7 Burst results for "Dr Kuni"

"dr kuni" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"dr kuni" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Back, and that's what happens. You just made somebody's day better. I believe in something called random acts of kindness. I have an exercise for you. Tomorrow. Do something nice for someone. Do it anonymously. And then after you do it, don't tell a soul that she did this good deed. Once you tell somebody about it, it completely negates the good deed. You do something nice for somebody. Then you have to go Tell everybody that you did something nice. It actually cancels out. The nice thing that you did you donate to charity and you go around telling everyone that you donate to the charity. Then it becomes about you. It's called virtue, signaling, you know how hard this is to do. To do a good deed and not tell someone about it. I mean, tell nobody don't tell your wife Don't tell your best friend. Don't tell anybody And you're like dying to tell someone. One of the hardest things in the world to do Remember one Kobe Bryant died in that helicopter accident. And then it came out that he used to go to hospitals and visit kids dying of cancer. He kept it a secret. His whole life. He kept it a secret and he would tell the hospital. No p r no PR mean Kobe. Definitely handsome issues over the years, But that tells you the kind of person he wass Do a good deed. And don't tell anyone about it. Don't be a pain in the ass. Don't be an Amazon reviewer. If you don't have anything good to say, Don't say anything at all. I'm Jared. Gillian. This is the Jared Deli in show. Sharon your money on your life. I'm Andy Solomon. Rheumatic diseases are painful, autoimmune inflammatory diseases that can affect the joints, muscles, bones and organs. A new survey by the American College of Rheumatology sheds light on a condition that impacts at least one in four US adults. Dr. Kuni Kamanga, practicing rheumatologist who works with the American College of Rheumatology, has more. The survey findings show that Americans living with a rheumatic disease face significant challenges in their daily lives, including.

Kobe Bryant American College of Rheumatolo Jared Deli Dr. Kuni Kamanga US Andy Solomon Amazon Gillian
"dr kuni" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

Jamming Their Transmission

13:16 min | 3 years ago

"dr kuni" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

"Smorgasbord of Sweden gusty with lifebuoy soap in hair pa- made. They strange the see King George in clean, Elizabeth making their maiden voyage to the states. They gazed upon the trial on and the Paris fear that their psychotic structures and having stopped culture having seen and heard tasted the future end. It's commerce. They went where they really want to go the amusement zone. Built atop a swan e catch at the edge of a former garbage dump the amusement zone was the place. Where respectable people went for Noddy fun. Yes. Repulsive aquatic shows in rides, but they were sprinkled in among Arctic girls frozen naked in ice and numerous other jiggle strip joints. They -cational rate by the city's vice squad only a minor annoyance them. It was so the door Dali's dream of the surrealist water show in a building quote Risley with packages and cast incorrect hustler light was in Iran addict source of the bekker's didn't care that the swimmers were topless that was fine by them. They minded that that idiot delete envisioned some of the women with hideous fish hits while anyone else. It brings new that. You had to have pretty Gaels with mermaid tails when the show Fokin replete with their breasted women wrapped clocks. Loves through an inverted umbrellas, but nary Bish headed swimmer. Incite the artist allegedly airdropped angry traps over Manhattan before leaving the country in a fit of indignation. Bizarre. Is the whole thing was it wasn't a strange sticking pig review. Nick in the back of the parachute jump in a city that still lacked any kind of consistent com comprehensive care for premiums. But that's Martin found himself. There were massive delays in opening this fair alluding to the fact that everybody was running over budget because the ground was randomness a couple of weeks test opening visitors were streaming into finally ready. Concession a thousand pound reproduction of Andrea del Roby is late fifteenth century relief of a swaddled infant sat on the roof an assigned declared that more than five million people. Seen the show about the door. All the world loves of baby. People came streaming through asking the usual Luebbe questions men and women still dizzy from the thrill of their choice came to ruin an ask are these the same babies from Chicago five years earlier. How did they live in the glass stoves? Given out now how much to help the 'incubators meant to poor people like us at twenty three year old former telephone operator said to report Dr Kuni even sent for our baby in his own ambulance with an incubator in science entering the consciousness of the people, Dr unstuck? Ever jolly in public. Martin's relations with the administration were increasingly testy. He griped about this catchily dressed women outside the enchanted forest and the coots show in the canine cavers building and all that summer. The money problems were sent by July. He was threatening to quit unless the controller's office could ease the terms of a loan. It had made that he couldn't and wouldn't reduce personnel or skimp on care the fair agreed to cut him a break. But by the season's end around the time, Germany, invaded Poland. Martin's accounts where running leading read. Wonderful. Thank you. This section reminds me of the writing of E L doctoral. Well, I did read that you know, after all had that book world stare, you know, it's about this world stare, and they actually go to the newsmen on at the enter the Buckingham like reading are they going to the incubator a conch. Okay. And they do it's interesting. It's a little anachronism in there. We'll do novel. But he talks about you know, all the babies hooked up to wires beavers buzzers. They didn't have any of that stuff this than they really didn't know only machines that they did have where the incubators and they had a little oxygen, but they didn't have any ivy's our monitor's at but read a lot of novels while I was working on this too. Because I wanted to just get a sense of what it felt like he read novels were set in the period written during the period. Well, yes. So now will that were sent around the nap time and that were actually written during that summer written during that too. But more like, you know, or. Levels about that time something that were written at that time, you know, even something like Heinrich, Boll what's to become the boy where it was his life in Germany in nineteen thirty four just till I could kinda get you know, there was so much reading that went on that isn't directly reflected in this book would or some of the wounds curious to hear more about them. Well, now, I would have to remember there's a whole bibliography in the back of the book. And so there's just an probably isn't even everything that I read, but just even little things like, you know, there's one of page in their Croatian, which is the town where he's born in. I would say I spent a least of week researching that so I read history. The talent went elegant mass of the town that I I read a couple books that too that's not necessarily literature. But there was a book Vike. Harry Brown novel called the hat speed that took place at the Chicago team Chicago world's fair. There's a wonderful book called swan gondola that takes place at the on the whole world fair remembering his name, I communicated with him. Obviously, flourish Larssen the devil in the White City. There were other things that I can't even remember what all I was reading on. I thought it was researching novel where it was just trying to look at anything that was set a particularly in the depression. Timothy Shia for its ago over another wonderful. I read in tire book about Salvador jolly string bean just for that run pair. Screw. And this goes back again to this idea of the chain of influence that you were describing earlier even ten gentle things can have profound impact on the writing in ways, you may not even be able to pinpoint and describe I'll definitely do, and I went there was a wonderful cured or at the queens museum. I went and looked at like, I just lift your hundreds of our travel photos that nineteen thirty nine world's fair, which didn't I'll make it in there. But that's you know, sort of like what is looking at what? Well, what else is in the amusements out and I had program guides things as well. But you know, it was just kind of like, so I could see a what is that? What is it looked like this jamming their transmission? I'm John Madeira. I'm speaking with Don raffle about the strange case of Dr Kuni how mysterious European showman saved thousands of American babies. Your marvelous reader dawn. Oh, well, thank you. You know, that also I will have to say comes from being Gordon class because you would have to read out loud in class. And it was did you actually study with Gordon nor haven't, but I'd say any self respecting writer in the past fifty years, and this infernal country has whether directly or indirectly that said, I'm so happy to have attended severance constitution, recur, Shen and other medical no etiquettes licia masterclass at a public space several months ago, his approach much truncated version of his legendary marathons was a remarkable and inimitable fusion of theory, storytelling memoir, improvisation tirade bombast gossip. Theatrics and stand up comedy, you know, he spoke with recently. Yeah. So I never took his class unfortunate that was the most tariff. Like, nothing is ever frightening again, if you manage to get through that you have to what you get away with skipping one week, but by the next week or he really had to show up with the thing, and you had to read it out loud until he cut you off in. There was no, you know, Willett like this. But not this. It was you know, you really get the axe. When when the thing was no good. And you're in there with these unbelievable writers every single week one great piece of writing after another. So, you know, I I was there with Christine Scutt in Holland and Sam Michelle end, Victoria, rebel wounds in there, and you know, kind. What am I gonna read after this is better be good? So how did you feel about Gordon's approach while you were taking his class and now reflecting on it years later? How do you feel about it? I've I've learned so much about rank which in composition from Gordon. And I also think he just got me to take myself seriously in a way that I probably wasn't before. So I don't I don't know that this would have been possible for me without that class of people who would have been writers. Anyway, I was at the time. Do think it was odd combination because it was the fiction editor at rebel for many years, which was a master relation magazi- with more than five million readers and everything had to be very acceptable. I was always pushing. My luck pushing the envelope in there were wonderful things prejudice that magazine that I don't think people are wear of where we were preaching are net would Antonia Nelson. Other other people would expect to be to see their Alison term, and they had to be acceptable announce in a certain way, but a kind of like doing that distinction was studying with Gordon I used to describe is like being cut in a force field. And I think it was sort of like everything learned from Gordon distinction always really trying to hold onto something that felt like an emotional core an emotional. Center. Which was it's I mean, he talked about a lot about putting your pencil in the right place to but think for me that kind of this. There's a certain emotional core. They're often it's family that came from or visit editor as well. I'm just seeing all kinds of different possibilities. What is it mean to put your pencil in the right place? You know, I can Gordon used to talk a lot about the idea that there's just so many books out there, and the, you know, do you need to add to the? Fast amount of language that's out there in the world through nothing to be saying something import you know this. He be say like is it worthy of your death? You know, but he the Email. It's Bentsen point. It isn't wonderful freeze for kind of like if you move this with the less you could put out into the world. Would it be worth it for you? Are you just writing something silly to see your name in print, or is this something that you know, if you could only right one more thing, you could only put one more thing into the world for this would be this. You know, don't waste time. Rich provocation reminds me of any Dillard who said quote, right is if you were dying at the same time assume you write for an audience consisting solely of terminal patients that is after all the case. What would you begin writing? If you knew you would die soon. What could you say to a dying person that would not enrage by its triviality, unquote? Speaking of finality, I'd like to ask you one final question, which I'm finding many writers despairingly asking namely why bothered writing during catastrophic times like now. And it is a question because we have to.

Gordon Martin Chicago Dr Kuni Germany Paris Sweden editor King George writer Manhattan Dali Gaels hair pa Elizabeth Risley Andrea del Roby Bish Iran Nick
"dr kuni" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

Jamming Their Transmission

13:25 min | 3 years ago

"dr kuni" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

"Evocative compression of details and experiences isn't attentiveness to language which could only be produced by you like, quote, where pigs strode doomed over the bridge of size and cattle hung bloody from hooks, unquote. There's a fantastic yet unobtrusive musicality to it and two passages like that. And I'm marvel at it in them because they're so artfully written head so seamlessly incorporated into the text. This took forever. This section was what Bank you I been forever revising just trying to get this place. Right. And this kind of came together in one those lucky coincidences, you sometimes have a bet when I was thinking I was writing a novel said of the Chicago world's fair, I do all kinds of research everything including you know, what was the weather like oh summers. And oddly enough noticed that there was this free Keat ways at a certain point in the second summer of the fair. It actually is still the hottest day ever record for Chicago that record has not been broken. I just you know, that was all the notes for what I thought what eventually be novel that he'd had some narrative abilities. And then when it was in the archives looking at you know, what I saw the press releases for this event with the baby reunion. I love to date. It was like oh crap. It's the same. It's the same time as the heat wave. And so it was. Able to put that together. And then of course, I started looking at all right return front page, Chicago, trivial Leif what's going on in town. And and you know, John Dillinger was shot dead by grafitti hitter before this Apted. So it ended up being a lot of things coming together. But I did a lot of kind of surrounding research like that like, you know, what else is going on in Chicago wealth. This is happening to distilling. All the information you were taking in as you researching. I don't I don't know. I mean this. This was in many ways to hurt her thing ever had to do. And I didn't initially started in Chicago either. But I felt like a can even though I've lived my entire life in the New York metro area in Hoboken, but you have this strong connection to Chicago in hit so much on that Chicago world's fair in in itsy, Mike. It was also such a critical turning point for this story. That was a moment where he was beginning to get some recognition. It seem like a moment where things really could've turned for him. And in terms of the treatment of premature babies in this country at that moment, it seemed like it could. But it didn't really an enormous same thing in a odd way felt like a pivotal here before World War Two where you thought it was still time to do something. You know, could could it it prevented? It's nineteen thirty four was there still time to prevent it. So that year was that was weighted with so much for me that thought that's where I feel it. The most strong AM that was the entry place for me. And again, I would say that this particular chapter grew out of a longtime in thinking about how would it righted as awful wonder if you might talk a bit about the autobiography in the? Book I needed to start to pull back the curtain on how the whole the whole research that I wanted to include Dr Gardner in Khokar of researchers call themselves Kuni bus. And so I was I came into very briefly myself. In. It's it's actually the beginning part two in. So it kind of circles rightback around to the very beginning. Love upper I wonder if you read up it's called the March of science industry. I also as a child I spent a lot of time even easy science industry because my grandparents lived at couple blocks away from their day. I had written a little essay about that. Which he didn't do that? But my grandparents lived in tiny apartment building in Chicago that was stilled with elderly European immigrants. And so we'll leave it come to. Visit. They were on just go play in the museum and you'd get arrested for that. And you just couldn't do. I just had ours. Ours unmediated Ariza child will anyway. So that was part of it too. This is the March of incident ustry this'll tell you how I got into the whole thing in nineteen thirty three a twelve year old boy took the train from Milwaukee to the century progress in Chicago his name was Mark raffle. And he would become my father the first anew of this. Visit to the failure was almost seventy years later after his death when it opened the door in his study and found a half dozen typewritten pages. This turned out to be a quote unquote autobiography that he had written at the age of sixteen the fair was mentioned almost as an aside. But if peaked my curiosity, I knew there was a world's fair in Chicago in the eighteen nineties it was famous for its Bariseel and in the nineteen thirties. The official nineteen thirty three program for the century of progress. Dated quote individuals groups entire races of man fall into step with the slow or swift March movement of the March of. Science Incan distri, and quote from the opposite side of the atom bomb in the holocaust that notion was disturbing unable to let it go. I flew from my home outside New York City to Chicago their spend hours in the history museums research center, squinting documents and sifting through photographs in tire spectacle, mesmerized me science in industry as humanity's driver. Imag -nificant hall of science the airplanes in the automobiles the enchanted island brides for happy children. No fuel of who would die in World War Two that the image couldn't shake came from the midway a body to body crowd appears in front of the building with a sign instant incubators with living babies, it seemed to encapsulate everything about this their science industry married to commerce bathed in voyeurism if you generation as commodity. The doctor in charge was named Kuni and he had impressive credentials, but who would allow their child to be exhibited in this way that a proven licensing technology existed. But once available in most hospitals had never occurred to me, nor was yet aware of the jenex exhibit, the real purveyor of babies as product the incubator show was among the most popular attractions of the entire fair. Even without yet. Seeing the full picture. It was easy to understand why who wouldn't want to the inheritors of the century progress baking ovens given the chance I have done it myself. Of them a book how many years later after that initial moment. Well, after a there's another little piece of this chapter about stumbling across it in Coney Island. So it after learning about that piece of the world's they're probably another ten years before a book after finding out that he was at Coney Island four years of really four years of just being in the trenches and kind of there was a full year of just solid research than they were the year that were kind of writing combined with research where it right? And then I I'd understand I needed to find out something else or or somebody else would come to me. It took it was over a year before it was able to find the original documentation of his naturalization mum, which was you know, not anywhere. It was in Omaha. Wasn't in New York wasn't the right year. The stock you are still not centralized these deprived. There's a lot of stuff. That isn't centralized jenner's. Lot of stuff that is digitized swing away. You're in kind of incubator too. I think for ten for ten years. Well, I don't know in a long and had very launch station. You writing other things to through in this time. Not. Well. Okay. So I was thinking about what I thought with the Chicago novel when I digressed by reading by writing the secret life of objects so that whole book camping in little way procrastinating. But they're also, you know, I work I've worked as a as book editor. So there were other books in my head that it was working on. I love the titles of the different sections and chapters in the book like everything you right who give great care and attention to them, and they're very much integral to the narrative to the structure to the overall effect of the book. Do you talk about this? I love writing titles. It's one of my favorite things to do. And I love writing titles or other people. So it's just fun. So that I just enjoyed it. And I guess in so many versions of this that I played around with then I titled in the way, I would title nothing was anything that sounds was a newspaper article actually really was in their Senate, the NFL chore it, but a title almost the way title micro fiction short story kind of billings of that. I really like I said I love writing titles. Sometimes it titled is a piece a sentence that comes out of the text itself. And then there were some where I felt like it was becoming too confusing. When I went over for draft number four. I thought I need to help the reader a little bit because he sound too much like titles fictions something like one is called William Silverman in Kuni books. Convenient. It was just a done in a really straightforward way. Because I felt like this is not fiction, and I I made to help the reader through the narrative a little bit. But certain things like the greatest novel. Vity if the age that was a real headline in the crime of the decade. My little brother that was real that all the struggles. It was also really interesting to look at how ordinary people wrote letters or newspaper articles or just the any communication in writing. It was much more ornate and embellished and many more flourishes than you have. Now, it was really fun. Then you have you have titles like all the pretty Premgi's get that was just me and all aboard the twentieth century. Yeah. Which are the twentieth. Century was the train was called the twentieth century. But it was trying to like a, you know, I was playing with that the idea of also this whole world's fair was about how the twentieth century was going to be the turning point for humanity. And in a it was this is jamming their transmission. I'm John Madera. I'm in conversation with Don raffle about her newest book, the strange case of Dr Kuni how mysterious European showman saved thousands of American babies, you read some more for us to this is playing with matches. It's New York City nineteen thirty nine. As the rain fell in the crowd stood shifting on their feet. Albert einstein. Had a few words to say it was April thirtieth nineteen thirty nine opening day at the world of tomorrow New York City's worlds there. It's planners expected this fair to easily exceed Chicago's in rinky-dink middle of the country. Chicago was the second city. New York was I buy are sixty different nations had pavilions Germany's ELO, but never mind we have their wild main genius in his thick German accent, Einstein said excited like art is to perform its mission truly in fully. It's cheap. Mints must enter not only superficial. But with their inner meaning into the consciousness, it's people. People were standing for hours online at General Motors utera inside they wrote in lighting. Cheers witnessing a better world to come skyscrapers highways. Fourteen lanes across on exiting. They proudly wore the buttons stating I have seen the future Chrysler presented automobile assembly in board. It's milking machines, but our CA one up to them with television. Magic in a bug's in the billions visitors sampled the Soviet Union. Poland France, Japan, the smorgasbord

Chicago New York City Dr Kuni Imag -nificant hall of science John Dillinger Coney Island Soviet Union Chrysler General Motors Albert einstein Milwaukee Ariza Dr Gardner Apted official Germany jenner Kuni Khokar
"dr kuni" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

Jamming Their Transmission

13:31 min | 3 years ago

"dr kuni" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

"Here wasn't it. Once I got into that too. It was also just might like felt like I was chasing after a while ago too. It was really just trying to get to. All right. Dr Cooney who were you really, you know, it that was a that was part of what can't be in. It was just he was so Manningly lucid. And you know, if the internet had not come along his cover with never have been blow because his fabricated again was constructed so carefully. So it was that. But also one of the things that kept me going because as I found the surviving babies who are, you know, some in their nineties, they were so invested in the story being told that I I did feel a strong responsibility to them to get it done, and I would periodically here from some of them like house of going to coming out coming Zillow, even when there was a certain point where I was just. About ready to throw my hands up in the air. It's not gonna happen. I felt a responsibility to them. The book also has many marvelous archival photos and letters and diagrams at cetera, which are definitely incorporated into the text. How did you come across these images these materials, and what was your thought process behind their selection and subsequent integration into the book itself? They are material from a was doing our cripple research New York Sicario in some of the other cities where he had done business. So I came across these images, which are kind of eye-popping some of them were given to me by the baby's themselves. Some of them were given to me by a doctor who I interviewed who had done a lot of sewn researching in the book, I mean to be fair. It really was the publisher who made the decision to include them any photographs in. You know, we had some back and forth about where this would fall. But I also felt like with this story. You almost have to see to understand what topping about. Case of duct Kuni also jumps backward and forward and time. Did you structure it this way from the outset or do this come about in the drafting ings? Him about through the draft because I heard do wear lot of really hard structure pale just with this one in one of them was if you go strictly in chronological order, it starts to have a same ING as to it like that. Now, there was this show. And then there was this was the show and wants to pull the curtain and look at how the truth of his story was pieced together. After the sent in also bring it into the president with the babies who are still alive because I felt that they're more interesting now in their seventy eighty ninety than just the fact of their birth which would again start to feel a little bit samey. So really that Matt contorts structure, sometimes I'm afraid this pattern only to myself. But there's one story line that pretty much is straight shot through his lifetime and alternates with a story that he gives the fifties after his death. With the Thiessen together of of who he was artist real identity was and that also felt I can started to see how much history is just piece together after the death by many different people. And it was very I mean, it was very humbling to me the whole thing even something as there's a story in there. The infamous execution of the elephants at Cody left. There are million versions of this story. And even if you go in pull out newspaper of republish that day there were many dailies papers in New York City, and they all have different versions of the story, which was the truth. Who knows you know, I did a composite as best I could from a couple explained in the anals. That notes are pretty narrative like well. How how did I derive because you can't by just one? It was really it was the work of two shellman of overtime. Also become kind of a legend that it was the worst time said isn't which it Worthen she histories almost always if not always composite a construction from multiple different perspectives. He rarely lives. Yeah. I mean, sure there's you know, there's stuff about this guy that I will never know. I mean most frustrating to me is people asking Emma understand why that asked, but he he will what was his mind. What was he thinking? Why did he do it? And I feel like I can't know that you know, I can make a good guess interns, dead in what he said. But can I know for fact, would he was stealing thinking, which might have changed from our moments the nest? You know an arena by rookie. And I think how could they've known that. I get a little aggravated with this. You're sitting at the kitchen table resi million either piece of. I have this. The book also jumps back and forth. Geographically, and there's a moment where you write quote, the love of imagined places fuels extraordinary creativity on quote, what is it about imagined places that inspires you to go not only around the country, but around the world. Well, he did you know, I live mostly trying to his taxes best I could. And that was another kind of difficult story to pull together because he covered a lot of ground. But yeah, I was I was just fascinated altogether. By that most world that he moved in. Dishes, jamie. Their transmission, and I'm John Madera. I've been speaking with Don raffle about among other things the strange case of Dr Kuni which I loved from its opening cliffhanger to its memorialize ING and unraveling literary mystery brimming with choice and often bizarre historical details exploring, the odd intertwining of scientific rigor and show biz glitz jumping, backward and forward in time and space. The biography is not only a wonderful, novelist. Depiction of legendary eccentric and critical interrogation of medicine and technology but a loving portrait of early to mid twentieth century America, especially it's metropolises, especially New York City. Would you please read from the book on and that prolonged is titled breath A with that's another thanks for talking about obsessions, a hit of session breath in you'll find that everything written. The paints came too early the cramping of the womb. The ragged breaths. The light demanding release the woman Marion common was carrying twins and on an otherwise gentle Thursday in may her labor had come in too soon. Not now not yet each contraction of blow only a year before she and her husband Wolsey had celebrated their wedding summer of nineteen nineteen Atlantic City honeymoon where in that golden pocket. The great war over prohibition, not begun a newlywed couple nights sip champagne, and here, they're beautiful fortunes told and stroll in their bloomers into the sea laughing now, they were in a hospital in Brooklyn Marion's labor could not be stopped one daughter entered the world drew breath for twenty minutes and lay still the second was so. Tiny. It was painful to look her skin near translucent, the obsta Trish in had no words of comfort. He just your toward the child who had died. Don't rush vary that one he said bluntly because you will need to vary. The other one to the cheese alive. Wilsey said she's not going to live the day. This was too much to bear will she's alive. Now. Her father said in Atlantic City had seen his side show on the boardwalk with premature infants in incubators being saved aren't the machines for little babies that will help them. Yes. But we don't have those here. The doctor said and anyway wouldn't make a difference in this case because she's not going to live Atlantic City hours a lifetime away. But something Woolsey Conlon had heard came back to him that boardwalk, Dr man, another sideshow closer. Two. While the Trish in continued to insist on the hopelessness of the situation. Wolsey Conlon picked up his do Perm daughter raptor in towel walked outside inhale attacks, Coney Island. He told the driver can use to have on please. Mel we're in the in the chronology of writing this book. Did you write this action? I guess of toward the end of it the until now, so here's another situation. This dialogue was actually came together. From a the woman that baby who was ninety five at the time. And I interviewed her a couple times when I interviewed her with her daughter because at ninety five her short term memory was gone. Her long term memory was pretty good. But her mother was her daughter was also feeling in things that she had said again and again over the years when she was younger. So some of this stuff the language king directly from them. But now do I know for sure if that's what the other said, I don't know this kind of a earned machines for little babies that will help them. That's the language that came out of these interviews with the people involved, but again. Is it the absolute truth during that the decks, and you know, the exact words it came out of others mouth that you're probably not please read some more from the book this cover nineteen thirty four minutes. All the world loves they ever actually read this anywhere. But it's a little piece of it. Let's tutis. Okay. Chicago nineteen thirty four Chicago hit already sweated through one hell of a week today was only Wednesday. The trouble began with a big literally on Sunday when the cop shot down John Dillinger outside the by ground gangster was seeing a movie if you didn't know better you might have believed the deceased was seeking revenge as the final larcenous breath rattled out of his loves the city was being strangled by Tuesday. The mercury in the snazzy have aligned thermometer chiller soaring over the century progress there on the lakefront head shot up to a hundred with a hundred nine degrees reported inland at the airport. Either way is the hottest day ever on record for Chicago. He formed the air which seemed to while close stuck to flush flush stink with ice in short supply an extension. The slaughterhouses ripening where pigs stroke doomed over the bridge of size and cattle hunt bloody pucks people fled to the beaches of Lake Michigan to sleep during the day. Perspire throngs press their way into the great halls in the billions at the world's fair less interested in the scientific and cultural Marvel's on display than inhaling refrigerated air. They poured out onto the midway dripping into their summer cotton's in brim hats, fanning their faces with folded maps mopping ice cream that melted Astor than they could eat freaks savages. Steamy strippers in miniature humans were there for their viewing pleasure. If people couldn't stanch the sweat. They could've Lee secure a couple hours respite from cruel, depression and the news coming out of Germany today. The high finally was supposed to be self of one hundred that in itself was caused for Sela. Gration as for the news for the fifteen minutes between twelve forty five and one PM the airwaves would be long to Dr of their Kuni and the adorable babies whose lives he had saved in his incubator. So I show. This passage. You just read is a wonderful example of compression within this small space, you have killing outside of theater tower than going back and forth to the weather the heat and how it's affecting everything. And everyone. And what I noticed besides this incredible evocative

Atlantic City New York City Woolsey Conlon Trish Chicago Zillow Dr Cooney Manningly duct Kuni Lake Michigan New York Sicario Matt contorts Dr Kuni Brooklyn Thiessen publisher John Dillinger president Cody Wolsey
"dr kuni" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

Jamming Their Transmission

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"dr kuni" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

"My sons are bigger than I am. I can still feel in me that great range of Lund. The call the world Fitch insistent suckle, those lovely. Thank you fascinating. How you begin with a question about a frame, and then you reframe the question about a frame moving from intimacy to greater intimacy and breaking up time, not only hours, but here's moving from body to body and then out into the world the universe thinking when you wrote this. I wrote these pieces where they much longer or do you find yourself actually enacting the kind of compression right from the outset. Now, I write that short. And this piece this whole book came together really really quickly. It's the only book of mine that did everything else did years in the Nike that this just happened. I actually think I was writing a book I did not set down to write a both or. A around them are anything of the kind that was just kind of jotting something's about the object around the really writing down for my kids over to record for them. And then as a started writing, oh, you mean this maybe this book? So I wrote it very very quickly the first draft of this book was written in a week gin. This fiction, which is at least partly about nursing and nurturing is actually a great segue into the strange case of Dr Kuni. How did he initially come to your attention? This came about net sort of a roundabout way. So after my father died, and I was cleaning out his peepers. I found something that he'd written as the spill that was like a probably school assignment. Although I don't know it was a little bit of an autobiography where he mentioned going to this Chicago world's fair in nineteen thirty three. And although Chicago was the emerald city might childhood, and I knew of the famous world's fair that we've all heard about the Jebel in the White City. Here was girl stare during the depression. I knew that my father the Asli went through. He wrote about it. My matter girl up right there. She would have gone, but they were both gone. And so I started doing a little research about that. I almost thinking that odd way I was looking at our cable photograph seeing if I could find in the back of my mind, some something about my parents in the world they lived in before I was born. And you know, I had this moment of looking at old photographs of the crowds and thinking wouldn't even recognize one of my own. The parents they were in this picture will be recognized when if your parents as a child in a blanket white crouch, you you wouldn't. But increasingly also started to think about this fair in the way that it was an old Valentine to technology that idea of technology as the driver of our humanity technology that will lift mankind to a human plane, and of course, technology did extraordinary things in the twentieth century and more so in the twenty first century, but it was also haunting to me. This was an attitude. It's also really right? Kind of eve of the holocaust, Adam, you know, that there wasn't any consideration of is really something that is is should be the driver of our humanity in. So I honestly thought would write a novel that was set at this world's there. And I was fascinated by this incubator, which fell in kind of metaphorical, ROY. Short story about it. That was included on those micro section prisident. Jeez. It didn't really hit me until I went to Coney Island one day for fun with during disaster. I don't know if you know her she's a wonderful writer, so Diane had moved out to Brooklyn. And she was off the F Draymond. She wanted me to come over for lunch United. Okay. If it can we go to Coney Island. I wanna go see this Coney Island museum who even do. There is a Coney Island museum. But there is one any probably more like a fun house than museum. And when it went there, I judge hit the floor because they realize this incubator side show had a permanent home on Coney Island or forty years. It was the same guy and the little that I could Google about him his story. Just didn't make any sense to me the whole idea of it. You know, this guy was really highly esteem doctor in Europe. But then he spent the rest of his life that code. Island. How

Coney Island Coney Island museum writer Diane Chicago Dr Kuni Fitch Lund Nike Europe Google Adam White City Valentine F Draymond Brooklyn forty years one day
"dr kuni" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

Jamming Their Transmission

09:25 min | 3 years ago

"dr kuni" Discussed on Jamming Their Transmission

"Greetings, humans living in dying in the ather. This is jamming their transmission. Where rebels? Critics dissident iconoclasts and oddballs. John deere. This is jamming their transmission. I'm John Madera in harass say how to get out of the slush pile. Dawn raffle writes, quote, and unforgettable narrative voice issues out of granular precision. The writer is paid attention to every syllable and inflection and indelible. Character is one whose particularities are. So finely drawn as to defy any known label even thousand page novel of big ideas and panoramic sweep owes its greatness to the precision of its insights, its language its composition its willingness to say, no to the prevailing wisdom that most of take as given the x factor that distinguishes a piece of writing that is competent from one. That's compelling isn't raw talent. That's the good news and the bad news. There's nothing congenital or magical about it. I'm convinced that almost anyone can. Learn the critical ingredient is the determination to interrogate every choice every word every quirk and every assumption about the way the world works. It takes patience and practice and nerve it's also enormously satisfying. And if you persist in doing it, honestly, painstakingly and courageously someone is going to notice. Don raffles most recent book, the strange case of Dr Cooney was chosen as one of NPR's best books of two thousand eighteen previous books include a memoir the secret life of objects a novel carrying the body and two story collections. Further adventures in the restless universe and in the year of long division. I began my conversation with Don raffle with asking her about a class. She will soon be teaching at Columbia University short form. So it's like, micro fiction, prose poem. And it's this weird combination of survey class and workshop rolled into one one of some of the things you're going to be covering in the class. Oh boy. Really? It's it's a way of looking at all of the possibilities in the four. And it's also a way of I like to get very granular with my students in look at sentenced making the sounds blank ledge. And even when the work was not originally written in English, we can still look at how two sentences into ideas rub up against each other in terms of structure, so their lessons that he could take forward, regardless of whether you end up working in short form or move our to longer for or you, Sean, I think that we learn a lot from. Studying compression from three leading compressed works in writing a compressed way because we can really look at how a writer at sheaves presence on the page, which is ultimately went when I talk about what makes the difference between a great work of writing. It's nothing. That's just okay. There's so much stuff out there. There's really snow much of this Justice. Hey, it's sort of like what is that X factor that it really comes down to the reader deciding do I want to spend time in the company this narrative voice? And so we really look at how much control does he authored have over a language, the acoustical properties, the language the juxtaposition of ideas against the other. You know, what are they doing to essentially created ticket to someplace new with the first things I tell my students is artist problem solving. It's all problem solving. So, you know. Can we look at how some other writers who before you have approached the problem of how do we express what it is to be alive in the world? Were some of the writers. You're going to be examining who are some exemplars of bringing such presence to the page. A lot of this is based on holiday by Allen Ziglar that is called short an anthology of five hundred years of the short form. So it really is. It's it's his hall of fame. So he's got vote a layer in maller may early at Gir Ellen POE, and or moving the way forward to people Elliott Williams, or that down Leone story that I've never forgot do you know that story Darlie on within the quarterly the state of santee with a paragraph in you'll never forget. And so it's it's kind of going all the way up to the present. I think you know, people who are current Cam Ching-kuei, Deb Olin unfort-, his certainly in their hand. There is a Hungarian writer who else excited to discover while I was. Hungry, but there's a whole giant package of people were going to be studying. Is done or Fehmi that was the brighter. I was very excited to discover one was hungry. It's really interesting to look at. Stuff from centuries ago, when you see, you know, a kind of I look at as the chain of influence, and I want to talk about what is the difference between influence and inspiration. And what is appropriation which we all seem to be traded now? And you know, what is what is copying? What is valid influence? How would you distinguish those three things, and what are some good examples of each of those? You know, we can look at short fragments from a threat friends and in the seventeen hundreds and find short phrase pieces like that. And we can look at rigid costal on its in what he's doing. Now, there's an influence in their making influence. He's not even aware of. I don't know. I haven't asked him, but somewhere along the line at wasn't changed. You know, he read something somewhere that Bill to love that chain. But it makes it is own. I mean, you're you're certainly not plagiarizing you're taking something and you're figuring out. How do I make this my own, you know, so you're not glomming onto somebody else's experience. It's your experience. How would you describe your chain of influence or inspiration and or inspiration? Who's in that chain on away? Everybody I've ever read. Yeah. You know, it's it's everybody who ever read everybody seen any art form. When certainly as you know, I studied with Gordon list that was huge influence, but you know, I have this obsession with Warren piece, which I've read way to any times. He would never even see that from reading what I've read, but it must be rattling rat of reading what I've written. But it must be ran on somewhere. Right. You know, certainly people Christine, Scott or Diam leaves when I look at how they do things. It's in there, but not setting out to copy them. And I don't think I don't anything like them. Each of. You has a distinct captivating approach to narrative in sentence making. I'm curious to hear about how your first readers, and or editors influence, your work. Well. Don't really have any consistent system. I raiders. Sometimes Therese foot boat has read something she's an excellent reader. She's really wonderful. You know, I I sometimes meet with a group of writers. And they looked at just one piece of strange case of Dr Kuni kind of told me, which crafty jettison from that can help me Salva problem in the whole thing. Increasing land in cut kind of have had to try to piece it out for myself. And I've also felt like I something that's been very important for me. Is that every book is different. I just don't want to be the kind of writer who is essentially writing the same book over and over again. And we are obsessions are gonna follow us anywhere. We go, right. I mean, the gonna come out somewhere, but I've really tried to make these books different sometimes by even writing a different form and still the subject of each book also demands different approach. So each time. I sit down to write a book a really do think. I don't really know how to write this book and going have to learn how to not only. Not only is it solving problems making problems for yourself from the outset. I guess it is making problems.

writer John deere John Madera Columbia University Dawn Dr Cooney Deb Olin unfort Allen Ziglar NPR Sean Fehmi Bill Dr Kuni Ellen POE santee Therese Gordon Elliott Williams Leone
NYC Century 21 security guard, alleged shoplifter arrested after altercation, NYPD says

Weekend Programming

01:20 min | 4 years ago

NYC Century 21 security guard, alleged shoplifter arrested after altercation, NYPD says

"Beard and glasses a security guard at a century twenty one stores charged with assaulting a suspected teen shoplifter polly christman reports the teen was tackled just outside the courtroom street store and video of the incident has gone viral you can hear the suspect say that he can't breathe police say security guard accustomed wilson used excessive force choking the suspect is he and two other security guards piled on nineteen year old victor roberson of brooklyn is said to have attempted to steal shoes from the department store roberson was treated at a hospital and then arrested polly christman four seven ten w are an estimated sixty million older americans at high risk for vision loss are not getting screened sara lee kessler reports dr michael kunia retina specialist in manhattan i near says failing to prioritize i health is a major mistake their biggest roller patients is macular degeneration clearly that's the thing that you don't wanna miss because it can cause irreversible loss of vision but there are lots of other conditions like glaucoma cataract which also pose a risk dr kuni says everyone over the age of fifty needs a full dilated eye exam once a year and that scene seniors should prioritize i examined the same way they get screened for high cholesterol high blood.

Beard Wilson Victor Roberson Brooklyn Vision Loss Manhattan Polly Christman Sara Lee Kessler Dr Michael Kunia Dr Kuni Four Seven Ten W Nineteen Year