. Yeah and if you don't then you're just You know that's what everybody Martin Luther King followed up with it. You know the those who sit idly by Are probably more at fault than those are the most aggressive against the values you have because those are the ones the ones who tolerate trump. Those are the ones tiring fascism everywhere. So it's it's a matter of recognizing that action is essential. You'll never be satisfied if you sat by and some of the Resin Jessica talking about misogyny the guys talking about the fact pit I have seen people one guy sitting over there was in a fraternity or club and he saw people saying that women and he didn't stand up. Someone said another said. How can you stand up all the time? If you don't do it then some young home is going to be abused every time you do what you have one less person. Because they're going to respect you when you're GONNA defend a new. Say It's inexcusable. And it does force you to be aggressive towards other people sometimes but there are times just as maybe I told yours and many other people are not acceptable. The call that Young Woman Sweetie Grandmother Sweetie sort. That's Mrs Jones to you..

people magazine Europe First House Coin Tunis Seventeenth Eightee Croton tennis ossining Martin Luther King Primary Care Medicine Romania Branca krant Belgium AIDS Central Station Belgian Beers Mrs Jones
"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

Conversations with Rosh Review

11:45 min | 1 year ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

"Being you could not fire someone who was tenured and so that made the difference. He could hold your salary and things like that. Make it difficult to function when he couldn't fire you so I had a job in the city. Wanted me I worked for the city and I worked for the university. The university wasn't cooperating. So I went basically for the city so created an independent force was wasted their him. In those days there was less integration of forces against you now it would be difficult. Can you talk about a failure of yours and how that failure or or maybe even in an apparent failure set up for later? Success developing emergency medicine was a great Failure from the beginning because it was turned down. I know I pushed a an academic department or to have a training residency from the early eighties. It took until nineties and had to present a proposal and headed to another proposal. I went to the mayor and I went to. The governor went to the Commissioner of Health. I went to the head of the health and hospital. I went to every faculty member who had a voting the chairman of the Medical Board here. Everybody said we couldn't do anything or they tried to do some. They couldn't do it so I failed there. Continuously and the I said the emergency department in the nineteen eighties after I'd gotten together. I said the emerged around here was disgracefully. Small was unacceptable with dangerous. And I think I went to. The Office of Management Budget with the presentation was either fourteen or eighteen. Times I had to go was always. It was too big. You're asking for too big and by the time the AIDS epidemic and said it's too small. I said I'll take it this time. You know it's just was rewriting. Things and redesigning and work with you started out. It was a five hundred thousand dollar deal that they said it was too expensive. They wanted to do for two hundred fifty so that I'm not gonNA take that. Was the hospital then. By the time it was ready you know it was enormous amount of the other failures like getting a An academic department you know after we got the residency in ninety or ninety one. They wanted to say you could be a professor of medicine and surgery and anesthesiology and pediatrics. Or whatever you wanted and we'll give you all four of those titles. I said I am refused to think that one only to be a professor of emergency medicine so it took from the time we got a residency until we got a department was sh- almost another fifteen years. Maybe thirteen or fourteen years and the guy L. Angolan who came to see us after the bombing of the World Trade Center was said. I'm a real ally of yours and you're doing wonderful things. He became a Giuliani who I did not get along. Well we're he this langone. Can I said you know ultimately he would say I like what you're doing. We should do it at the university. I said I've tried to get them to do anything. They don't WanNA listen to all to having an academic program so ultimately the Dean was he would always say in a meeting and say I'm to the right of Genghis Khan and you're to the left of marks but we agree. This should be an academic department of Emergency Medicine. We WanNA do. Did you always say meeting Langlands? Yes and he'd say in public you know. Did you get promoted to professor yet? I said No. Did you have an academic department? No we haven't gotten that until he would continue to push and he pushed ultimately deans to get it done well. He's Oh he was very supportive of what we're doing because it was wasn't a political position. This is practice physician just it outmoded to refuse to have an apartment of emergency medicine so he came into the picture just because he he was donating right he was truly became the chairman. He came to begin the chairman of the board of Trustees nyu. He's written two books about being from scratch biscuits the Home Depot. Or He's at least he's he was one of the founders home depot One of the early investors and then he just wrote a book called something like capitalism. Yes he likes every every right wing guy that around. I mean he likes him because he's police. And Gavin is exceptionally generous here. He's the guy who assured that they would be free tuition for everybody here when he's the guy he's treated a lot of these tendencies. He's he knows everybody he's a good guy. He likes people and he supported US immensely. And without him it would have dragged on forever. Wow dragged on for a long time but those are all failures of many people would. Everybody gave me advice on those battles that have maybe if I were more cooperative or more pleasant to the balloon took the other position. I said you know we're never going to win. People have battled forever for this. You know they battled each other fifteen years to get a residency and fifteen years to get a department on top of that. Don't stand up for our principles. We lose them now. In this battle we will win at some point. We've made great progress where writing books were doing research. They wouldn't let us do any h work because the dean had a sign off on it so we didn't have any rights to do a lot of stuff so he did it through the health department and we did it through other ways so I was maybe more stubborn than I should have been the other hand. I think it I don't know the answer is whether we could have gotten. I mean they may be someone else if I resigned. Could come in and they would have done it because they try to do for people replacement something else and they were looking for all sorts of people find find a way. I was too much of a thorn for the site of the old style. Doing it every time where you feel like you should have compromised and didn't before you answer that you know from what I gather. You would probably say you never compromise your values and principles. There's never a time for that. I mean that's what it sounds like. Maybe you alluded to this. Maybe I was a little stubborn where it was there ever a time. People said I was and I that I should have compromised with them and take the faculty promotion to help other. People get a faculty promotion are just there was Bo- can be part of the Department of ex. There were a lot of battles with other departments that over the rights of what we had to do. The resuscitation do trauma to do the things that had to be done. And by that point. Emergency Medicine progress elsewhere. I mean but there were. Many people of conscience were having big battles with their universities over this. You know we wrote a paper John Gallagher and I in a couple of other people and we were trying to do it. There was an inverse relationship between the academic city of a department at the height on the NIH award scale and the number of the higher the NIH award scale the lower. The percentage of areas that had departments of emergency medicine in places where there wasn't care of the most disenfranchised they did much better than where there was a link to the needs disenfranchised. It means a big change in. They didn't want academic departments emergency medicine. They were GONNA lose. They were worried about losing the role of their residents in emergency departments and the authority they had. I felt that was unethical to have them have authority. They didn't know what they were doing and they weren't doing what was best for the people that weren't communitarian. So it was lots of philosophic issues and they were. They weren't going to give supervision to the people if they had after the Lib Zion case they given supervision every place in hospitals. We'd be in better shape. It wasn't about the hours as much as was about the supervision people battled on the fact that it was the hours but it was really just the way in emergency medicine. We won and we accepted that we would have supervision twenty four hours a day seven days a week. No one else did that or very. Few people did in the beginning and over time. That's occurred but that was that they weren't the same people we were. The same people are working day and night. They hired hospitalised in those other services to do it and weren't totally integrated the system. So those are big battles. I mean I was on the Libyan case for several years. I spent a lot of time with it and I was told categorically I should not participate in just two for people who who may not know at the Libyan cases. Can you just take a minute? And just talk about the design daughter of affluent and prestigious been wife involved in New York City politics and journalism and lawyers and they Child went in to emergency department at Cornell Not have any just had interns and residents working in with a fever and they said she added hysterical agitation something like that for a viral syndrome with hysterical overlay and she hospital and rapidly got inadequate treatment and ended up dying of hyperthermia strapped to a bed. Never having been treated my next door neighbor was the assistant district attorney for Robert Morgan though Scott John Freed and so he came over. We never going to talk much. He came over. He said he had a case. You wanted me to look at it with him. Read I knew about it already. Heard about it a lot. And he wanted to have an adviser for the District Attorney's Office to look at it and so I then spent the he then drove me to work back and forth to work for several months. Swallow case was going on. I had never gone by the before. Never gone since but I went with him and we talked at length about it and Morgenthau was gonNA take it. Initially the thought was that it would be a case of negligence by the House. Officers might sense was that this was a case of negligence by the system. And it shouldn't be the people who the system is to blame and this this has to be changed and that led ultimately the court decision. That was along those lines. We use the standards for the nine one one committee that we'd established his physician city new. What had to be done in an emergency department? Was this a criminal case? This would have started as a grand jury took the position. Ida was a failure the system. Right right okay that lead to then a two year project with the Commissioner of Health the State near David axelrod formed a committee of about. I don't remember maybe nine or ten physicians from the State of New York or maybe an minister urgency nurses well or something like that and Chairs of medicine. Deans and coupled from various services ambulatory care and I was the emergency physician and that became standards of the state established for hours in supervision. David accident so that was an amazing but that was a three year project working on it by that changed the world medicine and certainly many people's perspective really the demonstration of the big issues in our healthcare system. What is one of the best or most worthwhile investments you've ever made? This could be time energy money. Something that you've invested in and has paid you back. I mean you could say the only a couple of things to come in and so the best thing in doing a good job one thing that talked at length and that's certainly a. You can't do it unless you don't do it. Well del release as possible to work with as many people match the world. You can't Do the finger working on. You can't be transformative in the world so that was to me. You know having a family. Having living in the country it was critical for the growth and development of my kids and my wife and myself and he just a way to live in the woods split all the wood that we had to do heath house sort of goal of fruit and vegetables that we hadn't so it was old place and my kids learn to grow things a lot and they learn to cook a lot from life. Whatever we grew we cook eaten three built..

chairman department of Emergency Medici professor NIH professor of medicine David axelrod Commissioner of Health faculty member AIDS US Chairs of medicine World Trade Center Genghis Khan Office of Management Budget Department of ex Medical Board Giuliani Home Depot L. Angolan Commissioner
"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

Conversations with Rosh Review

12:17 min | 1 year ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

"Onto be forever to a process of doing good work. You could say co worker Phil leaders. Working on hypertension would Ra- Maria Raven is in working on in San Francisco. Same thing she did hear grants number things that Kelly durant has here working environment. Toxicology often thin at the POINT CENTER FOR THIRTY YEARS. Forty years almost now. It's a commitment to working on a problem. That's in the public service you know. We have a guy named Dan. Lugosi tries to teach every single day but universal healthcare as something that's essential. I think people are devoted to values as values that I devoted. And you have so many people you know you can bandon spending as much time in a particular area that you gotTa Lotta Great Advocates. For Talk to them about what's going on but they. They know what to do that more evidence than I had. When I started working on hand I learned from them and so that we talk and we have lots think about different values and ideas but I mean so many people have gone off to do special things in areas. That are essential. You know the guy who was here from Kuwait your Anwar Amorebieta. We sell talk you too so long. Yeah so he's he's doing in Kuwait's great job. He had a tremendous battle over integrity of who to pass her exams whether the guy had to be good or be the son of the head of regulatory something. That's a everybody's got those and you've got to have the capacity to say no. I think if you do a job in a place like this where there's so many values stresses and set good examples. People become to recognize it. That's the norm. I mean I think you have to show that you can do it and so this is an you know a cauldron for experience and you'd like people come out of it having a sense of how to get the job done no matter where you go you know. You have this guide. Memory was he in your J. So he's working on the environment in talked recently in every. Everybody should be trained in environmental emergencies than He. You could do it in the emergency. Who has a problem today? That's related the environment. The guy is coughing when it there's the smog or the guy who's got frostbite the guy's got I mean. Are we prepared? Whatever you can take a host of things and you could train people from that perspective to look at the obvious causes. You're GonNa have to do something that's GonNa teach some of the resistors that this is a problem or risk. How many people are flooded out of their homes in this country today or who haven't closed hospitals closed host of areas? Just they're wiped out now so I think there's lots to us You know in terms of WHO's got lousy water. Why did we have lousy water? What's the quality and the river's you know? Look the Hudson River Consumer Dotson River and get crab into yet lint. Right yeah all right. So what is the book or books you've given most as a gift and why I don't know that I am? I was looking for one that I gave. The people recently see habits. I think it's called strong. Does by Abigail Zueger She's a great writer. She was a resident not strong shadow strong shoutings from an inner city AIDS clinic. Yeah suitor yeah did she. She brought near time she wrote for The New York. Times book section. Laura twenty years should now on the Bellevue. And she was a resident here she did infectious disease and then she did an ethics training and you know she talks about these talking about her patients that left an impact on her so he gave that to a number of residents couple of times when they did some creative writing and they read to the group I gave them that book as an example of someone who is also nearby. Who did that you know? She has wonderful story. You know I think. We gave all residents Bellevue Book by David Ocean skier. But the other things we use. God's hotel was booked by book by Victoria. Sweet gaither number people with general really about the almshouse in San Francisco where people were sent when they couldn't solve the problems and this doctor did slow medicine to look at the patient. Found the terrible problems so I think that that's a nice stories about physicians. Join Asaf tough issues when we look around us. Were sitting in your office right now. We look around the office there. Some books on these bookshelves. I'm sure you have many many more books and other places but is there any book on your shelf here? That you you kind of look at you. Glance at that serves as an Some purpose or inspiration or remind you of your work or I one book. I didn't know when I was a kid. Probably when I was twelve or thirteen my mother used to give me the New Yorker every month. Read Bertolucci early right in. His medical detective is certainly something that I think about is really that a lot of those stories. He sat in the New York City Pours and the Health Department there and got stories. They came in. Is that something that I often read about the New Yorker? It really was a guy who looked at the world and try to describe it. I think his father was a an epidemiologist. He was writer. Pretty quiet. I didn't want to ever come to talk to us. The data long island but he really had a lot of the first case of Lyme disease or the bad solicited poisoning from the poison centre. Things like that they really were Nice. Reads and was a style that I think I used to develop how we write the chapters in the textbook in the earlier part with a case and then with information relating to the evidence together. I see you have dreamland. Also that's actually the book so the Front Cover of Dreamland is Portsmouth Ohio seat round and it's it's right where I stay and I jog back and forth between shifts and I took a picture of myself as at that exact location. That's actually a fabulous any one or two books that are just over the years that that you've you've gifted or that you just really seem to be coming across the pathologies of power or anything that comes to mind depends on different errors. Yeah yeah absolutely you know. We a lot of books on a global health worked with the last ten years. Been spending a lot of time in Ghana and did a lot of reading the thoughtful approach to trying to be thoughtful about the things we do. Anything non-medical specifically And he works a fiction. That really you know emergency. Physicians is Frank. Hyler did the right of thirst. I think it's fiction but it's an Himalayans and it's really about Sort of the unintended consequences of going to help people and person's child's injured and how you do things and go lose a leg in what how he intervened. Do you do good or bad and read that. As as one example of Humboldt read recently you know so did tremendous books about earlier times looking at anything. How people acted in sort of often. Go back to reading about Darwin. I mean just to think about being an outside thinker you know like the Camus. I always read Latin English French and go back to that really thinking about it was the first one I read was the stranger and go back. Periodically have reread that. Because it's They changed the title. I liked it. I never thought the stranger was the right term. They changed the outsider. One of the more recent translations and it was someone looking on the world little differently than others. I often I could bond with that but we use the not your error but in the eighties when we were trying to keep the department together in the midst of the AIDS epidemic brought the plague and we talked about ready to many people. Try to get a sense of balance about how to deal with the world and how to get the community together help and solve the problem and understand it and so I think you had alluded to in the past is a sinclair Lewis. One of the jungle talk about that awesome that I read as a young guy that was very political guy but that was pretty simple. Just about how bad the Chicago meat. Markets could be and everybody had occupational injuries. They had you know either. You saw that you sometimes had beef in their pork or sometimes you had rats in the food you're being served in the guys working pickle component where they ended up with the acidity or alkalinity depending on what they're working with being so much they were injured themselves but work was like so. I think that's that's another great public. Health issue led to the FDA do so some people may look at you and and ask. Do you ever feel overwhelmed on focused? You never portrayed that right but being human it's only natural and so when you feel overwhelmed or unfocused store maybe lost her. Focus temporarily which are self talk. What do you do to to kind of refocus your mind or come back to the center? I think by Mccarthy episode taught me a lot and getting kicked out of Medical School told me a lot. I think that most other things you know I had a battle the dean who WanNa talk for years and we had no common ground and I think that what I learned in most of those experiences was that if you were doing what you believe with writing you've ultimately win it'll happen just it takes enough time and you have to think through is. Is this the right strategy? Or is this the right thing to believe in and if it was then a my sense is that you always win those things that concern about the way. The government behaved with McCarthyism. Were OUT STILL. Behaves is right. You've got the you know there are things that are simply obvious. What's right and wrong? I mean so rights was right in the battle had to be in the tank. Say you know people who are trained in racism for hundreds of years? Aren't going to change overnight there. It's embedded in their culture whether keeping up confederate statues. Or how you do it. It'll change it but it takes a long time to change. Things are better today in. Our classes are filled with people of all colors and Stripes and faculty. And so it'll happen. You know that I do use Berthold Brecht off in the great burning books poems. You know you've got the the honest thing when you're in battle you have to stay in the battle and offer You know did your books be burned. Also the journey honest man and makes a difference and so that I would say they In general I can resolve most of these battles either battles of a human rights battles of principle. You don't lose those battles. It's a delayed victory to some extent. I mean battles in the death of my wife was Probably more difficult than my daughters is in Saint. I'm more difficult than anything else. I. I didn't manage. I didn't I stopped working for number months while they were very sick and I came back to work slowly after that and then I had lots of do to help take my other kids and grandchildren and my son-in-law married to my oldest daughter I had lots to do but I can do my work if I can focus with intensity on the job and I can usually do that. I couldn't. I couldn't do that while my wife was sick. Nor for a while thereafter and so. I didn't do work. I worked on stuff like in a room like this or teaching theory but I didn't do much work and then again back to my own meaning in substance when I was working but you know my feeling was all I could do was fire me. That didn't have any weapons so that threats of not promoting me or not giving us department her not doing this or that that was petty stuff that was ultimately be one. They could try to fire but they didn't steamed in fire me and great part because when I came from Einstein I was a tenured associate professor because they did that at a very early stage than there was based upon creating this emergency department effort and the guy was a chair pushed throat so is protected and they did believe Farber that.

San Francisco writer Kuwait Kelly durant Ra- Maria Raven Lugosi Dan Hudson River Consumer Dotson R AIDS Berthold Brecht New York City Ghana Ohio sinclair Lewis Abigail Zueger Anwar Amorebieta Asaf
"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

Conversations with Rosh Review

13:54 min | 1 year ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

"We created out of emergency medicine here in the city. You know we're able to convince Koch you know you have a cold emergency in the winter that if the wind chill factor is below thirty two. Then you should put people up for the option of either going to the shelter here and across the city or if they refused shelter they can't sleep on the street. They brought a hospital was. They probably don't have capacity so their effort. Something there probably are others. Who shouldn't go to either but can't tell sue higher risk. And so we do that and you the same thing and you can't let people sleep on a hot tin roof winsome hundred degrees outside. And so you really bring people in we think about kind of compensated. Schizophrenic who's got twelve blankets on the blanket. Man Lives And he survives a winter because he's that and then he does not take off in. The spring writes heat. Stroke so I mean you see the things that happened. You see the kind of injuries you recognize where the crashes are in the streets in the crosswalk recognize the speed people go or the not enough chain. They've done a lot to change the timing of crosswalks based upon the intensity of traffic. And you know we have a lot of studies that Steve Walls doing a lot of epidemiologic studies on who are the people traffic. Crashes Where do they occur? What's going on? What would bike trouble to the bike lanes? Good that's part of our research in the process so that I think you see the problems of the world on the street and you then want to do that kind of research through the patients we get here. It's a great way to think about that. Walk and when you get on the train. What's that trainer? Ride like do read the paper to read a book de. Listen to music in the morning. I read the New York Times fatally. I like to look at the water's beautiful. I sit on the Hudson Riverside. It's amazing it's one two three or four Mile Wide River. It's quite beautiful. Look at and always doing something. I don't usually try to sleep on the train and try to do something whether it's to read the Journal articles for Tomorrow's Conference or whether it's for something that I'm writing working on getting the stuff together. It's a quiet time to read in though it's very useful. I don't think anybody else is going to be studying at some point during the day. So that bill. That in those are my study time to do things in the think about you know Reading The New York Times. You read a lot about what's going on in the city. The problems that are going on. Who's the person to get the information to see? They presented some medical problem effectively. You're known to be a Incredibly efficient ineffective worker as far juggling so many different projects at a time and people comment. I've heard And this is probably not true. No matter what time of day it is they send you an email. They get an email back within five minutes. And but yet we never see you or at least I never used to see you on any devices so we always wondered who was sending these emails. Probably Joan helped. Do you have a system A way that you've been able to be so productive. Is there anything that any advice or anything that people could think about or I think I have a good job? You know you get to help people. Every day you get to teach people who are going to help other people and so it's easy to be invested in the people you work with in a place like this because everybody's got to do something valuable and no one can succeed. As we mentioned earlier the problems are too tough so I need people to carry on continuously. So you don't want to not stimulate people who could go on to make the world a little better. I mean. It's like preparing for the future. The job won't be finished and that each new generation has more knowledge and ask tremendous creativity to change the world a little bit so it seems as though you can have an impact. I mean if you pay attention to people and talk to people. Listen to see what their needs are. See what they're thinking about. You know I right. I've got an idea of a pad that stays on my desk forever. That's got all the things that bother me and keeps getting updated and I use those things and so I've got little names next to the people who I think might take on that project and talk about it several times and then someone picks it up. Can you just tell us a little more about the system? When you say a pad is one of the piece of paper pads just a yellow pat carry yellow Pat Gray. I write stuff down when I see a case. Talk about and so you know when I if I'm going to have to talk make a An ethics presentation and a few months. I will picked up the cases and talking to people about an that got their names next swearing and use them to present the case. And that we're GONNA teach you other second study. That particular problem The others are big projects. I mean it always was homelessness. Alcoholism one type of problem or another looking for things and so I find the people find the right person to tackle a problem. They're looking for somebody something or somebody's got an interest so that we can transmit knowledge so we can understand something that no one's yet unable to grasp. Yeah do you maintain to keep these notes? These pads Ideas that you've done every The ideas that aren't allocated to someone Derek on. They're still there along. Is that list? Oh page pages and big things and then they're integrated and people are taking on parts of them. I mean I think that I told you this book that Raven and Kelly Durant are working on. Those problems have been there. They've taken them over. I mean they're devoted creative people trying to solve the same problems I was and so they helped me a great deal while they were here and there many others are doing these kind of things Ryan McCormick story. I mean everybody's taking on you know in your friend Phil Levi's working on hypertension and the inner city and to heart failure. These are totally preventable problems if we did our job well and the guy worked with. When I was at Mono- fewer Richard Cooper was very interested in racism and are interested in the African Diaspora. He and I ran into each other working on the same project in Ghana. He and I've been spending time together again. He's the I think. The Share of Epidemiology Loyola College in Chicago and linked with a third guy who also he and I were residence together and monitor and the guy who was the link is a fellow who is now in the population health program. A guy named Bengo GDP be. Who's come from the Nigeria? And is real scholar and working on his goal collaborates with what sites. Steve Walton other here they collaborate with doing good healthcare work in the mosques or churches or in the barber shops so that it's the kind of thing of solving this problem of hypertension solving this problem of untreated disease. Thinking about you need an army of people with all sorts of different strategies and not something. I wouldn't have thought about using the barber shop. I wouldn't have thought about using the mosque but other people who have religious experience or have better modern understanding where you have to go where the people are and you have to find a way to them to care. And how do you break the cycle of not wanting to get care so it takes that kind of innovation? You never thought that when we went to work on a project in Africa talked to the medical school but mainly we had to talk to the University. We need people from Nursing New People from social science. We need to people from law. We need them from economics. We need them every part of the system public policy and when we went architecture we went together and we talked about what they looked like. What that hospital in Africa looked like and we talked about what the system. What was GONNA try to do there? And that's exactly the way you've got to solve problems. No one can be left out of the system. No grant can work without it otherwise it fails because we don't have all the people's perspectives. You have to do a lot of this as an anthropologist would and he can't do it as Dr Intending to no one awful lot you need other people to be able to tell you. What from their perspectives relevant issue? So that's a big change. In the way I would say unable to think right through this process of real integration with you school global population health efforts. Gotcha one trait that. I always was so impressed. With was you would have people working on things dated realize that well two things really one is just about teaching and learning. They tell this to my wife. Danielle that the thing about Dr Gold. Franken is teaching. Is You're learning and you don't realize you're learning something and you don't realize teaching you something when you're doing something and that was something special to me and there's so many lessons that I remember just putting the side rail up something so basic putting the side rail up on on a patient's Bannon and why would we do that right. The other thing is really getting you inspired to take action to do something in an area that you never realized you would care about. I think many of your residents end up having careers based on not realizing that. That's something that they're going to ever be interested in. Then you inspire that in people. I think that's a really incredible skill than you do without telling people what to do but more of inspiring people to do direct. I think that's ask them do you want to do some the consequential not everybody's GonNa know what they WanNa do this. I didn't know I mean no one knows about what what surely focus on. So we opened up. Emergency medicine as a An Environment Without Borders right. And you want people. If they love their work they'll find something is something that bothered you. World is enough to soon time on it so find it and look at every patient you've gone and say what's wrong with the world that allowed this to happen and then it allows people to move in a fashion that is greater for them because then it's something that no one else ever thought about. No one else has ever solved it so you can solve something that's consequential and it could be something that other people would consider miniscule remarkably important. I'M GONNA move to some what I'm GONNA call rapid fire questions. They're not supposed to be fast. But kind of want to dig in a little to your philosophy ideology really kind of just your day to day and some other ideas so knowing what you know now what advice would you give to your twenty year old thirty year old self. Think you have to do something meaningful and you have to find that out if you don't if you're a profession to find out. What medicine is medicine? I thought I knew Madison's May when I got to Johns Hopkins at obviously the social crises were too great to concentrate on things that they thought were consequential..

The New York Times Koch Pat Gray Hudson Riverside Mile Wide River Steve Walls Africa Ghana Nigeria Johns Hopkins Journal Joan Phil Levi Chicago Ryan McCormick Steve Walton Derek Madison University Richard Cooper
"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

Conversations with Rosh Review

13:14 min | 1 year ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

"The aluminum is still there every morning. You know. And they're other people marianel in the Clinton Pharmacist. Who started the day? I came to Bellevue. She she came she. She was set up to go. Be on the cardiology service. She was from Saint John's university. They were offering her free. Clinical Pharmacists. And Richard Wiseman who came on that day. He's Day started also he that same day that I started in Bellevue in October of nineteen seventy nine Richard. Wiseman was supposed to envy sexual gynecology service but they were both from. Saint John's university that didn't that prohibited them to be involved with any abortions so they left floors the cardiology cardiologists said. This is necessary. We don't need anybody to help us do cardiology where the best clinical pharmacologist of our stuff he had. Richard Wiseman had elite. Because school wasn't let him bring students to the obstetrics floor so they came down and I didn't know them yet but they were both Hinson toxicology. So they'd bread. Maybe the second edition of our Tex. Maha came in. They said I don't have a job. I said what you can both have jobs with me immediately. They were paid by Saint John's whenever their salary is covered. I said one of you can be at the centre me and one of you can work here in the emergency department. You're hired and you can bring the students here anytime you want. So that's how we got started marrying. Alan comes from Trenton New Jersey by train every day and sits down in and goes to conference and then teaches all day long important center and those that goes back home. I used to see her on the train. S A student coming from New Jersey. This just circle back real quick to go. Frank Toxicology Ecology Book. That's been looted to head of how it started putting together some maybe case reports when you're in the South Bronx and I believe you're working on now. Which addition the Eleventh Eleventh Edition? And you've had input from hundreds or probably thousands of toxicologists and people have contributed to that book. You think it was more of circumstance that you started practicing the South Bronx and these pathologies were present. And this is what you're seeing that led you into toxicology. Or do you think there is a predilection. You had that attracted you to toxicology. Because I think when you know a large part of of how your defined as the clinician and your contributions a large part of that ease your contribution to the field of toxicology is that something that started just circumcision toxic plants as a child. That was interesting plants. I did a lot of reading. Botany I love Botany in College. I had an NSF grant National Science Foundation grant working on cobalt species. The fellow was interested in whether it might be related to something like rheumatoid arthritis in worked on cobalt toxicology. For while in college. So I Love Botany and I saw awful lot living in the woods and thinking about what was poisonous and wasn't deny Had these experiences and we had you know. A number of terrible poisonings in complex situations. When I was in Brussels I can see that. Alcoholism was prevalent. So I think it was interesting. I could look up other things in books in the South Bronx that had to do with internal medicine the head to do with surgical issues as I was learning them. But there wasn't any place to look the toxicology. So let's see and the other thing is that the epidemic of heroin epidemic going on for some time and we had the number of overdoses was overwhelming and it was just. Naloxone was just released people laboratory nine sign. We're using it. It just become improved. We were the first places in the world using the locks so really began to use it and it was remarkable with the lives. We save everybody. People were on Methadone. Then he locks on was a big asset. The way it is day and people aren't using other longing acting long acting preparation so it was just. We didn't know how to intubate people very well and we didn't have great equipment right. You didn't have fiber optic devices. You have a video assisted efforts you. You didn't have much in the way of technology so it was very difficult for everyone. People hadn't the training I hadn't had any training had a little bit of training but not much and so this wasn't easy to do so it was remarkable it. We did begin. This basic life support discussion. So bag valve mask was available and so no oxygen was something that we use very commonly. You didn't really have any method on to worry about at that point. So people didn't have dramatic withdrawal. They had short term withdrawal that they might have if they were on heroin and so it it changed the course of human events in the South Bronx and save lives became a big deal and then thought about the other toxins we began to see and so it was an uncharted territory in the midst of it. I mean I I had to learn all the other stuff but this was one that no one else was interested in right right. And how would you compare the opioid crisis of the seventies and eighties? Would you consider I mean? Was it a crisis then or just tremendous number of deaths. Tremendous and people were just dropped. In those days. There was a Rockefeller and standard. Was You're supposed to report people immediately? Anybody who's using heroin so the few people we knew in the city everybody agreed. We're not gonNA report anybody that would chase. People were already. People were just dropped on the on the door style because there weren't ambulances to pick people up and they didn't want to be seen with the person because they'd be arrested right so it was a battle but ultimately they gave us the state government gave us addiction counselors who would walk people from the Emergency Department to a detox center right after they either came in and withdrawal or people who had overdosed and then stabilized because we were already thinking about continuity of care and to do some harm reduction getting people places and they took them whether it did much good in those days. I was optimistic. That detoxification was going to help him to there. Wouldn't have that optimistic at all right now. I I spent time working in Portsmouth Ohio which is really start of the pill mills and with some people consider the main driver of the current opiate epidemic. What lessons can we take from the seventies and eighties or to apply now? Is there any lesson I would say that those of us who worked in the South Bronx are here? And when I got here said late seventies where to still heroine is going on in these people using lots of heroin. Is that most of the people who saw were poor people or African Americans or Hispanics the wrong so all the papers were about that right. Everybody assumed this was a problem of color right. And you couldn't get a strong OPIOID. They didn't exist yet at this time. You'll pill form or any other form. So that we never had opioids of any consequence available people so they weren't using that and what the inherited bias that probably saved. African Americans lives with it. There was a level of racism may be and not giving people who were of color enough that no one wanted to give them right. More drugs that we're GonNa Foster this EPA gray old epidemic and so it was the rich or that the Ellen Vermont New Hampshire in Staten Island as opposed to the South Bronx or West Virginia. Who were used getting these pills? And they were being prescribed them and many of them conceivably there are people who are doing it because they thought it was the right thing to do but they obviously. The design of those molecules was inherently catastrophic or the ability to resist dependency. Wow so I think that we now have a problem. That's comparable headed not into the election of trump probably with Obama's effort and holders effort would have been really dramatic changes in how we deal with substance dependency and probably presumably with Scott to come because the only solution is you can cut down. On all the opioids at people are prescribing. But that's GonNa tip large numbers of people into withdrawal who go to Fenton Hill and go to heroin. So you're going to have to work on decreasing numbers you're GonNa have to find solutions. And you know you're GONNA transform a lot of people into people on Buprenorphine now trek zone or method on to get through this epidemic where the plasticity of the brain is just become dependent and these people are very low success rate to become the absence. I duNno five percent. Maybe I'd say today whereas I used to think I was optimistic. The Su- thousand eighteen and I don't WanNa put you on the spot here. But what do you think? GonNa Happen with this. Current OPIOID epidemic in. Say three years. Five years are we going to be in a better place? What's IT GONNA look like? I mean what do you think it's GonNa look it's interesting? I have a I teach a class to the students who rotate in the emergency room. Almost everybody in the medical school does. Let's say and then we get a lot of outside rotator and so. I do it to our symposium where we all talk. Fifteen people are on each month. They talk about their experience with opioids in their community or for them as adolescents or them as young adults a- and there's always someone who talks about a next door neighbor who died or brother died or friends who've been treatment or the fact that they were on medication for something for dental extracted or for sports injury. And we're getting opioids for too long and really felt. They were on the verge of becoming dependent. And how it's disrupted people's everybody's got a story in the way they tell you know how some people say well we're having an opioid free emergency department and they see patients suffering because they need so. I don't think I mean I didn't have that kind of lecture when I was a student and people didn't have that up until recently so I think that's kind of thing that's probably mandatory in every training site in America and we have grants. We have people working on here. We've been doing for a decade or fifteen years working on treating the people giving sending people home with no lock zone working on getting it out in the community working on. We have some of our people who came here to work on an mini medical school community. Name our and altruism going out and teaching kids in grade school about drug risk and someone else roussel scouts talk psychology fellow very committed and it was also one of our residents whose out teaching kids about all of the drugs. That are at high risk. So we're doing a lot of stuff we're doing in. The pipeline of education is going down into the school's going into the community. And we have a lot of symposia about it. I mean everybody's talking about it and things are changing. I mean the doctors and dentists and whomever were using someone and things are stopping so I think it will be better but we're going to have a population who's AIDS epidemic. Where it was terrible and people were stabilized. And they'd thought they'd never live and they're living. And how do we get them to the next stage so I think doctors have changed and I think it's it's valuable when your next door neighbor is also on drugs and causing a lot of trouble. You recognize it's not color. These drugs were universally designed to keep the OPIOID CONCENTRATION. Such that people became dependent very effectively. Yeah so I think you probably turn the corner. As far as the providers. Go and the there'll be some little lag time before society feels those affects overall with GonNa have a lot of it depends on what they do. With regard to opioids for the Medicare population. They want to cut back on delivery. So what is going to go into withdrawal? We've seen people in their seventies who around using heroin so I think we'll have a tremendous problems but at least people are talking about it and some are doing something about it and we have some reasonable depot treatments naloxone and Naltrexone and Buprenorphine. So there we need a lot of creativity. GonNa need more support. You're GONNA need more protection for people but I think there's much more openness to action because then everyone's even a guy like pence or someone else like that has seen that the can have crises in Indiana. It just doesn't happen in the inner city so in a few hours. You're going to be doing something you've done. Probably for thirty forty years. Most days of the week. You'RE GONNA walk from Bellevue to Grand Central Terminal. You've been doing this. Walk Day in day out. Tell us about. Why do you walk? Would you think about when you're walk? What's that part of your day like when I had two kids it almond wife at home? We had a chance to think through all the stuff I do and to get peaceful time about doing it. I knew that I was going to be in the country and relaxing. Think about it With family and have a very complex where there's no sounds to figure out the house maybe the spring peepers and things like that and the walk in the. It makes you think about. Who's on the street. What kind of problems are there? You go past sign. That's selling jewels for Sixteen fifty for package and you recognize that what some thought was going to be good to help the people who are smokers. Get off smoking in the worry about whether they don't get it off and then they're getting worse deal because the nicotine concentration and smoke or you think about the kids who are buying these up in the same marketing as with opioids. So that's reminds you of stuff you see poverty You see affluence and then you feel whether know what it means when you're coming in when it's so hot you can't bear it and people are dying because heat stroke and you see The winter when it's so cold and people are freezing and you know..

South Bronx heroin Richard Wiseman Saint John Bellevue Emergency Department Frank Toxicology Ecology Book Buprenorphine Clinton Pharmacist Eleventh Eleventh Edition New Jersey NSF Botany in College Ohio Hinson Maha AIDS Naloxone Obama
"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

Conversations with Rosh Review

11:25 min | 1 year ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

"People? Why didn't the faculty worked full time in the hospital? Why weren't the supervision for us when we wanted it? Why do we only work in the morning? Whitewater go to the afternoon we wanted to work with faculty should be better taught. We should be taught at the bedside host of issues. That really were principles that I think I lived with and many did across Europe but those were principles that I think I brought back in really began to use as political strategy. Once again did it up. What medicine should be in? So that's how I developed my strategies to change emergency care. Create Emergency Care in America through the experiences that I've had in those days so your experience in medical school in Belgium you feel like shaped or at least really was spark to identifying the ability to treat patients an emergent way and in from Belgium you came to the Bronx or stop to In Connecticut I went to Connecticut University Connecticut and Mount Sinai Hospital there. I wasn't sure what I was going to do because I didn't. I was a conscientious objector but I had not been certified as one. It was going through appeals and when I left the country I didn't follow up at the draft board when I got back. I had to work again on that. But we're here was this around. I returned in nineteen seventy seventy so all the people in the residencies. I returned to her all taking the plank berry plan to avoid to finish their studies before they went into the military. I had refused to go into the army by said as number the ethical culture society. They think the guy talked me said senators when I had to go to my appeal board since I think since it doesn't have God it's not a religion was what he was worried about it and so then he said it was a value that it's a. I did not believe that war was good. I did not believe this particular. War was good so when I left Connecticut I spent a year in Connecticut and I had my capacity to go back to we had casting goes back to Belgium to To work if I had to do that but I also thought about going to Canada and we waited so I decided I need to go someplace which would be a health manpower deprived area which the relationship between Montefiore and more Seyni in the South Bronx was. That's where really began to understand. Emergency medicine they were just interns doing this job. And by the time I was in my second year began to write a draft of a protocol to become the director of the emergency department. Displace him to talk with the chief medicine. Who was very supportive of that? What I was doing and so that once I got back the United States. I thought that became a way to realize what I had to do. I didn't know how to do it. I had some ideas and they gave me a lot of leeway to start the development. So once you can have found this passion this 'cause what were some of the early steps took too because we look back on. It may seem obvious and it was an obvious at the time because there was no real specialty at the time and the way emergency medicine formed. I feel like it. Was you know groups of people around the country working independent of One? Another not necessarily knowing what they were doing what. We're kind of the real early phases of recognizing that this is a specialty itself. And you didn't have anybody else to talk with there. Wasn't anybody else doing the same stuff they were there. Probably a few people in the public hospitals here New York City Chelsea Jacobson. Jacoby Got Him Ralph Altman Metropolitan. I didn't know many of the people in there wasn't much communication strategy. I started you know. Add more this more Sania. City hospital was one hundred thousand visit E. D. in the South Bronx and it done been there as a resident. But you know you went in and you did your ships. You were alone. There wasn't any supervision. There was an overwhelming demand going on continuously and it was just one patient after the next and everybody at Erawan overdose are. Everybody fell out of building right. A car. Crasher and the surgical team was recently back a number of them from Vietnam and so there was a surgical attending team and we were beginning to that. We then rapidly hired people who are GonNa try to offer. The kind of Supervision Hospital had a number of great physicians Various Areas. And we were all looking at these overwhelming problems and they asked what he can do for emergency medicine. That's what the chair medicine said gave me the job whose fellow Dave Camerman and so. I said we'll give me a month and I'll figure out what I'm GONNA teach you about once a month at least talk without Steph and so I decided I didn't know but I'd already seen ten cases heroin overdose in a you know a thousand cases of poly drug overdoses in the first month. And so I said I'd do a toxin among the story month on Doksan and that began. What our textbook became just collecting had developed. Well I mean there wasn't anything. He couldn't go online anywhere. No one was talking about these things. That weren't any textbooks about docs these. I created very early on a volunteer system because there weren't enough nurses and doctors so I got high school kids from the community with a person who was running the volunteer office. And I said give me everything that says about heroin. Then give me an extra bedroom against method. Also get me go to the library during the index medicine. Find these things in. Let's get that stuff together so I can have stuff to read. I don't know where to find things about everybody. Everybody has their some forensic toxicology but there's no clinical toxicology of Under these circumstances and so had to do things it was obviously had to find a way to get the story from patients. People were waiting so much in various places couldn't get anybody buildings with a regular public hospital committed people but they didn't have time to build something so one weekend who was my oldest daughter and I he made and we put up four walls or something in the middle of the emergency department with some of the staff we created. That was gonna be our triage booth to start the had. Never been that. And you know where the the aimless people weren't trained yet they hadn't gone through any courses. We began in the mid nineteen seventies to develop training for advanced life support or training for paramedics. Never been a course on cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The American Heart Association just starting. So they're really. These things were just happening and so I think we knew that the different types of people but I kept a log of everything was going on the best of my billion who was happening one. What kind of problems that we have? What was the cause? People fell out of buildings. Kids fell out of buildings and then there was an active group of pediatricians in the group that worked on their That particular time was children can't fly. She had to put up window guards. That became part of the process and everybody was thinking the way. It was obvious to me. I thought in Brussels that everything had a cause and everything you saw you could by social action so the government was a way to solve. These problems had so how would mean everybody began to work together and there were oh so groups social activists and really. No one else was interested in south bronx except be a tough place to live as a lot of violence. Lots of drugs tremendous amount of poverty. And then how did you work on it and so I had to work with everyone? Who was there? So the clerks taught the clerks about hypertension and diabetes. Talk the registrar's taught the guy who was the security guard. Everybody who's involved the education. There weren't any other people that teach you to residents. He had worked with a few of the people and we begin to work with Beijing Department. And everybody we worked on special relationships but everybody had to who had hypertension diabetes congestive heart failure and asthma had to get into the clinic the next day or two days and the doctor who saw them we ended up with a resident said. We're GONNA follow that person up with nurse practitioners that we had so we ended up doing things that seem logical for me but they were the same problems. We're dealing with today that it was easy to solve it and you know in three years of doing that. We saw. We published a paper in the Archives of internal medicine showing that. There's a decreased admission rate for hypertension. Asthma congestive heart failure and diabetes. When you have ready access to an outpatient department and we had the people there to do something like that so there are simple things that seemed obvious and you could flow. I wasn't sure whether emergency medicine residency I did. I didn't even know enough about to think about it but I knew that the people who saw if you had seat belts on with rory recognized you had a problem everybody known had seatbelts. They didn't exist in. Most cars didn't have any tempered glass. Everybody had glass in them all over the place when they had a crash. There also things you'll learn if the vehicle flipped over. Yes yeah to watch everybody else. Even if the person only person was dead because we didn't have enough evidence We had opinions based upon these things but there were always patients everywhere and there wasn't enough space. There wasn't enough knowledge but there are a lot of people who are interested residents became interested. But you try to get organized I try to say I'M GONNA do rounds every morning at seven o'clock in the morning go roll cases and I WANNA go reached case with you before you go home at the end of the shift and so That to always took a long time because they didn't know anything and I was reading up on what the cases were and say well. That's not right and you have to do this. You have to use your time. And if the guy's become as alcoholic hypoglycemia. He's not going to go home. He has no gliding storm. So I'd have to defend and explain that to people and then so that then they would learn to distract people at six thirty so there was no one there when I got there at seven o'clock so I come in at six thirty and we do the same thing. So as a matter of It's the same problems that that you have forever and that people weren't adjusted to having supervision. They had always done it themselves. They learned a lot in theory but they didn't WanNa be get this kind of education. There wasn't this kind of intense supervision that was essential is that how bellevue during residency. We had morning report. We had walking rounds. Which was some? I tried to implement when I became program. Director was never as successful. Was that a carryover from when you first started working in. Well I mean that's where those I think that's the way we did it in In European you walked at the bedside and you talk to every patient and you looked at the fever chart at the end and you looked at the results that were there and so that was probably done on. Surgical on a pediatric ward is done every place so there was no reason you shouldn't do that in the army could do it any other way so he was just a standard in people had certainly hadn't done it because there wasn't anybody to walk around with them in the past. When I started I was the Internet at night. Someone's GonNa take over in the morning or there were two interns and someone took over in the morning. There was no supervision so when I was added. That was the first attending in that emergency department on a full-time basis and so it became. It was what I was going to try to do. And so I went over every case and when I got other people to come. We discussed the cases with people to teach the residents because they were going to go off and they would go to sleep and so those days. They didn't go to sleep right when finished. That was very hard. I mean we were on either when I was there. We were on twenty four hours then by the time I got. I said we would have twelve hour shifts and we would. At the end of the time we would do rounds. I think for anyone who's attended bellevue as a resident or as rotated through here Morning report is has been a highlight. Here correct me if I'm wrong. It's every day before every day conference the conference aware of a senior resident reports on a case and you get input from other residents or anyone into room. Really number people come all..

South Bronx Connecticut Belgium heroin director bellevue Europe Supervision Hospital Asthma Connecticut University Connect City hospital Archives of internal medicine Mount Sinai Hospital United States American Heart Association America Brussels Dave Camerman Doksan diabetes
"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

Conversations with Rosh Review

12:47 min | 1 year ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

"Task and no one makes any difference Emergency Department. You have to make contact with people you have to know them. You have to feel for them. You have to understand where they're coming from and what you could do to help. Sometimes it's a good discussion. The cliche is it's a teachable moment. But everybody who we think can come here has had stories that are important has capacity to really break a cycle sometimes think about it or to be changed himself for herself to become a different and better person and so it's essential to make that bond with people and so we talk with people of every imaginable behavior in every imaginable country. In the world. You'll learn a lot and you'll change yourself. I do it because it's fun I do it because it's I like the walk along with that resident because it's valuable to that resident and seeing how you do it. I don't think it's difficult but every glass or every other class we have one or two people and went into this project healthcare program. We've been doing for forty years and those people before they know anything about medicine. They know how to learn how to talk to people. They show that they're humanism is valuable they can make people visit to the emergency department a treasure because they talked not because what the president did or the nurse dinner of his but they take they can spend an hour with the person talking and listening and those people become great doctors because they've learned to listen. They learned that they can do wonderful things even if they didn't know any medicine and they have to learn the converse that if you know a lot of medicine and you don't talk to your patients. The patient and others goods can happen so that there's a combination of you humanism in your scientific methodology and your grasp aspects of medicine but integrating the two essential and. So that's an attempt to try to teach that I mean if I don't do those things then people won't believe that when I say I do them so that's part of doing it every time when I go to see somebody and I've listened to students talk presentation or the resins presentation then I go to get my presentation. Dave stimulate the patient to think about the process and understand what's going on and then I go in and ask the same questions. They did get a different answer. Because there really revved up to communicate and they understand the question better and we get to the bottom of the process and then you get to do the exam over again and you find something that's important and you get to spend time with the patient and touching the patient and being at ease about. Doing that is what we're trying to do. Touched the mind and touch the body and accomplish the task that you really want to be on that too. Often we go to fast. We're trying to be very efficient in emergency medicine. Well I would say it's pretty hard to be efficient in the Bellevue. Emergency Department with people have never seen a doctor. Before you don't speak the same language Yemen established a rapport easily in otherwise you go into someone when someone speaks French. Or let's say English. I can go in and shake hands and speak to them a good bit in language and break down a barrier smile a little bit and get going But for people who have to use a translator phone we use other devices. It takes a longer time and some people aren't health literate. Some people aren't whatever we need them to be to do a quick exam so we have to recognize. That efficiency might be entering the door and the emergency department. Get them in there and don't waste time with triage which isn't going to help us that much and find out the person's sick get the person's clothes off and then that part of the process made to become effective than we have to spend a lot of time to figure what's happening. I think everybody's got to do something like that. But certainly here. That's essential because of the tremendous gap between the patient and the providers of health. Care move back again and thing about a few of the things that we we've spoken about here and and I wanna ask you about. You mentioned that you speak French. And I feel like one of the crossroads in your life occurred prior to you being Dr but leading up to you being a doctor when you enrolled in Johns Hopkins Medical School and I want to hear a little about this story that you've spoken about a few times but when I think about it now listening to what you've said and I'll let you tell the story but what I see. Here is culmination of the intersection of the lessons. And the resistance From your parents would. You spoke about with Leading an ethical and carrying life and caring for all of humanity and really. It sounds like this then came to a head where you were pursuing a medical career. You'd rolled in Johns Hopkins Medical School. You're following your dream of being a doctor and then what happened there. I was not prepared to move from the north and the activist role. I had in college and civil rights or the things I was working on. We worried about the Cuban battles with the United States and moving to the south was certainly south of the Mason Dixon Line. I just gone just before I went to Johns Hopkins. I participate in the march on Washington and then I went to Johns Hopkins Just a few miles away in Baltimore and the place was still not integrated. And they're you know any place you look around. They were colored signs and there were White signs in that it was the year the diversity of people. I'd seen in college or that. I clearly more proxy. I think about today and see if it wasn't a single Asian in my medical school class. I don't know if there's anyone in the medical school in the student body. As the first African Americans would never accept the Johns Hopkins was in my class. They were only allowed to have ten percent of the classes women so it was strange. World and racism was everywhere. Everybody talked about in. Everybody acted and it was a strange feeling of things. I really thought were important and I went to the south because I thought it would be much easier participate in civil rights activity and I believed by that time. I was very clear. I believe in socialized medicine and it wasn't clear that everybody had to have the right. You know there was being debated in Congress in sixty three or sixty four Medicaid and Medicare. We're about to happen so just as I was starting strengths trans discussion. We had debates with no support for that at all. And there was a you know by the time Trying to find my way and having a reasonable time of joined by chemistry or anatomy or things like that and then Kennedy was assassinated and a few months after we'd started November so I've just been there for two months or so months. They were really. There was so many people who were so happy. These assignation of Kennedy that it gave you that feeling that just was where what kind of world will ris in. And so it was sort of downhill from there. I lost my belief that this could be a reasonable place to study and by the time shortly thereafter was called in to see the dean about being involved in a demonstration. Or I think in one minute we're turtlenecks to class or something like there's discussions about how you're supposed to behave and that I was argumentative about some stuff so it just it was a different world. Guy Said That you're not gonNA succeed. I said well I thought my grades were pretty good so far because they put them up. But that's a said professionalism is your ability to cooperate and participate in the culture of the institution or something like that. So doesn't matter what your grades are if you can't and professional that's what it being a doctor is yet to be professional. That's more obedient. Yeah so by the time I made it through that phase beginning to ready to the second half of the year. Which is I don't remember any longer. I could have been called in once more and not just got a letter that they didn't need me anymore. So I was terminated at that point I met a guy who was a professor at the University of Brussels in Philosophy. And he said the university Brussels is called the Free University of Brussels. We were resisted. The Nazis Everybody we believe that everybody has the right to say whatever is essential to say and You just have to come and you have to pass your exams and participate in learning so my wife and daughter and I got on a boat to go to afterthought about got off a boat and went off to Brussels to study and I wasn't sure I mean they didn't give me credit for some of the classes I had taken because they said anatomy was a two year course in Europe. Do it much more detail in one of the professors professor of Anatomy John Hopkins and he didn't like the Johns Hopkins scores because basically there were no lectures in was mainly dissection. And you know he. He believed you had to do it. So you got no credit for anatomy but she got credits for some of the other things. It was a remarkable experience. I learned to speak French. Well a little bit of Dutch and Flemish in a learned about universal health care. I spoke at length with the father of a slightly older classmate. Who was the guy wrote? The design of the Belgian a universal healthcare system. Shortly after the war. We saw it. The War was you know twenty years before but it was still a poor country just trying to gather and so it was a different life. We were treated royally as being Americans As foreign students in watch out for because we had a child and then second child trauma thereafter and learned a lot about. What Dr Scott do the doctor? There had done all a lot of work in the Congo. They were ultimately kicked out of the Congo. All they many of them went back to the Congo to work and participate but they talked about their racism. Talked about the problems associated that my class because the revolution in the Congo took place. During the years I was there the classes were filled with Congolese. Students are coming there because the university wasn't working in the Congo at that point so and they were a met. Lots of people. In the the number of African students was enormous and it was a tremendous learning experience. A number of people from Sudan and it became an environment where it was very politically interesting in heterogeneous. The world is there and I learned also a one of the most exciting times. Great course actually in public health or public policy really looked at why people got into trouble and had to come to ospital and really talked about sanitation and housing and things of that nature. You saw that. Every mother had to be checked out to see whether the home was good to bring the baby to. And you look at these things that were preventing disease and they wanted. They didn't want them pregnant woman to go home until they had penn seven days in the hospital and were nourished well and had have good warm beer during the hottest days of the year. Who's good to enhance lactation? And they wanted to make sure that you knew how to take care of a baby and had to prove it so my wife had approved just like every other woman in Brussels had to prove it so there was was safely slipping baby because they weren't gonNA take a chance at baby wasn't a development and the poor people were North African immigrants who lived in the same community that I did. There was an epidemic of meningococcemia. Amiga cockle meningitis. That occurred while I was on the pediatric rotation in the Emergency Department and in a week we had probably thirty or forty kids. Who had meningitis or meningococcal? Sepsis institution was filled with kids being treated and it was obvious that it was the poverty of them that the density people allowed so many kids to become infected locally but it also taught me about emergency medicine. You know you the beginning of the week a couple of kids and then there were others that were subtle and ultimately every kid who came in with headache or looked lousy ended up getting a spinal tap very early on and you end up picking up kids that who were very sick who had no signs and it became a pretty exciting experience in emergency medicine. About what MC senior or meningococcal and manage eighties was disease and so we have to triage protocol the same way. We developed triage protocols. Here when we're talking about diseases and this was that there was no emergency medicine that time. These are all people pediatric attending. Zain residents working in students working into department but it really was the exceeds exceptional excitement about a disease in the community people study. Who's in the community. Tried to get the look and look for people might become. Ill Bring Hospital. And how you responded to an epidemic so it was exactly the kind of stimulus that I and several of my coworkers who were transfer until one of them died recently. The three or four of us. Who who all became very excited about emergency medicine didn't exist in America didn't exist there but that close friend came the head of the pediatric emergency and the other. Co worker became a critical care worker. So that I think that epidemic transform several of US and the same time in that year or the sub-saharan you that year I guess. The Educational Revolution was going on in Europe in nineteen sixty eight really looking at. What was medicine serving the.

Johns Hopkins Emergency Department Congo Johns Hopkins Medical School United States Brussels Europe Zain Kennedy John Hopkins president Yemen Dave meningitis Bellevue Ill Bring Hospital meningococcemia Sepsis
"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

Conversations with Rosh Review

12:37 min | 1 year ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

"Member. Welcome donor politician actor actress. Dr Gold Frank pulled the curtain back in lying. There was a homeless man who had passed out from drinking too much alcohol. A man who has covered in emphasis and urinated on himself by initial reaction was one of surprise and disappointment. But then I realized I had been taught yet another lesson in humanity from one of the world's greatest teachers and this is not an uncommon story that I got. I got this kind of same concept here of caring for the people who had the hardest time caring for themselves and this is a theme that in the thirty or so years that. You've been bellevue that you've taught. I think it's about Everybody's human being and if you can teach people that everyone is value and from a student's perspective it's the human relationship for listening to a story to understand what the problem is and to learn the remarkably complicated probably the pharmacology toxicology alcohol or the poverty of being on the street. How do you make the world better so some days you can say you know? What could this teach someone every time we see somebody of this nature who someone? Who's in the emergency department? It's about how to prevent things. We're there what we asked properly as. Why do people like to do this? Why do people learn from it? And I've interviewed someone. We have the people we get together. And whoever is running the residency we were able to select people who could take an environment such as this and rise to the occasion to do something constructive about it. Think it's working. We look for people who could do something consequential with his experience not. Everybody should come to Bellevue. Not Everybody is going to profit from it. Not Everybody's going to take a learning experience well but those are the questions. Try to ask everybody. Can you tolerate caring for very poor people and that it's sense just coming here looking at it at the people and the environment it since coming here and leaving to change the world a little bit? It's easy to change the world but you can't be complacent you gotta be an activist. Everybody's got to do something wonderful with experience. They everything people have to rise to level to do something remarkable. That people need it so he have people that were a homeless guy said today. We've got a woman who works on. Who came and sat and talked same chair over there and the Kelly Durant said. She wanted to prevent homelessness. So you can't go to a Harvard University of Michigan to learn about how to prevent homelessness. GotTa go to where people are. Almost you gotta figure out these people bring you their problems. Their social determinants that a responsible person will solve. That's what Gregory Pincus did it. By needing to create or contraceptives. That's what w Perry taught me about trying to create food. So people don't have Marasmus kwashiorkor virtue. I would say you need the doctors. The advocate of the people are. You know the Clarence Darrow's the book about Clarence. Darrow is about Attorney for the dam. So the people we have or the people who have been neglected by society or haven't been given enough opportunity to survive and don't get enough help so that the goal is to show people that you need this alcoholic man who's covered with whatever was covered with or whatever he had it could be license. It'd be something you'll learn by looking at the manual. See the things that fail in our society and by doing this and getting the skills to manage that you have the potential to change the world we have a guy now working with us and Ryan McCormick. He came and he sat down and he talked after he'd finished residency at University of Maryland. He said I wanNA work with impoverished. Alcoholics I want to try to solve the problem. These guys have and he's got people who came in here. The people who were brought in one hundred times a year unconscious he demonstrated that they did have capacity once. They sobered up a little bit to be involved the research protocol. They obviously alternate agreed. There are many of them are on depot naltrexone and they stopped drinking and they're functioning again. I think it demonstrates the problems that we've recognized by being in a public hospital. We have problems that other people have not recognized and in the past. We've just looked at them and them by and not going to solve them and I think what having emergency physicians in Public Hospital in environment with extreme poverty and neglect of the newest immigrants that people no one else wants to deal with. Who allows the rest- spoke about those are the people who really teach us about life and teach us about Problems that we could solve we didn't we don't have to see a poor guy with the stroke. Retreated his hypertension. We don't have to see someone with diabetes melodies if we worked on the Diet or we worked on getting that person insult. We don't have to have a key to acidosis presenting here. We don't have to have asthma. We could effectively Decrease the amount of people to smoke in the latter level pollution and we can get people rapidly into clinics. We developed better drugs. The mercy be filled with people needing treatment for asthma residents. Don't know how to treat asthmatics any longer because we got better drugs and better access to the clinic and better communication with doctors. I mean there's so many things that could be done and so that my statement typically is if the world were good and we did our job well we would need emergency departments that very few people who need it because we get the problem solved so the goal of talking to people and interviewing everybody. It's someone say you know? Let someone else do it I would. I would say it's too important job because the fifteen people will come here year or six people come. You're you're of the people who have the commitment to try to solve the problems and suffered that they can't solve some of them and go on to make their career solving some of those problems and giving people a better chance. How do you tackled idea of homelessness disease of poor diet and poor choices that people make all the time and right? This is not a new problem. Thousands of years people have been making choices. And you know with philosophy. It's it's are we just kind of patching things do. We just have to wait. 'til society arrives at that point that it's evolved so much that we could deal with these problems in a different way. Well we didn't have when you were here when I started when I when I started in the South Bronx when I was a resident. There was one or two resonance on twenty four hours on twenty dollars off a now. They're faculty everywhere. There are many more residents and many more systems. Many more things being done. I mean there's a little bit of a reason for this to be smiling at what he sees going on. We're making some progress there. But the more we do the more we uncovered the more we have to do so it will never end. I mean just because the richest guys in the world are women. The world have tremendous problems. Also we're not going to solve all the problems but lots of people whose whose lives we can make better and so the objective is not to worry about whose life it is but the worry about a human being in trouble and to try to make progress for that person and when you get involved if we'd ask every resident find some problem you're interested in you know it could be a global health could be global health. It could be what we see about as opposed to Ghana NS gone. It could be the Ghanaians who live here in the community. It could be drug trafficking. It could be people who were sex crimes victims. It could be whomever and could be carrying for the newest immigrants. We hear you look at the community in which we serve and that everybody's an immigrant. That's my parents my grandparents. Everybody's everybody's recently here. The first generation their second generation their people from every nation in the world. I mean this is an experiment in living where the patients from everywhere and the staff come from everywhere and they learned the excitement of caring for somebody just like their grandmother. Someone just like them come from another country or their fathers just the opportunity to make the smiles on people's face when a young resident who speaks. Polish doesn't think important she only learned it in. School doesn't know much about how can help. Medicine is able to make someone who is not GonNa talk on the translator phone and his scared of talking to some of the doctor talks some young woman who knows something about Poland and can talk about it or someone who can speak Guys I work with and people who listen William Jiang's been translating Cantonese forever for the people who can't get a great opportunity so the old days when I first came people who are from Chinatown. Don't come here until their near death today. There are plenty of them here all the time. Because maybe we've made it a warm environment. Maybe people speak Chinese. Maybe the translator phone is better. Maybe there are some live translators but lots of residents common. They say you know. My Grandmother said if. I don't maintain my mandarin and Bengali. I'm not going to be able to speak to her so I work on it. I come to do that. That's why I come to this hospital and work. Lots of people have reasons right another story that was told to me. I'M GONNA call it. The Abraham Lincoln story here. I don't know if you're familiar with this or not. And maybe there's some myth but maybe it's there's some fact here I think the takeaways. There's certainly lessons here to take away regardless. But the Abraham Lincoln story is like many people can relate in emergency departments. There are women and men who who have a problem with. Alcoholism are here every day or every other day and they're recognized by the staff and knows them by name and cares for them and and there was one gentleman here at Bellevue in particular. Who was one of those who would drink a little too much and have to sleep it off here at Bellevue? And he would be coming here for years and then one day people notice he just stopped showing up. Didn't know what happened to him. And maybe six months or so later they see him Typically when they would see him he would be disheveled and not caring for himself when he was abusing alcohol and this time though six months later they see him and he's well dressed and cleaned up and maybe a nurse or resident. Ask him what happened. What changed what's going on in your life. And he said along the lines of well. Last time. I was in Bellevue. Drink too much. The night before vomited everywhere. And when I woke up I looked up. And Abraham Lincoln standing above me and told me to stop drinking and from that day on I stopped drinking and so I thought a lot about that story and what it really means and for those of you who don't know what Dr Gold. Frank looks like you could look them up on the web pretty easily. But he does have a beard and resembles Abraham Lincoln in many ways. But the lesson to me was every interaction is an opportunity to change. Someone's behavior and as a former program director and faculty member Emergency Department. It's something to constantly remind residents that every single patient you could change behavior. How do you maintain though right? This isn't three years of residency. How do you maintain that approach over decades and decades of seeing these problems not going away but still maintaining that conviction that belief of making change? I don't think I thought about the idea of burn out until I was taught by many people in these last years but I think that many of them when we talked about burnout had solutions for some said that. I'm GONNA spend two more minutes every single day with every patient I see and that's where my pleasure comes in life by doing getting those couple minutes and someone else said at the end of the day as a first year resident than the second year resident felt that I wasn't doing good job so I was really disgusted with on his doing and then I went around. I would decide I was GONNA say at the end of the shift. I was going to talk to each of the patients who were still there who was my patient. And the patient's said you're doing a great job and that Resin. Incentives smiled and felt that that was really remarkable. That I really may be was doing better than I thought. The patients gave me a better analysis. I think that going and talking to people there that everyone has a story. The ninety seven year old person as a great story the three year old child does a great story. If you listen and if you don't take the time to listen it's a technical.

Bellevue Abraham Lincoln Dr Gold Frank Clarence Darrow asthma Public Hospital Gregory Pincus naltrexone Ghana Kelly Durant Marasmus Harvard University of Michigan Ryan McCormick w Perry Poland University of Maryland Emergency Department Attorney program director
"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

Conversations with Rosh Review

09:42 min | 1 year ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

"We really live in the countryside on one mile or two mile road there were a couple of families was one family who I was quite friendly with and maybe a couple of others. But most of the people were either workers from the community or transplants. Something but it was mainly a mainstream republican community. Held him back then. Though is a little different than report is an hour or something like that so there was. I remember in grade school so that would have been in the about that time. The hours the Stevenson election probably two of us out of a class of twenty five. Who were pro. Stevenson is it was. It was a big Balkan community. This was a big deal politically for many people. But that's I always thought I think we lived way out in the country. There was a sense. I always held sightly outsider slightly different. I think that it helped my formation as a thinker or reader. You know I don't remember which it would have been reading particular books but there were the things that were different were important because in independent thinkers I mean I know probably by that agent so at thirteen may going to high school the next year or something like that. High school didn't teach evolution so a lot of Darwin or I got to read some of these great court cases I read things about the Clarence Darrow. Attorney for the dam. There's lots of things I learned that we're about people doing things that were different. And so I felt I didn't know a lot of people who had similar values was developing through reading and thinking about it. This taught me in one sense that whatever I was taught in the newspapers earn. School is probably not the whole story. Not The story. I was interested in so was always like skeptical of what I was hearing. So let me wary. It left. Certainly it was a tremendous impact on my parents. Earn a living in the way my sister was treated and ultimately I think that it was a critical developmental phase. Sounds like this curiosity that you developed this idea of independent exploration. Was this something that your parents kind of talked about. Or how did you become so curious? How did you understand at that young age and that there's more to the story that you know maybe to challenge the accepted way of of living? I think that One there were very few neighbors so that lots of time was spent with myself and wandering the woods. Got Really Learning about botany. Zoology as I could study. My parents belong to the ethical society humanist group and so the few people I met there were clearly had more similar values to mine and the intellectual things we talked about. Were distinctly that different than that which we didn't school so there were a few people are certainly support and my parents went to the theater periodically to see something that was important whether it was a battle like Lincoln or something. Probably about Darrow. I don't remember when I saw the opening of raisin in the sun or something like that a little later so the idea's about things didn't see we didn't it certainly wasn't an integrated community was almost not integrated in any sense seeing someone the only African Americans or black people. I saw it homer friends with my parents weren't any in the environment schools or things of that nature so I was trying to learn a lot of this myself and serve you talk with my parents of their friends but they were the friends. Were all people who had big political battles involved or big wife threats of the current political environment so it wasn't a realistic but it was. It was obviously oppressive education that I had to develop myself and figure out Mars going. Did your parents. You know as your advice or things that you remember that they will tell you. What was the dinner conversation or things like? That wasn't the dinner. Conversation was about politics about what was going on. And why there is this understanding the Korean War that point. You're thinking about the issues of civil rights which are developing in their friends of mine. Host of issues became the topic of conversation and the experiences they'd had in the past and that they were taking a low-key approach to his integrity that issue that you had to think these things through yet investigate the process. You know you had to read. The house was filled with books and they were big readers. We had to discuss a number thing that they helped and stimulated and talked about independent analysis of whatever. Hear whatever you believe. The have a lot of common values with the rest of the world and yet some very independent values at developed them so you can express yourself effectively and decide what to do with him so he do some things by baseball or played basketball. Whatever everybody else did and then I thought about what was the response away to do it. So how did you relate to the community? How did you relate to your work and assignments and ultimately go and do something I mean question would do and Sir Science was very interesting to me but I think the background was long before I learned about medicine. I don't think I had a doctor. I saw a couple of times but the issues things that I read Madame Curious. Young boy or recalled. The cracks book about Microbe Hunters were just amazing stories and things about What doctors did or what scientists did and by the time? I was a little older high school. I went to the Worcester Foundation for experimental biology. There was a summer science project that I applied for got about twenty or thirty of us. Who went to Worcester Massachusetts there? We were going to work at lectures. It was at the Worcester Foundation for experimental biology and we stayed at a alochol. Prep School of some sort during the summer. Call the Saint Mark's school and we were from all over the country rain twenty or thirty a young people and we got great. Lectures from revolutionary thinkers before the NIH gave a lot of money. This was a place where people did basic research and so my mentors there Gregory Pincus. Who was working on the contraceptive would say that. Able and talk to us. And they had these remarkable probably postdoctoral type people working with them and they talk with you and give you advice in the things that we did little laboratory experiments. At the Saint Mark's school some basic science efforts and a guy named and w period was working on the protein for human consumption. He wanted to feed the world because he thought that was. What if you put the protein which you extract these Lee from whatever plants in the community and put it into your VAT Ravioli in Italy to deal starvation and you can put fish? There's only one fishing development role someplace or split on your food someplace else and they'd project was set up in India and Ghana and important project was in Jamaica and there are places where you thought you could have an oxen grind up all whatever leaf products around and extract. The protein and save people from starvation. He was discovered a Malthusian. Very worried about the world and there was certainly lots of Kwashiorkor Marasmus so you saw a chemistry or science leading to change in the World Gregory Pincus was getting a pill to save people from being bored so we learned about abortion how many people got abortions a new died. There were many talks like that and so is really that a scientist was going to change the world and so it fit into the idea. People had to change the world. So that's what I learned my parents. That's what I learned from this kind of experience and so it was just part of one's responsibility to get involved and do something to think about so you could focus on things that were really beyond your capacity and you develop the skills and the spirit to do this so that you can meet liberal lifelock. Thanks for sharing that. I want to move forward few decades and you often and I remember being resident here. Bellevue and seeing presentations. You give you often quote. A part of the poem by Emma. Lazarus titled. The new classes written in in eighteen eighty. Three and the poem was written originally to raise money for the construction of the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty and ninety three the poem. It was put onto a bronze plaque mounted inside the pedestals lower level from poem. I I WANNA talk about a couple of stories that I've heard and see how they relate to this poem. Two new classes by Emma Lazarus is not like the brazen giant of Greek fame with conquering limbs astrid from land to land here at our C. Washed Sunset Gates shall stand mighty woman with torch whose flame is imprisoned lightning and her name mother of exiles from her beacon. Hand glows worldwide. Welcome her mild is command air bridged harbor that twin cities frame keep ancient lands. Your story pump cry. She was silent lips. And this is the part that very famous. Give me your tired your poor your huddled masses yearning to breathe free the wretched refuse of your teaming. Shore send these the homeless tempest. Toss to me. Lift my lamp beside the golden door and in preparing for this interview I reached out to as many of your former residents that I could find and I got story after story. And there's one in particular that I wanNA talk about because it became a theme. I'm going to read this as if I'm the resident one day during the early part of my fourth year residency. Dr Old. Frank asked if I could drop what I was doing to help them take care of. Vip that was just brought in by ambulance as a new chief resident feeling full of confidence in my skills. Emprie for being chosen for such a task. I sprinted to keep up with Dr Gold Frank Strides. My mind was racing as well as I formulated a picture of who this VIP possibly could be. Maybe a hospital executive board.

Gregory Pincus Clarence Darrow Emma Lazarus Worcester Foundation Stevenson scientist Dr Gold Frank Strides Statue of Liberty Worcester Massachusetts Prep School NIH Madame Curious Attorney Kwashiorkor Marasmus Sir Science Lincoln baseball
"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

Conversations with Rosh Review

13:57 min | 1 year ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

"Welcome to another episode of conversations. This is Adam rush and I wanNA thank you for joining me. Today's conversation has been a long time in the making. There is no justice I can do in this introduction to Dr Louis Gold Frank that would convey the impact. He has had not only on me but on the World Dr Gold. Frank is the former chairman of the Department of Emergency Medicine at New York University. Bellevue Hospital Center. The Nation's first public hospital. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and is widely considered one of the founders of emergency medicine and medical toxicology. He has authored. Countless scientific articles won numerous prestigious awards and is the editor of the most recognized medical toxicology book in the World Gold Francs toxicology. Now in its eleventh edition. I can say that every decision. I make literally every decision is influenced by the teachings of Dr Gold. Frank and I know this is also the case for anyone who has ever spent time with him. Dr Goal Frank is a positive force in so many ways. He is one of those rare people who lives the ideals he embodies when Dr Gold Frank speaks people gathered. Listen and then they're inspired to act PERHAPS HIS GREATEST INFLUENCE SAYS RAMA. Rao A MENTOR OF MINE. And a fellow -mergency medicine physician has been to teach us that to become a better physician. You need only to devote yourself to one task becoming a better person. The rest it seems will follow Dr Gold. Frank has been at the helm through many disasters. Such as nine eleven the AIDS crisis crack cocaine and opioid crises and the tuberculosis epidemic of New York City. Hurricane Sandy so many more he is the champion for the homeless and fervently believes in the worth of every single human being which is the principle that has guided his life instead of trying to give you a preview of everything we spoke about in his interview. I am simply going to say. This is the most intimate detailed conversation that I have ever heard. Dr Gold Frank engaging it is motivating inspiring and one that I will cherish for the remainder of my life. There is an exchange in chapter five of through the looking glass a famous children's novel by Lewis Carroll. It goes like this. The Queen says I'm just one hundred and one five months and a day. I can't believe that said Alice. Can't you the queen said in a pitying tone? Try again draw long breath and shut. Your eyes. Alice laughed. There's no use trying. She said one can't believe impossible things I dare say. You haven't had much practice said the queen. I was your age. I always did it for half an hour a day. Why sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. Dr Gold Frank helps you believe in impossible things and so often. He turns the impossible things in the possible. So without further ADO. Here's my conversation with Dr Louis. Gold Frank so I am sitting here with Dr Lewis Goal Frank and this has been a many years in the making for me. I have been wanting to this interview with you for a long long time and I finally have the courage to come into your office. Where believe it or not? I think it's let's see two thousand and three so fifteen years ago as a fourth year medical student. I remember sitting in this office during my interviews and you asked me a question of why I wanted to go to Bellevue and I had so many so many answers in my head that I wanted to tell you and I just kind of froze and you had the courtesy or or maybe you just felt bad you went on and kind of gave me some. Hinson into why I may WanNa come to you and I was able to answer that question pretty easily but I wanted to say welcome Dr Gold Frank. It's really really special honor to be able to have this conversation with you. Had we can do it then. Excellent so so much of how I make not only my decisions. The medicine but decisions in my life really come from where the foundations have started from things that you have taught me. And I know from talking to many of my colleagues and residents over the years that even years after they left Residency Training. How they make decisions when they are at the bedside. Your voice comes into their mind and what you've taught them really drives their decision making and it's really incredible legacy but I wanna go back many many years and try and identify and figure out what led to your ability to do this. What has really influenced you over the years of your life and I wanna go back I to your childhood. Maybe when you were around ten years old and doing some research for this interview I found out that your mother. I think her name is Helen. Kalani a gold. Frank she was actually hauled in front of Joe McCarthy's permit subcommittee on Investigations and this was during really heighten. The worst of McCarthyism on March twenty sixth nineteen fifty-three which happened. I found out to be the same day. I believe. This is just all Internet research the same day that the Great African American poet activist and playwright. Langston Hughes testified. I'm not sure if that's the case or not but that's what the records showed near. Mom was forty years old at the time. I think you are around ten years old. Can you tell us more about this? And what you remember from it. The impacted had on you as a child. And then really how. It's played a role in your life as an adult very dramatic experience My parents have been a very active in Activities Union organizing mother. Father spent a good time helping with the Communist Party and my mother spent a great deal of time at during the Second World War being an activist and bringing money behind the Nazi lines to support the people who were deeply threatened and help people escape from Nazi Germany. So she did that bit time. She was very successful for Wilde because she had blond hair up until that time until she was able to fool the people on the trains. You traveled with money strapped around body. Although near the end of that experience with too many people were questioning her and ultimately decided she wasn't safe to do that any longer and my father and jeet worked on many things of that human rights about support for the Spanish civil war. You know trying to protect people wherever they were my mother worked as the AFL CIO. She spent as a child did a lot of work in the young woman. Time in the coal mines out. Organiz trying to help people who had a tough life and weren't getting educated everything. My father did were really about getting rights or people. She and her sister did a graduation. Dance at high schools and they lived in Washington which is particularly segregated. They didn't integrated dance which got them in a lot of trouble activism and those were the friends of my parents of his were the ones that new well were very progressive. Very much interested in civil rights are mentioned. Human Rights Integration. Their incident adequate healthcare host of things. That didn't know much about the other side of the story. I knew their side of the story so it was a when my mother was investigated by McCarthy the headlines of the paper whereabouts local writer investigating McCarthy Communist risk in the community and would sort of education to me about politics not really knowing much other than all the things that seem to be wrong with. The world of my parents were working on that others were questioning that and so we had a lot of threats on the house and on our lives. We left our house and went to stay with a number of families for a couple of weeks not months or so. We were in and out after the hearing so it was a very dramatic experience but there are no lawyer was interested in taking a case from my mother taking her case so she and my father thought about someone who might be able to help and there was. Grandfather was an immigrant from Russia when he was a young guy and he became a pharmacist in New York pharmacy and then Washington. Dc had got very concerned every time. He made some money and got rid of the pharmacy and so everybody came and he fed them and he had no a lot of people in the young guy. My mother remembers who has law student who my grandfather paid for out of the money from the pharmacy and that guy was the one that my mother could find to represent her in front of the committee and like most of the people that point. She didn't WanNa name anybody's name so she took Fifth Amendment the process. It wasn't if any benefit that she was called before because she had books throughout USA ID or typical libraries across the world and these books were books that family was involved with is not looking at Apple Pie for Lois was. The questions were widened. Lola's like red apples as opposed to green apples and my mother did a lot of apple pie making the treason backyard and there were other earlier books. My mother had been book about insects. You know things for science For Children or science for young and she'd written other things about the Growth of child development and wrote about integration or wrote about the rights of people to participate in various activities and segregation so. There were things that they could comment on. She didn't respond in. That was sort of the end of the investigation. They could have called either one of them to be investigated they were interested in that day. As you said interested in people who were writing people had books so certainly the books. They looked at no political implications for anybody. I don't think that this was a subterfuge for anything other than just starting. She wrote books about snow birthday or Ginsburg thing in the countryside or things like that about going back into living back and forth in the city city springtime and what it was like to go between the country and the citizens we lived in the country and so those books most of our activities from the forties that we're not much else she won't for time she won't Fly. She wrote for number places where she was editorial writer and she worked for some of the union papers earlier but there really wasn't anything that was particularly critical and by the time I was born in nineteen forty one. She ended up spending a great deal of time at home. Once my father came back from the Second World War so I had a younger sister at that point and so as we mentioned earlier we were taken out of school and we went way for a month and then it was There's a neighbor who had helped repair my parents home. Built addition on it one point say a Norwegian ship worker. He pitches tenth on our front yard with his gun and said he'd be there to protect us. We said we wouldn't tolerate that in our country for people who are supportive of human rights and so it was a very dramatic experience. It was an awakening of sort of the difference between what the government was saying. Values were important from my perspective. And what I learned as being important you know in that social environment at home change for some time in that many of my parents friends in people didn't WanNa talk on the telephone. They all thought they're going to be investigated. There were many people who clearly were compromised by the people whose names were being used or that people. Just were fearful of having context of my youngest sister really lost her close friends families were very much afraid of having anybody visit with her and my mother wasn't able to publish a book for probably a decade people she submitted them to they ended up being published by someone else under some other name somebody else's taken the material so she was very angry and she lost a lot of time in her career and my father didn't progress substantially and his job for a long time because of the threats. A company he worked for was supportive. Doesn't accident so that was very dramatic for all of us and the friends my parents head. We're all very political. So those are the ones who stuck together and worked on support people were fighting for the retention of Passport Organic Corals. Lamont certainly was the guy who often talk with him. They work together number things and many others. The friends either stay in Mexico a went to Canada and try to get different jobs because they felt they were GonNa have an opportunity the United States so it was a formative stage of understand the politics of the time as a young boy. How long did this go for in your childhood? Was this something that kind of this constant threat of your different somehow or the community. You're in you said it sounds like was an support of there are people in the community that were like minded wasn't I would say it was a rural community to play school thornwood in New York. I mean very few people had similar values..

Dr Louis Gold Frank Dr Gold Frank Dr Gold Joe McCarthy Bellevue Hospital Center United States Institute of Medicine New York Apple Adam rush Dr Louis writer Lewis Carroll editor Alice Langston Hughes Hurricane Sandy National Academy of Sciences
"dr lewis" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"There are correct me if i'm wrong but the perception of of the effort by <hes> <hes> f. e. n. was they were to proactive correct. Is that correct or what what's the difference between why caring friends seem to succeed and final exit network did not okay <hes> so first of all both organizations <hes> quite it's similar <hes> final exit network evolved from carrying friends and included many of the same people and essentially it was was an organization of volunteers it and final exit network now is very much the same <hes> <hes> that <hes> is a ah you can look online and track them down and <hes> if a person is suffering <hes> and especially if they are living in a state that no that does not have that has not yet gotten around to <hes> testing laws <hes> dealing with assisted dying <hes> these folk who will help to do an assessment of the person's medical situation <hes> and <hes> if they meet certain criteria that the organization is that <hes> we'll send volunteers who are knowledgeable to the person's home <hes> and we'll provide them with information as to what they might do <hes> if they choose to four shorten their life <hes> and <hes> this is an organization where to the <hes> <hes> volunteers <hes> are willing to provide <hes> physical support in the sense of being abandoned the need just change that are willing to provide emotional support and are willing to actually be with the person <hes> at the moment <hes> in which <hes> this takes place. We'll be in touch with their family. <hes> <hes> the difference between what happened with caring friends and what's what's been happening with final exit network which is <hes> still as i say actively out there <hes> and i attended. I'm their annual board meeting. This year was incredibly impressed by the sincerity of the people who gathered <hes> is that <hes> carrying tearing friends <hes> kept things pretty quiet <hes> and they restricted their attention to members of the hemlock society <hes> an earlier organization nation <hes> final exit network pushed the envelope further open themselves up to the general public <hes> and even went so far as when they began again to be scrutinized by law enforcement <hes> have a public relations campaign <hes> that in many regards backfired <hes> by <hes> for the polarizing people's opinions about them <hes> but i gotta say like jack kevorkian my own on thinking about this group <hes> has become much more if you will <hes> respectful <hes> of <hes> what they do and what to do i would. The word i was thinking was nuanced so i would even better. Thank thank you so <hes> dr cohen were at our time again. The book a dignified ending take control of how we die recently polish polish. There'll be a link to it with the audio so let me say thank you for your time and and review of this <hes> maybe in the future relatively your next writing or future is we'll get back to mr freud discuss. Your son discussed since this year. You're trained in that field so thank you again. Dr cohen you have just heard another edition of the healthcare policy podcast hosted by david cosso to comment on this program or others to see information about upcoming interviews to suggest a program topic or two here an archive program. Please visit at our website. The healthcare policy podcasts dot com. Thank you for listening. Please listen again soon..

dr cohen jack kevorkian mr freud david cosso
"dr lewis" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

17:04 min | 2 years ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"Of substantial national importance. Your host for the program is david intraco a dc based healthcare policy analyst and researcher. We invite you to comment on a program by visiting the healthcare policy podcasts dot com now. Here's here's david welcome to healthcare policy podcast on the host david intra cosso during this podcast discuss with psychiatrist. Dr louis cohen one his recently published work a dignified ending taking control over how we die doctor cohen's bio is of course posted on the podcasts is website. Dr cohen welcome to the program david. Thank you so much and you can go with dr cohn. You could call me lou okay well. I think i'll devolve into lou. Thank you briefly on background. Assisted suicide or medical aid in dying is today legal in nine states and d._c. In order of passage oregon in one thousand nine hundred ninety four followed by washington montana vermont california colorado in d._c. Hawaii new jersey this year and it will be legal starting next year in the state of maine. The option is available to approximately one fifth of the u._s. Population in some related legislation has also been proposed in over twenty other or additional states ten state medical societies now allow physicians to default a course of treatment that comports with their conscience concerning public opinion he two thousand eighteen gallup poll found that three out of four american support laws allowing patients to seek the assistance of a physician in ending their life overseas medical aid and dying is legal in several countries including belgium canada luxembourg. The netherlands and switzerland listeners may be aware end of life has been the topic of several previous interviews last related was with the journalist and newman this past april fifteenth concerning a harper's article this past february on mercy killings clings with mcguinness gus latest work is dr louis cohen a dignified ending <hes> lou <hes> with that as a brief background introduction. Let me start by asking you particularly. Since you're a psychiatrist. How did suicide become defined as a mental illness well <hes> there was if you will evolution that has taken place is <hes> where if you want to <hes> <hes> start back in times in which there's maybe five or a half a dozen <hes> instances <hes> that are spelled out at people who took their lives who committed suicide <hes> one of the interesting things is that in the bible <hes> and i'm counting the new testament in this <hes> those acts those suicidal ex are not looked on on necessarily in a negative way <hes> if anything they are many of them are viewed with considerable admiration <hes> and as <hes> things that one might <hes> even aspired to <hes> <hes> <hes> so in christianity and judaism <hes> there was an evolution evolution and thinking <hes> the <hes> <hes> can be seen <hes> if you go back by the way to <hes> pretty can roman times <hes> there have been different periods in which again <hes> taking one's life <hes> was viewed as not necessarily a negative thing thing or <hes> an aberrant thing <hes> but a noble death was something that's the stoic <hes> <hes> put out there <hes> something that people <hes> should spouse and hope to achieve that people should be able to die in a way. That's consistent with how they lived. <hes> it's really <hes> comfortable augustine <hes> in the fifth century the suddenly there's a link made <hes> among the religious <hes> and which <hes> they point to the ten commandments and thou shalt not on kill or murder <hes> augustine suggested that applied also to killing oneself <hes> the suddenly suddenly <hes> suicide became sin suicide became not just a sin <hes> but <hes> something that was was prohibited something that had <hes> religious consequences <hes> <hes> in medieval times <hes> <hes> <hes> one was assured that one was going to go right to hell <hes> and suddenly laws were being passed. Civil laws were being passed <hes> mm-hmm at that time a big piece of it probably was a <hes> financially driven part of things <hes> which is that by killing yourself. You're depriving your liege lord of all the things that you could be producing <hes> for him <hes> and <hes> so <hes> <hes> suicide side was understood various ways including ones estate was taken over by the liege lord <hes> and <hes> the <hes> superstitions began to come into play and people would be intentionally buried if they kill themselves the crossroads of so full it could literally walk over their dead bodies. <hes> those bodies were sometimes <hes> <hes> steak was driven through the heart <hes> <hes> and and began to get <hes> criminal statutes placed <hes> where people who attempted tempted suicide <hes> we're also considered criminals <hes> and would be punished in various ways and it doesn't probably until the nineteenth nineteenth century and i'm sorry david. This is a long answer to short question. Please <hes> it's not until the really the nineteenth century entry <hes> <hes> twentieth century <hes> that <hes> <hes> there's a transformation from sin to crime to mental mental illness <hes> and <hes> <hes> the suicide. Um falls into the purview of psychiatric <hes> medicine and become come something that <hes> psychiatrists colleges conditions paver medicine clinicians <hes> are instructed structed to attend to and to prevent these things from happening. Okay thank you so <hes> as we'll get to suicide can be a symptom him of mental illness but not not in all cases which clearly you imply and your relative to going back. I did find it interesting. You start your volume by discussion of hercules and philip t._t.'s which you don't normally see in these work so i applaud you for that discussion impart. Just it doesn't aside. I'm curious to know if you know relative to insurance policies say say you're in one of these nine states. What's that i mentioned and say you're in oregon and you may be on the on the death. Certificate natural causes saves physician aid in dying how to insurance policies interpret that because typically if you commit suicide. There's no and you have a policy. There's the company won't pay although if you look little bit more carefully <hes> that is often. There's a time limit on that <hes> in which the clock begins ticking when people <hes> take out those policies <hes> and i don't i don't know if the six months or one year <hes> but beyond that if you committed suicide you would still be entitled to your life insurance back <hes> but that's an aside yes. Yes okay direct answer to your question. Is that every one of the <hes> legislators <hes> that have put together. The laws regarding assisted <hes> suicide. We'll call it and i and i should say by the way i'm perfectly comfortable in this book and i choose to use all the terms assisted suicide assisted dying <hes> medical assistance in dying and so on <hes> but <hes> the laws that have been passed in this country each one of them tackles exac- the question you've raised and each one makes makes it explicit <hes> the insurance companies cannot <hes> <hes> avoid wade payment of life insurance <hes> for people who make use of those laws okay. Thank you helpful. Let's get into the book there several themes in the volume <hes> let me start with a two i found particularly interesting and useful and those are your discussions of aden dying and contexts antics of patients with disabilities and those with alzheimer's or cognitive impairment on the former <hes> the disability community unity has been for good reason <hes> very concerned about this option. Can you explain what their concern has been and how this issue has been addressed for those patients with otherwise <hes> disabilities sure and you put your finger david on the two areas that when i started writing this book i had not anticipated would be of interest to me the orchestra as much of the book as they do <hes>. They just became things that i i couldn't get away from <hes> that i just you know needed to sink my teeth teeth into <hes>. The first thing is to recognize that the so called disability community is not any kind of uniform <hes> group of people with a particular stance but rather <hes> you know like the american population <hes> is filled with different opinions <hes> on every the issue <hes> and so <hes> i have certainly encountered many folks who identify as having disabilities <hes> <hes> who <hes> are ardent supporters <hes> of their right to be able to take advent to have and to be able to take advantage of sorts so it's a laws <hes> that you've enumerated <hes> <hes> and they often will become spokespersons when these <hes> <hes> laws are debated in state legislators legislatures <hes> you do profile profile the other end which is the the organization interestingly titled not dead yet from the monty python movie <hes> they are. They are more cautious. <hes> they are ardent <hes> activists who are strongly opposition to such laws and they come out regularly <hes> to any of the debates that take place or any of the opportunities to give depositions testimonies about these laws and they come out from me against it and i've been fascinated by them mnay try to follow what they have to say on this <hes> on the subject act <hes> john kelly <hes> is one of their leaders and <hes> he features prominently <hes> in the book <hes> i mean he's a man who i can relate to in terms of <hes> white educated <hes> interested interested in the world around him <hes> but someone who has now been <hes> restricted to a wheelchair <hes> for a number of years and who has become a avid spokesperson <hes> four point of view in massachusetts on his played a major part. I thank in preventing that our state the states that i live in <hes> from in fact <hes> passing <hes> a law to address this to become one of the <hes> <hes> communities that has passed and you know what i've learned from john what i've learned from listening to the other activists listen not not dead yet <hes> which sprung up by the way in reaction to jack kevorkian's <hes> public relations campaign ryan. We'll get it to him. Okay but what i've learned is <hes> that these are folk who are terrified <hes> and there's no other word four it at what these laws <hes> the harm that they can do to the disability community <hes> community that is was dependent on <hes> receiving accommodations <hes> receiving medical care and and support <hes> that allow them to maximally function in this world <hes> and what they've you laws like this as and again. I'm speaking for them and i apologize. If i don't get it quite right they would be quick to tell me. I'm not getting it quite right. <hes> you point that out talk. Yes yeah john one <hes> truly lamb best me and i don't hesitate about voting on it <hes> but you know what they believe is that <hes> the efforts should not be placed on helping people to die from their standpoint <hes> this this is a this is suicide <hes> and that's the term that they use all the time and that the society is being hypocritical when on one hand and it <hes> spouses all sorts of prevention and treatment <hes> to help people not commit suicide and then on the other hand when then folks come down with terminal illnesses <hes> we have these laws that say <hes> yes <hes> we will <hes> the and help you set up some rules that will allow you to end your life well. It's understandable that this is obviously a a population of very vulnerable people and i think the phrase using your book relative describing their concern is that <hes> aid in dying is a seductively inexpensive alternative to comprehensive palliative care so i did note that i thought that was a well phrase phrase routed to capturing <hes>. They're concerned you do relative vulnerability their unemployment and poverty rate which course contributes to this <hes> sadly early. Let's go to persons with cognitive impairment alzheimer's. You know the statistic one in eight older adults over five million million americans. <hes> you argue that under certain circumstances. It should be allowable. Can you explain how that what those circumstances circumstances are. What that circumstance is okay. <hes> i will be glad to but let me say that the story that we've through the touch on this most directly is that the young woman who comes down with dementia and who had stated did from her earliest time that she had no interest in going whole hog with it <hes> she wanted to have her life ended before it reached the point of being being severe <hes> and her husband was in agreement and the rest of her family was in agreement <hes> but people the human organism adapts and in her case <hes> time went on and she became more demented and she ends up dying <hes> after several years having been placed in the mount timers is a unit and i come out of this. You know i come out. Is it sort of feeling like <hes> there was a moment maybe when and things could've been done differently and she could have been helped to die but that moment passed and that the right thing was done in terms of <hes> both <hes> providing her with care so that she could maximally <hes> enjoy <hes> her life <hes>.

david Dr louis cohen oregon alzheimer john kelly lou Dr cohen dr cohn d._c david intra cosso david intraco doctor cohen augustine maine belgium policy analyst dc
"dr lewis" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

06:54 min | 3 years ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Hundred thousand dollars. Nobody expected to be the kind of hit. It was Donald Pleasants who played Dr Lewis had absolutely no idea what the script was about. He got it and said, no his daughter's read it and they said dad you've got to do this. And so for his daughters. He took the part, and it kind of made a career for him even though he had had a career before. But it kind of really made him an iconic pop culture figure. All because his daughter said, this is cool. Yeah. All right. So Jamie, Lee Curtis is back. If you ever saw any of the sequels to Halloween. All those are out the window as far as storyline goes, am, I am. I the only person who didn't know that her mom was the woman in psycho. Generally. Yes, I'm the only one apparent apparently once again, he is the daughter of James January. Born in one thousand nine hundred eighty six I imagine I'm not the only one born in the mid eighties who did know that answer. And who actually now knows that answer. Did you know Ron Reagan junior was the son of Ronald Reagan? I figured that. Okay. Because you were born in one thousand nine hundred eighty six so I don't know. I'm not sure if you knew anything at all, why didn't know her mom's name. Well, I heard her dad was your dad was I think our dad was Tony Curtis. Okay. That's where the Jamie Lee Curtis. Come. Well. I just heard that they watched the whole thing on Halloween yesterday and things, you know. Yeah. And found out that carpenter wanted to obviously stole a lot of shots filmed cues from Hitchcock. Yeah. And psycho. Yeah. And he wanted and boy did he ever wanna make kind of a lot of carbon copy to it hired her daughter. Yeah. And she actually January actually appeared in Halloween h two O in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight. Oh, really? Yeah. She had a small part. And in fact, was driving the car that she drove and one of her. Okay. Yeah. I've actually seen that I've only seen the first one and h two o I was in middle school. The rest of them are crap the whole idea on this story line is that Laurie strode the character. She played in the original has been waiting forty years. And she's become kind of like crazy old lady crazy old lady who is into all the self defense. Command bunker mentality of it. She's running she's learned how to fire guns. He's waiting for Michael Myers to come back. All the other movies are out the window. They're not part of the story line. This is just what happens forty years later after the original. Now, she's taking a little fire. Jamie Lee Curtis is, and I always thought Jamie Lee Curtis was a beautiful woman. She's married to. Christopher guest. Yeah. Yeah. All those mockumentary fantastic. Great stuff never made a bad one that I can think of best in show. And all right. So anyway, she's taking a little fire because you know, she's been out there on the road talking about she wants gun control, gun control, gun control, kind of typical Hollywood mindset who would ever imagine. And it was pointed out tour, but you say you want gun control, but the people who want to own guns, you're one of those people in this movie, and you kind of prove why you need one. Why you need a gun. That's right by the time the police show up to a mass shooting. It's over with, you know, and so it seems contradictory. It's and it does seem if you think about it seems very contradictory that guns subtle problems in Hollywood and movies, but everybody who makes those movies disagrees completely ignores the lesson that they put out in their movies. And so she said, look, I am pro second amendment. I just don't think people should have this kind of weapon or that kind of weapon. Okay. Bump stocks are those kinds of. Okay. All right. Yeah. Fine, whatever. Anyway, the reviews for this new Halloween. Yeah. All of them. Glowing realize that this is funny. Smart amazing. It'll give you nightmares. Is. It is it like thrilling. Or is it torture porn? I can't answer that question. That's what that is. Like, if we're talking like, a thriller that is fun to watch silence of the lambs kind of thing. There's some gory parts for the most part. You're just kind of on pins and needles. Yeah. I'm in. But if it's like hostile or saw. Yeah. Yeah. Well, those were reduce hostile what a piece of garbage. That was that seemed better film on gravy. Yeah. This one is getting rave reviews. People are saying this is very this is a very smart script. And this is what should have been made. So this is if you're a big nine years, if you're if you're a fan of the John Reid if you like Halloween, you're gonna love this movie. The reason their colleagues making more of these scary movies, even though they've made a lot. But now, they're really pumping money into them. Why shouldn't say pumping money into their dirty? These are low budget films, usually. Yeah. And the return can be great. What was the movie that almost want Beck's picture get out that was kind of a suspense film? And then you had the remake of it that made a lot of money. And so they don't put a lot. There's not a big price tag on these things to make now that's the big benefit one of the one of the most successful movies financially of all time was Blair witch project. I think they made for twenty eight thousand dollars three hundred million. It was written, by the way, you'll be glad to know that the guys who made that owned. It broke read a story about that a few years ago. Flat on their butts broke got nothing. All right now. Let me get to the Neil Armstrong movie little controversy, the movie's called I man, it's not dominating the box office. They're expecting a take of about twenty mil. Really? Yeah. They. Yeah. This is put out this is supposed to be this definitive great action movie. Got some good reviews, but the Apollo thirteen of our time kind of. Yeah. This is about eleven. Yeah. Yeah. But the peop- it's getting a lot of pushback from people at NASA saying, we don't know this person in this movie people people who knew Neil Armstrong said this is absolutely not him. I don't even know what the hell. This is. I imagine they he plays a real quiet and reserved from the from the trailer I've seen I don't know. I don't know anything about Neil Armstrong's personality. But that's what the movie at least in the trailer seems to be portraying quiet guy. Well, here's the problem with the movie they took they took the American flag out, which is caused a controversy. They wanted to say this. A human achievement of world achievement. When Neil Armstrong, according to everybody knew him said, no, no this was an American achievement and the other part of it is that amount of time. I'll have to save it until we get back. Laura Ingram, you can't be black and support Trump. So you're saying an entire class of people can't think a certain way, but what happened to free choice what happened to being an individual. And what.

Jamie Lee Curtis Neil Armstrong Tony Curtis Donald Pleasants Lee Curtis Hollywood Ron Reagan Ronald Reagan NASA Michael Myers Christopher guest James January Laura Ingram Beck Laurie carpenter Dr Lewis Hitchcock
"dr lewis" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Dr louis we welcome you to the program and thank you for the service that you have done for our country in the in the work that you have have done for so many years on our behalf one of the leading pioneers in concussion research well dr lewis welcome thanks frankie i will have to correct you're not a neurosurgeon actually i came at this from a very different angle but i appreciate the compliment tell me why though cbd oil why you love the hemp oil well you know i'm not i'm not that old but you know when i went to medical school there was there was i don't even think there was even anything in the literature about the endo canal system that you mentioned and so this is all fairly new and if we're going to be good clinicians good doctors good physicians and help people it you know it's intuitive to me that we need to continue to learn and so as i learned about this noodle e described ancient system that our body has just clicked just made sense that as a typical american we're how to balance and in many different ways whether that's a mega six to make it threes or whether it's our endo can just on but as we learn more about it it controls everything basically how we think how we feel how we react and so it just as this master receptor system throughout our brain and throughout our body that controls our levels of anxiety or levels of stress our immune response to all that it's just an amazing system that i think everybody needs to learn about you know we we have we have really been not understanding the brain to begin with and so for those of you just joining us dr michael lewis is where this season expert on brain health and you know you do so much with the brain i just assumed you were for whatever reason i had that in my in my own brain but had been doing brain research for a lot of years i i started about now almost ten well eleven years ago when i was active duty in the army so it has been right awhile era graduate of of of west point i mean we're talking about credentials that are outstanding on a good day you have talked so much about.

Dr louis dr lewis dr michael lewis eleven years
"dr lewis" Discussed on 20/20

20/20

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"dr lewis" Discussed on 20/20

"Back there to be a big injury on the left side and not something that's a global process throughout the entire brain the north koreans had claimed that this was a case of botulism a potentially fatal disease combined with a sleeping pill but you say you didn't find any evidence whatsoever of federalism at all that that's correct but dr lewis says even an autopsy which autos parents decided to forego would likely not have solved the mystery there's nothing that can be looked at from a pathological perspective to say here's exactly the sequence of events that happened while over there whatever the truth many wonder why young pioneer tours would even offer a trip like this in a statement to us the noted that none of the previous travellers who had been detained north korea had suffered such tragic finality still they will no longer be organizing tours for us citizens to north korea and they expressed their deepest sympathies to the warm beer family for more answers we sent an abc producer here to xiang china down this dark hallway he found the young pioneer tour offices tours the staffed in exactly give him a five star welcome to toss us not available note released statements.

koreans dr lewis north korea us producer