36 Burst results for "Dr King"

DraftKings Stock Falls After Hindenburg Research Reveals Short Position

Rick Hamada

00:15 sec | Last week

DraftKings Stock Falls After Hindenburg Research Reveals Short Position

"And shares of online betting company Draftkings are tumbling. After Hindenburg research revealed that it had a short position against the stock. The firm is concerned about draftkings valuation and alleged involvement in questionable gambling activity. By SB Tech, which Dr King's merge

Draftkings Hindenburg Sb Tech Dr King
Fresh update on "dr king" discussed on Rush Limbaugh Morning Update

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update

00:09 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "dr king" discussed on Rush Limbaugh Morning Update

"Dr king One of his most famous passages was that he hoped that his kids someday would grow up in a country. Where the i'm paraphrasing. Content of their character was the single greatest determining factor by the kind of people they were rather than the color of their skin Dr king and i. I have no problem saying this. Dr king would not recognize the modern iteration of the democrat party. He he did believe in nonviolent he he he might have had political motivation now and then played down towards the race card but that was not who he was it was not the defining thing about dr king and i so much is being done in his name that he never supported. I think he would be shocked. Probably is but it's kind of like saying this. Jfk j. f. k. would not be welcomed into the democrat party day gift k. Believe in tax cuts for example and a whole lot of other conservative economic principles. And yet all of these things that the democrat party supposedly believes that are being done in the name of people jfk. But more importantly dr king. And i'm telling you. Dr king would not recognize the democrat party today. And i have no compunction saying he wouldn't want any part of it or a large part of it..

Today ONE JFK Democrat Party Single Greatest Party DR Dr King King
Virtual 2021 Sundance Film Festival opens on a screen very near you

All Things Considered

03:50 min | 5 months ago

Virtual 2021 Sundance Film Festival opens on a screen very near you

"City, Utah. And because of the pandemic, thousands of film lovers will go to premieres, panels and parties, mostly online. NPR's Mandali Del Barco has this preview. This year's Sundance opens with the premier of the documentary, Summer of Soul or when the Revolution could not be televised. Director Amir Thompson, known as the Musician. Quest, Love presents footage of the 1969 Harlem cultural Festival that has never been seen since. Pressure's lower. Take My hand was Dr King's favorite zone and Sistema Hey, you're Jackson was my idol. She was my hero. I love this. So much listening to singer Mavis Staples praising my Hayley and Jackson is just one highlight of the film. In a normal year. There'd be long lines of festivalgoers standing in the snow to get into theaters to watch. This year films will be screened virtually through especially built online platform, says the festival's new director, Tabatha Jackson. The global pandemic hit And we realized that we had to re imagine everything. Jackson says her team wanted to create a wafer, filmgoers and filmmakers to gather will be able to chat with each other in virtual waiting rooms. Then watch film premieres together before asking questions of the casts and crews, and that's to preserve the energy and the excitement on the buzz and the conversation. In that moment, as we are confined in our Safe spaces. This is an opportunity to go out into the world and be taken around the world by some of these films as an international festival dedicated to independent filmmaking, the Sundance Community prides itself on being a bit scrappy. We're excited. I think this feels like a grand experiment, so people who are they couldn't afford it or couldn't make the journey. Couldn't navigate the icy streets of Park City can now come to Sundance. We're bringing Sundance to them. This year, Half the films at Sundance were directed by people of color as well as by women. Many were shot or finished during the pandemic lockdown. There's even one titled In the same breath about how covert 19 began in Wuhan, China. Many of the doctors said these hospitals must have known this new virus was spreading between people, but they were afraid to say so for fear of punishment from the government. Among the feature films to watch for is Koda, about a hearing girl whose family is deaf, also sons of monarchs, about a Mexican biologist and flee and animated film about an Afghan refugee. Other highlights included documentary about choreographer Alvin Ailey and another about the life and career of actress Rita Moreno. Life can be pressing America what was different about Anita and with side stories that she was a girl who respected herself. Who had a certain amount of dignity. Actually, she became my role model. The festival will also include online panels, meetups concerts and parties, many of them free. There will be virtual spaces for black and Latin. Next creators, and Jackson says festival goers can participate in the new frontier program using Webcams or virtual reality headsets from home, you Congar! Oh, in as an avatar, you can wonder around this incredible space garden. Go to parties, which are where people are going to gather to talk about films. We felt a cinema house in this virtual environment, and there's an extraordinary gallery off new work. The reason I'm so excited about it is because it really is an unusual space in which we can still come together and socialize, and it doesn't feel anything like Zoom. Sundance is also partner with art House cinemas around the country to present some in person events, including at drive in theaters. Manda Little Barco. NPR news.

Del Barco Director Amir Thompson Jackson Dr King Tabatha Jackson Sundance Community Mavis Staples NPR Hayley Utah Park City Wuhan Koda Rita Moreno Alvin Ailey China Anita America Manda Little Barco Npr News
In open letter to Dr. King, Stevie Wonder calls for equality

AP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 5 months ago

In open letter to Dr. King, Stevie Wonder calls for equality

"Singer songwriter Stevie Wonder releases an open letter to Dr Martin Luther King Jr on The holiday honoring the slain civil rights leader in the video, wonder laments the lack of progress against racism. In this 36 years since the holiday became a reality, it makes me physically sick. I am sick of politicians try to find in the easy solution to a 400 year. Problem Wonder once the new administration to form a Truth commission to find solutions and recommendations for

Dr Martin Luther King Jr Stevie Wonder Truth Commission
‘The Embrace’: Boston Looks Ahead To MLK Memorial As Monuments Come Down Across US

WBZ Afternoon News

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

‘The Embrace’: Boston Looks Ahead To MLK Memorial As Monuments Come Down Across US

"Push to get a memorial to Dr King here in Boston, as well as to his wife, Coretta Scott King in the city where they met is finally moving forward. After years of planning, a memorial in Boston is edging closer to becoming reality. The statue called the Embrace will honor Dr King and his wife, Coretta Scott, where the couple met and study together. Back in the 19 fifties work on the $9.5 Million.22 foot high bronze sculpture showing four arms embracing his ex Actually to begin in March. It will be installed on Boston common near the site of a 1965 rally and March, led by Martin Luther King Junior who would have turned 92 years old on Friday.

Coretta Scott King Martin Luther King Boston
When the FBI Spied on Martin Luther King Jr.

Kottke Ride Home

03:39 min | 5 months ago

When the FBI Spied on Martin Luther King Jr.

"A new documentary out today called. Mlk fbi which traces the ways in which the fbi was surveilling. Martin luther king junior towards the end of his life as well as other black activists in an attempt to tamp down the civil rights movements directed by legendary filmmaker sam pollard. This documentary is based on a nineteen eighty one book by historian david garrow as well as documents released by the national archives in two thousand seventeen and two thousand eighteen quoting the atlantic. Mlk fbi arrows attempts to stifle the civil rights movement through coordinated efforts to spy on king with the hope of discrediting his righteous public image with king as with many black activists since the beginning of the twentieth century. The fbi surveillance wasn't an isolated obsession. It was part of a long running effort to keep black americans from acquiring institutional power. Pohlad told me the film traces. Exactly how the surveillance of king started how it was conducted and the effects it had on his life end quote using tons of archival footage and interviews with firsthand witnesses. The film illustrates how. Fbi's surveillance of black americans began as part of fbi director. Jaeger hoover's obsession with rooting out. Communism believing black people to be more susceptible to political manipulation as their efforts became more focused specifically on martin luther king junior and his growing influence. The fbi sought to expose his extramarital affairs as a way of discrediting him to the public and his followers but director sample are noted to npr's fresh air quote would hoover didn't bank on was back in the sixties. The press did not take the bait. They didn't reveal the personal lives of these public figures. They didn't do with john kennedy. They didn't do with others and they didn't do it. With dr king and quotes and while this documentary serves as a needed reminder. That martin luther king junior was not universally revered in his time there could be wearing that paints too negative a picture of him by including personal details like the affairs he had producer. Benjamin heddon said a our approach however quote he wouldn't be d- mythology someone he would simply be portraying him with responsibility and sympathy the way he would subject in his documentaries who was not known to the wider public and quotes and hannah georgia's said in the atlantic quote. Mlk fbi offers an important corrective to prevailing myths about king and his principles of nonviolent resistance. Which were not in fact. Widely embraced as my colleague. Van newkirk wrote in two thousand eighteen hostility toward the civil rights. Movement turned into a cherry. Pick celebration of the revolutions victories over segregation in over easily caricatured gap toothed bigots in the south and quotes and continuing georgia's. The reality was that opposition to king into the racial progress. He symbolized was restricted by region or by political affiliation diplomats and republicans alike had turned against king by his later years especially after he voiced objection to the vietnam war. It's impossible to separate the fbi's decades long commitment to tracking black activists from its relative failure to address the credible threats posed by white nationalists including those that surfaced with last week's deadly attack on the capital the fbi surveilling king and using dubious reasoning to do so isn't altogether shocking for much of the country's history sabotaging black rebellion by any means necessary has been integral to preserving white political power. The new and still contested development is finally accepting black people as active participants in american democracy and quotes.

FBI Martin Luther King Sam Pollard David Garrow Pohlad Jaeger Hoover Benjamin Heddon Hannah Georgia Atlantic Van Newkirk John Kennedy Martin Luther Hoover NPR Georgia Vietnam
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:00 min | 5 months ago

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy

"Today is Martin Luther King Day a day when we look back on Dr King's commitment to nonviolent civil disobedience to advance civil rights and reflect on his famous 1963 speech delivered here in D, C. I have a dream. A little Children. One day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin. But by the content of their character, I agree. Following last year's death of a black man, George Floyd at the hands of a white police officer and this month's deadly attack on the U. S Capitol by supporters of President Trump include including far right extremists. Is Dr King's dream still alive? Well, joining us now to talk about that Maya King with politico who covers politics, race and campaigns. My It's always good to talk to you. Thank you so much for joining us today. Hi. Thanks for having me. What might Dr King think of the protests going on today? How far have we really come on racial issues as we mark his birthday. I think it's king were alive today he would be able to draw a number of parallels between his time in his experience and activism and what we've seen really over the past 12 months, with massive protests and civil disobedience, calling out Systemic racism and police violence on But of course, the current threat that we face of violence largely led by white supremacist groups, who have felt largely emboldened by a number of Government leaders of these are things that Martin Luther King also warned us against, and said that you know if America really did continue to try to advance on the platform or legacy of racism and racial terror. That that could cause issues for more than just racial minorities. But the broader community that we see across this country and I think that's especially evident, of course, looking at just how tight security is around Wednesday's inauguration.

Martin Luther King George Floyd White Police President Trump Maya King U. America
Indiana Attorneys Offer Free Legal Counsel as Tribute to Dr. King

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:34 sec | 5 months ago

Indiana Attorneys Offer Free Legal Counsel as Tribute to Dr. King

"In the spirit of martin luther king junior's messages of equality and justice indiana's legal community is offering free legal counsel today to those in need kelsey kotnik with the indiana state bar association. There's so many hoosiers who are needing help because of the pandemic has just made everything worse for so many people and the entire indian illegal system has kind of come together to make sure that hoosiers can get the legal help that they need. But there's such a demand. The indiana bar has hosted. Its talk to a lawyer today. Program for nearly twenty years. As an annual tribute to dr

Kelsey Kotnik Indiana State Bar Association Martin Luther King Indiana
"dr king" Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

CMO Moves by Adweek

04:06 min | 5 months ago

"dr king" Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

"At central saint martins college of art and design. So i quit my job at turner. Altogether move to. London ended up meeting someone at turner's uk office and did an internship at turner europe asia africa and the middle east in corporate social responsibility. Just off a chance meeting a myself and my manager became an entire department. So i pretty much work fulltime and turner in the uk. While i was in grad school full time and it was a phenomenal experience. And i hollywood have never left london except it was incredibly expensive and my mom. was older and disabled at the time. And so. I promised that i would come back home to help. Take care of her. I'm an only child and she was managing a lot on her own. And so at the end of my program i ended up getting a roll back in atlanta. At which is crazy. Because i wanted a brand strategy job in there were nine and so actually came back an hd graphics producer which at the time people knew me as an artist. Of course you can do three d graphics. And i learned so much and i'm so grateful for that opportunity but i spent a couple of years working at turner pretty much making cullum. Mp as violators at the bottom of the screen like watch pretty woman tonight at seven. That was me Version ing them out and it was great because at the same time they were building up. Internal design chops within the company said farming's out to agencies so i also got to be the liaison between our creative group marketing team in helping to build up an internal agency so that was great and then a couple of years later. Turner had acquired court. Tv and so my first big brand strategy projects. I got hired on as a brand manager to work on the rebrand from court. Tv to shoot ev. And that was an amazing experience in really hold my brand strategy chops just in working from suit. Let's doing all of it. Nanjing naming agencies you name it pretty much independently and after that..

atlanta london central saint martins college turner London nine tonight middle east first a couple of years later asia africa turner europe Nanjing hollywood pretty woman Turner couple of years uk seven
"dr king" Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

CMO Moves by Adweek

04:58 min | 5 months ago

"dr king" Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

"Recommended. But you're creative for us. We are a business. And you don't really fit our molds. And i was devastated in at the same time. There was an assistant in the communications department. Turner broadcasting. I had no idea what turner broadcasting was it. All they said was finish your talent inner projects at the time as an artist designer designed this black power girl. I was going to send him a doll slides in a briefcase of that was my artwork and i suck at sewing so i tried to make this dollar debt workout but that sketch turn into a page in a magazine that i created was a t. Three t guide all about myself from my brand made myself a cleopatra in turner classic movie ad. I made myself a ball kid for an nba on tnt ad ultimately. That magazine was the thing that got him by first marketing job at turner because they said you sold yourself so well to us. We think you would do amazing job of selling our content to consumers that was the beginning of my career. Marketing in that year was marketing at tnt and the all star game was in atlanta. And i was a ball girl on the court. For the hawks. Mopping-up michael jordan sweat. Wow that's amazing well so many props to you for just owning your destiny. I mean this is what i'm gonna do and i'm not gonna stop until i get there and that has served you so well in your life. I've probably had no idea what i was doing at that. Stage but added passionate desires. So much of it is kind of being driven by you. Know just natural curiosity of wanting to know what could be yeah. Well let's keep going down your path so fascinating so then what happened so once. I started at turner broadcasting. I had never really taken a marketing. Class of college took one. Pr class in rhetoric analyzing very academic it wake forest. It was on the path of a professor. And so when i started it was rape time in marketing like the beginning websites being developed in at the time for television. The website was all around the schedule. Like people only wants to the website for the schedule. I'm like wolters shifted so much And so i got a great broad marketing generalization pat of education that rolls everything from working with our analytics team and understanding ratings and markets and to working with our design team on an ad for tv guide or whatever else to working with our turner group which was Vying in planning team..

michael jordan atlanta hawks turner group first one all star game turner Turner
"dr king" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:32 min | 5 months ago

"dr king" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"Furnace understanding of the law and our responsibility to it. You just need to look at something written on scraps of paper from jail for the colson center on john street. This is breakpoint in an eloquent defense of life marriage and religious liberty known as the manhattan declaration authors chuckles in professor robert. Georgine doctor timothy. George wrote this quote. There is no more eloquent defense of the rights and duties of religious conscience. Then the one offered by martin. Luther king junior in his letter from birmingham jail recently of course. New allegations from biographer and historian. Dr david garrow have escalated concerns about dr king's moral failings especially his sexual exploits in his mistreatment of women. Many christians are also rightly troubled by. Dr king's unorthodox theological views especially his views on the resurrection and salvation views that are outside of historic christianity. And yet at the same time as a work of moral philosophy. Colson and the georgia's are absolutely correct about their assessment of. Dr king's letter from birmingham jail. It's simply unparalleled in. Its clarity about the nature of law. What constitutes an unjust law and our responsibility to respond to unjust loss. Twenty years ago. Chuck colson reflected on dr king's legacy and especially those very important contributions from his letter from birmingham jail. Here's chuck colson. A just law is a manmade code that squares with a moral or the law of god. An unjust law is out of harmony with the moral law. Do you know who wrote those words. It was with these very words in his memorable letter from the birmingham jail. That martin luther king junior threw down the gauntlet in his great civil rights. Crusade king refused to obey what he regarded as an immoral law that did not square with the law of god all across america today. Millions of people are celebrating the birthday of this courageous man and deservedly so he was a fearless battler for truth and all of us are in his debt because he remedied past wrongs and brought millions of americans into the full riches of citizenship in schools on courthouse steps people will be quoting his. I have a dream speech. It's an elegant powerful classic. But i would suggest that while. Dr king's greatest accomplishments one which will be little mentioned today because it has suddenly become politically incorrect is his advocacy of the true. Moral foundations of law. King defended the transcendent source of laws authority and in doing so. He took a conservative christian view of law in fact he was the most eloquent advocate of this viewpoint in his time as interesting enough justice. Clarence thomas is today. Writing from a jail. Cell king declared that the code of justice is not man's law. It is god's law. Imagine a politician saying that to be. We all remember the controversy. That erupted just a few weeks ago. When george w bush even made reference to his christian faith in a televised national debate but king built his whole case on the argument that an unjust law is no law at all. Exactly as argued by saint augustine and thomas aquinas to be just king argued. Our laws must always reflect god's law and this is the greatest you today in the public square is the law rooted in truth is a transcendent immutable and morally binding or is it as liberal. Interpreters suggest simply whatever the court says. It is emerson's dr king's day the. Us supreme court has been moving a step by step away from the positions. This great civil rights lead espoused to continue in this direction. As i've written can only lead to the loss of self-governing democracy. So i would challenge each of us today to use this occasion to reflect. Not just on his great crusade for civil rights but also on martin. Luther king's wisdom in bringing back to its moral foundations many think of king of some kind of a liberal firebrand but when it comes to the law he was a great conservative. Who stood on the shoulders of thomas aquinas and saint augustine striving without apology to restore our heritage of justice. This is a story. I tell my new book. How now should we live a great moment in history when a courageous man applied the law. God to the unjust laws of our time and made a difference. And that's the lesson. We should be teaching our kids on this holiday. This isn't just another day off from school or day to go to the mall. In fact i have a suggestion. Take this data. Sit down with your kids and read them. King's letter from birmingham jail. It may be the most important civic. Listen they'll ever get. That was chuck colson. I encourage you today. Re through dr king's letter from birmingham jail discuss it with your kids. I think you'll find it to be an incredibly important civics lesson for the colson center. I'm john stonestreet with breakpoint..

Chuck colson George david garrow thomas aquinas america martin millions Colson King Twenty years ago Dr today Clarence thomas saint augustine christianity each george colson chuck colson Luther
The Fight for Civil Rights and Freedom

TED Talks Daily

05:13 min | 6 months ago

The Fight for Civil Rights and Freedom

"This is such a great honor for me to be in this room with you to have this conversation. I can't tell you what it means to me to have this opportunity. You represent something so precious to so many of us not just wanted to start by thanking you for that for your willingness to wrap your arms around people may and to make me think that it's possible to do difficult things important things and i just want to start by asking you to talk a little bit about that experience. Growing up in rural alabama and the black belt of america and how that cultivated the spirit that shaped your life and your vision. You used to have to pick cotton on your family's farm while usa fuss as a young child complaint. Why this to. Emma motherless. Avoid so many things we can do. She's to his hard work with. What are we going to do. We have to make a living. But i was hoping in prynne. What a day. When people wouldn't have to work so hard in hot sun she was hoping also the thing would be better much better for us as a as a people and for my family my mother She was always thinking ahead. Did we get up early and going pick as which climb as we could. We get more money. 'cause she knew declining would be heavier. Coulda do we own it so it was weighed. Miami will be increased. Your mother sounds really strategic my New mother one day. She came across a little newspaper in downtown short. That says something about the school in nashville tennessee. That blanks students could attend. She encouraged apply for that. Even though that met you'd be leaving. The house should be leaving the farm. You would not be contributing that that extra labour will out was willing to go to try to do what mine. We'll call during better yet to get an education but in the beginning i wanted to choice state you wanted to. To desegregate. estate submit an application. High school transcript and never heard from the school saw. I wrote a letter to dr king at india. my mother. My father enema sisters brothers in an teachers told him i needed his help. He wrote me back. iran Around bus ticket invited me to come to montgomery to meet with. You can never ever forget it. You knew about dr king even before the boycott you'd heard his sermon The apostle paul preaches to american christians. It's the speech she gives to. All the people in montgomery four days after rosa parks has been arrested by at the end of the speech. He says one day they're going to tell a story about a group of people in montgomery alabama and then he says a black people who stood up for their rights and they stood for their rights. The whole world changed and you had an immediate response to that call to action. The message really appeal to me. Yeah it was sort of a social gospel message. I wanted to do what. I could make things better coinc- something that is not variety of just you have to assess something you have to do. Something was like a fine burning up in your bom and you cannot be silenced. My mother was said to me. Boy don't get in trouble. Don't get in trouble. you can get hurt. You can get killed. Dr king and rosa eating nixon and others that are read about done it time and later met in spine. Rena get when the trouble necessary trouble. And i've been getting in trouble. Ila sems- the citizens to freed awry. You went to nashville mcgann. The work of leaning nonviolence winded nonviolence become an essential part of your worldview in the theology and the activism that you wanted to create grown up wanted to be minister. I felt that dr king was saying in his speeches in keeping of jesus so readily accepted the saadia nonviolence. The philosophy disappoint a nonviolent. We talked to respect the dignity in the worst of every human being

Dr King Emma Motherless USA Montgomery Alabama Nashville Enema Miami Tennessee Rosa Parks Apostle Paul Iran High School India Rena Rosa Nixon Mcgann
Jon Ossoff and the movement energy hes tapping in Georgia

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:12 min | 6 months ago

Jon Ossoff and the movement energy hes tapping in Georgia

"John asa. Thanks so much. For coming on the podcast. Thank you so much. Jonathan grade the bigger right so you just started a bus tour a six day bus tour. If i remember right where are you going. And what kind of reception have you been. Been getting because it's been a one day already so far. Yesterday we were out in in madison and augusta and we will be hitting not just every major city but Several dozen small towns will be very visible in rural georgia. And this is the health jobs and justice bus tour across the state in the program that we are encouraging folks to get out and vote to support is one that ensures every georgian has great healthcare that we invest in economic recovery and job creation infrastructure clean energy and that we passed major criminal justice reform at a new civil rights act and that is galvanizing our coalition. There is movement like energy in georgia. Right now and as. You've heard me talk about jonathan. The situation in georgia is unusual. Because you've got a young jewish son of an immigrant running alongside a black preacher. This is not how democrats have been running in the south for the last couple of decades of talk more about that. Because i've heard you say that in television interviews Mostly in television interviews. And you know you both. You and reverend warnock who. You're talking about another person. Who's been on the podcast of your both sons of the south but for you in particular you were born and raised in georgia. As you just said you jewish-american and for a lot of people. The south has not been hospitable to african americans or jewish-americans. Talk talk about your your Your childhood your upbringing a did you endure wild antisemitism there in georgia not wild anti semitism up but it's something that pops up from time to time in the life of any jewish person. I think that. Because i don't wear a keep up right a yarmulke because i'm not outwardly. Observant I would not attract the same sort of over a of anti-semitism might who's judaism is more apparent externally or as a black person might in the south. But i think that when i inflict on my childhood so i was bar mitzvah at the temple which is a a reform synagogue in atlanta and one of the interesting things about the history of the temple is that it was nineteen fifty seven when dr king established the elsie in atlanta and it was nineteen fifty eight when the temple was bombed and from the late nineteen fifties through the civil rights movement of the early and mid nineteen sixties and all the way through the present day there has been an alliance between blacks and jews in georgia and when i first sat down to have a meal with congressman john lewis because my first ever exposure to anything like public service was working as a very very young man in his office where he wanted to talk to me. You were in high school. That's why it's had very very young man that exactly. I mean we ever had for about ninety minutes. He wanted to talk about that alliance. He wanted to talk about how he marched. Alongside rabbis and jewish activists. Here was a young jewish man in his office. He wanted to talk about the necessity of nurturing and strengthening that alliance and not taking for granted that that would happen on. Its own and so i- i reflect often as you've heard me reflect about how he is looking down on us right now in georgia smiling.

Georgia John Asa Reverend Warnock Augusta Jonathan Madison Dr King Atlanta John Lewis
Georgia Senate debates make headlines ahead of runoff

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

07:05 min | 7 months ago

Georgia Senate debates make headlines ahead of runoff

"Voting in georgia for the january senate elections begins one week from today. On december fourteenth debates for both georgia's senate races were held last night in atlanta. Here's republican senator. Kelly leffler and democrat reverend raphael warnock. My question is a pretty simple. Yes or no. Senator leffler did donald trump lose a recent presidential election. President trump has every right to use every legal recourse available in our own state. We've seen time and again that we have investigations that need to be completed. The trump campaign has filed fifty three frivolous lawsuits claiming election fraud courts. Actually the lawsuits did not ever claim fraud. Not in a single one of those losses. Did they claim fraud. Once they got in a court courts found zero instances fraud that includes one case. George that was dismissed today by a federal judge appointed by president. George w bush drudges republican. Senator david perdue who is facing allegations of insider trading. Just refuse to show up to debate as challenger don crat jon ossoff who appeared next to an empty lecture. My message for the people of our state at this moment of crisis is your senator feels entitled to your vote. Your senator is refusing to answer questions and debate his opponent because he believes he shouldn't have to. He believes this senate seat belongs to him. The senate seat belongs to the people today. John also held a campaign event in lilburn georgia. Imagine being a. us. Senator afraid of answering questions in public for fear that he might incriminate himself at a moment. Like this when people are hurting joining us. Now is who and castro. The former secretary of housing and urban development in the obama administration. Former mayor of san antonio texas secretary castro. Thank you very much for joining us tonight. You're back on the campaign trail today. Jon ossoff tomorrow for raphael warnock What are you seeing out there. Especially in response to this weekend's debate last night's debate where a david did not even show up. It's good to be with you lawrence. But what i've seen is a lot of people georgia understand how important the stakes are here. They understand that what happens here in georgia is gonna affect not only all georgians but also all of us as americans. I think most of gay and what they saw in the debates last night. Reinforce this that in a senators leffler purdue they've had two people that endorsed most critical moment of need have chosen to serve themselves to enrich themselves benefit their friends instead of working on behalf of the people of georgia. And what they see an rafael warnock in jon. Ossoff our to folks who are committed to serving the people georgia who were talking about the issues that matter healthcare job getting small suspect up in going housing opportunity as many people facing eviction making sure that we tackle climate change in the biggest challenge of our generation so the the differences here couldn't be more clear. Let's listen to more of what john also had to say on the campaign trail today. And how are these campaigns. These two democratic campaigns a sound like a partnership. Let's listen to this. You got the young jewish journalist son of an immigrant running alongside a black preacher who holds the same pulpit as dr king at the knees baptist church building a movement for health jobs and justice for the people at a moment of crisis because health jobs and justice are what the people need right now and we are running against the bonnie and clyde of political corruption in america secretary castro that kind of teamwork is unusual. Most people would. They're running for office. They're just trying to get themselves over that hurdle. Well it is. And i think we're fortunate that we have these runoffs going on at the same time as you know. Lawrence doesn't not happen where you have to united states senate seats in a runoff at the same time and i think they've done a very good job as a team and painting making sure that their message is clear about what they're gonna do for the people of georgia that get his asses the work to make sure that folks have good opportunities in georgia. And that's how they're going to govern governed in a much stronger way for the people of georgia than a leffler and purdue. Have i want to listen to something. That reverend warnock said last night in his debate because interestingly both democratic campaigns are running against republican candidates credibly accused of insider trading using their senate positions for insider trading. Let's listen to what the way reverend warnock put it. Last night. She was only there three weeks. i'm not sure she was fully unpacked when she started dumping millions of dollars of stock trying to protect herself and She purchased. That seat is done well for her. The issue is that the people who sold it to our. Don't it and the people of georgia coming back to get their seat sir. Castro is that issue getting traction on the campaign trail is especially. Because you're is somebody in kelly lafleur who was not elected Who last night into debate. You could tell just said the same thing over and over and over again and instead of addressing the issues basically just tried to label roselle warna you know as do liberal for georgia when he was there actually talking about the things that we hear people talking about table being able to afford the rent. You know wh what is their gonna come back online. What is washington dc. Doing work to make sure that they have opportunity. And to make sure the infancy can get asked endemic It's night and day away. That worn can also addressing the issues. That people are talking about the care about right now. And i'll disconnected leffler and her do our sanitary helene. Castro live from the campaign trail in georgia. Thank you very much for joining us tonight. Really appreciate

Georgia Raphael Warnock Senate Kelly Leffler Senator Leffler Senator David Perdue Don Crat Castro Jon Ossoff Obama Administration Rafael Warnock Donald Trump George W Bush Lilburn Dr King Purdue Atlanta America
'Waste' Activist Digs Into The Sanitation Crisis Affecting The Rural Poor

Environment: NPR

04:40 min | 7 months ago

'Waste' Activist Digs Into The Sanitation Crisis Affecting The Rural Poor

"Catherine coleman flowers. Welcome to fresh air. Thank you thank you for inviting me. You've been active on this issue for a long time and have brought a lot of people. Philanthropists reporters elected officials to rural areas to see for themselves. Poor people living with this problem of simply not having sanitary disposal of human waste. I'd like you to describe the experience of just one of these tours and the reaction of those who saw what what you showed one of the persons who's reaction with i think sums it up was Dr phillip boston. Dr allston was to you in special rapporteur on extreme poverty and when he was invited to lowndes county. It's part of his official tour. He went to see areas where people were living amongst also which was the one of the homes that we went to It was a compound with a number of mobile homes that set off of a dirt road and one could see the the water lines. They carry water into the home. Going above of what looked like a ditch. Full of raw sewage and nearby was a Was a basketball goal. Which children apparently played basketball. And when he saw there was a were reporters with us On his his his tour and one of the reporters asked him. Have you seen this before. And he said this is common in the developed world. And i thought that that spoke loudly of what i had phil for all of these years did this and so what what people would see a new taken. So many people to this and observe their shock at what they saw was often in a peace pipe. V pipe running from home or a trailer to a hole in the backyard. And then when you get closer what you see. There are when you get closer. You probably see human feces and toilet paper. Aisle whatever was flushing in the toilet. that day. The one place that we win That was this out in my mind. Is that it was full of pitfalls raw sewage. As you say the person had pvc pipe there was a lot a lot of ingenuity. This involved. In this they the the pvc pipe was buried underground and it went to appear in that period again was full of you know raw sewage and you could see the eyes of a frog that was embiid in the sewage and was p p coming out from it and oftentimes depending on the time of the year and now that the days we have long warmer seasons. Their mosquito sometimes congregated on top of the sewage. Those animals will spread this stuff to wherever they go exactly. you grew up in lowndes county alabama. It's an interesting place in the history of the civil rights movement. Isn't it yes. It's very interesting place. In the history of the civil rights movement. Most people know about lowndes because of his fight for voting rights and the establishment of the lowndes county freedom organization which was the original black panther party And that the black panther was chosen because a lot of the sharecroppers had not been afforded the opportunity to go to school so they wanted to use a symbol that people could understand and also you know they wanted to slogans from their time was pulled the till for the panther When they organized their own political party and ran candidates On that part because at that time it was not But people running. This candidates was accepted on either republican or the democratic party In lowndes county. So that itself was more was a a great accomplishment on the side of sharecroppers former sharecroppers who had been kicked off property just because they sought the right to vote and that was the lowndes county freedom party that preceded the black panthers organization right yes and it's also is this area on the root of the famous march from selma to montgomery that dr king led yes. Most of the civil montgomery mind troop goes to lowndes county lowndes. County is actually between selma and montgomery

Catherine Coleman Flowers Lowndes County Dr Phillip Boston Dr Allston Basketball Lowndes County Freedom Organiz Phil Lowndes Panther Party Alabama Lowndes County Freedom Party Democratic Party Dr King Selma Montgomery
Interview with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

Toure Show

06:29 min | 9 months ago

Interview with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

"The game, the structure, the style of the game that you played back to the basket center right trying to get high percentage shots closer to the basket that game has been completely forgotten, and there's very few. There's nobody who plays the center position the way you did with the back to the basket and it's like try to get the highest value shots the furthest away. But three pointers as much as you can does this style interest you disinterested you look down on it. You say you don't know how to play the game properly. Well, you know there, there are different theories about how to play the game but I think getting high percentage shots really makes a lot of sense, but it also has to dovetail with your defensive strategy also. So a great team like the Bill Russell. F- Celtics. Bill was able to to stymie any shots around the hoop and. His team. Would run and get high percentage shots down down court, and that was a winning strategy era. I mean, nobody's playing center. The way you did that is totally gone now. I think. So but that doesn't mean that someone cat had that type of skill and still come in effect the game. In a meaningful way, we talked earlier today. One of the things you said, the eighty five finals against the Celtics was one of your most important moments as a player. One of your crowning moments as a player you were the. MVP that year you guys won the Lakers one but you had to go through the Memorial Day massacre where you guys got crushed by like forty points a game over in the middle of third order and a down moment and I lived in Boston at that moment, it looked like are going to go on to destroy them. How did you come back to win and why do you think of that as one of your crowning moments as a player that series? Well I think that? What happened to me personally in that series was. Once, we made it into the finals I kind of relaxed. and. So I went into that first game thinking that. The worst is over and you know the the worst was yet to happen. So. It kind of woke me up and made me realize that I had to kick my game up a couple of levels in order to. Finish off what we started out to do because we lost. In eighty four to the Celtics and Gabe a game away. And that ended up being the the crucial game. How could you go into? A series against the Celtics who had Larry Bird who series plate you know clearly one of the great players of that time how you Gonna Like Oh, we got this. No. I didn't think that we got this but for me personally, I figured I've done my job where we're in the finals. Things. Think things will be alright and they work. One. Of the one of the chapters, one of the parts of the book that I really thought was really interesting. You talk about athletes and what they must do with how they have role models at the happy aware that they are role models and you say we can't pretend athletes are influencing our children's thinking and behavior. So we must demand higher standards from them like it or not college and Professional Sports. Machines are turning them into role models, and if they aren't willing to accept that responsibility as part of the contract, then they should seek another profession. Strong position. A little bit about why you feel that way when you went through that life right superstar High School Athlete College, Athlete, and you know the way that superstar athletes from a teen age are coddled. They are given you know love for their athletics points for their character. Society is not training them to be role models, but then they become big college players big prosed and we expect them to be role models. Are they even ready for that? I don't know you know for me. Being a black American and in the era that I grew up in all black. realized. That They would be judged by the actions of. Any problem. Black Person. And so. That burden. Was something that that you assumed. Soon, as you've got to do anything in a in a prominent fashion, you assume that burden because you knew that. All black people would be. Judged on whatever it was that you did and he's screwed up A. Set, the race. I mean that's absolutely right and you talk about that I came to realize that the lew alcindor that for the younger folk that was his name forty, fifty years ago the lew alcindor everyone was cheering. Was it really the person they wanted to be they wanted me to be the clean cut example of racial equality the poster boy for anybody from any background regardless of race religion or economic standing could become an American success story to them. I was living proof that racism was a mythological beast like Jack. Elope when when the audience is feeling like that right I assume the media is part of it. How do you? How do you rebel against that? Well. You just have to show them that they're wrong and. That that is not the case, there's a whole lot that has to be done. I into earlier. Right after Dr King was assassinated, I was involved in a demonstration on UCLA's campus and people. Would just standing there. and. It was a silent. stood. There for an hour in silence and some of US had signs and a number of times people came up to me and said, you're getting the opportunity to play in the NBA. What do you demonstrating for and they did not understand how these two things did not relate to each other at all the fact that I, I was getting opportunity to play in the NBA did not mean that what happened to Dr King was a tragedy and a crime and the. Thing to get across to people and the you know I, it's taken awhile you

Celtics Bill Russell Dr King NBA High School Athlete College United States Black Person Boston Larry Bird MVP Lakers Ucla Gabe A. Set Jack
The lie that invented racism

TED Talks Daily

05:18 min | 9 months ago

The lie that invented racism

"What is up with US white people? I've been thinking about that a lot the last few years and I know I have company. Look I get it. People of Color have been asking that question for centuries. But I think a growing number of white folks are to. Given what's been going on out there In our country. And notice I said what's up with US white people. Does right now, I'm not talking about those white people. The ones with the swastikas in the hoods and the tiki torches. They are a problem, a threat, the perpetrate most of the terrorism in our country as you all in Charlottesville better than most. But I'm talking about something bigger more pervasive. Talking about all of us. White folks writ. Large. And maybe especially people sorta like me. self-described progressive. Don't WANNA be. Racist. Goodway people. Any good white people in the room? I was raised to be that sort of person. I was a little kid in the sixties and seventies, and to give you some sense of my parents actual public opinion polls at the time showed that only a small minority about twenty percent of white Americans approved supported. Martin Luther King and his work with the civil rights. Movement. Wild. Dr King was still alive. I'm proud to say my parents were in that group. Race got talked about in our house. And when the show's about the dealt was raised with come on the television, they would sit us kids down made sure we watched the Sidney Poitier movies roots. The message was loud and clear and I got it. Racism is wrong. Racists are bad people. At the same time we lived in a very white place in Minnesota. And I'll just speak for myself I. think that me to believe. that. Those white racists on the TV screen were being beamed in from some other place. Wasn't about US really. Did Not feel implicated. Now I would say I'm still in recovery from that early impression. I. Got into journalism in part because I cared about things like equality. Justice. For a long time racism was just such a puzzle to me. Why is it still with us when it's so clearly wrong. Why such a persistent force. Maybe. I was puzzled because I wasn't yet in the right place or asking the right questions. Have, you noticed that when? People in our mostly white. Media Report on what they consider to be racial issues what we consider to be racial issues what that usually means that we're pointing our cameras and our microphones are gaze at people of Color. Asking questions like. How are black folks or native Americans Latino or Asian Americans how are they doing? In a given community or with respect to some issue, the economy education. I've done. My share of that kind of journalism over many years. But then George Zimmerman killed. Trayvon Martin. Followed by this unending string of high-profile police shootings of armed black people and the rise of the black lives matter movement. dylann roof in the Charleston. Massacre. Oscarssowhite. All the. Incidents from the day to day of American Life. These overtly racist incidents that we now get to see because they're captured on smartphones sent across the Internet. And beneath those visible events the stubborn data studies showing. Systemic racism. Every institution we have. Housing Segregation. Job Discrimination. The deeply racialist inequities in our schools and criminal justice system. And what really did it for me? I know I'm not alone in this either. The RISE OF DONALD TRUMP. And the discovery that a solid majority of white. Americans. would embrace or at least accept. Such a raw bitter kind of white identity politics. This is all disturbing to me as a human being. As a journalist I found myself. Turning the Lens around. thinking. White folks so the story. Whiteness is a story. And also thinking. Can I do that? What would a podcast series about whiteness sound like?

United States Martin Luther King Trayvon Martin Sidney Poitier Donald Trump Minnesota Charlottesville George Zimmerman American Life Charleston
Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:19 min | 10 months ago

Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is encyclopedia will Manica. All month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up against injustice and four a better world. Today we're talking about an American civil rights activist whose work began as a student and extended throughout her life and beyond. She was one of the leaders of the sit in and Jalen movements continuing to fight for a more just society even when faced with serious harm. According to The New York Times her FBI file was over four hundred pages long. Let's talk about Patricia Stevens do. Patricia Gloria Stevens was born on December ninth nineteen, thirty, nine fifteen months after her sister Priscilla who would go on to be partner in many organizing efforts. Patricia was the second of three kids born to Lottie Mae Powell Stevens, and Horace Walter Stevens. The Stevens family lived in Belgrade Florida for most Patricia Youth. By the time she was thirteen years old Patricia was very aware of the discrimination she faced for being black and was ready to protest. She and her sister refused to go to the designated colored window at their local dairy queen. Instead, they stood in line for the window marked whites only. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, seven Patricia started school at Florida Am University. Two years later in Nineteen fifty-nine Patricia and Priscila attended a workshop put on by the Congress of racial equality or core on nonviolent civil disobedience. Patricia then started a local chapter of the organization in order to continue the work, she tried to tackle it just thirteen years old integration. The following year on February. Twentieth Nineteen Sixty Patricia, her sister, and some other students sat down at a whites only lunch counter at a Woolworth Tallahassee and refused to get up until they were served. Nineteen days earlier, four guys sat down at a similar lunch counter in Greensboro North Carolina officially kicking off. Since movement across the South Patricia and ten of her peers were arrested rather than paying three hundred dollar Fine Patricia and. Out Forty nine days in jail. Their determination to serve their time as a statement became a norm when others were arrested and charged on fairly. Patricia leadership and courage caught the attention of people around the country support of the cause including Jackie Robinson Eleanor Roosevelt Harry Belafonte, and James. Baldwin. Dr Martin. Luther King. Junior. Sent the sisters telegram that said. Going to jail for a righteous cause as a badge of honor and a symbol of dignity. After she was finally released, Patricia continued the fight to change her city and country. One of her fellow activists was a man named John D do junior. He was law school at Florida Am University. The two got married in nineteen, sixty three and would go on to have three children together for their honeymoon Patricia and John went to the march on Washington and heard Dr King's I have a dream speech. The following year in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, Patricia took on a new role in corps. She served as field secretary for a voter education and Registration Project in North Florida under her leadership. program. More. Voters than any other regional program in the south. Patricia also worked to improve the lives of workers, the poor and other underserved populations in the US. But her activism took a physical toll on her. After being hit in the face by a can of tear gas, Patricia is were injured and she was forced to wear dark glasses for the rest of her life in nineteen sixty, seven, ten years after she enrolled. Patricia graduated from Florida Am. University it took her all of a decade to get her degree because she spent periods of time traveling around the US to rally energy behind the civil rights movement. She was also suspended multiple times by the

Patricia Patricia Gloria Stevens South Patricia Patricia Youth Florida Am University Florida Lottie Mae Powell Stevens Horace Walter Stevens Luther King Harry Belafonte Stevens Jalen Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan United States FBI Woolworth Greensboro John D
A Conversation With Rep. Ayanna Pressley

Hysteria

05:29 min | 10 months ago

A Conversation With Rep. Ayanna Pressley

"Representative Presley. First of all, we love you. So you know it's going to be a hard hitting interview. With. We love you. Let's let's get into it. Okay. So president trump has clearly included playing up unrest in cities in part of his reelection strategy. He's even gone as far as to imply Democrats are to blame for escalating violence at protests, how Progressives and Democrats push for police reform in a world where an attempt at pursuing justice is spun as a rush to anarchy by right wing media and used as an excuse to become violent by law enforcement officials. Say It's thrilled to be here with all of you. Thank you. I'm big admirers in the ends of the two of you and glad to be with you today. You know what can I say about Donald? Trump. These already the dog whistles anymore there are just blaring horns you know wrapped up in incendiary soundbites and cruel policy in calcium administration. So it's very predictable. This is an old play in this sort of in movement building work you know we're used to it. How do we advance policy? The way always advanced policy as a nation nestor movements you. Know a lot of people when they reflect back on those grainy images, those black and white images of protests and demonstrations. In the nineteen sixties, they will define the progress came out of that solely as the voting rights act in the civil rights at but honestly that movement was the blueprint for every progressive piece of legislation thereafter. So this is how legislation is moved its through movement building and social transformation. That is why now things like inviting qualified immunity which bill that I introduced representative Justin Amash are now part of public discourse that is from organizing mobilizing. Conversations around reimagining our budgets to actually value black lives that has everything to do with the power of movement building, and so we have to continue to do that. We're in this moment of national reckoning on racial injustice is a culture shift occurring people. Now, a very unapologetically affirm that black lives matter but now that has to translate into power shift that is reflected in who we elect to office the laws that we right in the budgets that right those are the only. Receipts that matter. So if you believe that black lives, matter than black representation matters than black data matters, then black home ownership matters black entrepreneurialism matters in. So that's how I seek to legislate is in a very precise way and I'll in here by saying the disproportion hate heard her that has been foisted onto black Americans for generations was not naturally occurring. It was legislated was precise in codified lawmaking until the path forward must be one where we are also precise reverend. Barber. Poor. People's campaign someone that I look too often and just someone admire tremendously. Grateful for his moral clarity and conviction says for moment of reckoning the demands, a third reconstruction, and so that's what we need to be squarely focused. Dohrn is what does that third construction looked like and how do we enlist everyone from organizers to lawmakers as community builders in that reconstruction of a better word equitable world IANNA and I'm calling you Iona because I've known you since the ninety s and that's just how it's going to be. When you when you were telling me what's what? Let's not forget? This week. Joe Biden gave a speech and he released an ad where he made the point to clarify that contrary to what the trump camp is saying about him. He doesn't actually like property destruction that has occurred were some protests have occurred? By doing this Biden, allowing trump to control the conversation. Let me just say this there is an effort to infiltrate into undermine the impact of the black lives matter movement, and the fact that these motivation efforts have continued, which is constitutional. Right to assemble to peacefully protest descent is the ultimate patriotism. James Baldwin said I extensively paraphrase like I criticized this country America because I, love it just that much. She can and must be better. I think we have to be careful to make sure that our movements are not co-opted the people that I see in community who are the four of these movements bay, our community builders, not destroyers and the people that are doing that are infiltrators who won the black lives matter movement to be aligned to be mischaracterize. The people doing the work of justice seeking our peacekeepers you know and I, also think it's important that we not completely rewrite history and sanitize what these movements have looked like in the past. No. So people will bring up Dr King and they'll bring up John Lewis. Will John Lewis was who practice nonviolent peaceful protests almost died on that bridge in many times thereafter in fact, many advocates have said we don't know how John Lewis made it out alive because they always focused on.

Donald Trump Joe Biden John Lewis Representative Presley Movements Bay Justin Amash Dr King Iona President Trump Representative Dohrn Barber James Baldwin America
Black Power and Jewish Politics with Marc Dollinger

Jewish History Matters

05:14 min | 10 months ago

Black Power and Jewish Politics with Marc Dollinger

"So highmark. Welcome to the PODCAST. Great to be here. Thank you. Yeah. I'm really glad that you can join us for I. Think Really Important and relevant conversation. I read through the book I think it's a fantastic book. I think that you're offering a revision of some of the ways in terms of how people have understood. Especially, Jewish people have understood the question of the history of black Jewish relations. You maybe WANNA get US started off by saying a brief word about your argument in the book and what it is that you're putting forward. Yes, sure when I was growing up as a white suburban Jewish kitten in in La I learned that the civil rights movement was the story of a black Jewish alliance that brought heroic Jews to the south where they fought on behalf of racial justice until the mid nineteen sixties. The. Rise of black militancy of. Black Power of anti-semitism. Community purge Jews and ended what was a wonderful alliance. When I looked in the archives though and began researching the book. I discovered an entirely different story emerging instead of sort of the Dr King Rabbi Hessel arm in arm narrative that I was raised on. I. Found that even White Male Jewish leaders of National Jewish organizations understood as early as the nineteen fifties. There was a fundamental difference between being white and Jewish in America and being black? In. America. And they in fact, knew that there would be limits to the black Jewish alliance and That was my first sort of shocking discovery in terms of revising I knew growing up. It's a really jarring perspective for a lot of people Jewish people I want to say who grow up thinking about and being taught about this alliance within the civil rights movement and the involvement of Jews within the civil rights movement. So I think that what you're offering here is a almost radical perspective, a radical revision of how we understand the role of the Jews in the civil rights movement. I'd like to frame it s a both and and it's really important I to acknowledge the extraordinary American Jewish participation in the civil rights movement and in social justice causes. When you look at the ethnic groups in America, Jews are the most liberal. Progressive. Democratic. Party. Now Voting Group only African Americans vote more. And by that standard I think there's justifiable pride amongst American Jews for the work that we have done and those perspectives have been covered in the historic. Already. What's also true is even as many heroic. Jews. Did go to the south to register voters and in some tragic cases, of course, gave their lives most Americans use didn't. And there became almost sort of in the north, a sense that watching on TV, what the Jewish heroes were doing extended to them as well. So what my book is trying to do is take a broader more inclusive look of all Americans, or at least white American Jews, and now we get to see more complexity to what's going on. So I don't see this as as undermining. The existing truth about Jewish involvement but I see it hopefully deepening it and making it more complex. Why do you think that it's important to offer this complexity to the narrative of first of all? It's surprising in and of itself there's something that custodians recall historical memory, which is what actually happened and what we remember or think happened what we were taught happened is often different. In fact, there's a history of historical memory which says the way in which we choose to remember or forget or analyze or spin. If you want to be more cynical, our historical past actually is meaningful in and of itself. So what I found, when I was surprised to find was that as early as the nineteen fifties, Jewish leaders were calling out the limits of white Jewish liberalism and the inevitability of of African American autonomy and what would become the rise of black power. So at the very time that the public narrative was consensus arm in arm. But I love the called peace love and Bobby. Sherman. Everything's great. At that moment, even the Jewish leaders who were engaged in that kind of consensus politics understood its limits. That's the part that we've forgotten. I think over the last fifty or sixty years and I think it's really important especially in today's climate for us to understand better that it was always deep and complicated an intense and we knew about it at the time. And then the real story is how in journalism and historiographer and in public memory, we sort of forgotten that element until we've remembered it again with the national reckoning on race

Dr King Rabbi Hessel La I America Bobby Sherman
The March ON Washington, 57 Years Later

20/20

06:18 min | 10 months ago

The March ON Washington, 57 Years Later

"Hello I'm Deborah Roberts those images from today an echo of something fifty seven years ago when a quarter of a million people I descended on the nation's capital protesting for jobs and freedom. On today's anniversary of Dr Martin Luther. King Junior's I have a dream speech we at twenty twenty or proud to present the march a documentary directed by Jonah Comfort and narrated by Denzel Washington originally made in twenty thirteen to commemorate the Marches Fiftieth Anniversary. Some of those voices sadly are now gone, but their legacy lives on. I have had to tell my children about the segregates what it means. Seven year old daughter she wanted to go from town. And we found it necessary to explain to That she couldn't go to fun town because she was colored. To attempt to explain a system like unjust and. Segregation. Six year old child is very difficult thing. In nineteen sixty three. The Movement for civil rights came to the most segregated city in the American. South. Birmingham Alabama. All. Resistant to the gration. Thoroughly, segregated. City the United States. had. More on saw on. WILL HOMES ENSURE A. United. States. Many other southern city. Okay. Birmingham is bombing him. They have quarries and conducting the quarry business you used dynamite. So there are a lot of local people who are expert in Isa Dynamic. Teenage. Board riding a bicycle had been knocked off the bike and castrated. Young couple had gone to the City Hall to get a wedding license. Came around the corner. And Brush shoulders with Birmingham policeman and he pulled out his pistol and pistol whipped the more to the ground. It was a horrible heinous place. The campaign was to be led by the organisation's Ben Thirty four year old leader. The Reverend Dr Martin Luther King Junior. WHO HEARD PEOPLE? who except in dusted oppression and second-class citizenship. in an attempt waiting go the Paul Pompidou. The time all we ripe to do right. Dr King was the voice of Civil Rights from the bus boycott on but by the end of nineteen, sixty, two, he recognized. That the civil rights movement. was. Losing what he called its window and history. The. South was still segregated and he said we need to take more of a risk. We need to go for broke I need to go for broke. I think he felt that. We have to be willing to give our lives to put an end to segregation. If we do. Then segregation will end even if we die. That was the reason he chose. Birmingham. For the victory won some even have to face physical death. We must come to see the now some things. So eternally true that they're worth dying for, and if a man has not discovered something that he will die for he fit live. In January of Nineteen, sixty three. One man was determined to stop kings desegregation message from spreading any further. Birmingham's police chief Eugene. Bull Connor. Negro is off the attempted takeover of our country the lazy. The beat nate, the ignorant and buy some misguided religious and bleeding ought. Do, you think you can keep coming in the present situation of segregation I may not be able to do it, but I'll die trying. Overcoming Bull Connor segregationists zeal not to mention his jails would take something special. And in the winter of sixty, three king would find out just how special that effort needed to be. Spent all of January February and March nineteen sixty three training people to accept nonviolence to go down into marches and be willing to go into bull connor's jails. But. Conner's jails were so fearsome that no matter how much they exhorted people no matter how many freedom songs they sang, how many prayers they prayed, how much fervor there was in the meetings, people wouldn't show up to risk going into those jails.

Birmingham Bull Connor Dr Martin Luther Dr King Deborah Roberts Negro Denzel Washington Isa Dynamic Twenty Twenty Jonah Comfort City Hall Alabama Paul Pompidou United States. Ben Thirty Conner Nate Bleeding
Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

Morning Edition

24:00 min | 11 months ago

Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

"Rights activist and icon who became a moral force in the United States. Congress will be laid to rest. Today. He's been celebrated in a series of memorials this week and this past Sunday, he received a hero's sendoff in his native state of Alabama. And on Monday, Congressman Lewis was honored in Washington, DC It was an emotional Ceremony with lawmakers. His colleagues Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, played a portion of a speech that Lewis gave to graduates at Emory University in 2014. As young people. You must understand that there are forces that would take us back to another period. But you must know that would mark warned by way made too much progress and we're going to make you some step back. Some delays some disappointment, but you must never give up. I give in. You must keep the faith and keep so eyes on the prize. That is so calling. That is your mission That is tomorrow. Obligation that is oh, man. They get out there and do it getting away. Lewis lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda following the ceremony, making him the first black lawmaker to receive that honor. And today, Congressman Lewis comes home to Atlanta, Georgia. The funeral service is being held at the historic Ebeneezer Baptist Church, where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr was once co pastor and joining us Now is Emma Hurt. She's a reporter with our member station W. A. B in Atlanta, and she joins us live from outside of Ebeneezer Baptist and Emma describe what it's like there where you are right now. Hi, Emma. Can you hear me? Emma will be joining us shortly. She is outside of Ebenezer Baptist Church. Now let's go to Debbie Elliot. We'll check back in with Emma. And just a few moments. Hi, Debbie. How are you? I am good. I know that you spent a lot of time in Alabama over the weekend. There were several memorials and services. It was quite a scene. Right. You know, I think the thing that stands out the most was was when he was in Selma and his casket was on this horse drawn carriage. And it crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, of course, that iconic place where he was met with state troopers and sheriff's deputies who beat him up in a peaceful march for voting rights. Back in 1965 and people had come to sort of witness him make that Symbolic final crossing. Yeah, you've been You've known the congressman for for many years. You spoke with him back in 2015 at that. Edmund Pettus Bridge. Tell us about that. Yes. So this was in advance of 50th anniversary celebrations marking You know, 50 years since the Voting Rights Act passed because of that horrible incident on that bridge. The nation in the world really became aware of the brutality against African Americans who were pushing for equality in the American South. And so I met him there. We stood at the foot of the bridge, and we had a conversation about what it was like back then. And let's listen to a little bit, and he describes what happened on that came before. Beating us. Shrimping with horses. Releasing the tick and I was getting here. A state trooper with the night stick. My legs went from under me. I thought I was going to die. I thought I saw death. He thought he saw death, You know, and this was a moment where he had been that the the sheriff's deputy in the state troopers told them you have to turn back. We're not going to let you march to Montgomery. And they asked to kneel in prayer and as they went to kneel in prayer before they were going to turn back and go back to their churches. They were told. The meeting started. Tell me what's so powerful about that moment in history is that it was it was. It was a time where people were able to see for the first time the brutality. Those images were so powerful. It was labeled bloody Sunday and it sped up the passages you said of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Debbie will will come back to you a little later to talk more about that. That's NPR's Debbie Elliot. We now have with us in the hurt. She is a reporter with our member station W. Abe in Atlanta, and she's outside of Ebeneezer Baptist Church where services will be held today. And Emma describe for us what it's like for you out there right now what you're seeing. Okay. Hi, Emma. This is Tanya. Can you hear me? Hi. Yeah. Can you hear me? I can I know that. It's It's quite a crowd. Okay? Can you tell us a bit about what you're seeing out there? I'm seeing I'd say about 200 people out here and we've kind of got to groups. We've got the people that are starting to gather at the Jumbotron, which has been set up right outside the church. I'm waiting to watch the service live there. And then we've got a crowd of people who are who are welcoming people as they arrive, welcoming the VIPs on presidential watch. Right now, I would say, waiting waiting for the three former presidents who are going to attend today and speak and the mood here is is really. I mean, it's it's serious, but it's also so joyful. It's about singing, and the stories that people have been telling me are just really powerful stories of how much Congressman Lewis meant to them. How much his message means to them in this time. And how much they want their Children and their grandchildren to make sure to remember him and what he stood for. What's really powerful, a swell about his home state of of his home state of Georgia and the city of Atlanta. Is that so many people felt like they knew him because they met him. You're hearing all of those stories from folks, I'm sure their interactions with him. Ebeneezer Baptist has so much history is I mentioned earlier, Martin looking Junior was a co pastor their share with us the significance of that church. Well, this was this was more Luther King Juniors from church. He grew up in it and was pastor as you said. It was also John Lewis's Home Church, where his wife's funeral was held in 2013. And it's really special. I think for these two figures overlap in this In this part of Atlanta to on Auburn Avenue, which is really the centre of Black Atlanta life, and some would argue the center of the Civil Rights movement and the two figures. I mean yesterday what was so powerful about Congressman Lewis lying in state in the Capitol in Georgia was that this was an honor denied to Dr King when he died. So I spoke to people who said I'm here because of all the people like Dr King who were denied that honor. And here we are giving Congressman Lewis most them may be the most honor. That we can right now. Sure, Let's listen to some of those folks that you spoke with you. It was amazing. It was amazing. All people on the young people. A lot of my friends has passed away. But I remember him from there. So that's why you mentioned This church being in the Hart. I just want to tell you that was Patricia Spicer, who's here, and she was talking about seeing Congressman Lewis speak at the 1963 march on Washington and that that's why his words were so powerful then and grabbed her then and she had to come today. The body of John Lewis was brought to Atlanta yesterday, and as you mentioned, it passed a number of important landmarks in the city. Walk us through. Some of those final landmarks that this journey to finally to Ebeneezer Baptist Church. There were there were quite a few stops because, as you said, Congressman Lewis has been such a presence in his district for, you know, 30 plus years. There was a pause at the Rainbow Crosswalk in Midtown, which you know, celebrates LGBT Q. The LGBTQ community here they passed by his downtown congressional office and a major street here that was renamed after him in the John Lewis Freedom Parkway on DH. It was there was also a big stop at a mural that you, Khun see driving down the interstate that runs through Atlanta. It has a picture of John Lewis and the words hero and, you know, it was really powerful. Tio. Watch him land for the last time in Atlanta and to watch him, you know, make his his final journey around the city. That's Emma hurt. She's a reporter with our member station. W. A. B in Atlanta. Thank you so much. Thank you. We're going to bring in another voice to our conversation. Remembering today the life and legacy of Congressman John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtry is with us. Now. She's a political organizer and strategist. She ran. The Democratic National Convention is in 2008 in 2016 and she is the presiding prelate of the House of the Lord Churches. And there is perhaps no one better to talk about the intersection of faith in politics in this moment, which is what's so much of John Lewis's life really represents Bishop. Doctor. Thank you for being here. Good morning to you. And thank you very much from including this conversation. I guess I would just start by asking where your thoughts are this morning. Oh, you know, in the it's Ah, it's a powerful day. In the African American tradition. We call this the services home going And so they are mix of sorrow and sadness, but also great joy, particularly when it's someone like Mr Lewis, who has lived his life in such an exemplary way and in keeping with the principles of his faith that we know that he And our tradition. He's going home to be with the creator. And so we rejoice in bed and in the deeply held idea that we will see him again. So the mix of emotions on and I'm looking forward to the servants and being able to worship with those who have gathered To celebrate his life. The the word and his faith came before politics, did it. Not that was with what guided him first? Yes, yes, And I think that's so instructive for all of us who are people of faith. He was deeply guided by the principles of the face that he held so deeply and so closely and though that is what informed him and informed his action. Informed his decision to get involved in the civil rights movement on then to pursue a career in electoral politics. It's because of the ideals of of of our faith of our share faith that God intends for all of us. To live a full and abundant life. It holds us equally ah, in God's eyes and ah, divinely created and therefore in endowed with these Possibilities of being hole and equal. And then we have an obligation to pursue of society that sees us as God. And so for John Lewis that meant getting involved in the civil rights movement. That meant going on the bus boycotts being part of the leadership because it was he was pursuing the principal's off his face. And then in his later life, Of course, he came to Congress again, seeking ways to create a just society, a beloved community that treats all of its citizens equally. That has got had intended them to be he. It was almost a joke near the end of his life. How often he was asked to talk about preaching to chickens as a child on how readily he wanted to share that story, right? It was, he just he reveled in it of the idea of Off the joy he had as a very young man. I mean, eight years old, even sharing what he believed to be the most important important message there, Wass and and it helped him. Negotiate through through Washington. It helped him find ways to communicate with people with whom he disagreed. This's a very important part of his legacy is enough. It is it is, you know it and it tells you how deeply held his faith was. You know in these days, particularly when people are chasing followers, and ah likes and so forth on social Media network to think of this young man who who so loved his face. It was so impassioned by that any audience any Opportunity. He had to share his fate. Even with the chickens, Wass and was a chance to home his craft was a chance to get his ideas out was a chance. The tests, cadences and rhythms of words was a chance to share was the chickens and with those around the pick of the air, the grass the field how passionate he was about things that he believed and then bringing those ideals to Congress and understanding again. The people I help The idea of our faith that God has created a so equal And so if this idea that you don't have to be just like me to be just like me, there's something we have in common with each other. And if we can just talk if we can just be in conversation, we can see each other perhaps here because we may not still agree, but at least The tendency to demonize the unknown goes away lesson diminishes in the conversation. And who could refuse the conversation with Mr Lewis, who could refuse to just sit and talk and listen, and he was as good a listener. As he Waas a conversationalist. So you know, I think the Congress was richer for having him there on the Congress was Richard that his colleagues were Richard for just being able to be in conversation with someone who has deeply held ideal of deeply held conviction and experience. We should point out. Three former presidents are expected to get the memorial today. Bill Clinton. Barack Obama and and George W. Bush. I mean, just exemplifying the way that he he was very firm about what he believed and believed in his party, but he would work with Republicans if it meant Getting getting through the legislation he thought was most important. That's right. I mean, red and blue. These sorts of lines. These artificial divisions that we create among ourselves to categorize each other didn't really existed. Mr Lewis's lexicon. It was all about the humanity of people, and so has admit moving communities forward if admits Getting everybody the rights they deserve. Then he was willing to have the conversation. He was willing to be engaged and involved. And we see that in the folks that are going to speak today that are going to be present today at the tone and the tenor of the service, which he himself Designed. He spoke to his his closest staff. A. Stephen knew his time was shortening and said, who he wanted to be there. And what's the one of the elements of the club is to be what we see. Today is of Mr Lewis's own crafted bishop. Doctor, Can I ask one quick question if you were involved in the ceremony today, Realism putting you on the spot. But is there scripture that you think represents this moment, something you can point to that that carries the weight of history with it, but also Is about hope is about the future. You know, The thing that comes to mind for me is the passage and Hebrews. There's a chapter the faith chapter. We call it. Chapter 11 that talks about all the icons of our faith. Abraham and Sarah and getting and so forth on a long litany and in the middle of verse 13 says these all died in the faith, not having received the promises. But having seen them afar off, and for me that speaks of the hope. That was Mr Lewis's life. He stood on the shoulders of those who went before who didn't see freedom who didn't think the achievement of our civil rights. He followed them and he lived his life in such a way that he advanced the faith. He advance the causes, but he didn't see all of the achievement. And now we come behind him on continue his legacy. So he believed he held these convictions didn't scenes didn't see everything he fought for comes repair, But he still believed he still continue fighting. And henceforth Scripture goes on to say there was laid up for me A crown of righteousness was the Lord. That right? Justo shall give me on that day. And not to me only bought to all those who love disappearing. And so we look forward to seeing the two of us again in the future. Bishop Leah Daughtry. Thank you so much for sharing your reflections with us on this day. Thank you. Yes, very powerful. Let's go now to NPR. Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR's senior editor and correspondent on the Washington desk. Ron Elving. Hey, guys. Kelsey. Good morning. We've heard so many powerful tributes from people throughout the country and the world. But But Louis is home state of Georgia. His presence and work had an especially profound. Meaning for his home state of Georgia for his district. Tell us a little bit more about his time there. You know, I am reminded of a couple of really, really standout moments of. I think one of the things that I think about a lot right now is the tribute that that they delivered for Johnny Isakson, who was a Republican senator. Of from Georgia, who retired last year, and in 2019 it was in November. So just just so a bit ago, Johnny Isakson was being was being honored and John Lewis Delivered this speech explaining how they could work together and and how there was an opportunity for anybody to find spaces where they agreed. And then, at the end of his speech, he walked across the Isaacson, who was in bad health and who had had trouble with his spine and said I will come to you brother and walked over and gave him a hug. That was really very much representative of the way. That John Lewis approached, you know, working on problems was what he wanted there to be bipartisanship. He wanted to be the person who came across, walked across and shake somebody's hand gave them a hug and said We can get something done here. He was also the kind of person who, whenever you saw him in the capital. There would be some person some tourist or a constituent who wanted to come and talk to him, and there was always had the time he had the time to tell his story had the time to talk to people about their story. He was extremely generous with his time and his constituents were known to come up to the capital and spent time directly with him. There was never a moment when it team like he was bigger than anybody else. Yeah, it's been Ah, so enriching and so fun over the last week to hear how so many people that I personally no have have met John Lewis, whether it's in Washington whether it's in Atlanta. New York Across the country. People have had a chance to meet him, but also have these intimate one on one conversations with him A CZ. We've learned he never turned anyone away. He was always willing to stop and have those conversations. One of the things that jumps out to me was a story about Congressman Lewis. When Hey, was in his district and he would spend a day doing a job in the district so even way back in the seventies, he would do things like drive a ups truck for a day to get a sense of what his constituents were up against. That is something that so many people feel is that he was of the people. Absolutely, and a lot of members of Congress that I speak to say they learned from that approach. They learned from John Lewis not just from the work that he did in civil rights, but the way he had a relationship with his constituents the way that he continued to speak about issues that meant something to him and then became active in them. I am reminded of the sit in on the House floor. On gun violence. He led House Democrats in a sit in and following. I believe the pulse shooting and they said that this was not a time when they could leave, and then he wanted to be the person who, you know who did the good trouble that he always talks about. He did not want to just be a person talking about it. He wanted to be a person involved in it. And you know so many members of Congress on Democrats and Republicans who felt inspired by that personal connection to his beliefs. The service eyes expected to begin shortly, and about 10 5 or 10 minutes. Ron, I'd love to go through with you what we can expect for today's service. But I want to talk first about Lewis's time as a civil rights activist, part of the movement back in the sixties. We expect to hear a lot about that today during the service, right? Yes, indeed, his life traced if you will, the trajectory of the African American experience over the last 70 80 years in American history. He was one of the group sometimes referred to as the Big Six, of course, beginning with Martin Luther King, whose name will be invoked. Many times today, but also Whitney Young of the National Urban League. Roy Wilkins of the CP. James Farmer of the Congress of regular Racial Equality and a Philip Randolph from the Pullman Porters Union. They were in many respects the Giants. Of the civil rights movement, as it took shape after World War two and rose in the fifties and sixties. Of course, John Lewis was there for most, all of it. He was part of the citizens at lunch counters in Nashville. He was one of the original 13 Freedom riders in 1961 integrating bus travel in the south. He was the youngest speaker on that day in 1963 when the march on Washington for jobs and justice featured Martin Luther King's I have a Dream speech. John Lewis spoke that day was the youngest speaker. He's the last person surviving from the speakers Dyas that day. And then, of course, the 1965 moment we have referenced Many times his beating on the Pettus Bridge. And, of course, his career in Congress, As Kelsey has described and then his links to the Black lives matter movement, which he paid tribute to In death as his cortege was coming to the capital earlier this week and paused on black lives matter Plaza in front of the White House to pay tribute to the movement and the people who are carrying forward his ideals today. Yes, And as we

Congressman Lewis Atlanta Congress Emma Hurt Martin Luther King Jr Washington Civil Rights Movement Debbie Elliot Ebeneezer Baptist Church Georgia Reporter Congressman Alabama Kelsey Snell John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtr W. A. B John Lewis
"dr king" Discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

The Sean Hannity Show

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"dr king" Discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

"Okay, but you know they've done these polls throughout the years. And what are we learned all the police terms of net confidence there plus sixty percent. The military plus sixty five percent, small business plus sixty You know then they go through different. You know the presidency Let's see that'd be plus six supreme, core plus seventeen. Banks plus ten. Oh, let's get all the way down to television news people. Oh minus thirty. Let's. GET DOWN TO. Congress minus forty. One net confidence. Confidence in the police, the military, but in not not so much in Congress or the mob in the media. Gee, I wonder. Why really hard to figure that one out, isn't it? Unbelievable. These very one hundred and fifty one days the now see by sense of urgency. What the Hell is at stake here because there's a lot at stake. By the way Attorney General Bar, He's defending the police officers, and you know disputed a question from the New York. Times asked whether or not America's law enforcement system was effectively racist, and he said as with all human institutions. There are some times bad apples will deal with that. He said, but these have very much the exception and not the rule. Being Leo Terell, agree with that. And he said the rule of law will prevail very clear on that, too, and the Attorney General says they have evidence of Antifa hijacking a lot of the protests around the country. We have James O'Keefe coming up with you. Know Witty. Hear what he has in round. Two is second installment of his investigative report because they infiltrated ANTIFA, so we'll get into that as well anyway. Eight hundred nine four one, Sean. If you want to be part of the program, they want it. Is You know it's going to be jobs or MOPS? Because I. Don't hear Joe Biden condemning what we're watching on TV every night. I. Don't hear him. Condemning governors mayors that can't get control..

Gee Leo Terell Congress Antifa Joe Biden James O'Keefe Attorney General Bar MOPS New York Attorney America Sean
"dr king" Discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

The Sean Hannity Show

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"dr king" Discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

"Stunned. I didn't expect it it is it is? It is like a cloud lifts? I had been saying that. Take all the hits. We expect the second quarter numbers you know, post, a shutdown was. Going to be really bad and by the way there's still going to be bad, but I'm thinking okay. We're not opening up fast enough, you know. We learned a Lotta lessons I've gone through all the lessons again and again and again and what we learn what we did right? Protect the elderly like they did and and Florida with the Santa's and Abbott and Texas. Texas and camp and Georgia. Okay, do pretty well and you. You protect the most vulnerable the opposite of what Cuomo did in new. York and Murphy did a New Jersey both in Pennsylvania. Whitmer admit you know shutdown whitmer in in Michigan by the way shout protesting just like Nancy Pelosi with no social distancing pretty amazing, considering all that they've been saying just recently. And I said all right, but if we can one of the things, one of my pet hopes projects. What I want more than anything is a sense of normalcy and I believe sports will do that for us. You know we've seen NASCAR now. They have their races now up and running UFC now they're moving. They're getting things up and running. I don't. Don't know what's going on with Major League Baseball and the players. Association, but you guys don't make a deal soon. It's not gonNA work out for any of you and just think back about the strike was in the ninety s The next year didn't work out well for Major. League Baseball People Go away. They get bored and they forget about you so. I get up and running and if I have to wear a mask to go to NBA game or an NFL game or an MLB game I'd be willing to wear temporarily you know hopefully this thing is all done. We'll find out a lot soon. one of the biggest indicators is going to be with all the people out on the streets marching and all these different cities. Are we going to see a spike in new corona virus cases? We'll know in a couple of weeks. I'm praying we. We don't have that spike. But as possible, so the numbers come out the US economy I did not expect this in May. I did not think this would happen this early now. I did believe that if we opened up the economy that that we could absolutely see a the the v-shape, at least the beginnings of it, a dramatic reversal, the economy, but there's the fundamentals before covert and corona virus of this economy were strong because this president. What did he do? He got rid of all the burdensome regulation. He cut taxes and brought manufacturing back now. We're going to bring back a lot more manufacturing. Those are the. The jobs that Barack and Joe said one never coming back, but for this strong showing in May. These these numbers shocked me and I don't often get shocked and because I didn't expect it this early now if it was the end of June or we got June's numbers in July and these were the numbers I'd say yeah, I would have expected that I think now. Even what's Today's date that the next week? Even New York is opening four phases whatever phase they're going to be in. This is great for everybody..

Whitmer Texas Major League Baseball Joe UFC US Cuomo NASCAR Nancy Pelosi New York Barack York New Jersey NBA Abbott president game Florida Murphy Pennsylvania
"dr king" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"dr king" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Leaders paid tribute to Dr king but one thing governor Baker said is getting some criticism Charlie Baker is apologizing for calling Congress woman I on a Presley speech a ramp the only thing I can add so that rant I okay the comment came after Presley spoke about in the quality and civil rights and was met with some groans from the audience and complaints on social media the Massachusetts Democratic Party tweeted the governor bakers use of the term was dismissive and offensive around fifteen hundred people attended the fiftieth annual MLK breakfast governor Baker went on to say this I say to people all the time that the greatest gift that it's come to my wife and to me as a result of this chance we've had to serve has been the opportunity we've had if only for a few moments at a time to walk in the shoes of so many different people across the Commonwealth whose life experiences have been different than ours starting at one this afternoon on Capitol Hill the Senate impeachment trial of president trump against proposed rules from Senate Republicans would not guarantee witness says Wurster police have now made an arrest in connection with an assault at a nursing home last week a lot of Williams is in custody accused of attacking staffers at the Christopher house nursing home before fleeing is a video of the whole salt Williams is facing charges including on armed robbery and assault and battery she's expected to be arraigned today in Central District Court after a months long investigation state police say they've arrested two people in north Attleboro for allegedly running a meth lab they found a one pot set up were methamphetamine was being cooked and completed methamphetamine product along with needles used to inject the drugs hi may Nickerson and Shannon daily were taken into custody and are facing drug charges acting police are investigating a series of four break ins at local businesses over the past few months chief Richard Burroughs says the first one happened in late August at a gas station on grape road most recent one occurred shortly before nine thirty Sunday night at a convenience store also on the same road police are asking anyone with information to contact detectives handling the investigation and police in Kensington New Hampshire say I may man killed a coyote with his bare hands yesterday after it attacked his kid earlier in the day a woman and one for dogs were bit by the coyote she was hospitalized for rabies shots and treatment in two hours later the coyote went after a father and son on a hiking trail in Exeter and the man reportedly suffocated the creature to death New Hampshire officials say the animal is being tested for rabies whether together the Subaru retailers of New England all wheel drive traffic on the three WBZ traffic time is three thirty three well Sir drive north of town in revere where route one north has been closed all night and remains close that golden circle for a tractor trailer rollover tractors deep Dodd traffic is detoured off at route sixty no word on how long that will be ninety three one twenty four ninety five are flowing freely downtown ninety three south double leveling closure chose you down just a bit Sullivan square over this a coming through the o'neill tunnel on the pike east and westbound we have two lanes taken in the potential tunnel both at the speed limit eastbound side it's a twenty two copies where is close follow the detour at twenty four a on the airport tunnels Callahan tunnels leveling closure from the exit through the airport terminal no delays Ted Williams he's has a right wing taken no delay there either Ted Williams west and some or are not a problem south of the city expressway north the left lane closure prior to the pike will slow you down just a bit ninety three south the rate to twenty four south is closed west of the city mass pike westbound a doubling closure before one twenty in Weston is not causing any issues route two and nine.

Dr king
"dr king" Discussed on I Want To Speak To The Principal

I Want To Speak To The Principal

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"dr king" Discussed on I Want To Speak To The Principal

"Oh <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> tweet tweet <Speech_Male> chat with us on twitter <Speech_Male> Bayshore <Speech_Male> to share the podcast <Speech_Male> on your <SpeakerChange> favorite <Speech_Male> social media channels <Speech_Male> WanNa see. 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"dr king" Discussed on I Want To Speak To The Principal

I Want To Speak To The Principal

09:23 min | 1 year ago

"dr king" Discussed on I Want To Speak To The Principal

"A A A little metaphor that Dr King gave in their to their success and what he said he say it and I and I I used to recite Disney in high school. He says if it falls your Latte to be a street sweep sweep sweep streets like Michelangelo painted. Peach pitchers sweep streets like Beethoven compose music. That was very powerful man. Can you imagine he would be in fourteen fifteen years about to tell you that a they let you know? Hey It don't matter it. Don't matter what you do just what would you do. Give it Showbiz and he and I think that he what he was saying. Is that the job title that you have don't define you ever. It is the work that you do that reveals. You'll care so you know it does ain't the title anytime we got full. Got All kinds of titled Man President Doing All type of things but but You know thing is is your character and you know if the work is honest upright and pleasing to God and give it to be a man so you know. I'm real big on the principal parts. The principal The nuggets inside of of what people say and how people do and that stree- sweeping right. If you're a street sweeper do it so much. So be the best. Re Sweep was so much that when you die somebody will say hey. They're right there. That was the street sweet. Go Yeah and that's key right there. When you do man give to and just like you say. Leave a legacy on that. So people see the stairs. Freedman's he said you know what you do a good job. Sweetness would you Michael Meal like a history sparkling and at the same thing holds in education for teaching administrators? Would ever. When you leave you will leave a legacy there you on TV. You all keys. Remember you a saw somewhere. The other day. They said a lot of times. Kids don't always remember their teacher but they remember the concept that the teacher taught me. So I'm I'm sorry. I say that backwards. It always remember the cut self that they remember the teacher because of what they did. And that's that's what is always badly just doing the best you can do regardless of what school you're at if you're at a poverty school Title One School of Fluent School. Whatever just give it all you got give it all you got so when Dr King gave speech in nineteen sixty seven To those young. Suzy was talking about What is your life blueprint and He's he gave three solid structure. Foundations The first one was deep belief indignity Worthiness and all your somebody Innis Roy And how do we as as educators get our students to buy into that principle to have a deep belief in dignity worth and the own? Somebody nece like to own your somebody like you are. Somebody had we cultivate than students will. Will you know? And that's that that that is a very difficult challenge. Antidote difficult charge in some cases particularly when kids aren't getting that reinforcement from home and we as teachers and administrators. All the only ones that don't mean however that we can't make a difference and when a kid gets to school letting them know. Hey you know Regardless of what your background is what your circumstances are and quality education can change their. And that's why it's so important that we build a relationship with kids as administrators and teachers and so they will trust that. What we're saying is something that we're saying that his sincere and something that we really mean Instead of just just talking words I know is coming up as a kid. I had teachers and I had administrators. Who did that You know and I was very lucky because I got a lot of positive reinforcement of from hall to about just who? I was what I can do. My grandfather always telling me you know regardless a who'll man is they all put their pants on the same way you put shows so you know you are just as smart as anybody else in your brain functions like everybody else in God built you just like built the next person so we get those type of reinforced from home. Our problem today is that we are challenged by a Lotta obstacles of via Social Media. through And this is a good thing in some cases and not a good thing saying entertainment and also the athletic field a lot of times. Kids think they're only worth is in being a great athlete are being I can rap really. I ain't got route. I ain't got to go to school. 'cause I'm the fans gown a block and you know the thing is that we just have to over the go com net by showing them that all those talents are good goddamn tells a goodwill but before you can do all that you'd need a quality education 'cause you need to be able to read that contract that she goes side make sure they'll be taken half or your twenty million dollars exactly exactly so also in his speech and we kind of foetal over that and what you were talking. It was the determination to achieve excellence. And I think also within our educational system. That's something that we don't get a chance to implore and to our students very often Just a push to be excellent at what you do. Although we give lead agree in as is is in some cases deterrment excellence way. So how do we encourage students to put forth excellence and what they do in those God given talents that they got right? Well you know there's a there's a word that I use a lab as call Grit and It seems that one of the things that we have to bill in our kids is staying sticking winning which is a part of Grit perseverance. Which is a part of Grit and Believing in yourself which is a part of Grit and so you know the thing is teaching a T. I think teaching Grit Just just and and and I don't know if you really teach that I think one of the things that you have to do with with students today is to be an example of that time. Faye and so and I think if you built that relationship with kids and you talk to them about the importance of being term sticking waiting and don't quit perseverance. You know Believing in yourself if they see you as someone who they trust and believe Ed continue to model that on a daily basis a believe that they will eventually come around and and do that themselves also S. I agree with you wholeheartedly The last point that he Say during his talk was A commitment to eternal beauty and love and Justice League Our students right now are in a culture of Being immersed into the Racial bias that he was like an undertone in America. Right speak own How we can get kids to love justice and love everybody in America? How do we incorporate that into our school system? Well I think we'll one the things that kids do what we have some very smart kids today. I just look at some of these kids. May I say man just head some of the intelligence keesing and one of the things that kids are very very perceptive about is that? They're not so they don't watch so much to they. Don't listen too much to what you say they kinda ridder's watch what you do so if you're saying that you know what? Hey this is. America got to has to be a place of justice. But they're not seeing just as going on in America. Say Hey man you just give lip service so again. It's practicing what what what you preach if you're saying that in the classroom. Hey I'm going to be fair to all kids in the class but they see that certain kids get different consequences and different type of Tong. Your language with them is different than it is with some while the kids then. They're going to question whether or not they're just as an equality in your classroom. You know if they see some kids dead or you know you're always calling on and another does not being called on in the same way and you get my point same way as an administrator you know with discipline they looking for that also is it is it. Is it fair and equitable? The discipline? That you that you administered They'll sit down to all sorts of different. Consequent Star quarterback get some different. Then then the then the Tuba player in the bay head if he fights you know in the class. Oh that's there so once again. It's it's the exact we we have to. We have to walk the talk and as a as a as educators. We can't say one.

America administrator Dr King Title One School of Fluent Sch Michelangelo principal Disney Innis Roy President Freedman Michael Meal Suzy Faye ridder Ed Justice League
"dr king" Discussed on I Want To Speak To The Principal

I Want To Speak To The Principal

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"dr king" Discussed on I Want To Speak To The Principal

"So what I did was Rural Book Together next at twenty. Eight team We had to Redo podcasts iniquity and a new role assistant prosecutor. You know appreciate you. Guide me every. Step it away At the community is real accepting. The administration is all accepting my personal here. Principal Scott Moody as Wonderful Man. I work with Other great administrators. The Superintendent has also real welcoming. The students alert students. I haven't been able to seventeen weeks what I love those kids and the teachers of every hour. I'M GONNA go spot America's spy and I appreciate you for helping me get there. Oh as no doubt man you know the thing is like I told you when you accepted that physicians that you they were not only were you lucky to get that job. But they were lucky. Very lucky to get you to Because you're a man of very high character and I know that you're going to bring a lot to that school and to the students and as we've talked about before I know that that administrative body has seen a lot of change for the positive. Since you been there just your presence and your commitment manage it uses out actually into the school so I'm sure I know that you have been a big impact positive impact on that particular Campbell. And that's that's just the beginning for you. We'll as I see it I mean you you. You go very far in the field of education and in podcasts broadcasting. When you're committed man you you like excuse dog on the Bra. You gotta go let go to. You're going to get that so I'm very proud of thank thank you documents. They appreciate accolades. And now we're GONNA MOVE INTO OUR NEXT SEGMENT..

prosecutor Scott Moody Superintendent Principal America Campbell
"dr king" Discussed on I Want To Speak To The Principal

I Want To Speak To The Principal

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"dr king" Discussed on I Want To Speak To The Principal

"ACT MEAL. Stay was happening. Oh none wheels yes. Good to be back here in the studio which you and recording our podcast. Yes Sir yes sir. Appreciate Iran applause want back. Yeah Man I'm so glad to be back in here. This is the kitchen up segment where we talk about what we're doing since. I last podcast. I'm GonNa let you go. I will appreciate it. Doesn't let you go first but but I will go I. It's it's been a very active Year I guess that we've been. I've been working hard providing students and parents With information on the import of attending school and graduating head op tuna. Reclaim over twenty students. There's some rolling back in high school and so far four of graduating so very proud of that. I've been placed to advisory boards when my community with a county district attorney and the other at the Dean with the Dean is college Education at Texas Southern University Been kind of work with my wife. Awesome community government funding Training programs with her. So that's that's been good happy. Happy Life after life was presented Last last winter with the excellence in education award not issue and as a result was inducted into the Kaiser Hall of fame. It takes a slow but most importantly will. I'm just excited about Over the past six months I had three of my men. Teas that are now Secondary school administrators. And I know I I'M NOT GONNA kill it. I'm not going impede on which you're about to say but You're one over and so I'm very very proud. Promotion tennis assistant predisposition..

Dean Kaiser Hall of fame Iran Texas Southern University
"dr king" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"dr king" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"We begin our show to saving a day set aside to honor. Dr Martin Luther King junior set in motion by President Reagan. Furthermore, set in motion years before by the civil rights movement in the civil rights marches that Dr king embodied that he led and a great sea change in American history in the mid nineteen sixties. That some people think we haven't really gotten that far away from fifty years, plus, hence, I would suggest that we've come a long way baby. And there's always more ways to come. But I was struck today by listening to Jesse Jackson speak on the advent of Martin Luther King day. Jesse Jackson, obviously, a part of that early. Civil rights movement. Was a close or at least close enough. Confidante of Dr king. And watching him speak. About the missions. And the goals and the hopes of the civil rights movement. The Dr king spearheaded in the early and mid nineteen sixties listening to Jesse Jackson and seeing his body of work ever since I've felt more than just a tinge of hypocrisy. He was talking about the hope that the civil rights movement. And Dr king started. What he left out for himself? Personally was the chance to extort money out of people in corporations in the name of social Justice for his own gain. Like, many many great messages. They're always eventually perverted by human beings who follow in the footsteps of the greats. The Reverend Jackson one of them the same thing as the. You know, the greasy used car salesman. Like televangelist preacher, not all of them are this way. But the ones who pervert, the the message of God and of the bible for their own personal gain to be baptised could be Catholic could be any denomination. And we've seen it over and over and over again. So in this Dr king day in two thousand nineteen while we obviously honor the man, and what he began in one he helped change in this country. Many times in my mind. The only reason we've got a long ways to go or some of the people who have followed him and not been true to the spirit or the letter of what he was teaching and what he was striving for. Not only for himself, but and not only for black people. But for an entire nation who in our declaration of independence states. We hold. These these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal. We have Dr Liu join us here in a little while the hall of Famer Marty Brennaman will be joining us on the phone in just a few moments. I I wanted to address something Jeff and sue Mensur my neighbors in Southgate Kentucky been my neighbors for five years. Although it seems like I've known them all my life and a couple of months back. Jeff, son. Brandon Mench diagnosed with a very aggressive. Form of multiple sclerosis debilitating form an MS multiple sclerosis, many people live with it chronically for years, some of its relapsing some of it in the case of Brandon are very aggressive and untreatable or uncurable to this point. Brandon is seeking the only treatment option that might help because there were chemicals in his brain. And our brains are all different chemicals in his brain that do not allow him to take the most trusted and the most effective forms of medication for MS. So he's tricking trading seeking treatment that he can only get out of the country. It's very expensive are holding a benefit for Brandon. Coming up on this coming Saturday night at.

Dr king Jesse Jackson Brandon Mench Dr Liu President Reagan Marty Brennaman Jeff salesman tricking Southgate Kentucky sue Mensur fifty years five years
"dr king" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"dr king" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"I mean, I think the first thing is the movements. King is a part of right are deeply disruptive. I think we somehow look back and have made it seem like all good people thought what Dr king was doing was right at the time. That's just not true. The majority of people at the time did not approve of the civil rights movement while it was happening. They did not approve of Dr king's. If we look at the FBI attention to Dr king their surveillance of Dr king their harassment of Dr king only escalates after the March in Washington speech. So if we think of that March in Washington speech is king the way it's presented now to school children. This is the most American thing that ever happened. And then we look at actually how treated at the time. Most Americans did not agree with it. It was heavily police. East and heavily surveilled by the FBI ended in his in the week of the March on Washington that the FBI increases its Valence Dr king with the Kennedys agreements. If you look at the documents signing off on the kind of bugging king POWs in office and stuff, it's time like the robber Kennedy. So I think sometimes we talk about king and say, okay, in the last year or two, he became unacceptable. In the last year two, he angered the powers that be know the powers that be were terrified of Dr king and sixty three. I mean they are terrified of him and sixty seven, but they are already care fide in sixty three. Then I think we have to remember that because I think sometimes the way we remember Dr king kind of excuses are in inaction in the present, right? So it somehow we would be with somebody like Dr king today with these new movements. There just disruptive to reckless there to all over the place. When many of these same criticisms are used against the civil rights movement. In fact, a fundamental misunderstanding among a lot of black folks as well about the actual nature of direct action which wasn't designed to bring the crisis that the oppressed were experiencing to the larger society to create a crisis for those who had privilege. Absolutely right. That part of the essence of civil disobedience. The essence of when we think about whether it's the citizens and nineteen sixty or the Selma Montgomery, these are meant to expose the system of segregation and oppression and part of how that system maintains itself used by the normalizing of it. And so what activists figured at the time rightly so is that you had to create a situation where you bring that tension again, I'm paraphrasing Dr. King to the surface, the ten. Is there. He is saying we are not causing tension. We are merely bringing it to the surface because it is there in these practices, right? Whether it's school segregation, whether it's public segregation, whether it's the denial voting rights, whether it's the denial of jobs, whether it's policing, right, all of these things, they're saying, we have to bring that tension to the surface. We need to expose what these systems are, but that was profoundly disruptive and people were uncomfortable deeply uncomfortable. And as you're saying, this included kind of differences in the African American community about the disruptive nece. And if we look at how how snick history, the student on violent coordinating committee is treated how young people are treated during the nineteen fifties and sixties right of going too fast of going too far. And yet we see over and over young people being in the vanguard there. And also today. Yes. When I see people who are of a certain age and should know better today who claim that they are carrying on Dr king's die, wrecked action kind of strategy simply by marching with placards, but creating the crisis for the rulers whatsoever. I think again, remembering that part of the work rights movement as right is less to create this comfort. I to hold a mirror up. It was not merely if you think about the March, we think about what's happening in Birmingham in nineteen sixty three. It's over and over and over people are getting arrested over and over and over. It's not a one day much right. It's an over and over and over to make it kind of business as usual sort of untenable. Similarly, in Montgomery, right, if we think about the Montgomery bus like that is it is it's a disruptive consumer boycott..

Dr. King FBI Washington Montgomery Selma Montgomery Birmingham harassment Kennedys one day
"dr king" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

10:55 min | 3 years ago

"dr king" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"We have to listen, and I think that's what I what I hope this memory of this event sparked in the church like you do. I also want to bring this up to that. I just want to quote Chuck Colson here. Chuck wholesome would often say that Dr. king. Letter from Birmingham, jail was one of the finest pieces of Christian legal theory written in the twentieth century, and it was written there on scraps of paper as he was arrested for his for his work in the civil rights movement. Basically, it's a wonderful example of what we call natural law, that there are actually laws that are higher than what government provides moral laws higher than civil law and the jester unjustness of a civil law depends on how it aligns with the moral law and it's just a brilliant statement. And one of the things that's most brain about it is that only that so well articulated, but it it, it's applied to a specific issue in a specific context. So you can see this legal theory being applied even in the way that he led the movement and the way that he saw the movement should go forward and disagreement with many other civil rights activists for the record and so on. In fact, if you missed that, we re ran this week on break point. A commentary from Chuck Colson. Chuck was such a huge. Fan Dr. king as well as specifically a letter from Birmingham jail, and we reared that if you come to breakpoint dot ORG, click on the link on the homepage is as resources mentioned on the radio and podcast will link you to these various resources on Dr. king that we've mentioned. You're listening to breakpoint this week with that stetzer and Johnstone street will be right back. We invite you to visit breakpoint dot org. While you're at our website, be sure to browse browser online Colson center store of great books and other resources, and you can link up to our social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. Breakpoint this week. I'm John Stonestreet along with Ed stetzer Ed. We spent last week's program talking about holy week talking about Easter, but say what the media and I know you hate that phrase the media, but the eighty. But anyway, it's not an thing. Okay. But there has been a remarkable run over the last several easter's weeks, Christmas holidays, everywhere media, you know. You know. Week for the media. Well, so my favorite of all time is still win. I think it was a New York Times, talked about the Crozier spelling it like the crow, the animal in the ear, the Crozier. Now a lot of even may not know what a Crozier is, but it's the cross that's carried down in the middle of a liturgical service, but calling it a Crozier. That was pretty funny, but there was another one, but here's what's interesting. This will hasn't kind of liked the typical. You know CNN NPR although we, we actually do have some bad behavior from them that's worth reporting from this week, but the Wall Street Journal. So these Rayleigh Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu talking about a water generation project in Israel made the statement that the technology that's part of this project quote improves on Moses. He brought water from a rock. They bring water from thin air the Wall Street Journal completely missed the allusion there to the biblical tax and had to issue a retraction ever. It was the because they said that what Netanyahu said was that Moses brought water from Iraq the country. That was our a Q, right? Exactly. So, of course, the the, the, the tweet, Moses, actually, this is where we got the phrase, tap water, Moses tapped Iraq and water flowed from the rock. And that's a little joke there for a little little Sunday school joke. And so the Wall Street Journal actually heard Iraq the country. And I think the reality is we see these kinds of things far too often and embarrassingly. So there's actually a blog dedicated to this mutual frontier, Mattingly and some others sort of lead out on this blog. I actually talk about how the press just doesn't get religion, and it's true. And of course others include the the the most recent and spectacular Chuck Todd's reference. And so where he actually talked about Good Friday, the exact quote. So what exactly does the exact quote for that? Oh, yeah. This was a doozy Chuck. Todd said in this was by the way. A Good Friday tweet. I'm a bit hokey. He writes when it comes to Good Friday, I don't mean disrespect to the religious aspect of the day, but I'd love the idea of reminding folks at any day can become good all it takes a little selflessness on our part works every time somehow shut visit. Realize that the point of Good Friday is that little selflessness on our part hardly ever works and that we need rescue from God. Yeah, but it was just tone deaf. I mean on Good Friday is that I mean, obviously he missed the meaning of the holiday. He missed the meaning of the remembrance. He missed the meaning of the cross, didn't even seem to connect across with Good Friday and somehow that good kind of meant like a kind of a Good Friday, like having a happy day. Good yet a good meal. You had some friends over and that's kind of Good Friday, good Fridays, good. Because Jesus died on the cross for our sin and in our place. But the the stories don't end there NPR which actually has done some. Decent religion reporting. And actually several these places have. I mean, some of these folks have good religion reporters, it's when the maybe the people are unaware and the lack of awareness of religion could be stunning. It sometimes for example, the NPR blog described Easter this way and I'll quote Easter the day, celebrating the idea that Jesus did not die and go to hell or Pretoria anywhere at all, but rather a rose into heaven is on Sunday. Now, I don't know the, they actually corrected the peace to eventually describe Easter as the day. Christians celebrate Jesus resurrection, but let's not miss the. I don't even know the working the day, celebrating the idea that Jesus did not die. Well, first he did die. I go to hell or purgatory or anywhere at all. Of course, then people talk about he descended debtors into hell in the creeds, but rather a rose into heaven which is by the way called the ascension, the resurrection is on Sunday. It is. But so so again, it's it's easy for us to. I see these things and roll our eyes, but really some basic literacy of religion should be if you're if you're going to write on it. I mean, if you're writing on sports, I don't know anything about sports. So I don't know if you know the Super Bowl that had the people get to that and how you win and football, and how many downs you getting the Super Bowl. I don't know any of that, but I don't write on the subject so and there's reason. So I think for people to write about Easter or Chuck Todd to comment on Good Friday or or the Washington Post. One of the reasons I think that many Americans get frustrated with the media to us attorney like the user of the mainstream media is that they're often so out of touch on religious issues. And but for many Americans, middle America and beyond religious deeply important issue in their lives. I mean, so we actually have probably based on one kind of analysis I did about twenty five percent of Americans kind of order their lives around. They call themselves Christians according to order their lives around it. And to have twenty five hundred people who this is a really focal priority in their lives and yet to have a lack of basic religion knowledge. I mean, when you have to launch a blog as as Mattingly and peers have done to basically point out bad religion coverage, that's pretty bad. And I think you've got a long way to go. I'm thankful. Let me again be clear. You always yell at me for this, but I am thankful for good religion reporters at some of these places. I mean, even these outlets that might be called mainstream media, there are good religion reporters there. These were not among them. Well, it would be a whole lot less irritating if the same media outlets didn't always try to tell us. In fact, there have been so many articles written over the last six months or even longer. Since really Donald Trump became elected telling us what even Jellicoe should believe or giving us kind of like these, here's what Christianity is about. So before we get off the bad behavior, this wasn't a kind of an embarrassing mistake, but it's one of those things that makes those embarrassing mistakes, so much more irritating when. CNN runs an article on Easter titled and I quote how Easter became a hashtag metoo moment. It's all about how you know the, the men pressed the women and all of this sort of stuff. And it's like, what? Here's what really happened on Easter. We talked about the belief series that CNN ran back. What about a year ago with, you know, the cannibal Hindu and all that stuff that was going on and just kind of the claiming of the, here's what religion really is. And and you know, the terrific journalist pieces that happen every Christmas and Easter suggesting that Jesus probably didn't exist, which is just an idea that is fringe on every level of scholarship Christian liberal and everything else. And then of course, you know, this has been the main topic and I think avenue delicacies have some real things to answer to in some of the things that they've said in their support of President Trump. I don't think we're going to get a mulligan as one leader suggested or anything like that. But at the same time, it's so irritating that a media that is so religiously illiterate is often. So quick to lecture us on what Christianity and Christian life really is all about. That's why. Percent agree on everything you have just said. And I think the media's lack of knowledge on religion and lecturing of people have faith, do not go well together. So I think we're gonna firm that there's some good religion reporters out there big. We also affirm that in general, I find most religion coverage is poorly done. It tends to be critical of people have devout sincere Evangelos or other believe for that matter and ultimately doesn't really get again back to that thing doesn't really get religion. And I think ultimately, that's a reality and I think this is part of the whole, you know, I think for a lot of people, I mean, even like the New York Times after president trumps election, just realized they didn't get a whole lot of America. So they're, for example, they hired a some new new people who were specifically to understand middle America better. And I, I get that, you know cost the sound. So I, you know, so much like I'm a New Yorker. I grew up in New York, but you know, it's New York and DC or. Are not all of America. And I think ultimately that religion is one of those ways that there's a huge difference between middle America and perhaps perhaps the some of the east coast and the west coast as well. And I think officially Ed, we should write it down because this was a day that we almost fully agreed on the whole topic. You're listening to breakpoint this week with at stetzer and Johnston street will be right back.

Chuck Todd Chuck Colson Wall Street Journal America Dr. king Moses Ed stetzer Ed Chuck New York Times Birmingham Crozier Iraq President Trump Mattingly Jesus CNN
"dr king" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"dr king" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"In the streets at the hands of not only each other but law enforcement and they're always under suspicious circumstances and there never seems to be adjudication or justice for those who are unarmed and are victims of this and i think if dr king rid here were here he'd be on the front lines with black lives matters and other organizations and he'd be challenging this government and this nation to honor the civil rights that he fought for in his generation died for literally so where could we go as far as politically in fulfilling that we're in a difficult place right now politically we're very divided i think we're as divided now as we've ever been maybe more so in some ways because at least in the time of dr king there was a consciousness that there was right and wrong that this could not stand you know you think of the famous jfk speech in nineteen sixty three where he talks about you know the founding principles of this nation in that you can't have half the population living one way and the other the rest but i think now we think we're beyond that i think because we've had a black president we think we're over racism it doesn't exist anymore so i think it's harder in many ways to get through because for many white americans in particular the roseanne america that everybody's talking about those folks say wait i'm disenfranchised i'm out of work i'm struggling why am i worried about the rights of immigrants or women or minorities not that those things don't matter but i'm struggling as a white american so there's this great divide now we're not talking to each other we're talking at each other and that's a problem how much is that fostered by the current administration greatly also well just go to twitter you know the president of the united states is in office that sacred it's a sacred trust between the presidency and the people and it has a decorum it has a standard of conduct that no president has violated save richard nixon and what he did and he had to resign a result but we've had two presidents impeach johnson and clinton and.

dr king president united states richard nixon johnson jfk twitter clinton
"dr king" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"dr king" Discussed on 1A

"Get ahead never get by never keep all the bills paid in the and no matter how hard we tried and and mom always told me you know work hard be a great citizen and everything will be all right you know that those are the key ingredients to having a good life and despite me doing everything right still couldn't get bus still couldn't pay bills keep food on the table and i realize no matter how much individual effort i put in in me and my fiancee we just weren't going to get get ahead alone and that's when i came to be a part of the movement to win a union and win a living wage here in kansas terrence since today is about the legacy of dr king i wonder how much you thought or had a sense that things should have been better by this point do you feel i wonder from where you sit or did you feel maybe as you are beginning to get an activism that economic justice should have been further along by now maybe partly because of the work that dr king did well if you look back in the history of this country of america many things that have been one in this country and changes that have been made have been through movement and i've come to learn that through the fight for fifteen that if we're going to win a living wage just like women won the right to vote just like in the civil rights movement victories that were gained these were not individual victories done for by one person even though dr king led the civil rights movement it had many different movement moving parts in many different individuals participating and the for for me to know that that this movement the fight for fifteen is the way that we're going to get economic and racial equality in this country is is why say in the beginning that i'm hopeful today i know that we're not quite there or where we should be but we've got a path and we can we can win american america has showed us that way in the past and i know that we will win economic.

dr king america kansas
"dr king" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"dr king" Discussed on AM Joy

"We think about two people two men who will amaze people with their preaching before the age of sixteen to men who fought for on behalf of oppress people two men who spoke against wars and rumors of wars two men who were pursued persecuted by the authorities to men who predicted they own deaths in two men who were executed before the age of forty jesus christ himself and dr king and it's important that we realize that while we celebrate the life of jesus and his resurrection the tomb being empty we've got a declared dr king's to minty to his resurrection as spirit in what we do is is organizers and activists and journalists even and continue to fight the fight that he started yeah i mean ironically there was a death of a teenager that occurred in the the march before dr king came back to memphis when those sanitation workers were striking again guy named larry pain kind of lost a history but a teenager killed ostensibly by police allegedly while they were looking at people breaking windows during during that marsh a lot of ironies here i wanna play a little bit of dr king's only grandchild alonzo king nine years old and this was yolanda little yolanda speaking at the march for our lives rally last weekend he martin.

dr king memphis larry pain alonzo king yolanda nine years
"dr king" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"dr king" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Dr king was doing something where if you hit someone look i understand the are if you want to talk about malcolm x and like if someone put their hand anew brother you make sure they don't do that again like i get that we need both of these ideas these energies as i understand both sides but i think with dr king was going for i'd like to your evening is if someone hits you right and you hit them back your agreeing to the narrative of awesome them there's you and the and there's me you hit me i'm your enemy i hit you back but if you don't do anything you're just like you're trying to show through your passivity you're just hitting yourself why hangers why does that make sense yes the myth of redemptive violence is that a corresponding act of violence will make it better right eubam us we bomb you that will make it better rate at which point we have agreed to your rules that's right you get an injustice to us and so then we can really guided someone goes should we bombed the maccanico i think that's the wrong question and the and the the the the dalai lama talks about like we need to learn to sit in grief and listen to each other without an agenda that's what we're talking about that spacious hey what they like to be palestine skulasen have we we have we done third way before i dunno punching if someone strikes you know down this no are you gonna poetry i can't believe haven't talked about this before okay tornado cheek yes jesus as tornado jake right where does that come from first century jewish rabbi says.

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