7 Burst results for "Dr Laura Riley"

"dr laura riley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:28 min | 2 d ago

"dr laura riley" Discussed on KCRW

"And I'm Rachel Martin. Good morning. Half of all adults in the U. S have now received at least one shot of a Corona virus vaccine. And as of today, everyone 16 and older is eligible to get vaccinated in every state, But the challenge is going to be getting the second half of the population vaccinated. Earlier today we spoke with Dr Anthony Fauci, the Biden administration's chief medical advisor. And we asked him about his own expectations for getting everyone vaccinated. By the end of May, There will be enough vaccines to vaccinate anyone who would want to be vaccinated and from a logistics standpoint, getting into people's arms. We hope we do it sooner, but no later than July. NPR's Allison Aubrey has been looking into that question. And she joins us now. Good morning, Alison. Good morning, Rachel. I mean, this is great news. Eligibility is opened up everywhere, right? That's right. Yes, Teenagers aged 16 and 17 have one option. That's the Fizer vaccine. Adults. 18 and up can get either Fizer armored arena. For now, The Johnson and Johnson vaccine is off the table. As the rare blood clots are being evaluated. Estates weren't expecting much of this vaccine right now, anyway, given an on going production issue, But this pause could be lifted later this week. In fact, the advisory committee on Immunization Practices is set to meet this Friday. The group advises the CDC and I spoke to Patricia Stench Field. She's a nonvoting member of the committee. I think there's no doubt that the pause does make people a little bit nervous, But I feel like it's the right thing to do. And I think in the long run, I think pauses like this builds confidence to say Yeah, you know, we had a pause. We looked at it. We evaluated it. We feel confident going forward. You know, there are a lot of directions. This could go Rachel. One possibility is that there could be some restrictions placed on the use of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine say by age. Remember, the blood clots were seen and women under the age of 50, right? So is there any evidence Alison, though, that this pause in the change a vaccine? Has led to hesitancy among women or or other folks who may have been on the fence about getting vaccinated in the first place. You know, among the healthcare providers I've spoken to Rachel. This pause has led to some concerns among people who may already be hesitant, including some pregnant people or those considering having a child. I talked to Dr Laura Riley. She's one of the authors of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists guidance policy on vaccination during pregnancy. She says she understands the concerns. The J and J stopped. I'm sure has thrown some people back on their heels. And so I think the purpose of the pause is not only you know, like, obviously, you want to see. Are there more cases, but you also wanted pause so that physicians and patients know what to do if they have the symptoms. You know, with so much attention on this. Once the pause is lifted, people could be warned about symptoms that could be warning signs. Physicians would know how to respond if the pas were lifted, and people are getting this vaccine again, she says. For now, she's advising patients to go ahead. Yet the Fizer Madonna vaccines because they're available, and she's reminding people that the risks of not getting vaccinated far exceed the risks tied to the shots, right. But even so, I mean, we have to acknowledge around the country. There are all these reports of vaccine appointments going unfilled. Even in places. I mean, which is everywhere now where eligibility is open. That's right. I mean, from pharmacies to clinics. There are lots of sites that report. They've not seen appointments. Philip is quickly as the supply has come in, and that's frustrating for everyone involved in this clear handing of the Association of Immunization Managers told me this is not limited to just one area of the country. No, it is certain areas of the country Certain counties. They tend to be white, conservative, evangelical counties, rural areas. You know, this is where we're seeing that demand is not as high as a supply. So more outreach maybe needed to help answer questions. Try to convince people I mean, we heard her reference, hesitant, C'mon white conservatives, which is really interesting because in the beginning of the whole debate over the vaccines, there was a whole lot of attention put on black communities and concerned that they were going to be really hesitant about getting the vaccine. Not so much anymore, huh? Yeah, well, you know, a Kaiser Family foundation pulled back in December. At the time, the rollout found 52% of black Americans said they would wait and see before signing up. More recent NPR PBS news are Maris poll found. 25% of black respondents said they did not get did not plan to get a shot compared to 28% of white respondents. So you know, not a big difference there clear hand and says there's been a lot of successful outreach efforts. Black doctors, black ministers, black nurses. There are so many black leaders involved getting vaccinating being vocal about it. I think it's helping tremendously, which is great news, But I imagine that the Johnson and Johnson pause on that vaccine, There could be a risk that that's slowing down the progress. You know, in May I've spoken to people doing outreach and vaccine education, including a doctor in Los Angeles, Dr Calvin Johnson. He told me that among the people who are most skeptical, you know he does feel he's making progress. But among those who were the most hesitant, this pause has led to more doubt. I think that my job is going to be more difficult. There's fear and there's anger. The thought is that they've been tricked vaccine came out too fast. It wasn't tested enough. See, I told you so. So clearly more work to do it more meeting people where they are answering their questions, he says, Having watched so many hospitalized people die from Cove it. The message he tries to communicate is that it's critical to get his many people vaccinated as quickly as possible. Can you just give us a sense of the numbers at this moment? Alison when it comes to the pandemic in general Sure, I mean, they're more than 65, or about 65,000 cases a day. On average. That's been the average over the past week. Deaths have been declining down to about 700 or so a day in terms of cases, it's mixed around the country. New YORK, New Jersey you're seeing declined. So that's good news. But cases have been rising in hot spots, including parts of Michigan, Pennsylvania, Florida Bottom line viruses still circulating nationwide. Here's Dr David Rubin of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia who who has been analyzing all the trends. Americans have quickly retreated from any sort of social distancing. So there's kind of this mismatch right now, where I think a lot of young and middle aged adults in particular and those who are vaccine hesitant are being swept up a bit into this long tail and a bit of a spring resurgence. You know now that eligibility is opened up..

Rachel Rachel Martin Alison Allison Aubrey David Rubin Los Angeles December Patricia Stench Field Calvin Johnson 52% New YORK Anthony Fauci 28% Michigan Philip Pennsylvania Kaiser Family Laura Riley 25% Johnson and Johnson
"dr laura riley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:56 min | 2 d ago

"dr laura riley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noel King. And I'm Rachel Martin. Good morning. Half of all adults in the U. S have now received at least one shot of a Corona virus vaccine. And as of today, everyone 16 and older is eligible to get vaccinated in every state, but the challenge is going to be getting the second half of the population vaccinated. NPR's Allison Aubrey has been looking into that question and joins us now. Good morning, Alison. Good morning, Rachel. I mean, this is great news. Eligibility is opened up everywhere, right? That's right. Yes, Teenagers aged 16 and 17 have one option. That's the Fizer vaccine. Adults, 18 and up can get either Fizer armored arena. For now, The Johnson and Johnson vaccine is off the table as the rare blood clots are being evaluated. The state's weren't expecting much of this vaccine right now, anyway, given an on going production issue. But this pause could be lifted later this week. In fact, the advisory committee on Immunization Practices is set to meet this Friday. The group advises the CDC and I spoke to Patricia Stench Field. She's a nonvoting member of the committee. I think there's no doubt that the pause does make people a little bit nervous, But I feel like it's the right thing to do. And I think in the long run, I think pauses like this builds confidence to say Yeah, you know, we had a pause. We looked at it. We evaluated it. We feel confident going forward. You know, there are a lot of directions. This could go Rachel. One possibility is that there could be some restrictions placed on the use of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine say by age. Remember, the blood clots were seen and women under the age of 50, right? So is there any evidence Alison, though, that this pause in the change a vaccine? Has led to hesitancy among women or or other folks who may have been on the fence about getting vaccinated in the first place. You know, among the healthcare providers I've spoken to Rachel. This pause has led to some concerns among people who may already be hesitant, including some pregnant people or those considering having a child. I talked to Dr Laura Riley. She's one of the authors of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists guidance policy on vaccination during pregnancy. She says she understands the concerns. The J and J stopped. I'm sure has, you know, thrown some people back on their heels? And so I think the purpose of the pause is not only, you know, like, obviously, you want to see, Are there more cases, but you also wanted pause so that physicians and patients know what to do if they have the symptoms. You know, with so much attention on this. Once the pause is lifted, people could be warned about symptoms that could be warning signs. Physicians would know how to respond if the paws were lifted, and people are getting this vaccine again, she says. For now, she's advising patients to go ahead. Yet the Fizer Madonna vaccines because they're available, and she's reminding people that the risks of not getting vaccinated far exceed the risks tied to the shots. Right. But even so, I mean, we have to acknowledge around the country. There are all these reports of vaccine appointments going unfilled, even in places. I mean, which is everywhere now where eligibility is open. That's right. I mean, from pharmacies to clinics. There are lots of sites that report. They've not seen appointments. Philip is quickly as the supply has come in, and that's frustrating for everyone involved in this clear handing of the Association of Immunization Managers told me this is not limited to just one area of the country. You know it is certain areas of the country Certain counties. They tend to be white, conservative, evangelical counties, rural areas. You know, this is where we're seeing that demand is not as high as a supply. So more outreach maybe needed to help answer questions. Try to convince people I mean, we heard her reference hesitancy among white conservatives, which is really interesting because in the beginning of the whole debate over the vaccines, there was a whole lot of attention put on black communities and concerned that they were going to be really hesitant about getting the vaccine. Not so much anymore, huh? Yeah, well, you know, the Kaiser Family Foundation pulled back in December. At the time, the rollout found 52% of black Americans said they would wait and see before signing up. More recent NPR PBS news are meris poll found. 25% of black respondents said they did not get did not plan to get a shot compared to 28% of white respondents. So you know, not a big difference there clear hand and says there's been a lot of successful outreach efforts. Black doctors, black ministers, black nurses. There are so many black leaders involved and engaged getting vaccinating being, you know, vocal about it. I think it's helping tremendously, which is great news. But I imagine that the Johnson and Johnson pause the pause in that vaccine. I mean, there could be a risk that that's slowing down the progress. You know, in May I've spoken to people doing outreach and vaccine education, including a doctor in Los Angeles, Dr Calvin Johnson. He told me that among the people who are most skeptical, you know he does feel he's making progress. But among those who were the most hesitant, this pause has led to more doubt. I think that my job is going to be more difficult. Given the pause in the change a vaccine. There's fear and there's anger. The thought is that they've been tricked. It's the vaccine came out too fast. It wasn't tested enough. See. I told you so. So clearly more work to do it more meeting people where they are answering their questions, he says. Having watched somebody hospitalized people die from Cove it. The message he tries to communicate is that it's critical to get this many people vaccinated as quickly as possible. Can you just give us a sense of the numbers at this moment? Alison when it comes to the pandemic in general, Sure, I mean they're more than 65, or about 65,000 cases a day. On average. That's been the average over the past week. Deaths have been declining down to about 700 or so a day in terms of cases, it's mixed around the country. New YORK, New Jersey you're seeing declined, so that's good news. But cases have been rising in hot spots, including parts of Michigan, Pennsylvania, Florida Bottom line viruses still circulating. Nationwide. Here's Dr David Rubin of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia who who has been analyzing all the trends. Americans that quickly retreated from any sort of social distancing. So there's kind of this mismatch right now, where I think a lot of young and middle aged adults in particular and those who are vaccine hesitant. Are being swept up a bit into this long tail and a bit of the spring resurgence. You know now that eligibility is opened up. The hope is that many of these unvaccinated young adults will up to get the shot and that can help to put this pandemic behind us. And a big question right now is really whether we will ever get to a level that would be considered herd immunity, right? That's right. I mean, you hear different numbers for those 80 to 85% of Americans need to have some protection. So you do the math and you look at what what's happening now they're clearly headwinds..

Rachel Martin Rachel Noel King Allison Aubrey Alison Pennsylvania Kaiser Family Foundation 80 Los Angeles December Michigan David Rubin 28% 52% Patricia Stench Field New YORK Laura Riley Calvin Johnson Florida 25%
"dr laura riley" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

06:21 min | 9 months ago

"dr laura riley" Discussed on Short Wave

"I think I've heard kind of floating around especially in my age demographic, which is, should I even get pregnant during a pandemic? You know if you're if you're trying to plan your life is this time to say well, maybe now is not the time many patients will ask me that I think it's a fair question I I also think that it is it's difficult for me to say that you should put your life on hold indefinitely because it's unclear to me sort of when this is quote unquote over. I think that it may be that we need to continue to take these kinds of precautions for a really long time even when there's a vaccine. So I don't know that now is the time. To, say, Oh, I'm going to wait until you know what? Twenty, twenty, two, twenty, two, twenty, three, that may not be. For all sorts of medical recent, the right thing to do depending on what your ages. Dodger Gotcha and. In we got another question that I thought was was made a lot of sense. I shouldn't say that. All of your questions made sense listeners if you're listening. Okay. So there was another question a question about how to decide who can visit a newborn like how much when do you have advice about what kinds of precautions new parents should be taking? Time to have a baby in the not be able to have people around you to support you and celebrate that right. Exactly. I think that this is one of those things that just sort of adds to the anxiety and the difficulty of having bbn a pandemic so you do need to think about those things. When you're making that decision from the last question. But what I've been seeing to patient is that you know you do need to minimize those exposures rate. So the same way that we wanted to keep. Women and children safe during the midst of really high numbers of exposures we were saying stay at home and wash those high touch surfaces. So yes, people can be tested, but you know how practical is it for them to be tested every single time they wanna come visit but you know I understand that there is a balance there. Between people coming just to. See The in which case there's zoom. Versus people coming to help you and support you and and that may be you know a reason that you have to take that little bit of risk. But again, if they take precautions, it should decrease the risk. Okay doctor Riley. So obviously not all pregnant women can afford the luxury of staying home right. So so what are kinds of challenges you're seeing your patients have to deal with during this pandemic in how are you trying to kind of support them through that? Yeah. So you know in my own mind I worry most about those women who are literally the frontline workers, right? So not so much the frontline healthcare workers which yeah, I worry about them too because of the exposures, but they can take precautions with mass than gowns and gloves and. Knowledge and you know all of that I worry about the people who are the food service workers, the Bass transit workers, people who will not be able to necessarily clearly, one can't do their job from home. And To may not have all the protection that they need and deserve, and then three don't have the luxury to say you know what this job is too high risk. So you know I remain very worried about that group of patients and in this country, a lot of that group of patients is black. Necks. So what kind of conversations are you having with those people what your role in trying to support them? So I think that you know this is where I go over as much as I possibly can what prevention strategies people can take, but just also recognize that ad it's just not that easy to say, Oh, you should stay home. I'm very cautious about saying things like that. because. That may not be appropriate, right? You should stay home that you have no wave eating I. think also, we've been very slow in medicine and really actually quite reluctant in healthcare in general to deal with the social determinants of Health I. Think people are like, yeah talking about it but no one really wants to ask the questions because of course, if you ask the question, you'll get answers that you don't necessarily want. And don't have to deal with but I think that this pandemic has definitely shown us that one it's important to ask. And to there are things that we can do, it's going to force us to work within our communities to to see if we can help people, it's not just food insecurity. It's that lack of transportation it's that need to continue to work. You know I feel like obstetrician gynecologist need to advocate for those women who are working in Walmart or working in wherever Who Need to work to make sure that they have masks to make sure that they're able to take those breaks to make sure that there's you know that their employers are helping them with transportation or whatever the issues are i. do think that that we can have a role there. Yeah. Absolutely. Okay Dr Laura Riley I really appreciate you I appreciate your time and I and I know our listeners to so thank you my pleasure. Thanks for asking because I think that it's it's interesting I can say these things in the office but by saying on NPR people actually find it more believable. He's like, Oh, I read about that or I heard you on the radio like I told you that like an hour and a half ago but I'm glad it's more believable on NPR..

Dr Laura Riley NPR Walmart
"dr laura riley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"dr laura riley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm steve inskeep here's a surprising sideeffect of being bitten by tick tick bites can cause many diseases and if you're bitten by a loan star tick you could develop a food allergy this problem is spreading as the ticks range expands npr's alison aubrey reports one day last summer lars sterling took her doug governor for a walk on a trail near her house she lives in savannah park maryland later that evening she realized she'd been bitten by a tick i found it three or four inches to the left of my hip bone and didn't think anything of it i just took it off and throw it away but about three weeks later she ate an italian style pork sausage for dinner and had a horrible reaction i would say it was probably six hours after eight it was in the middle of the night and i woke up covered in hives she was itching and scratching she felt lightheaded she also noticed stomach aches so she went to see an allergist he asked me did you change your detergent did you change anything in your diet and i said no and he said in the last month where you bitten by a tick and i said yes after a blood test the allergist told her she was allergic to red meat and maybe dairy too i thought it was completely crazy because i've eaten dairy and i've eaten red meat all my life her story is pretty typical of people who develop a red meat allergy after a tick bite says allergist scott commons he's an associate professor at unc chapel hill and he was among the first to identify the allergy in patients with tick bites about ten years ago he says back then there were just a few dozen known cases but now we're confident that the number is over five thousand at least in the us alone there are also cases in sweden germany and australia likely linked to other species of ticks now coming says in the us cases of moved beyond the southeast to new york maine minnesota absolutely we're gonna find this continues to expand the reach of the tick is expanding and equally i think we have a blood test we're raising awareness and the word is getting out there still a lot to learn about this allergy it's known as an alpha gal allergy alpha gallison's sugar that animals make including cows and pigs but we don't as humans we don't make this alpha gal sugar we all make an immune response to it so how does it tick bite caused the allergy well it's possible that ticks inject alpha gal into people's bodies when they bite ticks likely get it from feeding off wild animals such as mice or squirrels come and says it's also possible that ticks activate the response in another way whatever the tick is doing it seems that it's very potent awakening for our immune system to produce antibodies and in this case it is antibodies to a very particular sugar in red meat as for laura sterling she now avoids all dairy and all red meat once i was told just stop eating it i was fine felt great allergist usually give their alpha gal patients epipens because reactions can be dangerous but the good news is that people can outgrow the allergy this is most likely to happen if they avoid further tick bites allison aubrey npr news all right when you're pregnant you know the doctors want you to get a few key vaccines and now the american college of obstetricians and gynecologists is trying to make that a little bit easier for the first time it's put together a one page immunization guide for obese and midwives npr selena simmons duffin who happens to be pregnant at this very moment went to find out more the guy pulls together information about which shots pregnant women should skip which they can get an which they should definitely get the two and that should get category are the flu shot since the flu can be really dangerous for pregnant women and thi dep the tetanus diphtheria protests vaccine medical assistant kimberly johnson getting ready to give me teed up a few weeks ago at thirty weeks pregnant fame the idea here is to protect newborns against protests or hooping cough people are like i never heard of who've been caused what's the big deal why do we even have to worry about this that's dr laura riley she's the vice chair of obstetrics at massachusetts general hospital and helped write the.

steve inskeep thirty weeks four inches three weeks six hours ten years one day
"dr laura riley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"dr laura riley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The ticks range expands npr's alison aubrey reports one day last summer lars sterling took her doug governor for a walk on a trail near her house she lives in severna park maryland later that evening she realized she'd been bitten by a tick i found it three or four inches to the left of my hip bone and didn't think anything of it i just took it off in threw it away but about three weeks later she ate an italian style pork sausage for dinner and had a horrible reaction i would say it was probably six hours after eight it was in the middle of the night and i woke up covered in hives she was itching and scr catching she felt lightheaded she also noticed stomach aches so she went to see an allergist he asked me did you change your detergent did you change anything in your diet and i said no and he said in the last month where you bitten by a tick and i said yes after a blood test the allergist told her she was allergic to red meat and maybe dairy too i thought it was completely crazy because i've eaten dairy and i've eaten red meat all my life her story is pretty typical of people who develop a red meat allergy after a tick bite says allergist scott commons he's an associate professor at unc chapel hill and he was among the first to identify the allergy in patients with tick bites about ten years ago he says back then there were just a few dozen known cases but now we're confident that the number is over five thousand at least in the us alone there are also cases in sweden germany and australia likely linked to other species of ticks now common says in the us cases of moved beyond the southeast to new york maine and minnesota absolutely we're gonna find this continues to expand the reach of the tick is expanding and equally i think we have a blood test raising awareness and the word is getting out there's still a lot to learn about this allergy it's known as an alpha gal allergy alpha gals sugar that animals make including cows and pigs but we don't and humans we don't make this alpha gal sugar we all make an immune response to it so how does it tick bite caused the allergy well it's possible that ticks inject alpha gal into people's bodies when they bite it takes to get it from feeding off wild animals such as mice or squirrels come and says it's also possible that ticks activate the response in another way whatever the tick is doing it seems that it's a very potent awaken her for our immune system to produce antibodies and in this case it is antibodies to a very particular sugar in red meat has for lars sterling she now avoids all dairy and all red meat once i was told just stop eating it i was fine felt great allergist usually give their alpha gal patients epipens because reactions can be dangerous but the good news is that people can outgrow the allergy this is most likely to happen if they avoid further tick bites allison aubrey npr news all right when you're pregnant you know the doctors want you to get a few key vaccines and now the american college of obstetricians and gynecologists is trying to make that a little bit easier for the first time it's put together a one page immunization guide for ob's midwives npr selena simmons duffin who happens to be pregnant at this very moment went to find out more the guy pulls together information about which shots pregnant women should skip which they can get an which they should definitely get the two in that should get category are the flu shot since the flu can be really dangerous for pregnant women and t up the tetanus diphtheria protests vaccine would you have a purpose that's medical assistant kimberly johnson getting ready to give me teed up a few weeks ago at thirty weeks pregnant this one's pain the idea here is to protect newborns against pertussis or hooping cough people are like i never heard of hooping cough what's the big deal like why do we even have to worry about this that's dr laura riley she's the vice chair of obstetrics at massachusetts general hospital and helped write the.

npr alison aubrey lars sterling thirty weeks four inches three weeks six hours ten years one day
"dr laura riley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"dr laura riley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The ticks range expands npr's alison aubrey reports one day last summer lars sterling took her doug governor for a walk on a trail near her house she lives in savannah park maryland later that evening she realized she'd been bitten by a tick i found it three or four inches to the left of my hip it bone and didn't think anything of it i just took it off and threw it away but about three weeks later she ate an italian style pork sausage for dinner and had a horrible reaction i would say it was probably six hours after i ate it it was in the middle of the night and i woke up covered in hives she was itching and scratching she felt lightheaded she also noticed stomach aches so she went to see an allergist he asked me did you change your detergent did you change anything in your diet and i said no and he said in the last month where you bitten by a tick and i said yes after a blood test the allergist told her she was allergic to red meat and maybe dairy too i thought it was completely crazy because i've eaten dairy and i've eaten red meat all my life her story is pretty typical of people who develop a red meat allergy after a tick bite says allergist scott commons he's an associate professor at unc chapel hill and he was among the first to identify the allergy in patients with tick bites about ten years ago he says back then there were just a few dozen known cases but now we're confident that the number is over five thousand at least in the us alone there are also cases in sweden germany and australia likely linked to other species of ticks now coming says in the us cases of moved beyond the southeast to new york maine and minnesota absolutely we're gonna find this continues to expand the reach of the tick is expanding and equally i think we have a blood test raising awareness and the word is getting out there's still a lot to learn about this allergy it's known as an alpha gal allergy alpha gallison's sugar that animals make including cows and pigs but we don't as humans we don't make this alpha gal sugar we all make an immune response to it so how does it tick bite 'cause as the allergy well it's possible that ticks inject alpha gal into people's bodies when they bite the ticks likely get it from feeding off wild animals such as mice or squirrels come and says it's also possible that ticks activate the response in another way whatever the tick is doing it seems that it's a very potent awakening for our immune system to produce antibodies and in this case it is antibodies to a very particular sugar in red meat as for laura sterling she now avoids all dairy and all red meat once i was told just stop eating it i was fine felt great allergies usually give their alpha gal patients epipens because reactions can be dangerous but the good news is that people can outgrow the allergy this is most likely to happen if they avoid further tick bites allison aubrey npr news all right when you're pregnant you know the doctors want you to get a few key vaccines and now the american college obstruct obstetricians and gynecologists is trying to make that a little bit easier for the first time it's put together a one page immunization guide for obese and midwives npr selena simmons duffin who happens to be pregnant at this very moment went to find out more the guide pulls together information about which shots pregnant women should skip which they can get an which they should definitely get the two and that should get category are the flu shot since the flu can be really dangerous for pregnant women and teed up the tetanus diphtheria protests vaccine would you have samuel you'll like it that's medical assistant kimberly johnson getting ready to give me teed up a few weeks ago at thirty weeks pregnant from spain the idea here is to protect newborns against pertussis or hooping cough people are like i never heard of who've been caused what's the big deal like why do we even have to worry about this that's dr laura riley she's the vice chair of obstetrics at massachusetts general hospital and helped write the.

npr alison aubrey lars sterling thirty weeks four inches three weeks six hours ten years one day
Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise

Morning Edition

04:18 min | 3 years ago

Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise

"The ticks range expands npr's alison aubrey reports one day last summer lars sterling took her doug governor for a walk on a trail near her house she lives in savannah park maryland later that evening she realized she'd been bitten by a tick i found it three or four inches to the left of my hip it bone and didn't think anything of it i just took it off and threw it away but about three weeks later she ate an italian style pork sausage for dinner and had a horrible reaction i would say it was probably six hours after i ate it it was in the middle of the night and i woke up covered in hives she was itching and scratching she felt lightheaded she also noticed stomach aches so she went to see an allergist he asked me did you change your detergent did you change anything in your diet and i said no and he said in the last month where you bitten by a tick and i said yes after a blood test the allergist told her she was allergic to red meat and maybe dairy too i thought it was completely crazy because i've eaten dairy and i've eaten red meat all my life her story is pretty typical of people who develop a red meat allergy after a tick bite says allergist scott commons he's an associate professor at unc chapel hill and he was among the first to identify the allergy in patients with tick bites about ten years ago he says back then there were just a few dozen known cases but now we're confident that the number is over five thousand at least in the us alone there are also cases in sweden germany and australia likely linked to other species of ticks now coming says in the us cases of moved beyond the southeast to new york maine and minnesota absolutely we're gonna find this continues to expand the reach of the tick is expanding and equally i think we have a blood test raising awareness and the word is getting out there's still a lot to learn about this allergy it's known as an alpha gal allergy alpha gallison's sugar that animals make including cows and pigs but we don't as humans we don't make this alpha gal sugar we all make an immune response to it so how does it tick bite 'cause as the allergy well it's possible that ticks inject alpha gal into people's bodies when they bite the ticks likely get it from feeding off wild animals such as mice or squirrels come and says it's also possible that ticks activate the response in another way whatever the tick is doing it seems that it's a very potent awakening for our immune system to produce antibodies and in this case it is antibodies to a very particular sugar in red meat as for laura sterling she now avoids all dairy and all red meat once i was told just stop eating it i was fine felt great allergies usually give their alpha gal patients epipens because reactions can be dangerous but the good news is that people can outgrow the allergy this is most likely to happen if they avoid further tick bites allison aubrey npr news all right when you're pregnant you know the doctors want you to get a few key vaccines and now the american college obstruct obstetricians and gynecologists is trying to make that a little bit easier for the first time it's put together a one page immunization guide for obese and midwives npr selena simmons duffin who happens to be pregnant at this very moment went to find out more the guide pulls together information about which shots pregnant women should skip which they can get an which they should definitely get the two and that should get category are the flu shot since the flu can be really dangerous for pregnant women and teed up the tetanus diphtheria protests vaccine would you have samuel you'll like it that's medical assistant kimberly johnson getting ready to give me teed up a few weeks ago at thirty weeks pregnant from spain the idea here is to protect newborns against pertussis or hooping cough people are like i never heard of who've been caused what's the big deal like why do we even have to worry about this that's dr laura riley she's the vice chair of obstetrics at massachusetts general hospital and helped write the.

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