35 Burst results for "Dr Larry"

Baldur's Gate 3 Early Access Review

Giant Beastcast

05:03 min | Last week

Baldur's Gate 3 Early Access Review

"We're here talk about video games and food and walls speaking of the things that all of that together. Baldur's gate three early access a lot of lot of if you watch the quick look if you have some is stuff, maybe skip the first ten minutes of that thing because get some eyeball business going on there. Abbey played some abby watch cut scene I'm talking about. Yes I do I did play gate three and I really like it and I want to play more of it, and also I'm bad at it and I don't understand it at all. You. Get a chance to touch this Baldur's gate three. Not. Just yet I did. The city although the So Boulder Dr Larry, suspect you have had a chance to jump into it negative. Baldur's gate three not unfinished early accesses what they technically all this stuff available on steam a stadia, and but there's one more and I can't remember what it is. EPIC. Long I been played it on steam playing on Steam Gog. God you're right. Yes it has got. With Cross, eaves I believe. That's Nice So it's early it's early. It's an early access game buyer beware and one I will say out of the gate here is if you are interested in CRP Jesus my for you if you're interested in dungeons and dragons fifty dish in this might be for you if this is like I'm going to check out with all the talk is about this. Maybe sixty dollars a bit much to get into it now and and do that stuff because saves might not come over when the thing goes one point. Oh, they're they're saying probably at least a year out from that as well. Think they say around twenty, twenty, five hours in this. Early access build and it is. Fairly tutorial free. So yes I. Agree with that there is really no hand holding at all I. Keep Picking up other friends who then join my little party. So the how the game works is very much like dnd like you're going in a little bit of role plan then you're like fighting people but occasionally like meet other people and they can like join your party and your crew you get control of them and their powers I have no idea what this latest power still. So I'M GONNA to keep Avenue Shooting Arrow and hope that that works fine So. It is by Larry in studios the. Original Sin People demanding original sin to peel very popular. It plays a lot like those games. Yeah Abby saying you see you get up to four party members when they join your party the game doesn't have a lot explaining spell slots doesn't have a lot explaining cells spells. The hot bar for spells and items and scrolls is all mixed together in a way that is maddening that doesn't sort stuff by level or item, or so they'll have a level one spell like a couple of potions than maybe a bonus action and then a trip it just all spread out and like when you have a party member come in your, I don't know what any of these things are. So. You know it took me a while to just sort everything out get all my spells together. Again Luckily I'm of at least familiar enough with fission CRP to know what I think. What is going on here to sort all that stuff out that being said, some stuff is from fifth addition is implemented a little differently and kind of learning the. Stuff in the game. Took a little took a little while and I'm still kind of learning how they want me to play. I'm not playing like I normally would at a table of friends playing for the baby for better or worse you know I would be really annoyed if after every single attack for any character, they tried to move and roll a stealth check every two seconds at the table because that would wouldn't be held want to spend my seven hours of people rolling South checks but that's what I'm doing here and it's working for my game play. That being said okay. So the you can go watching unfinished to see what classes and suffer and it is not everything they're missing what I think the more interesting classes like barbarian. And she was pretty cool. T fling. Yeah. The the races that are in it, they're missing GNOME. They're missing half or. Missing Dragon born yeah. I will say all the racist they have seen very similar. It's like Elf like human half Halley. Yeah. Yeah cheap lanes are probably the most out there for what they have in in there now but it's fun. It's you know it is fantasy it is RPG. It is that computer RPG is not unfamiliar territory but I'm glad Larry in his doing it. I I was playing even though it's rough I have good expectations and high expectations and I have enjoyed it so far I think the writing too far has been fun I think the fidelity of it aside from any graphical bugs I think it looks really good. I think the Menus and the UI. Great I don't love the menus in the You I. Think they are very hard to navigate but so were they in original sin. So anything that's stuff is.

Dr Larry Abbey Abby Cross
First American dosed with Oxford-AstraZeneca phase three COVID-19 vaccine speaks out

Tom and Curley

00:45 sec | Last month

First American dosed with Oxford-AstraZeneca phase three COVID-19 vaccine speaks out

"Contenders are Corona virus vaccine has started a final round of testing in the US Get the latest from CBS Medical correspondent Dr Jon Lapook 23 year old Jacob Serrano is the first volunteer to be dosed in the US with either the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine or a placebo. He has lost seven family members to covert 19 and says he wants to be part of the solution to save lives. No matter the cost. I know there was a break because it's like it's a trial, but I rather have us one step closer matter what it takes. Serrano was dosed on Friday at Headlands Gem Research Institute in Lake Worth, Florida Immune response was very encouraging. Dr. Larry Bush is an infectious disease doctor and the lead principal investigator for this trial site. He says he's optimistic. This vaccine is effective. More

Jacob Serrano Headlands Gem Research Institu Dr Jon Lapook United States Oxford Astrazeneca Dr. Larry Bush Principal Investigator Cbs Medical Lake Worth
Man who lost 7 relatives to COVID-19 becomes first American to trial Oxford vaccine

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:05 min | 2 months ago

Man who lost 7 relatives to COVID-19 becomes first American to trial Oxford vaccine

"For a Corona virus vaccine has started a final round of testing in the U. S. Researchers at Oxford University in partnership with AstraZeneca started dozing the first volunteers last week. During this third and final phase. The vaccine is tested for safety and how effective it will be of reducing or blocking cove in 19 symptoms. CBS chief medical correspondent Dr Jonathan Luke spoke exclusively with the first American participating in this trial. 23 year old Jacob Serrano is the first volunteer to be dosed in the US with either the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine or a placebo. He has lost seven family members to covert 19 and says he wants to be part of the solution to save lives. No matter the cost. I know there was a break because it's like it's a trial. Bye. I'd rather have us one step closer, no matter what it takes. Serrano was dosed on Friday at Headlands Gem Research Institute in Lake Worth, Florida Immune response was very encouraging. Dr. Larry Bush is an infectious disease doctor and lead principal investigator for this trial site. He says he's optimistic this vaccine is effective in the phase one in two trials. A vaccine has been proven that not only do you get where bus neutralizing antibodies to fight the coroner Corona virus you get a T saw response another arm of the immune system to fight off the cells that do become infected. That's crucial in treating infections. Oxford University has been conducting phase three trials in the United Kingdom, Brazil and South Africa. Earlier phase is there was no evidence the vaccine causes serious reactions. Headlands research says. They're focuses on enrolling members of the African American and the lap next community who have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic. The numbers are pointing to that those groups of people becoming infected at a higher rate. And therefore that's a group that would highly benefit from vaccination. AstraZeneca says it plans to enroll up to 50,000 participants globally and is planning to start phase three trials in Japan and Russia. The company expects to have late stage trial results later this year. That is

Jacob Serrano Astrazeneca Oxford Astrazeneca Oxford University Dr. Larry Bush Headlands Gem Research Institu Dr Jonathan Luke Principal Investigator CBS United States Lake Worth United Kingdom Japan Russia South Africa Brazil
Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

"The former head gymnastics coach at Michigan State University has been sentenced to jail for lying to police about what she do about abuse by university Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg is said at trial that she did not remember being told about abuse by former Olympic and Michigan State University doctor Larry Nassar she was found guilty by a jury in February of lying to police and today she's been sentenced to ninety days in jail and eighteen months of probation Nassar was sentenced in twenty eighteen to forty two hundred and seventy five years in prison for decades of serial abuse to hundreds of athletes several of Nassar's victims testified the greatest knew about the abuse two of them spoke ahead of the sentencing Larissa Boyce sekaligus held up a piece of paper in front of her when she was sixteen and older if she filed a report there could be serious consequences for her voice that she was representing her sixteen year old self was silenced and humiliated and all of the hundreds of girls that were abused after her I'm Jennifer king

Michigan State University Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg Larry Nassar Jennifer King Larissa Boyce
Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

"The former head gymnastics coach at Michigan State University has been sentenced to jail for lying to police about what she do about abuse by university Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg is said at trial that she did not remember being told about abuse by former Olympic and Michigan State University doctor Larry Nassar she was found guilty by a jury in February of lying to police and today she's been sentenced to ninety days in jail and eighteen months of probation Nassar was sentenced in twenty eighteen to forty two hundred and seventy five years in prison for decades of serial abuse to hundreds of athletes several of Nassar's victims testified the greatest knew about the abuse two of them spoke ahead of the sentencing Larissa Boyce sekaligus held up a piece of paper in front of her when she was sixteen and older if she filed a report there could be serious consequences for her voice that she was representing her sixteen year old self was silenced and humiliated and all of the hundreds of girls that were abused after her I'm Jennifer king

Michigan State University Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg Larry Nassar Jennifer King Larissa Boyce
What Have We Learned From Elijah Wald's Escaping The Delta

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:02 min | 3 months ago

What Have We Learned From Elijah Wald's Escaping The Delta

"It's time to let it roll. This is your host Nate Wilcox and we're doing a special. What have we learned episode once again with my friend and colleague Dr? Larry Campbell Yuri welcome back. Good to be here can't get good so today. We're GONNA. Look back on. Elijah Wald's book escaping the Delta and my interview that we did with him. and. We picked us up this book in that episode because. Other than Ed. Ward who basically taught me everything I. Know about analyzing music is a cultural history. Elijah Wald's books, this one and how Beatles destroyed rock and roll, which we'll talk about the next episode of what have we learned. Really expanded my mind because it took. It's a revisionist take on what has been disagree romanticized history of Robert Johnson, and the Delta Blues and found walls attempts to reevaluate Johnson. From the perspective of his peers and contemporaries, basically the black African that African American Blues Fan of the Nineteen Thirties and. Rather than from the perspective of generally white blues, fans of the nineteen sixties to now so it just totally blew my mind I tried to capture that to great interview. But the main point that the book put across that Robert Johnson was just a human being who sang and played beautifully. He wasn't a mythical figure. That probably wasn't really devil at the crossroads he wasn't. A country Bumpkin? He was a sophisticated sharp-dressed cat who travelled widely who listen to all kinds of music, not just what he heard live in the delta, but listen to the radio listener guards and learn so having said all that. How do you think we did did did I get that across in the interview with walled? Yeah, I think the book and the interview with Wall. You know Really, helps a flesh out. You know the the basic ideas that you were just talking about. And really helps to make it clear. that you know the blues artists of the late Twenties and early thirties in the early twenties really. Physically people that they were professionals. That they were participating in You know the creation of. New Cultural forms new sort of musical expressions. While at the same time. trying to freeze their audiences. Who had know? Fairly sophisticated demand and varying labs. Right so that the artists themselves as you suggested had to have A. Wide ranging set of skills, they had to have been aware of those sort of traditional musical expressions, and you know like in the case of the blues, things like Hollers and loans, and that sort of thing well also being aware of of popular music. Which by the nineteen thirties you're talking about. Artists like Duke. Ellington and Louis Armstrong and and People that are appearing in films on the radio, etc.. And so the picture of Blues. As this sort of backwater expression. Rural Culture Coming from people who were simply oppressed and trapped and you know on some level were expected to the ignorance. And poverty stricken just didn't hold you know I mean. You couldn't can be successful blues artists if you travel the country and rags. showed up at. Various venues unable to relate to modernizing audiences. And I think I think the book captures that really well. and. I thought your interview with Wall. Made that clear.

Robert Johnson Nineteen Thirties Elijah Wald Wall Larry Campbell Yuri Nate Wilcox Ward A. Wide Louis Armstrong Ellington
"dr larry" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:32 min | 4 months ago

"dr larry" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Hey guys, what can you as an individual do to help? Break the cycles of rage, pain, fear and violence that continued to grip, America and many other parts of the world, relating to the issue of race. Even though our guest this week was shot at by white police officers when he was only eleven, and then later in his life, had his house firebombed allegedly by local racists in the town where he was living. Even though he's gone through all of that, he is still hopeful that now is a moment of true, potential and opportunity to transform what he calls America's Racial Karma and by extension ourselves. Dr Larry Ward is a lay minister in the lineage of the Great. Vietnamese master TechNet Han. He's an advisor to the executive leadership institute at the Peter F Drucker School of Management He's done consulting work with fortune, five hundred companies, and he has a PhD in religious studies with an emphasis on Buddhism. His forthcoming book is called America's Racial Karma. Here, we go with Dr Larry Ward. Nice to meet you remotely, and for doing this sure nice to meet you, too. Take good care. We have a lot of meditators who listen to the show and so. I'd love to know more about what you do in your own mind when you feel the. The kind of suffering where you're. Empathizing with the families of these of these young people have been killed, or when memories are coming up for you from your own personal right story I, thank. Two pieces are important to. This is also the intergenerational. Flow of trauma. And it is also. The trauma experienced on the land in which we live. And so how I practice caring for myself different ways. Depending on what I'm feeling. <hes> etc so sometimes. I put on just music. And listen to music. That will help me move energy. That may be stuck somewhere in my body out. Or. What do you like through well? All kinds of music <hes>. Oh, I have a pretty wide. Pretty wide. Range of music I like depending on the mood or what I'm feeling needs to be processed. Michael Jackson Helps me a lot with some of his particular songs, especially the one he was sung at his memorial. Will you be there? Harry Belafonte's Day. When I need to feel like beauty is still in the world. Campaign the line <hes> no I do. Try to remember <hes>, I'm kind of a romantic at heart and so that. That soothes that part of me. That helps me remember. Life is beautiful. that it can be captured and word and sound and vibration, and in color. Sometimes I. Listen or observe an Natalie stall someone. WHO's a brilliant conductor? especially in her version of <hes>. Hombre, Ma Fu. So sometimes. I go the classical route. And choose different melodies and symphonies that also can move energy all of our. Creative! Arts and methods from my ancestors in one way designed to do these things, but if we don't learn to master them and don't learn to take the time to do them. We just as my grandmother used to say, running around with like chickens with our heads cut off. So, you put the music on and dance as a way to get the energy to move flowing. Yeah, sometimes I dance sometimes I cry sometimes I lay down and just let the sound and the music's music wash over my body. Sometime inspires a poem, etc, or another song that I find. Healing. And energizing and recovering to listen to so I don't get lost in my pain. And sometimes always every day. I go outside. So one of my practices daily at morning noon and night if I can is to be outside of four.

Dr Larry Ward America advisor Peter F Drucker School of Mana executive
How You Can Help Transform America's Racial Karma | Dr. Larry Ward

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:32 min | 4 months ago

How You Can Help Transform America's Racial Karma | Dr. Larry Ward

"Hey guys, what can you as an individual do to help? Break the cycles of rage, pain, fear and violence that continued to grip, America and many other parts of the world, relating to the issue of race. Even though our guest this week was shot at by white police officers when he was only eleven, and then later in his life, had his house firebombed allegedly by local racists in the town where he was living. Even though he's gone through all of that, he is still hopeful that now is a moment of true, potential and opportunity to transform what he calls America's Racial Karma and by extension ourselves. Dr Larry Ward is a lay minister in the lineage of the Great. Vietnamese master TechNet Han. He's an advisor to the executive leadership institute at the Peter F Drucker School of Management He's done consulting work with fortune, five hundred companies, and he has a PhD in religious studies with an emphasis on Buddhism. His forthcoming book is called America's Racial Karma. Here, we go with Dr Larry Ward. Nice to meet you remotely, and for doing this sure nice to meet you, too. Take good care. We have a lot of meditators who listen to the show and so. I'd love to know more about what you do in your own mind when you feel the. The kind of suffering where you're. Empathizing with the families of these of these young people have been killed, or when memories are coming up for you from your own personal right story I, thank. Two pieces are important to. This is also the intergenerational. Flow of trauma. And it is also. The trauma experienced on the land in which we live. And so how I practice caring for myself different ways. Depending on what I'm feeling. etc so sometimes. I put on just music. And listen to music. That will help me move energy. That may be stuck somewhere in my body out. Or. What do you like through well? All kinds of music Oh, I have a pretty wide. Pretty wide. Range of music I like depending on the mood or what I'm feeling needs to be processed. Michael Jackson Helps me a lot with some of his particular songs, especially the one he was sung at his memorial. Will you be there? Harry Belafonte's Day. When I need to feel like beauty is still in the world. Campaign the line no I do. Try to remember I'm kind of a romantic at heart and so that. That soothes that part of me. That helps me remember. Life is beautiful. that it can be captured and word and sound and vibration, and in color. Sometimes I. Listen or observe an Natalie stall someone. WHO's a brilliant conductor? especially in her version of Hombre, Ma Fu. So sometimes. I go the classical route. And choose different melodies and symphonies that also can move energy all of our. Creative! Arts and methods from my ancestors in one way designed to do these things, but if we don't learn to master them and don't learn to take the time to do them. We just as my grandmother used to say, running around with like chickens with our heads cut off. So, you put the music on and dance as a way to get the energy to move flowing. Yeah, sometimes I dance sometimes I cry sometimes I lay down and just let the sound and the music's music wash over my body. Sometime inspires a poem, etc, or another song that I find. Healing. And energizing and recovering to listen to so I don't get lost in my pain. And sometimes always every day. I go outside. So one of my practices daily at morning noon and night if I can is to be outside of four.

Dr Larry Ward America Advisor Harry Belafonte Michael Jackson Peter F Drucker School Of Mana Ma Fu Natalie Executive
"dr larry" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:11 min | 4 months ago

"dr larry" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Break the cycles of rage, pain, fear and violence that continued to grip, America and many other parts of the world, relating to the issue of race. Even though our guest this week was shot at by white police officers when he was only eleven, and then later in his life, had his house firebombed allegedly by local racists in the town where he was living. Even though he's gone through all of that, he is still hopeful that now is a moment of true, potential and opportunity to transform what he calls America's Racial Karma and by extension ourselves. Dr Larry Ward is a lay minister in the lineage of the Great. Vietnamese master TechNet Han. He's an advisor to the executive leadership institute at the Peter F Drucker School of Management He's done consulting work with fortune, five hundred companies, and he has a PhD in religious studies with an emphasis on Buddhism. His forthcoming book is called America's Racial Karma. Here, we go with Dr Larry Ward. Nice to meet you remotely, and for doing this sure nice to meet you, too. Take good care. We have a lot of meditators who listen to the show and so. I'd love to know more about what you do in your own mind when you feel the. The kind of suffering where you're. Empathizing with the families of these of these young people have been killed, or when memories are coming up for you from your own personal right story I, thank. Two pieces are important to. This is also the intergenerational. Flow of trauma. And it is also. The trauma experienced on the land in which we live. And so how I practice caring for myself different ways. Depending on what I'm feeling. etc so sometimes. I put on just music. And listen to music. That will help me move energy. That may be stuck somewhere in my body out..

Dr Larry Ward America advisor Peter F Drucker School of Mana executive
"dr larry" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

04:25 min | 4 months ago

"dr larry" Discussed on Amanpour

"As long as my dernie continues as long as we cut down the rain forest as long as we live in animals territory as long as we. Must Africa and wet markets. We consume wild animals. as long as we eat more meat in places that are Ramirez grown and farmed in a way that you have these pancake houses were on the bottom floor, a of pigs in the middle for chickens, top his people and you. Raise the pink you eat it. You cut it up and when there's leftovers you render them. And what are you that chickens and you raise the chickens and you cook the chickens and you eat them. With leftover you cut up and render it view into the picks. I don't know that I could have considered creating a scientific experiment that would be more efficient at creating new viruses, so we're living in a way. The virus jump from animals to humans, an unprecedented rate, and we have this great shed travel system We have this great tourism industry that takes these viruses from the place. They jump all over the world and eighteen hours, so we are on the cusp of an age of pandemics. And that makes it all the more daunting. For us to deal with not just this one, but the next one. We need to re-empower CDC. Need to re, establish the person who was fired in the national, Security Council who would be eyes and ears and mouth for pandemic preparation. We need to invest in public health all over the world. None of us are safe. We need to take this as seriously as we would take war, as would take famine as we will take any other. Problem that. We have faced. A War America right. We can do this, but we have to focus on. We have to take it seriously. Dr Larry Brilliant. Thank you so much for joining us. And Finally Tonight Chore Freud's killing triggered a global reckoning on racial injustice and his brother Phillies has taken the message to the streets to Congress and now to the United Nations urging them to set up a commission to investigate police violence against black Americans. Take a listen to his message. The way you sell my brother, torture and murder on camera is the way black people are treated by police in America..

Phillies America Dr Larry Brilliant Ramirez Africa CDC Security Council murder Freud United Nations Congress
"dr larry" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:12 min | 4 months ago

"dr larry" Discussed on Amanpour

"So the corona virus rules still call for banning large gatherings, even where lockdown is slowly lifting nevertheless on Saturday president, trump is said to hold a campaign rally in Tulsa. He says the Kuroda virus is dying out in the US, but data directly contradicts him. As this week, Oklahoma saw a record increase in new cases, and there are spikes in twenty three states. Our next guest Dr, Larry Brilliant is a physician and epidemiologist who's been sounding the alarm about pandemics for years, and here's talking to our Walter Isaacson about what he learned working for the WHO in India about combating viruses. Yawn and Dr Larry Brilliant Welcome to the show. To See you! You've been through a lot and you've been through the sixties. You were there for everything from the civil rights to the Vietnam protests to the summer of love, and then go off and fight pandemics in India smallpox, but have you ever seen anything like this moment before? I mean certainly there were times in the smallpox program. With, hundreds of thousands of deaths and babies dead bodies. By courts. would. When seem like you were in the middle of Dante's inferno our? Or Herodotus bashes paintings of of the end times. but I've never seen a combination of pandemic and The kind of. politization of I mean masks it's it's been since the Mask of Zorro that anybody saw mass us as a political statement, and to see these young people. These ernest wonderful people marching in the streets for for justice, human rights, and to have them a crushed by a military force. Nafi. It's where. No and and you you add to that. Speaking of crushing the crushing of our economy. By a series of reactions to the pandemic that we're not scientific. But were -mergency reactions because we didn't do the science. We gave the virus in the United States a two week start. and the consequences were unthinkable, so we. Clampdown everything of. Doing. Good always done smallpox eradication of polio eradication, which is good epidemiology. Find the virus find the contacts. Put them in a cage for put the two percents of people. In isolation who can spread the disease and leave the ninety eight percent of people who were not afflicted and not at danger free. We've done everything. It seems backwards subvert troubling combination of circumstances and if you add to. The growing nationalist and the thug up receives the cleft up which is Country after country..

Larry Brilliant smallpox trump United States India Walter Isaacson Oklahoma Tulsa president Herodotus Kuroda Vietnam Dante
"dr larry" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:56 min | 4 months ago

"dr larry" Discussed on Amanpour

"They condemned it. where the different line where the difference lies is the degree of accountability and legal, a punishment for male relatives, fathers, brothers husbands who do this. I when I said when I set out to report this story I thought that honor killings were rare, because we hardly ever hear about them because they're either the authorities hide them, or the families feel ashamed to really publicize them, but then when I started reporting I realized that they were more than we thought just in the past week. there have been reports of to honor killings one in Care Mon a twenty two. Two year old, being murdered by her husband at a nineteen year old I'm sorry. Twenty two year old, being murdered by her father in nineteen year old in done by her husband so romanoff's cases really open the LID and has brought women forward in telling their stories, and it seems to be a real issue, a problem of the pushback that that we get from conservatives and religious scholars in Iran is that. The Islamic. Sharia law does not allow men to. Commit violence, and that it We need to educate they don't. They don't want to change. the impunity that's given to the to the father into the male relatives they they talk about education in school system or educating the the the parents rather than addressing the legal. Loophole that exists now. Interesting. We also have women women, women, rights activists who are who are schooled in Islamic jurisprudence, one of the most well-known faces that I'm sure you've known reported is fine. How shimmy the a former lawmaker, a your and the daughter of a former president? Akbar off Sanjay. And she's come forward after nine and has said this is absolutely unacceptable. There's no aware in religious tags in the Koran or in religious Islamic tests that that that says that men can't face capital punishment or retaliation in kind as it's called in Islamic law of for murdering their children or their wives, and we need to address this..

Akbar romanoff Iran president
"dr larry" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:36 min | 4 months ago

"dr larry" Discussed on Amanpour

"This is nothing new, sadly and an it's been tolerated by the state and by society for many years, but the the height. It's been heightened. Lately so that you know. We went from six to eight women to ten women to now eleven over eleven women per day. on the one hand and part of this has to do with a very with the difficulty to access justice and for justice to actually happen in cases like these NBA. Impunity rate in Mexico as alarming, conservatively estimated at ninety five percent or ninety nine percent, even of crimes, such as these go completely unpunished, and and so there's that factor, and then now the government sort of trying to keep belived on it. Instead of actually creating policies that will prevent this is is also sort of an aggravating factor adding insult to injury. Literally. And as you mentioned April, we understand from the stats has been the deadliest month for women in Mexico. For the last five years. The government has told us in response that it has actually nominated officials to look after women's safety, and to try to figure out a response to this but I. WanNa turn to you. About Iran because you wrote a very devastating report about a so called honor killing, in Iran in which a fourteen year old girl! Romana was essentially one not essentially. She was beheaded by her father, who didn't like her boyfriend essentially. Can you tell me about that story how you heard about it? How it came to light and what? The response in Iran has been to that Mitt murder. Roaming Ashraf fourteen year from a remote village in of the Caspian region in the north. West of Iran and she apparently been courted by an adult man in one thousand nine year old for two years and. When her boyfriend approach to family, and asked for her hand, or asked to marry her father declined and. She ran away. She ran away. The father found them after three days. An return convinced the judge to return roaming onto him. Despite the fact that the woman I told the judge that were life was in danger her father when he found out that she had a boyfriend. Threatened to kill her had even brought rat poison and told. told her to kill herself, so he doesn't have to do it for her. She ran away when she was returned twenty four hours leader. He beheaded her. In her bedroom while she was sleeping this story kind of exploded on Iran on social media on Iran. It was on the front page of every newspaper with her picture. This innocent smiling girl, a with a blue scarf on the cover of every newspaper and magazine ended really shocked Iran of because. You don't be perceived that honor killings a rare in Iran, but actually when I started reporting this story, I discovered that according to Iranian government's own statistics about thirty percent of all murders annually our so called honor killings, killings of women in by the hand of a male.

Iran Mexico Romana NBA Ashraf Caspian Mitt murder
"dr larry" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:44 min | 4 months ago

"dr larry" Discussed on Amanpour

"It's difficult to look at his resume and attack him the way president trump and his loyalists have attacked everyone else who has come to criticize him or contradict the president's message you. It seems that the only qualifier for being dismissed by this president and dope is one of his favorite terms, but as a liar is not contradicting the president because remember. A whole host of people have been dismissed in similar ways. Jim Mattis was one of his generals appointees defense secretary until he. described. Him In effect is unfit. For Office Mitt, Romney, the president considered him for Secretary of state till he then dismissed him Gordon Sunland in the Ukraine impeachment inquiry, trump appointee million dollar donor to his inauguration, until he testified under oath that there was a quid pro quo so John Bolton is characterised been around Washington as you. Well know for years. He's made a lot of enemies here. He certainly very focused on his own public profile. That said he claims and took notes by the way contemporaneous notes of what he says. We're alarming instances of this president's decisions and decision making. So basically the bottom line as far as I can gather is that he is saying that every single turn the president makes particularly in foreign policy is designed with the reelection in mind, so every conversation he has is about. How can you help me get reelected? So you heard what he said to ABC that we played. It Bolton says he's not fit for office. And you heard what the Democrats have said about the timing of this if he had all this information for instance about quid pro quos in Ukraine, and we'll get to the China did. Why didn't he bring them to the impeachment hearing instead of waiting to put them in a book? This is a fundamental question for John Bolton that he must answer because if these accounts are true, and he believes that those accounts these decisions these statements by the president, and there are many alarming ones. If they were so alarming, why didn't he step forward months ago? When by the way country was going through an impeachment hearing to remove the President? President from office his his defense. If you WANNA call it, that is that well, the Democrats should have had a broader impeachment inquiry, but the fact is the opportunity to tell that one small piece of the story, the Ukraine piece of this story which led to the impeachment inquiry. He could have made the choice to testify and not wait for a judge. Judge in effect to give them a free pass to do so that's that's a fundamental question for John Bolton. He's going to have to answer that said. If you're sitting lawmaker today of either party, you don't believe what's written in the book..

John Bolton president Ukraine Jim Mattis trump ABC Romney Gordon Sunland Washington he. China
"dr larry" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:48 min | 4 months ago

"dr larry" Discussed on Amanpour

"Hello everyone and welcome to. His what's coming up? Explosive claims about trump confusing the national interest with his only trust in former national security advisor John. Bolton's tell all memoir and. A deadly rise in domestic violence, the pandemic within pandemic for females trapped at home I. speak to experts for Mexico to Iran then it's never too late containment. It's the only thing that we can do epidemiologist and physician. Larry Brilliant on how the United States can still overcome covid nineteen. Welcome to.

Larry Brilliant advisor Bolton United States Iran Mexico
"dr larry" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

The Tennis.com Podcast

01:37 min | 6 months ago

"dr larry" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

"They need support. And and we can't live in the black and white these extremes of I gotta do it on my own or I need someone to do everything for me. It's somewhere in between. I need that support advice. That mentoring that counseling. And maybe even his therapy and and I would. I would suggest that for anyone but also what it always comes back to is. What are you going to do about it? What choices you'RE GONNA make? What are you gonNA commit to and to to better your life to strive for your dreams to to help someone else and and so I think the sometimes why people don't go to therapy is because they feel like well it might open Pandora's box and they'll never close like all the demons are gonNA come out and I'm going to be just stop and and the reality is it gets harder at first but then it gets much better because you need to go to those places and understand yourself and too many people Stop when it gets hard. It gets emotional and and to be honest. That's where you need to go. Sometimes you need to pick the right times. You don't do you know as you're about to go into court unless you have. That's just where you're at but you you need to find the right times to go to those places and I'll give Irena credit here that she did that and I think it's it's allowing her to really enjoy the rest of her career and I think that's so important and that concludes our therapy session with Dr Larry Lower. How much do we owe you? Well I I don't want to say that On I don't want to commit myself number. Yeah it's probably true. Thank you so much.

Irena Dr Larry Lower Pandora
"dr larry" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

The Tennis.com Podcast

13:39 min | 6 months ago

"dr larry" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

"Lower. He's giving us a little bit of a therapy session to improve our mental strength. Keep listening it's very common for example to go to a tournament. Let's say you going. You qualify you. When two rounds and then you lose a heartbreaker you lose a very tough one for some reason players. Just focus on that bad one instead of realizing. Hey I had four matches already under my belt you know and I think that's the other thing. It's knowing that you have to be grateful and appreciate what you've done. I think people just forget about doing that. And it's so so important or brains are tuned to negative more than they are positives. Our brains catch the negatives and remember those are written deeper into the brain probably because of the emotion that comes with losing with feeling like you've failed whereas a pot of positives we kind of like. Yep that's what I'm supposed to do. We don't really give it the credence that we should write arena. Yeah and that's why you always hear Girls and guys complain about their significant others. It's not usually like you all the good stuff. It's I'm going to vent and complain and tell you all the bad stuff. So that makes one hundred percent cents now that you say yeah and not. I mean again if you if you want to better your life. It's turning that equation and starting to look at the good things more often and not saying being ignorant and blissfully ignorant but being aware of the things you need to do which everybody has things that they need to improve but really paying attention to your strengths and the things that you are achieving and and one of my favorite things that we teaches every day. Get up you know. We've seen recently people talking about morning routines the CEO's and actors and actresses and Athletes. Get up in the morning. Do some mindfulness meditation. Your choice and and then think about what you're grateful for. Think about what you're going to achieve that day at the end of the day reflect on. What did I do today because in any day? There's GonNa be some positives now some days it might be. Wow I really like what I work today from my hair look or whatever and some days like man. That practice was amazing. I learned something really cool today that I wanNA remember so every day every moment is different and if we embrace them all then. His journey gets a lot easier to be honest. Do you practice what you preach. Do you look back on your days and think about things that are. We're technically wins and losses in your career and and that sort of stuff. I do Sometimes I have four kids and it's literally driving off campus and figuring out where I need to go but I really do may try to make that mental effort to be aware of the things and I think that in our practice is mental coach. A psychologist part of our job is to take really good notes. And that requires you to reflect on what you heard and what you saw and so a arena doesn't know this but there's a whole folder and there's a bunch of notes on every single player and and those things are highly confidential and kept locked up and password protected but our job which helps me reflect on the work that I do is to note. Take and be aware and be prepared for the next. Sunday we interact with that person and so as part of my profession. I think that requires me to do it and do that. But you're talking about practicing what you preach. That's where I began with this whole process is that I didn't begin by taking classes. And then just like okay. I WANNA teach other people is like no. Let me work myself. I because I had things I needed to deal with and things that I needed to get better with that. I wanted to work on and once I was working so that process I felt like I had a better understanding of how to start helping other people and I don't know that if Dr Gold realizes probably does he's pretty sharp but he really was mentoring me and and counseling me for twenty years to get me to where I am and it wasn't just I wasn't just a student. He was showing me a way to get to where I want it to be and it was almost like doing therapy for twenty years but it was really more of a mentoring friendship and a professional relationship where I could not only See how he would deal with things but then think about it and say okay. Well then how would I actually deal with that? I am I able to do that. Or what do I need to learn to be able to do that? And and that was a great experience for me. Obviously we can't really go back in time. We don't know what the future lies. And all that jazz all the knowledge that you have all this information. How much of an impact do you think would have made when you were nineteen? You knew a lot of what you know. Now let's just say you knew a fraction. Do you think the outcome would have been different? I believe wholeheartedly. Yes and because I believe in myself and I don't want this to come off as cocky but I do believe that had I known a lot of what I know now I would have been a much better player. Much better athlete Even from the time that I stopped playing baseball and I really started playing more hockey I was a much better competitor in hockey after that because of the things that I was learning starting to read and and so I think for sure it would have made a huge difference for me and where that ends up. I don't know I like to think I would have played professional baseball. But there I will see some limitations but you've seen sprint. I'm fast so and I can hit the ball long ways and throw it hard but for some reason I couldn't figure it out at eighteen but that's the that's the challenge is that in everybody gets to my age. You know. Middle aged forty six is like if I only know what I know now. But that's life in somehow we have to be able to help. The young adults The adolescence to children to be able to be open minded to some of these ideas so that they don't have to say the same thing and that that is a big thing that drives me and in the things that we do so like doing this podcast or our compete. Like a champion podcast. That coach parks and I do Those are vehicles for us to be able to explore and how people think about well. Maybe there is another way to do this. Maybe there's a whole another area that will help me that. I'm not even tapping into that. That is the brain. I mean you kind of touched on it a little bit there. You do have a podcast. Compete like a champion. Usda podcast with Jani Parks. You started that and you mentioned the beginning of this a little bit of interest in accommodating career and I think everyone can agree. You're very smooth talker. I put people to sleep biproduct. I've heard that too is is the podcast something that you started because you wanted to help you just said that. Is that something that you're enjoying and looking to do? Regularly is that something people can listen to the years to come. What's the vision? The vision really was to reach out to people in a different way. I felt like I was limited by this space and being Orlando and not being able to be with people and be present with them. That's one of the most important things in terms of making a difference as being present with people but podcasts are different in kind of interesting way to be present with someone they can always access those episodes and listen to what you're saying and reflect on their own way and what that means to them and so I felt like that was our best vehicle to reach the most people will. There was athletes coaches parents. Other sports scientists People in the field about what we're doing and different ways to look at performance and not just from the psychology of it but all all of the main so the vision going forward is definitely to continue it on a regular basis Is To have fun with it and really try to challenge ourselves to innovate and do different things you know. Y'All hope that at some point we do podcasts on site at a tournament or We're able to you know certainly bring in guests more from the outside And really start to expand and broaden the reach of it. So you've been doing quite a long time and you work with elite pro tennis athletes. Do you feel that you've hit your elite level as well in your career? Now you're getting deep. I like it all right. Well yeah now. I'm trying to think about my filters kicking in like should I say what would be appropriate or am I going to go? Baker Baker Baker Mayfield on this be like my man Baker Mayfield. Okay so I'm Gonna I'm GonNa tell you how I feel. I feel like I I feel like I'm really good at what I do. But being elite is a daily thing and I got to continue to challenge myself so that I can better the players and coaches that opportunity. The opportunity help so I would say Yes getting there but I don't WanNa say totally there because then you're daunting you you get behind. So would you like? Have you made it? You know when people say like oh I've made it like okay. I've hit my career high. I've won a Grand Slam. What would you say about you know? No and that's just being very honest because I feel like a again maybe goes back to the idea of being satisfied and versus complacent. But I'm always looking for newest challenge and I feel like if I personally if I feel like I've made it that I will stop challenging myself but with that being said I feel very grateful unfortunate for where I am Took a lot of work but it also took a lot of help from a lot of very great people that helped me along the way that saw something that I didn't see that I didn't think I could ever do so. You know being grateful but always looking to challenge myself and Hopefully when I'm seventy seventy five I'll say okay now I can feel like I've made it and then that's probably when I would start to shut it down. I'll ask you that question. Then in that question is no. I'll ask you all you ask your seventy seventy five. That'll I'll be in Hawaii. Perfect all right. I'll have to visit visit. Yeah on that note on that note of future plans. Maybe you have one more question. Yeah actually just. I want to put you in the hot seat. I WANNA see like I know. I think we're out of time here. We go I know that we I mean this is all very relevant to pro tennis athletes. I mean what? Have you taken away from this because I I mean just because you're not a pro tennis athlete yourself? I mean I think everybody still needs a little help in the mental side of things. Well some of the questions I asked where selfish Because these are things that I've thought about either when I was playing in college or before that and things that I've thought about Censo- like yeah my day to day life isn't wins and losses but the part about trying to always do. The next big thing was something that I think about a lot so I think everything you've said can apply to the office or can apply to someone who's working as an accountant or a journalist or an actor. I don't think it's just tennis. So everything we covered would apply to me not so much. Maybe like what I think about during the actions of what I'm working on. I don't think I think like you're better than this or like you can do. Great next point you know but I think it all applies safely. Okay I just I just wanted to now make her have one takeaway that she's going to do tomorrow. Kind we do with the players does well. I like the part about treating myself. Oh of course yes I think everyone does. That's a good one. Yeah I'll work on that. I work on that. I'll give you some homework that I'm sure Dr Lower would agree with all right. Well I think we should schedule to come meet with me. Maybe both of us and we could actually recorded on ten more serious note I would I was. I never really thought out mental mental skills therapy or sessions or help ever Something I thought was not stigmatized but awkward so this have yeah spelt like not week but I always felt like you know you can figure that out on your own. You don't need you. Don't anyone's help. So this helped a little bit to see you know. This is very normal and everyone does it and everyone is is working on this every going through and talking about it. It's still a little bit embarrassing to me. But I I think I can see the the positive impact it could have on your overall life. So that's a takeaway. Maybe well thank you for both of you bringing us up and and certainly die arena for sharing a lot of what you've gone through in your career and many other players. Professional athletes are now speaking out about mental health and support they received. And I think it's opening new doors. And I I think it has the opportunity for our our young players and are adults to be much healthier and realize that you know we live in a Western. Society is very individualistic. And you know you should be able to do it on your own. Every every action movie has one person who beats like fifty people right. We have such an individualistic kind of mentality. That were Bruce Willis. We need to figure it out our own right. We gotta do it all our own and the reality is everybody needs help..

tennis hockey Baker Baker Baker Mayfield baseball Orlando Bruce Willis CEO Dr Gold Usda Baker Mayfield Hawaii Jani Parks Dr Lower Censo accountant
"dr larry" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

The Tennis.com Podcast

11:14 min | 6 months ago

"dr larry" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

"Like you would on Timers hey everyone we're here with Dr Larry Lower. He is the USA national campus. Mental skills specialist talks a little bit about how he fell in love with sports psychology and also talks a little bit on how he's helped so many American players compete. Keep listening are you. Can I throw it to you a little bit? I know that you work with someone and it was a big part of going back to the tour as comfortable as you. WanNa talk about it. What did you get into? What kind of exercises did you do? And how did it make a difference because as someone it's it's hard for me because I see things as tangible and I think mental health. It's a little bit hidden and a little bit harder and mental and working on mental. Training is so hard for me so for some people to really see us. Yeah I can't see it. I can see someone getting stronger. Can someone playing tennis better? But I can't see what's happening in their head. So can you explain what happened to your well? I mean no one knows what really is happening. I mean you can do the homework. You can do everything but Sometimes seeing it. It's it's like you said it's not tangible. It's not something that you can just. Oh it's so clear as day I actually worked with Dr Lower Before my break and then I decided to work with someone that was through the W. T. A. And for me it was just getting deep inside of myself as weird as that may sound but just raw and kind of taking out all my layers and seeing what was what what was I really thinking And like Dr Lower said. There was a lot of homework to do I think one of the coolest homework assignments that I ever got was to write a letter to myself and the letter was pretty much writing all my ailments like everything that I thought was wrong. Okay and then a few days later go back and read that as if it was your friend. Okay you go back and you're like wow why am I being so hard on myself lake? It's not that bad and I actually. I I remember sending it to you. I sent you that homework I was like hey like you should do this like I don't care what you're going through do it. Yeah but it's There's so many I think assignments that if you just don't even say has anything to do with mental mental training. It's just you kind of see inside yourself And you just learn more about yourself. And it was enlightening. I think. Yeah but did that stuff. Did you feel it paying off on court the past few weeks could you do you think during a match the stuff you'd worked on and actually helped in the moment in the point in the game a hundred percent I remember seeing Dr Lower in Tyler Texas and granted I lost first round to the eventual winner but One of the things that are selling it was my mantra that I decided to you know. Tell myself every single point and it was never satisfied and then once. I told him that he was like you should. You should also add never satisfied. But always gratified. Now's like that's really good because it's true. I've said an and what I've also realized that the peaceful warrior is one of the greatest books and movies. I think I've ever seen and It helped me a lot because once you realize that at the end of the day it's not a point it's not a match it's just a moment It changes a lot and then a very last thing I think was just cutting myself some slack instead of talking to myself in negative derogatory ways. I talked to myself if I was speaking to a small child and it's very different from. Wow you suck on this. Like why'd you do this point? You know you suck so bad instead of saying that you know it's like hey next point like your great. Don't worry about it. You got this and just that thinking alone can really just change your mental thinking and you know just the dynamic of how you play. I think and this I mean bouncing off of that you know coming back or even starting to play pro tennis even going to play tournament. There's a little bit of fear of a failure right. I'm not saying it's Irena. I'm saying it applies to a lot of different people. I'm not GonNa put you on the spot again. But what do you tell players? Who are or any athlete. Who is a little bit? Afraid that they're going to fail and it might not work out and everything they're working on is is not going to actually get them anywhere asking questions today so. I think it's understanding. That failure is a normal part of the process of learning in changing the view. And there's many athletes have come out and talked about how their failures have led them to where they are. There's in any endeavor Nina there's this level of trust that has to occur that if I do what it takes I will get there and also you're hitting on maybe one of the hardest things in all of professional sport and add is can you trust in yourself in your in your plan and your team and everything. You're doing that it will get you there. And that's the challenge because I think there's a fear that exists that if I do all these things and I don't get there that's a huge failure but it's not because it's actually the journey of everything you did to get yourself there that opens up new doors. That allows you to be the person you're going to be calm and maybe reach outcome. Maybe you don't. But because of striving and going on that journey you become much better and you have a lot of great moments right Irena through that journey so people talk about failure. I get it I feel like I feel sometimes I hate it but at the same time you have to realize it's a moment in time it's one data point. It's an experience that I can use to get better. We talk about failing forward actually falling down so I can actually get up and be farther ahead and using that as a way to to get better and then it gets into law talk about his acceptance that Roger Federer makes mistakes Serena Williams makes mistakes. Why can't you you're human and you're GonNa make mistakes and mistakes are not failure actually starting to get that word out and saying look. It's part of the journey. Accept it for what it is and use it. Use It to get better. I mean I have a I have another one because that I mean smiling before. He's finished in the hot seat. I like hearing. That kind of stuff definitely helps makes me think more about it so I mean I definitely almost like getting a mental therapy session right now. It definitely calendar later this week. There you go to my other thing that I notice a lot with tennis players in particular. Irena maybe you can and add onto this but the feeling that you always have to be chasing the next big thing you win a tournament or you win a match. There's always another one the next day how long you know you can actually sit on having won a tournament or had a great run. It's so short and you always want to get higher in rank higher and be better and it's the same in real life. I've noticed that with me. It's always like what can I do? Next. That's going to be bigger and better than I did last week or last month. And you're only as good as your last result. What how do you work through that kind of stuff with players? Who are always chasing. I think the one thing I will say is that I've been there. I've done that. I've done the okay. Well I just wanted my match like who's tomorrow and the older I've gotten I realized that you have to take the time to be grateful and realize what you've done and tennis is not one of those sports where you have weeks and months at a time where you can just coast on a win or be down on a loss like you have an opportunity the very next day every single like pretty much every single day. And that's one of the things My Boyfriend Travis. He's a pro boxer so he wins a fight he will have. He'll be able to coast for a little bit before he fights again very different very different from tennis. And that's one of the things like I saw A player when a sorry. I saw player recently lose Owen. Oh and to be able to come back and do well that following week. I mean a lot of people would be very upset about that. But that says a lot about that players well An so tennis is just one of those sports where you have to realize okay. This happened but I'm going to accept what happened whether win or lose I'm GONNA accept it. Be grateful you know and then move on and I think that's that's important and like I said I mean you have to be able to. I know people say this all the time like treat yourself. But I'm a big believer of that like no matter. What like if you did something good and you feel like you WanNa get positive reinforcement or you want to treat yourself you should life is short is GonNa Right Lane. I'm pretty much on board with arena. Feel like we're trading roles. Here she's GonNa take my job eventually. I think he to celebrate the small victories and the challenges of pick up where arena left off is then being able to refocus and prepare again and sport like tennis because you in junior tennis. You have maybe a couple of hours in protest. You might have twelve hours. Twenty four hours. And how do you do that in taking the moment to appreciate what you've done is not being complacent taking a moment? Appreciate what you've done will fuel you for the long term. And that's what you need. I mean sustainability. I've talked about the players all time. If you WANNA do this well you need to be able to sustain your motivation for ten fifteen years right. It mean to do this at the highest level and degree that you may want to do it. So how do we celebrate the small victories and still turn it around and be ready to go again? I think that One of the biggest most important things okay is being able to take every moment and let it pass through in realize there's more coming and being okay with it and being okay with the past and if you can do that non-judgmental then every moment can you can embrace those moments. It's hard sometimes When things aren't going well but realizing it's a moment and the next one could be much better allows you to move forward and and certainly when you have a great moment you win a match. You WanNa Tournament There's a part of you that should be wanting to push for more but but not at the expense of your well being You need appreciate what you've done and have that pursuit of excellence that you know in a healthy way that okay. This is good. I did a good job now. I want to go and do it again but.

tennis Dr Larry Lower USA Irena Roger Federer Tyler Texas Nina Travis Owen Serena Williams
"dr larry" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

The Tennis.com Podcast

13:13 min | 6 months ago

"dr larry" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

"Hello. Everyone welcome to the tennis. Dot Com. Podcast we are in Lake Nona at the US J. National Campus. I'm your host Nina. Panic joined by my co host. Irena Falconi. Hey guys. How's it going this episode? Special guest is Dr. Larry Lower Larry Welcome. Thanks for having me. I'm looking forward to it. Can you give us a brief little bio about who you are and what you do here? Well here I'm the mental skill specialist for player development. I work with are pros and our juniors Getting Ready for competition preparing mentally. I work with the coaches as well to get players ready. So my job is while the coaches work on the physical side is to work on the players mental side and make sure that they're prepared for competition as well as helping them deal with things that happened in their life. So it's not just about The player on the court but the player off the court as well the holistic approach. And it's my job to make sure that the players have what they need to compete in a happy way in a healthy way and a high functioning way. Have you always wanted to do this from the very beginning was this? You're calling well not since I was a baby but Certainly when I not not really no being not being facetious anymore being serious when I was younger I wanted to be a coach and civically a baseball coach. I wanted to play professional baseball. And that didn't work out We don't need to get into that and this podcast and since tennis sports play so I had decided I was going to be a coach and maybe actually go into commentating. On Television Live sports events. I was interested in and so went to Clarion University. My Hometown University and really wasn't that interested in the courses and communication and and the degree. So I I ran into the psychology doctor Dr Easily Krause who knew that I played sports and coaching as well and she said hey you know there's actually something called sports psychology. I was around nineteen years old. I'm like what does that was. Clueless had no idea. This is dating myself but this was like nineteen ninety-two right. What is that and she said? Well come check it out. I'm going to have a special course on sports psychology and so I took the course and love. It fell in love with it and at that point. I knew that's what I wanted to do. Because an answer questions I had about my own performances in terms of at times playing great and other times. Not Performing You know going in and going four for four and having a home run and three RB is in the next game striking out four times. And why does that happen and why are sometimes feel on and other times just way off? Why sometimes in the feudal my locked in and other times? I'M MAKING MISTAKES. Couldn't answer it for myself necessarily and. I wanted to know to help myself but also to help the players that I was coaching in Baseball Thomas. Coaching sixteen seventeen eighteen year old Baseball in Pennsylvania says I dug deeper into psychology and and Indus. Four psychology started answering the questions that I had so that that was really the start and then I was fortunate to be able to go to. Unc Greensboro with Dr Dangled Who's one of the best sports psychologist in the world and having worked with him? I really got a deep understanding of what it means to perform under pressure and in really the literature sports psychology and Research and application. And really that kind of set me up. That's that's a quick version of it for what I'm doing today. I know you said baseball is not the same as tennis. But you can relate to players who have struggled in their sport given your background playing sport but you can also maybe I know you work with professionals who maybe are successful. But you probably people that. Don't make it right absolutely so you can relate to. I WANNA get dark. Unless you can relate you can really yeah. You can relate to someone who is struggling with finding their identity after thinking they were. GonNa make it as a pro and not getting there right. So how did you? How did you work through that if you can talk about that and you know? Is there a formula for figuring yourself out after your dreams and your hopes kind of change that is deep this early? So that's a great question you know getting into my psyche this turning turning the tides on me. We're GONNA talk about Irena. We will okay good so much better about that well honestly schering dot. Me That was that was a process Having gone to college and and and walked onto play baseball and it didn't work out and I didn't really understand recruiting process and probably could played somewhere but ended up not playing coming from a small rural area and losing that dream. That point was really difficult. And so I'm I'm age. Nineteen you know and and not yet mature as I am now. I know it's hard to believe. But and and it took a while it was kind of a tailspin for a while I was. I wouldn't say I was depressed but I was pretty down about it and upset that this dream that I had didn't work out. And it took me some time to sort of regroup and certainly being in college and and having those experiences helped a lot where I was exposed to different things and ended up really being mentored in a in a wonderful way by Dr Crowson. In the field of psychology. And helping me take something that You know was a big disappointment in not being able to further my baseball career and actually turn it into something. We're now my mission is to help. Other people have what they need to be successful. Because I felt like maybe I missed out on some things for sure. I miss out on some things. I didn't understand the psychology. I didn't understand the process of figuring out how to get seen and recruited and go to college and play baseball. I didn't I don't understand any of that. I didn't have that opportunity so I wanna make sure that the players that I have a chance to come in contact with have what they need to reach their goals whether or not they do. It ends up being on them. But I don't WanNa be the reason that they don't get there and that's really important so that that changed my whole outlook on life but it took some soul searching and sometimes of just you know like what am I gonNa do you know. And there's no like easy way is not like okay. Do these three steps and it works out you need to. You need to go there. You need to think about what it is you want and realize that you know as my friend David Roth for. Who's ex-navy seal said that you have more than one mission in life the mission changes and for me that Dreamer. That mission changed at age. Nineteen where base? No baseball was no longer an option as as a player and I had to figure out what I was going to do and I found a new mission that was to help other athletes and help coaches. And that's something I truly love and enjoy and that's probably where a lot of the passion comes from because you know I hate to see people miss out on an opportunity at least have the chance to be successful. Speaking of helping people a lot of coaches talk about being able to see something special and a player that does eventually make it. Do you find that. It's easy to to to see that with With players that you work with are you able to see whether their mental skills are above and beyond someone that potentially does not make it? I think I can see the outliers. Pretty well. The people who just stand out but probably most people can one of the one of the things I think we fall. Prey to his as coaches is believing that we know. Who'S GONNA make it? And who's not and if you go back through history of looking at drafting or selection processes were not very good at determining and identifying. Who's GonNa make an WHO's not? It's really a numbers game to be honest. You you make enough choices. You'RE GONNA hit on somebody right so and not to others a lot of people out there that do this work and there's a lot of good people out there but it's really challenging to no no of someone can can do this at the highest level but what I will say is the thing that you look for. I is to someone have the passion to do tennis to do. The whatever given initiative sport activity it is and that is something that you you can see in person as you spend time with them I think it's a fallacy to think that you can go watch a player once or twice a tournament and thank. You have a figure it out you know. Thirteen fourteen year old player. Once you get to know someone I think you can start to understand better than this person may be has the building blocks of something pretty special but it needs to be now nurtured and developed and that in my mind you know there's not many players is not many. Serena's there's not many rodgers out there so but there's a lot of great players who developed through the pathway right and we wouldn't have known at thirteen but we know now

baseball tennis Irena Falconi Dr Larry Nina Dr. Larry Lower Lake Nona Clarion University Dr Easily Krause US J. National Campus Dr Dangled Dr Crowson Hometown University Lebron James Serena Williams Pennsylvania David Roth Sidney crosby rodgers
"dr larry" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

The Tennis.com Podcast

13:13 min | 6 months ago

"dr larry" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

"Podcast we are in Lake Nona at the US J. National Campus. I'm your host Nina. Panic joined by my co host. Irena Falconi. Hey guys. How's it going this episode? Special guest is Dr. Larry Lower Larry Welcome. Thanks for having me. I'm looking forward to it. Can you give us a brief little bio about who you are and what you do here? Well here I'm the mental skill specialist for player development. I work with are pros and our juniors Getting Ready for competition preparing mentally. I work with the coaches as well to get players ready. So my job is while the coaches work on the physical side is to work on the players mental side and make sure that they're prepared for competition as well as helping them deal with things that happened in their life. So it's not just about The player on the court but the player off the court as well the holistic approach. And it's my job to make sure that the players have what they need to compete in a happy way in a healthy way and a high functioning way. Have you always wanted to do this from the very beginning was this? You're calling well not since I was a baby but Certainly when I not not really no being not being facetious anymore being serious when I was younger I wanted to be a coach and civically a baseball coach. I wanted to play professional baseball. And that didn't work out We don't need to get into that and this podcast and since tennis sports play so I had decided I was going to be a coach and maybe actually go into commentating. On Television Live sports events. I was interested in and so went to Clarion University. My Hometown University and really wasn't that interested in the courses and communication and and the degree. So I I ran into the psychology doctor Dr Easily Krause who knew that I played sports and coaching as well and she said hey you know there's actually something called sports psychology. I was around nineteen years old. I'm like what does that was. Clueless had no idea. This is dating myself but this was like nineteen ninety-two right. What is that and she said? Well come check it out. I'm going to have a special course on sports psychology and so I took the course and love. It fell in love with it and at that point. I knew that's what I wanted to do. Because an answer questions I had about my own performances in terms of at times playing great and other times. Not Performing You know going in and going four for four and having a home run and three RB is in the next game striking out four times. And why does that happen and why are sometimes feel on and other times just way off? Why sometimes in the feudal my locked in and other times? I'M MAKING MISTAKES. Couldn't answer it for myself necessarily and. I wanted to know to help myself but also to help the players that I was coaching in Baseball Thomas. Coaching sixteen seventeen eighteen year old Baseball in Pennsylvania says I dug deeper into psychology and and Indus. Four psychology started answering the questions that I had so that that was really the start and then I was fortunate to be able to go to. Unc Greensboro with Dr Dangled Who's one of the best sports psychologist in the world and having worked with him? I really got a deep understanding of what it means to perform under pressure and in really the literature sports psychology and Research and application. And really that kind of set me up. That's that's a quick version of it for what I'm doing today. I know you said baseball is not the same as tennis. But you can relate to players who have struggled in their sport given your background playing sport but you can also maybe I know you work with professionals who maybe are successful. But you probably people that. Don't make it right absolutely so you can relate to. I WANNA get dark. Unless you can relate you can really yeah. You can relate to someone who is struggling with finding their identity after thinking they were. GonNa make it as a pro and not getting there right. So how did you? How did you work through that if you can talk about that and you know? Is there a formula for figuring yourself out after your dreams and your hopes kind of change that is deep this early? So that's a great question you know getting into my psyche this turning turning the tides on me. We're GONNA talk about Irena. We will okay good so much better about that well honestly schering dot. Me That was that was a process Having gone to college and and and walked onto play baseball and it didn't work out and I didn't really understand recruiting process and probably could played somewhere but ended up not playing coming from a small rural area and losing that dream. That point was really difficult. And so I'm I'm age. Nineteen you know and and not yet mature as I am now. I know it's hard to believe. But and and it took a while it was kind of a tailspin for a while I was. I wouldn't say I was depressed but I was pretty down about it and upset that this dream that I had didn't work out. And it took me some time to sort of regroup and certainly being in college and and having those experiences helped a lot where I was exposed to different things and ended up really being mentored in a in a wonderful way by Dr Crowson. In the field of psychology. And helping me take something that You know was a big disappointment in not being able to further my baseball career and actually turn it into something. We're now my mission is to help. Other people have what they need to be successful. Because I felt like maybe I missed out on some things for sure. I miss out on some things. I didn't understand the psychology. I didn't understand the process of figuring out how to get seen and recruited and go to college and play baseball. I didn't I don't understand any of that. I didn't have that opportunity so I wanna make sure that the players that I have a chance to come in contact with have what they need to reach their goals whether or not they do. It ends up being on them. But I don't WanNa be the reason that they don't get there and that's really important so that that changed my whole outlook on life but it took some soul searching and sometimes of just you know like what am I gonNa do you know. And there's no like easy way is not like okay. Do these three steps and it works out you need to. You need to go there. You need to think about what it is you want and realize that you know as my friend David Roth for. Who's ex-navy seal said that you have more than one mission in life the mission changes and for me that Dreamer. That mission changed at age. Nineteen where base? No baseball was no longer an option as as a player and I had to figure out what I was going to do and I found a new mission that was to help other athletes and help coaches. And that's something I truly love and enjoy and that's probably where a lot of the passion comes from because you know I hate to see people miss out on an opportunity at least have the chance to be successful. Speaking of helping people a lot of coaches talk about being able to see something special and a player that does eventually make it. Do you find that. It's easy to to to see that with With players that you work with are you able to see whether their mental skills are above and beyond someone that potentially does not make it? I think I can see the outliers. Pretty well. The people who just stand out but probably most people can one of the one of the things I think we fall. Prey to his as coaches is believing that we know. Who'S GONNA make it? And who's not and if you go back through history of looking at drafting or selection processes were not very good at determining and identifying. Who's GonNa make an WHO's not? It's really a numbers game to be honest. You you make enough choices. You'RE GONNA hit on somebody right so and not to others a lot of people out there that do this work and there's a lot of good people out there but it's really challenging to no no of someone can can do this at the highest level but what I will say is the thing that you look for. I is to someone have the passion to do tennis to do. The whatever given initiative sport activity it is and that is something that you you can see in person as you spend time with them I think it's a fallacy to think that you can go watch a player once or twice a tournament and thank. You have a figure it out you know. Thirteen fourteen year old player. Once you get to know someone I think you can start to understand better than this person may be has the building blocks of something pretty special but it needs to be now nurtured and developed and that in my mind you know there's not many players is not many. Serena's there's not many rodgers out there so but there's a lot of great players who developed through the pathway right and we wouldn't have known at thirteen but we know now and so. I think our job is certainly try to identify the ones who are the outliers and make sure they get the support they need. But there's a whole lot of very good players. Who If we put the support around them? They could actually do great things as well. And and that doesn't lessen those players at all because I have a tremendous amount of respect for the those players who developed themselves through hard work to get what they're going to be the the super talented ones the Lebron James. They're probably GONNA make it no matter. What Sidney crosby Serena Williams but there's only a few of those every generation so we have to make sure that we identify and do a great job. Bring those players up so long winded answer Irena but getting back to the point. Is that really hard to know but I think as you get to know somebody are they passionate are they the ones driving the bus or they proactively. Do they want to get up in the morning and do the training are they pulling their parents along to get to the courts are they pulling the coach along. Are they asking for more? They WanNa do one more when something's asked to them like all right. I'll do that and more It's not always about more. Obviously but there's A. There's a something that you've seen a person wear. They are driven and they have goals. And they're going to get this done and I think you can over time figure that out. Can I ask a bit more of a simple less loaded question? What is a mental training session? Like the is it. You're giving out homework to players or are you sitting down and having a therapy session and talking one on one is it. A big group of 'em and you're having them bounce ideas back and forth and talking things out. What is it like having an hour with Dr Larry? Lower OFF AMAZING. Kinda rammed a little less. It's that you did. It was very nice Yeah I think it's all those things. You mentioned Nina. It's it is the group work Especially with our younger ones but we also sometimes do group work with our pros The adults not very often but when it makes sense. We're we're working on a topic. Say We're teaching visualization the basic skills and we want everybody know it we might bring people into room or something like that Will do group work. We'll do individual work will will work many different ways to me. I think you need to work in in in sort of three ways to be successful. I you need to work directly with the person and teach and educate and figure out where they are. And what's going to get them across the gap to where they want to be okay and you need to know that person secondly you need to really work with the coaching staff for their coach their strength coach to figure out how to integrate lessons and the skills that you're teaching into training which eventually then is an easier jump to performance than trying to go from the classroom or the office to the court. How do we integrate what we're teaching in the training so it needs to work out and be done in the gym on the court on the track all those places okay and then the third thing is exactly what you said? Is there are. There is homework because a Lotta people believe that mental skills training is like okay. Larry says something brilliant which doesn't happen very often and suddenly I'm better versus. There's a bunch of habits that we develop and we develop these habits of excellence. It allows us to cross that gap to bit where we WANNA be. But you don't do that in in one session. You do that over time so and you do a lot of that work on your own when nobody's watching you're practicing in your mind how you're going to play that closeout game how you're going to play that. Tiebreaker right. You're you're setting goals that motivate you and focus you on how you're going to compete how you're gonNA play versus the outcome or worrying about expectations of others. So there's all this work can be done including journaling. Visualization mindfulness meditation. There's many many things in you have to learn those base skills and that often is done away from the office and away from the court and so yes. There's there's a heavy bit of Just doing your work just.

baseball tennis Irena Falconi Dr Larry Nina Dr. Larry Lower Lake Nona Clarion University Dr Easily Krause US J. National Campus Dr Dangled Dr Crowson Hometown University Lebron James Serena Williams Pennsylvania David Roth Sidney crosby rodgers
Dr. Larry Lauer on improving your mental skills

The Tennis.com Podcast

06:52 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Larry Lauer on improving your mental skills

"I'm your host Nina. Panic joined by my co host. Irena Falconi. Hey guys. How's it going this episode? Special guest is Dr. Larry Lower Larry Welcome. Thanks for having me. I'm looking forward to it. Can you give us a brief little bio about who you are and what you do here? Well here I'm the mental skill specialist for player development. I work with are pros and our juniors Getting Ready for competition preparing mentally. I work with the coaches as well to get players ready. So my job is while the coaches work on the physical side is to work on the players mental side and make sure that they're prepared for competition as well as helping them deal with things that happened in their life. So it's not just about The player on the court but the player off the court as well the holistic approach. And it's my job to make sure that the players have what they need to compete in a happy way in a healthy way and a high functioning way. Have you always wanted to do this from the very beginning was this? You're calling well not since I was a baby but Certainly when I not not really no being not being facetious anymore being serious when I was younger I wanted to be a coach and civically a baseball coach. I wanted to play professional baseball. And that didn't work out We don't need to get into that and this podcast and since tennis sports play so I had decided I was going to be a coach and maybe actually go into commentating. On Television Live sports events. I was interested in and so went to Clarion University. My Hometown University and really wasn't that interested in the courses and communication and and the degree. So I I ran into the psychology doctor Dr Easily Krause who knew that I played sports and coaching as well and she said hey you know there's actually something called sports psychology. I was around nineteen years old. I'm like what does that was. Clueless had no idea. This is dating myself but this was like nineteen ninety-two right. What is that and she said? Well come check it out. I'm going to have a special course on sports psychology and so I took the course and love. It fell in love with it and at that point. I knew that's what I wanted to do. Because an answer questions I had about my own performances in terms of at times playing great and other times. Not Performing You know going in and going four for four and having a home run and three RB is in the next game striking out four times. And why does that happen and why are sometimes feel on and other times just way off? Why sometimes in the feudal my locked in and other times? I'M MAKING MISTAKES. Couldn't answer it for myself necessarily and. I wanted to know to help myself but also to help the players that I was coaching in Baseball Thomas. Coaching sixteen seventeen eighteen year old Baseball in Pennsylvania says I dug deeper into psychology and and Indus. Four psychology started answering the questions that I had so that that was really the start and then I was fortunate to be able to go to. Unc Greensboro with Dr Dangled Who's one of the best sports psychologist in the world and having worked with him? I really got a deep understanding of what it means to perform under pressure and in really the literature sports psychology and Research and application. And really that kind of set me up. That's that's a quick version of it for what I'm doing today. I know you said baseball is not the same as tennis. But you can relate to players who have struggled in their sport given your background playing sport but you can also maybe I know you work with professionals who maybe are successful. But you probably people that. Don't make it right absolutely so you can relate to. I WANNA get dark. Unless you can relate you can really yeah. You can relate to someone who is struggling with finding their identity after thinking they were. GonNa make it as a pro and not getting there right. So how did you? How did you work through that if you can talk about that and you know? Is there a formula for figuring yourself out after your dreams and your hopes kind of change that is deep this early? So that's a great question you know getting into my psyche this turning turning the tides on me. We're GONNA talk about Irena. We will okay good so much better about that well honestly schering dot. Me That was that was a process Having gone to college and and and walked onto play baseball and it didn't work out and I didn't really understand recruiting process and probably could played somewhere but ended up not playing coming from a small rural area and losing that dream. That point was really difficult. And so I'm I'm age. Nineteen you know and and not yet mature as I am now. I know it's hard to believe. But and and it took a while it was kind of a tailspin for a while I was. I wouldn't say I was depressed but I was pretty down about it and upset that this dream that I had didn't work out. And it took me some time to sort of regroup and certainly being in college and and having those experiences helped a lot where I was exposed to different things and ended up really being mentored in a in a wonderful way by Dr Crowson. In the field of psychology. And helping me take something that You know was a big disappointment in not being able to further my baseball career and actually turn it into something. We're now my mission is to help. Other people have what they need to be successful. Because I felt like maybe I missed out on some things for sure. I miss out on some things. I didn't understand the psychology. I didn't understand the process of figuring out how to get seen and recruited and go to college and play baseball. I didn't I don't understand any of that. I didn't have that opportunity so I wanna make sure that the players that I have a chance to come in contact with have what they need to reach their goals whether or not they do. It ends up being on them. But I don't WanNa be the reason that they don't get there and that's really important so that that changed my whole outlook on life but it took some soul searching and sometimes of just you know like what am I gonNa do you know. And there's no like easy way is not like okay. Do these three steps and it works out you need to. You need to go there. You need to think about what it is you want and realize that you know as my friend David Roth for. Who's ex-navy seal said that you have more than one mission in life the mission changes and for me that Dreamer. That mission changed at age. Nineteen where base? No baseball was no longer an option as as a player and I had to figure out what I was going to do and I found a new mission that was to help other athletes and help coaches. And that's something I truly love and enjoy and that's probably where a lot of the passion comes from because you know I hate to see people miss out on an opportunity at least have the chance to be successful.

Baseball Tennis Irena Falconi Dr. Larry Lower Nina Dr Easily Krause Clarion University Dr Dangled Hometown University Dr Crowson David Roth Pennsylvania
Dr. Larry Lauer on improving your mental skills

The Tennis.com Podcast

08:59 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Larry Lauer on improving your mental skills

"Hello. Everyone welcome to the tennis. Dot Com. Podcast we are in Lake Nona at the US J. National Campus. I'm your host Nina. Panic joined by my co host. Irena Falconi. Hey guys. How's it going this episode? Special guest is Dr. Larry Lower Larry Welcome. Thanks for having me. I'm looking forward to it. Can you give us a brief little bio about who you are and what you do here? Well here I'm the mental skill specialist for player development. I work with are pros and our juniors Getting Ready for competition preparing mentally. I work with the coaches as well to get players ready. So my job is while the coaches work on the physical side is to work on the players mental side and make sure that they're prepared for competition as well as helping them deal with things that happened in their life. So it's not just about The player on the court but the player off the court as well the holistic approach. And it's my job to make sure that the players have what they need to compete in a happy way in a healthy way and a high functioning way. Have you always wanted to do this from the very beginning was this? You're calling well not since I was a baby but Certainly when I not not really no being not being facetious anymore being serious when I was younger I wanted to be a coach and civically a baseball coach. I wanted to play professional baseball. And that didn't work out We don't need to get into that and this podcast and since tennis sports play so I had decided I was going to be a coach and maybe actually go into commentating. On Television Live sports events. I was interested in and so went to Clarion University. My Hometown University and really wasn't that interested in the courses and communication and and the degree. So I I ran into the psychology doctor Dr Easily Krause who knew that I played sports and coaching as well and she said hey you know there's actually something called sports psychology. I was around nineteen years old. I'm like what does that was. Clueless had no idea. This is dating myself but this was like nineteen ninety-two right. What is that and she said? Well come check it out. I'm going to have a special course on sports psychology and so I took the course and love. It fell in love with it and at that point. I knew that's what I wanted to do. Because an answer questions I had about my own performances in terms of at times playing great and other times. Not Performing You know going in and going four for four and having a home run and three RB is in the next game striking out four times. And why does that happen and why are sometimes feel on and other times just way off? Why sometimes in the feudal my locked in and other times? I'M MAKING MISTAKES. Couldn't answer it for myself necessarily and. I wanted to know to help myself but also to help the players that I was coaching in Baseball Thomas. Coaching sixteen seventeen eighteen year old Baseball in Pennsylvania says I dug deeper into psychology and and Indus. Four psychology started answering the questions that I had so that that was really the start and then I was fortunate to be able to go to. Unc Greensboro with Dr Dangled Who's one of the best sports psychologist in the world and having worked with him? I really got a deep understanding of what it means to perform under pressure and in really the literature sports psychology and Research and application. And really that kind of set me up. That's that's a quick version of it for what I'm doing today. I know you said baseball is not the same as tennis. But you can relate to players who have struggled in their sport given your background playing sport but you can also maybe I know you work with professionals who maybe are successful. But you probably people that. Don't make it right absolutely so you can relate to. I WANNA get dark. Unless you can relate you can really yeah. You can relate to someone who is struggling with finding their identity after thinking they were. GonNa make it as a pro and not getting there right. So how did you? How did you work through that if you can talk about that and you know? Is there a formula for figuring yourself out after your dreams and your hopes kind of change that is deep this early? So that's a great question you know getting into my psyche this turning turning the tides on me. We're GONNA talk about Irena. We will okay good so much better about that well honestly schering dot. Me That was that was a process Having gone to college and and and walked onto play baseball and it didn't work out and I didn't really understand recruiting process and probably could played somewhere but ended up not playing coming from a small rural area and losing that dream. That point was really difficult. And so I'm I'm age. Nineteen you know and and not yet mature as I am now. I know it's hard to believe. But and and it took a while it was kind of a tailspin for a while I was. I wouldn't say I was depressed but I was pretty down about it and upset that this dream that I had didn't work out. And it took me some time to sort of regroup and certainly being in college and and having those experiences helped a lot where I was exposed to different things and ended up really being mentored in a in a wonderful way by Dr Crowson. In the field of psychology. And helping me take something that You know was a big disappointment in not being able to further my baseball career and actually turn it into something. We're now my mission is to help. Other people have what they need to be successful. Because I felt like maybe I missed out on some things for sure. I miss out on some things. I didn't understand the psychology. I didn't understand the process of figuring out how to get seen and recruited and go to college and play baseball. I didn't I don't understand any of that. I didn't have that opportunity so I wanna make sure that the players that I have a chance to come in contact with have what they need to reach their goals whether or not they do. It ends up being on them. But I don't WanNa be the reason that they don't get there and that's really important so that that changed my whole outlook on life but it took some soul searching and sometimes of just you know like what am I gonNa do you know. And there's no like easy way is not like okay. Do these three steps and it works out you need to. You need to go there. You need to think about what it is you want and realize that you know as my friend David Roth for. Who's ex-navy seal said that you have more than one mission in life the mission changes and for me that Dreamer. That mission changed at age. Nineteen where base? No baseball was no longer an option as as a player and I had to figure out what I was going to do and I found a new mission that was to help other athletes and help coaches. And that's something I truly love and enjoy and that's probably where a lot of the passion comes from because you know I hate to see people miss out on an opportunity at least have the chance to be successful. Speaking of helping people a lot of coaches talk about being able to see something special and a player that does eventually make it. Do you find that. It's easy to to to see that with With players that you work with are you able to see whether their mental skills are above and beyond someone that potentially does not make it? I think I can see the outliers. Pretty well. The people who just stand out but probably most people can one of the one of the things I think we fall. Prey to his as coaches is believing that we know. Who'S GONNA make it? And who's not and if you go back through history of looking at drafting or selection processes were not very good at determining and identifying. Who's GonNa make an WHO's not? It's really a numbers game to be honest. You you make enough choices. You'RE GONNA hit on somebody right so and not to others a lot of people out there that do this work and there's a lot of good people out there but it's really challenging to no no of someone can can do this at the highest level but what I will say is the thing that you look for. I is to someone have the passion to do tennis to do. The whatever given initiative sport activity it is and that is something that you you can see in person as you spend time with them I think it's a fallacy to think that you can go watch a player once or twice a tournament and thank. You have a figure it out you know. Thirteen fourteen year old player. Once you get to know someone I think you can start to understand better than this person may be has the building blocks of something pretty special but it needs to be now nurtured and developed and that in my mind you know there's not many players is not many. Serena's there's not many rodgers out there so but there's a lot of great players who developed through the pathway right and we wouldn't have known at thirteen but we know now

Baseball Tennis Irena Falconi Lake Nona Dr. Larry Lower Nina Clarion University Dr Easily Krause Us J. National Campus Dr Dangled Hometown University Dr Crowson Pennsylvania Serena David Roth Rodgers
"dr larry" Discussed on Discover Lafayette

Discover Lafayette

03:33 min | 8 months ago

"dr larry" Discussed on Discover Lafayette

"If someone at your house becomes becomes. Okay okay in terms of protecting yourself. Minimizing transmission at your own home. But there's not any reason to be stockpiling on supplies. You know there's reason to be washing your hands and be cautious. But we don't want to be having the hysteria right now of stockpiling for for Armageddon. That that's not what we're talking about. Okay over pets are safe right as far as as far as we know that dog our dogs and cats. Cnn chickens won't get this We really don't know we don't know There are have seen a couple of write ups and some veterinary websites Indicating that they're looking into it. And I know Jason I know you and you and your wife have got some animals my wife our animal rescue. You know and so that that's important and if I come across anything that that seems legitimate with answering the question will be Shirley no phone call. I will definitely do that similarity. Do you want to get the website in about your animal rescue while we're here would you So We're we're on facebook it's the LMS animal rescues rough rider R. U. F. F. R. E. E. R. Transports. And what do you do so with my wife and I do. Is We take in dogs? That are on the euthanasia list from local shelters Ami coordinate with other rescues and fosters all throughout Louisiana And other no kill shelters in Louisiana. So we get dogs off of the Youth Asia Lists. We then can submit these dogs to To No kill shelters in Iowa. Kansas New York All over the country really and transport them out of Louisiana to to get them to To get them to find forever homes you forever forever you know you are and I do. WanNa talk about the laugh. Animal Control Center. They're building a beautiful new complex Morobi DOE had made that I already and he really did end up seeing a lot of it through and the Animal Control Center or laughing. Animal Shelter and Care Centre has done things like lowering adoption fees and moving towards no kill. The adoption rates are much higher. They're partnering now with with our rescue as well as many others for transporting animals out of Louisiana and the impact that it's having euthanasia lists in Lafayette has been phenomenal and just a huge thank. Thank you to To show the Della who's director Lafayette Animal Shelter and Care Centre? But if you want to help out Our rescue it's the L. M. S. It's my initials. My wife's financials L. M. Ass Animal Rescue Foundation and you can find us on facebook. You can find us an Amazon Smile and You know please get involved. Please rescue spay neuter adopt And do what you can to help. Wonderful Pets in our community. I wanted to get that in. Because you're also active with rotary north. You're the incoming president so you bring your expertise to the community as a a doctor but you also bring your heart to. I said thank. You know it's fun. Yeah Rotary Rotary is a great organization again. You can look at dot org again. Put in pull the HAM hands but You know we're excited. We've gotten pulled down. Not only two countries worldwide Afghanistan and Pakistan World Polio Day every Tober twenty-fourth and check that out in Rotary Dot Oregon end polio. Now and Thank you very much for having me Aung. I want to thank Dr Larry. Simone for being a very knowledgeable guest.

Louisiana Lafayette Animal Shelter and C L. M. Ass Animal Rescue Founda Animal Control Center facebook Animal Shelter Cnn Lafayette Amazon Afghanistan Shirley Morobi DOE Jason Dr Larry Simone HAM Iowa Care Centre Kansas Pakistan
"dr larry" Discussed on Nourish Your Health at every age

Nourish Your Health at every age

03:54 min | 8 months ago

"dr larry" Discussed on Nourish Your Health at every age

"But wash your hands. You know practice. The the sort of six to eight foot diff- distance rule. You mentioned gloves. Clorox wipes yeah clorox wipes can be can be helpful for for cleaning services at your home the become in particular helpful for first of public spaces in terms of keeping those safe but gloves and having those things that your house become useful. If someone at your house becomes becomes. Okay okay in terms of protecting yourself. Minimizing transmission at your own home. But there's not any reason to be stockpiling on supplies. You know there's reason to be washing your hands and be cautious. But we don't want to be having the hysteria right now of stockpiling for for Armageddon. That that's not what we're talking about. Okay over pets are safe right as far as as far as we know that dog our dogs and cats. Cnn chickens won't get this We really don't know we don't know There are have seen a couple of write ups and some veterinary websites Indicating that they're looking into it. And I know Jason I know you and you and your wife have got some animals my wife our animal rescue. You know and so that that's important and if I come across anything that that seems legitimate with answering the question will be Shirley no phone call. I will definitely do that similarity. Do you want to get the website in about your animal rescue while we're here would you So We're we're on facebook it's the LMS animal rescues rough rider R. U. F. F. R. E. E. R. Transports. And what do you do so with my wife and I do. Is We take in dogs? That are on the euthanasia list from local shelters Ami coordinate with other rescues and fosters all throughout Louisiana And other no kill shelters in Louisiana. So we get dogs off of the Youth Asia Lists. We then can submit these dogs to To No kill shelters in Iowa. Kansas New York All over the country really and transport them out of Louisiana to to get them to To get them to find forever homes you forever forever you know you are and I do. WanNa talk about the laugh. Animal Control Center. They're building a beautiful new complex Morobi DOE had made that I already and he really did end up seeing a lot of it through and the Animal Control Center or laughing. Animal Shelter and Care Centre has done things like lowering adoption fees and moving towards no kill. The adoption rates are much higher. They're partnering now with with our rescue as well as many others for transporting animals out of Louisiana and the impact that it's having euthanasia lists in Lafayette has been phenomenal and just a huge thank. Thank you to To show the Della who's director Lafayette Animal Shelter and Care Centre? But if you want to help out Our rescue it's the L. M. S. It's my initials. My wife's financials L. M. Ass Animal Rescue Foundation and you can find us on facebook. You can find us an Amazon Smile and You know please get involved. Please rescue spay neuter adopt And do what you can to help. Wonderful Pets in our community. I wanted to get that in. Because you're also active with rotary north. You're the incoming president so you bring your expertise to the community as a a doctor but you also bring your heart to. I said thank. You know it's fun. Yeah Rotary Rotary is a great organization again. You can look at dot org again. Put in pull the HAM hands but You know we're excited. We've gotten pulled down. Not only two countries worldwide Afghanistan and Pakistan World Polio Day every Tober twenty-fourth and check that out in Rotary Dot Oregon end polio. Now and Thank you very much for having me Aung. I want to thank Dr Larry. Simone for being a very knowledgeable guest.

Louisiana Lafayette Animal Shelter and C Clorox L. M. Ass Animal Rescue Founda Animal Control Center facebook Animal Shelter Cnn Lafayette Amazon Afghanistan Shirley Morobi DOE Jason Dr Larry Simone HAM Iowa Care Centre Kansas
Man In His 20s Tests Positive For Coronavirus In Boston | MSNBC - MSNBC

WBZ Morning News

00:35 sec | 9 months ago

Man In His 20s Tests Positive For Coronavirus In Boston | MSNBC - MSNBC

"A local college student has contracted the corona virus the twenty year old UMass Boston student tested positive for the corona virus and is now quarantine in his own home the student returned from China on Tuesday and began noticing symptoms a day later Dr Larry Matt off of the department of public health talks about the virus this is the eight case of infection with this novel coronavirus which they recorded in the US the risk to the public from the two thousand nineteen novel coronavirus remains low in Massachusetts the CDC will continue to investigate and monitor the

China Dr Larry Matt United States Massachusetts CDC Boston
Wisconsin is seeing a spike in E. coli infection cases

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Wisconsin is seeing a spike in E. coli infection cases

"There's been a significant rise in a certain strain of E. coli infecting people in Wisconsin well state health officials are determining the source the bacteria Dr Larry Ludwig with the Mayo Clinic it'll clear tells today's T. M. J. four he may have treated some of these patients with a similar let us link are three cases suspected they suspected that was from a salad or staff salad ingredients the best defense against catching colitis to avoid touching contaminated food and water and washing hands

Wisconsin Dr Larry Ludwig Mayo Clinic T. M. J.
"dr larry" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"dr larry" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Dr Larry on the printer built L. college but first the conclude like technique Nikki Haley into the break there's a conclusion of my interview with ambassador Haley in your in your time at the U. N. did you work with the deputy Assistant Secretary St George can't ambassador Taylor a battery of on a bench at all you know I don't I may have been in meetings with them but I don't think I had any direct interaction with them have you been following their testimony I had some white yes it sounds to me I don't think there's any illegal action by the present here I don't think there's an offense much was an impeachable offense but I do understand that the state department hates back channels and has since Harry Hopkins went to England in nineteen forty one since John Scali dealt with the Soviets and during the Cuban Missile Crisis and Kissinger went to China the state department hates back channels how do you assess the criticisms from these career professionals are obviously smart and talented of the president and Rudy Giuliani well first of all you know we worked with many foreign service officers and and I have great respect for them they are true patriot they are experts in their field and helped me tremendously I'm at the land at the state department but I will tell you we did encounter foreign service officers at the U. N. that had a political bias and date challenged us and we would have to you know address that with them set them down talk to them tell them that look you know we are we are doing the actions of the president and so those things can happen these people you know absolutely are patriots for serving our country this is the part that bothers me is they are going off of a lot of assumptions you go to hear them say well this is what the president wanted none of them had direct conversations with the president to hear them say I heard a conversation between these two people and assume that you heard what the president said there's a whole lot of perception and there's a whole lot of assumptions and when those types of things happen you have to go back to the fact let me close let me close investor Haley with twenty twenty four we're going to have the vice president running for president we're gonna have senator Rick Scott maybe run to Santa's maybe governor do see maybe Mike Pompeii I'll is there any way you run in twenty twenty four I just don't know and I don't think it's worth thinking about I think that right now I want to make sure that the president vice president get elected and make sure that we can continue to to work on Republican majority and and keep our country strong strong and and continue on the path that were on that I just don't know means it is possible because I look at this as a conservative center right Republican backing talk show host who's got you know in twenty sixteen I had to do a hundred and seventy interview to cover the feel I did the field going to be that big do you think the fields going to be a lot more people than Mike pence I think our days are over when we have small primary I think that's true on the Republican side I think it's true on the Democrat side I think we're not gonna have larger primaries going forward and do you believe that they are and see how to set up rules to eliminate you know marginal candidates who could not possibly win the nomination so that we don't go through what we did in sixteen and the Democrats are going through now trapped by declarations of trying to run and get attention you've got to set the bar high do you agree with that well I think it it's a fine line I mean I believe anybody that wants to run should run I think that you know if that were the case that never would have been on the run for governor I was sent out of five candidates you know least amount of money at least not a name ID and we worked our way up when I do think that the Democrats have done better than the Republicans this time that's how they manage the debates there have to be requirements that you have to me to be in a debate so that we can start to lessen the number of people that are on that HM I think I think one of those requirements are to be doing the you you it shall monthly how about that I absolutely agree fastener Nikki Haley thank you with all due respect the brand new best seller by our former United States ambassador to United Nations go out and get it today she'll be back often because I think he got a run for president in twenty twenty four but she didn't say that she didn't say that thank you she didn't say that but with all due respect is it's not quite a campaign book it's pretty close I believe she will be dog by that allegation of general Kelly I know it did not sit well with a lot of people it suggests insubordination by a highly decorated marine officer she probably didn't control the timing of the book but it coming out on veterans day for a gold star family also rankled quite a few people but she is very articulate very able very effective in defense of the United States the president and I think she's running in twenty twenty four okay but doesn't Pentagon run Nikki Haley governor Scott now senator Scott I think governor deuce you gonna run except very state Pompeii might run I I believe as well that senator Rick Scott's gonna run maybe senator Marco Rubio we might have three four ready I mean I'm gonna be back in that same cycle of I got a twenty twenty four I would have to do two hundred and seventy interviews but what we gotta do is stop the marginal candidate god bless George Pataki but yeah in my over bending over backwards to be fair I interviewed a map dozen times in twenty sixteen we don't need that we don't need we need people have a pathway to the president did not there but I like the fact if you read this UNRRA the refugee organization when she talks about how we put pressure on them to clean up their act it's just Ukraine to Plano it's the same thing she wrote the book months ago before this came out no bribery absolutely absurd I'll be talking about it was said Gorka tonight the Silicon Valley at the Fremont merry I hope.

Dr Larry Nikki Haley deputy Assistant Secretary St
DOJ Investigates Olympic Groups

WSJ What's News

03:37 min | 1 year ago

DOJ Investigates Olympic Groups

"US Justice Department is investigating sexual abuse within US Olympic organizations the following the case against former national gymnastics team Dr Larry Nassar currently serving ineffective life sentence for sexually assaulting women and girls. The Federal Inquiry Creek comes ahead of the two thousand twenty Olympics in Tokyo joining me now with more details is Wall Street Journal reporter Rebecca O'Brien Rebecca. This seems like a widespread investigation allegation which groups have you found that are under investigation right now by the Justice Department so it is a wide ranging investigation and it's actually I think best thought of as multiple investigations that interconnect and the important bodies to think about here are the US Olympic Committee the Center for Safe Sport USA gymnastics and and USA Taekwondo and the FBI which is sort of a side issue but think of it as like a layer cake right this mitigation which is being led by multiple offices offices in the Justice Department along with irs criminal investigators is looking at bad actors who are coaches or doctors in the gym level of various Olympic Sports. It's across the United States and then secondarily. There's an investigation into potential cover ups and maybe financial and business wrongdoing by the national governing bodies are N. G. Bees like USA gymnastics or USA Taekwondo and the third level here. Is You limit committee to the big overarching organization Asian. They're looking you know as well their response to sexual abuse allegations another potential financial wrongdoings now how big of an impact did the Larry Nassar Sir case have on the current investigations. This was pretty blockbuster case shook up the world of gymnastics in the Olympics too large extent what I think I mean the Larry Nassar case it slowly began building came first surfaced right after the Rio Olympics more than three years ago now and what I find incredible is that what the Nassar case not only did it first of all you know hundreds of women came forward with allegations but it really also opened shed light on all these other cases like in USA taekwondo or there had been allegations and some mm cases convictions of coaches that had kind of been lost to history and these this repeated. There's a trend over decades of misconduct induct and sex-abuse in a number of different sports that no one really had paid close attention to on a grand scale so the national case really not only was had a tremendous impact on on gymnastics in the Olympic Committee but it also just opened the floodgates as it were now we are looking ahead to the twenty twenty games in Tokyo what under the implications for the US Olympic system as we have been talking about the Nassar case did cause a lot of damage to the institution yet national case did a lot of damage image to USA gymnastics but it also had some blowback on the US Olympic Committee because of executives there who were informed of it and didn't necessarily take steps that many people in the public thing you know they they didn't talk about it more publicly. They didn't take steps to advance the investigation and they leave with egging their face and what is important about these investigations. I the thing is that they show the continued legal pressure on the USOC. There's political pressure with also legal and potentially criminal pressure on some of the executives or former executives of these organizations and going into twenty twenty. They're going to want to resolve this. I mean not only do you. WanNa make sure people are safe going to the Olympics but also it looks bad if the USOC he is heading to the next Olympics with this cloud of uncertainty and investigations over their head and of course you know in nine years they're going to be hosting the Summer Olympics in Los Angeles so oh you know we'll see how they resolve this

Us Olympic Committee Dr Larry Nassar Gymnastics Olympics Usa Taekwondo Larry Nassar Nassar United States Justice Department Olympic Committee Tokyo Rebecca O'brien Rebecca Wall Street Journal Inquiry Creek Reporter Center For Safe Sport Usa FBI Los Angeles IRS Three Years
Education Department fines Michigan State University $4.5 million in sexual assault case against Dr. Larry Nassar

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Education Department fines Michigan State University $4.5 million in sexual assault case against Dr. Larry Nassar

"Michigan State University you'll have to pay out a record four and a half million dollars for failing to protect its students from convicted to sexual predator Larry Nasser under the agreement with the department of education the university will also have to overhaul its title nine complaints procedures saying the system

Michigan State University Larry Nasser Department Of Education Million Dollars
Education Department fines Michigan State University $4.5 million in sexual assault case against Dr. Larry Nassar

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Education Department fines Michigan State University $4.5 million in sexual assault case against Dr. Larry Nassar

"Michigan State University being told to pay out a record four and a half million dollars for not protecting students from convicted sexual predator Larry Nasser the former USA Olympics doctor under the agreement with the department of education the university will also have to overhaul its title nine comply. its procedures saying the system

Michigan State University Larry Nasser Usa Olympics Department Of Education Million Dollars
Former Michigan State President Lou Anna Simon in court

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Former Michigan State President Lou Anna Simon in court

"Fifty former Michigan State University president Lou Anna Simon back in court today. He's are felony charges against former MSU president Luana Simon, her attorney Mike Morgan says she stressed out. She's terribly fighting to we upset, prosecutors say they have evidence that Simon lied during a state investigation into MSU's handling of the sexual assault. Complaints against Dr Larry Nassar Morgan, Roth says the evidence isn't there that she lied because she said, she didn't get the name Nassar in two thousand fourteen when she was told about the doctor of medicine was under investigation. She didn't so far. They hadn't got one piece of twenty seven thousand emails and documents back and forth. The hearing will eventually determine whether Simon

Lou Anna Simon Dr Larry Nassar Morgan MSU President Trump Mike Morgan Assault Attorney Roth
Dr Larry Mackenzie And Pinterest discussed on Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Dr Larry Mackenzie And Pinterest discussed on Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

"A warning from experts to a growing number of people using Pinterest recipes to make their own homemade. Sunscreen summer gets closer. Researchers are warning that Americans don't have sufficient information about sun protection is more and more people are turning to homemade sunscreen recipes something. Dr Larry MacKenzie of nationwide children's hospital advises against we would say that the homemade sunscreen products, and the recipes are risky, because they're not regulated and they're not tested for efficacy like commercial sunscreens.

Dr Larry Mackenzie Pinterest
Michigan AG to investigate gymnastics coach with ties to Nassar

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Michigan AG to investigate gymnastics coach with ties to Nassar

"The latest on an investigation at Michigan State University. Michigan attorney general Dana Nessel is talking about the latest developments in the investigation into Michigan State University, and they're handling of the allegations against former Dr Larry Nassar, Nestle says she hopes Michigan. State officials will continue their cooperation looking into the matter. Now, I would say it's time for Michigan State University to do the right thing. I won't here is to help provide Justice and also to provide a sense of security, and that's something like this will never never happen again

Michigan State University Michigan Dr Larry Nassar Dana Nessel Nestle Attorney
"Super blood wolf moon" will light up the sky Sunday

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

01:01 min | 1 year ago

"Super blood wolf moon" will light up the sky Sunday

"For Russell Wilson's backup. Spot. That'll be interesting. You have Brett Hundley who of course is on board picked up in a trade with the Green Bay Packers. We'll see if maybe the Seahawks will look at the draft as well as another outlet to bring some more quarterbacks in junior Adams has been aimed wide receivers coach for the husky football team last two seasons. He's been the offensive coordinator at western Kentucky law. More sports in thirty minutes right here on your home of the huskies. Komo news time five eleven the interim president of Michigan State University has resigned after making controversial comments about sexual abuse survivors, the comments stem from former Olympic gymnastics coach and convicted sexual abuser. Dr Larry Nassar, I moved at the board of trustees of Michigan State University here by accepts John M anglers resignation as interim president of the university. John Engler becoming the latest high ranking member of Michigan State University to resign in the wake of the Larry Nassar sexual assault scandal angler recently came under fire. Fire for telling the Detroit News that survivors. Larry Nassar's abuse are enjoying the spotlight the scandal brings that's pretty upsetting just as a female and as someone who has been through similar situation. It's not like it's the easy thing to do. It's it takes a lot of bravery to step forward and say something worth hundreds of women accused the former doctor of sexual assault. How many during his time as a team doctor at MSU? The judge who sentenced Nassar to prison says that comment was the final straw. I assure you that there isn't one of them who wouldn't give every thing back. Every penny every word they want this to never have occurred. Many survivors tornado guns are who spoke at Nassar sentencing. Wow. Now say they look forward to this change and hope to once again be proud to wear green and white English statements regarding survivors of sexual assault had been extremely hurtful and do not reflect the values of our university. Banglore had only been the interim president at MSU for less than a year. Not the board says they will accept his resignation immediately. They have already announced his replacement. Maggie Rulli, ABC, news, New York. Komo news time is five thirteen. A new lawsuit is taking on the powerful opioid Oxycontin. And the family that owns the company state of Massachusetts is suing them accusing them of misleading. The public about its dangers the complaint alleges certain members of the Sackler family who are worth thirteen billion dollars were aware of the dangers of Oxycontin, but continued to push sales. According to newly filed court documents when Oxycontin was first released Richard Sackler, produce, former president and son of the company. Founder is quoted saying at a accompany event that the launch would be followed by a blizzard of prescriptions that complaint also says years later as evidence of widespread abuse of Oxycontin, began to mount Sackler urged the company to blame addicts allegedly writing in an Email. We have to hammer on the abusers in every way possible. They are the culprits and the problem, they are reckless criminals Purdue pharma, telling ABC news, the attorney general has cherry picked from among tens of millions of emails and other business documents produced by Purdue they complaint is littered with biased and inaccurate characterizations of these documents Purdue and the individual defendants will aggressively defend against these misleading allegations that's ABC's which Johnson

Michigan State University Dr Larry Nassar Interim President Assault Larry Nassar Komo Detroit News Green Bay Packers Purdue Mount Sackler Richard Sackler Russell Wilson Brett Hundley John Engler ABC President Trump Seahawks
"dr larry" Discussed on WNVZ Z104

WNVZ Z104

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"dr larry" Discussed on WNVZ Z104

"Dr larry vc justice justice no no no so those no good trump actor two senior this just who in the burbs sandra who live so our that is the mind on the chances of mine bad bad job two man justice thomas it's fast 602 all.

Dr larry vc