28 Burst results for "Dr Ken"

"dr ken" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

05:26 min | Last month

"dr ken" Discussed on Defocus Media

"Wasn't really impacted by, let's say, optometrist, I set up this web page more as an information piece and I started to gather more and more followers from that people seeing what I was posting. And most of the posts had to do whether it be regulatory affairs, regulatory information. What's happening in the states? Where the government, for example, is going with regards to healthcare. Where are the professions going with healthcare? Where is pharmacology going? So I try to be able to piece together in a very, very concise way on a daily basis, information from a variety of sources, whether it be a way focus, whether it be Google news articles, for example, whether it be vision Monday, for example, being able to take pieces there, where I find that there are articles that are very, very important. There are a lot of technology companies that are out there. What's happening and you'll see a lot of telehealth articles, one of the things that really interested me this past summer is that I was involved in the state of Vermont, where they had an interstate telehealth working group. Because what's happening with again, going back to the area of telehealth. What would be happening post COVID? What's happening to the states and say in the New England states where you have states like Vermont Maine, Massachusetts and all the surrounding areas New York, New Jersey, where sometimes you may have students going to one school, one state, then they're about maybe ten miles before they hit the border, but they can't take care of people. So being able to pass on that information and I think it became word of mouth and I have found that it's just grown and grown and grown. And I guess to that matter, I think that there was a need for that..

Vermont Google New England Maine Massachusetts New Jersey New York
"dr ken" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

05:33 min | Last month

"dr ken" Discussed on Defocus Media

"But the way that we hit this inflection point, I remember reading an article actually a book by Andy grove from Intel. And Andy grove came out with a thing where we hit an inflection point in progress. When you either go in one direction or you go the other direction, what is very chancy, the other is kind of like that status quo. But if you push the envelope a little bit, the computer chips, at least as he was concerned, can be smaller and smaller and smaller with more and more information. So I think we actually hit a positive inflection point where the technology now is improving. I do see, and I proceed to the future that where we're looking at whether it be artificial intelligence. And there are systems out there now that are, let's say, reading retinal photos that can be able to maybe help with the doctor, for example, in looking at a photo and saying, well, there's a chance that that diabetic retinopathy may be increasing. It may be something that may be a problem that will monitor later on. You also have areas where you may look at patients being able to be monitored for visual fields. You can do those things and iPads right now. Home monitoring, for example. But where I really foresee changes that are going to occur and it hasn't occurred as rapidly as an electronic medical records. And interoperability of these systems where it's not just going to be in small little units. Right. You're going to be able to have information shared. And I do foresee that those changes are going to probably occur over a period of time. It's not going to be overnight, but you can look at industry, for example. You can look at the combinations like with CVS, a lot of these drugstore big conglomerates getting involved and collaborating and joining forces with insurance companies. So that's going to be an area driving more to let's say areas where healthcare will be provided..

Andy grove Intel diabetic retinopathy CVS
"dr ken" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

04:29 min | Last month

"dr ken" Discussed on Defocus Media

"And we looked at telehealth and kind of maybe a skewed way because there may have been entities that were out there that were more, let's say, commercially minded with regards to doing, let's say, auto refractions and things along that type of line. Sure. But what was important for me is that if you look at technology in completely a very, very open manner and look at it and I say that, I mean, you have to look at technology as an adjunct. Technology is going to be increasing. I mean, yes, we can look at the phones. We can look at what's happened. Post COVID with all the technology that has rapidly increased, whether it be zoom, different types of like we're talking right now, for example, in this type of a forum, which we probably didn't have prior if we did, it was a very, very small area that we would have been involved with. But what was most important is how do you incorporate that into practice? How do you look at technology, not as replacing the doctors judgment? You have to look at it as a tool. In other words, it's another tool in the toolbox for optometrist. And whether you're in private practice, whether in hospital based practice, we can see all the new equipment that we're getting and how these things kind of work together. So if you can look at this as an adjunct that's an additional method and how do we do that and what was most important in what has always been most important is that the list of course is my personal opinion, but of course it goes with the AOA's point of view is that the standard of care has got to always be maintained. And at the present time, the standard of care for the gold standard, whether it be in person examinations, whether it be development of technology that's going to affect and keep people at distance, how are we going to incorporate that and one comment that I had is that if you use technology wise, it's good. But if you don't use it as wise, it can be not necessarily for the best for the patient..

AOA
"dr ken" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

05:11 min | Last month

"dr ken" Discussed on Defocus Media

"Association membership itself is very, very similar to that. And it provides a resources for the state as well as a national association to do the things that they do. Without it, you know, there's really no way for them to be able to provide the services, whether it be in communication, the staffing of the offices, and all of that. So there's a lot of value to being a member. And yes, people can say, well, I don't have to be a member, but I can take advantage of somebody else paying all of that. Well, that's really not the way you have to look at it. And if you've been paying dues member for all the years, there's a value in that. I think that you're paying ahead. It's almost like you're doing what is necessary. You're providing the resources for the association. So that basis, I think, to answer your question, they're dependent upon the help. Gotcha. And I think it's key. I mean, you have to pay them. I've been blessed. I should say, I probably should, you know, take a step back, being with my eye doctor, they pay for all of our AOA fees, you know, all those society fees and they've done that from day one. And even when I was with eye care associates before we partnered with my eye doctor, they were doing the same. So since I've been out of school, I've always had the membership fee pay because they want to continue to push the profession for it. Over the last three years, I've actually switched to donating more money simply because I want to be able to have that insurance like you stated. And I think that makes a big difference. I want to be able to sleep well at night to know that what I practice is going to be there tomorrow and then we're going to expand that scope..

national association
"dr ken" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

05:08 min | Last month

"dr ken" Discussed on Defocus Media

"See an eye doctor. In addition to being able to staff at cedars Sinai, we had 20 doctors on staff there, who also volunteered their time and efforts to see patients also, they needed to have care and weren't able to get into seeing doctors. So being in LA and getting involved, they felt was extremely, extremely important for me. And it goes back many, many years. Talk about family. I have two kids, two children. My son, Brian, and my daughter, Karen. And my son lives up in Washington state. He's a radiation oncologist. And my mother is in basically Internet real estate technology software in Los Angeles. And of course, with COVID, it's been a real trial and tribulation to be able to finally get over and get to see them all, but we've been able to accomplish that. Yeah. Going on further, a little bit more background. And we can talk a little bit more about what I did after serving with the state of California in 2007. I was appointed by governor Schwarzenegger to the California state board of optometry. For two terms from 2007 to 2015, and then after completing my time there, I was approached by the college board in British Columbia in Canada. Okay. On their board. And so I was on their board for a couple of years. And then when I moved back to the east coast to be with my wife, myrna, because I don't speak French, which of course you have to speak French in Quebec. If you want to be practicing, I'm only an hour from the border and decided to practice in Vermont. And when I did that, that was probably also got to be appointed by the governor of Vermont to the promote state board of optometry where I still serve..

cedars Sinai governor Schwarzenegger California state board of opto Karen LA Brian Washington Los Angeles college board California British Columbia myrna east coast Canada Quebec Vermont
"dr ken" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

The Stem Cell Podcast

05:42 min | 10 months ago

"dr ken" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

"Why don't you tell us why do is a tremendous place for stem cell biology and regenerative in general medicine. And what you're actually hoping to accomplish as the new head of the duke regeneration center. Yeah well it is a place in. Durham is A really great place to live with a booming technology sector in the aloke low cost of living compared to other places. So i've been eighteen. years is really impressive. See what's going on. With with durham and You know the folks coming here just to live here and and to work at great places like like duke like even see chapel hill but that the parts of i always been At duke The faculty here and the students here Yeah they're impressive It's been it's been my privilege to to work here I i would say that May maybe ten years ago We were We we we have A great set of traditional departments biochemistry cell biology pharmacology and cancer biology. But we've we've. We've never had some formal entity that could acknowledge formerly again the the importance of stem cell and regenerative biology. I think We had The people here and developmental biologist People using worms flies and my sincere chickens and fish and mice so Understand petitioned form and how embryos are padding but then we have a great by medical engineering department in school of engineering. Gets on one nice campus and then you mentioned that the the clinical engine but So the goal of regeneration next was just to get get these people together and talking more about the science and Initially science now what what. What are the questions in in regeneration that we should be thinking about. And we framed it as tissue regeneration and not so much stem cells. Though we all up stem cells recognize their their place but we also see regeneration as kind of the ultimate goal and And where we could have a particular angle. Because again i think because the base of a developmental biologist there interested in understanding how tissue forums whether whether or or or not saying the case of regeneration it would involve stem cells or or some.

duke regeneration center Durham chapel hill durham cancer
"dr ken" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

The Stem Cell Podcast

05:10 min | 10 months ago

"dr ken" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

"Jeff is so critical it's cancer angiogenesis and this is in fact what. I studied as an undergrad duke. While studying angiogenesis in in the context of endothelial cells and importance of of signaling egypt. Signalling to to regulate all that. If you're taking these pills and you already have. Some propensity developed cancer or some very early stage cancer. My fear is that the blood vessels and the angiogenesis in that. Tumor is gonna skyrocket right. Isn't that the fear. It's it's straightforward. Think not for you partner. Your vessels are fine. You got your clean brother and you. You're young like a cherub. I don't know what you're talking about this past year. But i'm looking you in the in the screen here and you're looking fine my friend. Don't take the veg f. You don't need it but You know some of you out. There may need something else. Some other side kinds. And i've got a message for you from stem cell technologies. That might be able to help you with that. Activate expand and differentiate yourselves with cited kind chemokines and growth factors from stem cell technologies. These reagents are validated to ensure reproducibility across a variety of applications for immunology stem cell research explore more at www dot stem cell dot com slash site. A kind spoiler alert. You're not gonna find any bej pails there so don't bother looking now. Let's get to this interview with our fellow. Dookie dr ken poss- or at everybody. We are here with dr. ken pause. Who is professor of cell biology and head of the duke regeneration center also president of the newly founded international society for generative biology. Dr pastas lab studies the regeneration of tissues like heart appendages and spinal cord and zebra fish model system. Has i have is established. Many new concepts and mechanisms of tissue regeneration including the discovery of zebra fish heart regeneration and tissue regeneration enhanced. Her elements can thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you for having made great great to be here. Check two guys yet. It's a pleasure to have you join us on the show. Dr poss and i've been a fan of your work. Ever since my days. Undergrad duke and in reality..

cancer Dookie dr ken poss Jeff egypt ken pause duke regeneration center newly founded international so Dr pastas spinal cord Dr poss Undergrad duke
"dr ken" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"dr ken" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Now. <Speech_Male> <Silence> <hes> Press <Speech_Male> dot com <Speech_Male> promo code. <Speech_Male> Ken <Silence> and <Speech_Male> You know ken. <Speech_Male> Thanks a lot for being <Speech_Male> here today. <Speech_Male> <hes> hopefully <Speech_Male> we get to talk <Speech_Male> more. Let me just say <Speech_Male> this before. We close <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> years ago. <Speech_Male> I went to my <Speech_Male> mentor. Rc <Speech_Male> scroll <Speech_Male> specifically <Speech_Male> asking for counseling <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and our c. was <Speech_Male> primarily a writer <Speech_Male> and an academic <Speech_Male> not one given <Speech_Male> easily to requests <Speech_Male> of for <Speech_Male> personal counseling <Speech_Male> time. But <Speech_Male> he reluctantly <Speech_Male> gave in <Speech_Male> as we sat <Speech_Male> in his living room outside <Speech_Male> of ligonier pennsylvania <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> colonial <Speech_Male> blue wing chairs <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> the buds of <Speech_Male> spring green <Speech_Male> dominating. The trees <Speech_Male> outside the window. <Speech_Male> <Silence> i <Speech_Male> Trying to get <Speech_Male> up the nerve to ask <Speech_Male> him why. I had wanted <Speech_Male> to meet <Speech_Male> my teenage <Speech_Male> years. Were coming to a close. <Speech_Male> And i was very <Speech_Male> serious about my <Speech_Male> christian faith. <Speech_Male> My studies <Speech_Male> despite this <Speech_Male> fact <Speech_Male> Every unguarded <Speech_Male> moment of <Speech_Male> my mind was <Speech_Male> filled with girls <Speech_Male> and my urged <Speech_Male> emerge was <Speech_Male> off the charts. <Speech_Male> Now <Speech_Male> i'm not sure <Speech_Male> how. I specifically <Speech_Male> worded <Speech_Male> my question <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> i know <Speech_Male> that the sex charged <Speech_Male> underpinnings <Speech_Male> didn't do <Speech_Male> this perspicacious <Speech_Male> man <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> who <Speech_Male> Who saw almost <Silence> everything. <Speech_Male> What do you <Speech_Male> do when your mind <Speech_Male> tells you that one <Speech_Male> thing is right <Speech_Male> and your feelings. <Speech_Male> Tell you <Speech_Male> the opposite. <Speech_Male> There's so <Speech_Male> many ways to put <Speech_Male> that but <Speech_Male> perhaps the song <Speech_Male> comes to mind. <Speech_Male> How can <Speech_Male> it be wrong <Speech_Male> when <Speech_Male> it feels so <Silence> right. <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> run to meet me. <Speech_Male> And i reach out. <Speech_Male> I reach <Speech_Male> out my arms <Speech_Male> when i hold you close. <Speech_Male> It makes me feel <Speech_Male> so warm <Speech_Male> and will slip away <Speech_Male> and beat together tonight. <Speech_Male> How <Speech_Male> can this be wrong <Speech_Male> when it <Speech_Male> feels so <Silence> right. <Speech_Male> You listen to <Speech_Male> the rest of the words of that <Speech_Male> song they talk about <Speech_Male> how then they go home <Speech_Male> and put that aside <Speech_Male> in. Hold another close. <Speech_Male> How can that <Speech_Male> be wrong <Speech_Male> when it feels <Speech_Male> so right if feel <Speech_Male> the emotion <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> as you listen <Speech_Male> to it so <Speech_Male> our c. Sat back <Speech_Male> and simply <Speech_Male> said. <Speech_Male> Let me ask you a question. <Speech_Male> How many <Speech_Male> times have you gotten <Speech_Male> in trouble for doing <Speech_Male> what you knew was <Silence> right. <Speech_Male> And how many <Speech_Male> times did you get in trouble <Speech_Male> for. Doing what <Speech_Male> you felt was right <Speech_Male> at the moment. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It wasn't <Speech_Male> enough <Speech_Male> but

"dr ken" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"dr ken" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"I'll i'll give you my sermon outline some time. But it had it had a bucket and it was seven things in that bucket and ask for forgiveness. Ravenous seven point sermon. But i did in the l. association wives were like sunday school. So at your head is your feet. Yeah it's a good stuff. It's about the everything and we have to deal with it and we need help. And that's why it's going to serve as well go out and and get your book and tell me a story of somebody who applied this stuff and you saw the change in their life won't you. Oh gosh i remember. I was one of the things that i do is i. I'm part of a teaching team at our ranch in southern montana. And we do these five day intensive discipleship cohorts with groups of fifteen to twenty guys. And there's a there's cohorts for women. But i don't lead those. There's other folks that do that. We have guys that. Come from all over the world. So we have military First responders police fire fighters. We have teachers. We have executives pastors missionaries. I mean it is a representation of men just mend being men one of the weeks. I had a couple of former marines who had seen a lot of combat and had were really struggling with ptsd. And after one of the sessions that i taught one of the guys pulled me aside and shared a story with me about his experience on the battlefield where his commanding officer was killed right next to him and he believed that it was his fault and as we talk through that it was clear to me that he was taking responsibility for something that was not his to take responsibility for and as we talk through that i remember john sunglasses on so i couldn't see his eyes but i remember as we were talking. He started tilting his head. Like this. it's kinda like forgive the analogy but like my dog when i'm talking to my dog. She's trying to understand what she does. The same thing right. I could just see on his face. It was like something. New was dawning on him that he had never thought before. It never dawned on him that it wasn't his fault. And so that just that validating that and empathizing with and carrying that burden with him even for those few moments really led to an. That was a couple years ago I have a friend of mine. Who's been kind of working with him and the progress that he's made as a result of a new way of thinking it's been followed up by a lot of other things for sure was just foundational to his recovery from a very distorted way of thinking will unfortunately our our time is up. How thankful we are for that but also just brings up. I think for both of us. How many people are struggling after many years in life with with things. That just seem insurmountable. That really don't have to be in. And i think your book is one of the ways that people can begin to work through that stuff and and let me just mention again.

southern montana both seven things fifteen one five day twenty guys a couple years ago one of the sessions things First responders seven point john
"dr ken" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"dr ken" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"The pain pastors are not equipped with a world view. If you will to really understand that and so a lot of the answers they. They're doing the best they can. But a lot of the answers they provide. Don't get to the heart issues of the broken nece in a way that actually facilitates healing changing growth. And i think people over time. Just get to the point. Where okay pastor. I've i've prayed. I've read my bible. I've served i've given. I've done all these things. But i'm still stuck what's going on and i think what i'm trying to do is provide a bridge that will help span that gap in our own emotional health spiritual health and growth that has tended to be left out of our discipleship process in the local church in. What's in that secret sauce. That might surprise. You don't see and every other book that this sin that often is associated with rebellion against guide is more often in my experience the result of broken ness and unresolved emotional pain and it doesn't make it less sinful but we when we got to go to the source john and so many churches just focus on the behavior. It's stopped the behavior. What is addiction. is it porn is it. Alcohol is a drug. What is it just stop doing. Because they're identifying that as the problem. Well that's not the problem. It's a problem for sure but the problem is what's going on in the heart because what's going on in the heart is going to be played out in our behavior so to change the behavior. We gotta do hard work and you can't just address behavior and have changed happen this past sunday. I had the chance to preach and I was thinking about you know easter after easter. If you not the senior guy right right senior crowd and they bring in. Somebody like me and i was thinking really what is after the fundamental christian message of you know good friday and easter. What are we supposed to do. And so i was thinking about that a couple of sundays and of to preach and one of them. I just focused on this One verse where. The apostle paul says literally says but one thing i do and i thought well i better pay attention if this is. This is the apostle. Paul wrote most of the new testament. But one thing. I do forgetting what lies behind and then it goes on to talk about an most people. Just skip that forgetting what lies behind. I bet you don't skip that part. Do it takes some work forgetting what lies behind well and i think i think to your point. A lot of astor's and church leaders use that very passage in philippians. Three as a no psychology. Go back and resolve the unresolved emotional pain of your past and such. But that's not. What paul's talking abou now passage john. And you know that right is that. He's talking about all of his accomplishments that he had been dependent upon as Righteousness before god and he goes on to say i consider those dung and the greek word that he actually uses there is is more like human excrement remade. Yeah he's being intentionally graph so he sang all of my spiritual trophies fair. See i'm from the tribe of benjamin. I'm you know. I mean you talk about having letter his name. That guy had them all and he saying all of that is superfluous compared to knowing. Christ jesus my lord..

Paul One verse Three one paul benjamin Christ one thing bible christian philippians past sunday greek friday source easter john
"dr ken" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"dr ken" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Who was about my age and so and that was that was good. My sister and i got along very well and then my dad and step mom had their own child together. So i have a half brother but you know. Blending families is very challenging. And there's there's just a lot of dynamics that go along with that else happened in your life that got you into the christian world and his why you're here but on the edge really was psychology in a training that ended up lead you into the ministry and you have a lotta initials after your name like i do. But what attracted you so much to the psychological side of. I've always believed that god. The way god created us is going to inform how he's going to transform us and it just made sense to me that under the umbrella of general revelation the sciences can help to inform that whether it's psychology philosophy. Sociology anthropology neuroscience. What have you from my perspective. Those don't define what is true but they do. Illuminate what this bible already says is true actually in regard to faith and practice okay so when you refer to general revelation you're talking about specifically what god reveals to everybody apart from the bible any specific book but that everybody can kind of look out there and has revealed himself in ways other than scripture alone. Right correct yeah. The apostle paul in romans chapter one talks about how creation gives us a an understanding of a creator. And whether you talk about intelligent design whether you talk about just the beauty and majesty of the creation but paul even makes the point that even god's divine attributes can be seen in creation so general revelation as we understand it as the allegiance is a profound lens through which we can see can see the lord the way i sometimes put that as we have to work really hard not to believe in god and i'm always reminded a see us lewis who said as an academic he was convinced that god didn't exist and he was very mad at him for it. Tell me you you've written a number of books but tell me about the latest one because it gets to what we want to talk about today. It's called unhindered abundance restoring our souls in a fragmented world and it's really my ministry manifesto. John it's my life narrative up to this point and i'm fifty seven so i've got some some mileage kinda runs throughout.

John today fifty seven christian bible paul one half chapter
"dr ken" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"dr ken" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Ever thought the devil made you do it. Why do you do what you do. And how does faith fit into it today. Brain science and belief with dr ken. Baugh welcome to church and birds. Pant bad about religion and spirituality. You've ever had questions about the jurors may be a bit jaded in your attitude. Do religion you come to the right place. Host he was an honors philosophy student ordained a presbyterian minister planted three thought figures university. But now now you just aging margin food never quits asking the host roads and dr john rain science and belief. Don't tell anybody. But i've got addicted to binge watching a series on net flicks. No really don't tell anyone because the language is way too graphic and the sex on the screen won't pass any sunday school test but the story line and the imagination is simply overwhelmingly compelling. The series has called outlander and had forces one to contemplate the cultural medical and spiritual annex in the mid twentieth century compared to the mid eighteenth century. How would you handle life if you woke up tomorrow. Two hundred years back in time. Imagine the differences beginning with no lights. Turn on much less thermostats. Do adjuster prescriptions to take so. Why don't we just keep that line of thought going from minute in the christian world. It wasn't long ago. The catholics believed powell The protestants were all heretics and protestants thought. The pope was the antichrist. Psychology is a specific field of study was not even born as miss and superstitions abounded in the areas. We might call brain science today from you. Were doing something crazy. What are we supposed to conclude. If we don't know about brain tumors chemical imbalances and personality disorders rushing forward today. The you wonder why you are struggling with faith and relationship issues in ways. That seem unique. Do you question the prescriptions which are supposed to take the edge off of your anxiety or depression. Still finding yourself..

mid twentieth century mid eighteenth century dr john rain tomorrow dr ken. Baugh today Two hundred years back three thought figures christian protestants catholics
Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:31 min | 1 year ago

Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

"Well i of course. Our hosts quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine pulmonary disease critical care and neuro critical care and still fighting on the frontlines over the war on. Covid my very good friend. Dr steven tae back. How you doing steve. I'm well thank you as you've heard joining us from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor kenneth pinta. He's the director of research for the james buchanan. Brady urological institute. He's the co director prostate cancer research program for the sidney kimmel cancer center. He's a professor of urology. He's a professor of oncology. he's a professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Welcome dr to. What do you do with all your spare time can. This is not meant to be a softball question. But it's going to sound that way. I'm trying to understand from your inside. Perspective. what is it about the environment you work in a johns hopkins that produces these kind of outcomes. These ratings and the international recognition part of it is tradition. Johns hopkins was founded as the first research university in the united states and we've always placed the tripartite mention of patient care education to students and research on equal footing. So that we're always seamlessly combining those and the other piece of tradition is johns hopkins hospital in the medical school itself. We defined american medicine at johns hopkins with william oastler. Starting out saying we're gonna do medicine differently. Use the term. Medical residents started at johns hopkins. Because ostler made. The doctors live in the hospital to be trained in. So that's where the term came from. You know we have this dome at the hospital. With with the wings of the building and medicine rounds what referred to the fact that they would go round and round the dome to the different wards. And you know we carry that sort of tradition with pride and people love to work there and we've always attracted really smart people who love madison in love taking care of people and really love combining that with the research that powers the next generation of medicines. Forward dr parton. Your department chair talked about. While other hospitals use reports for urological surgery hopkins actually makes their own. Robots isn't making davinci robot. No we use a commercial robots like everyone else but what we are doing is creating the next generation of robots to work with mri machines. We have danced in. Our department is making a special robot that does that. The hopkins whiting school of engineering is developing the next generation of robots to integrate imaging with robotic surgery. A lot of that is not just hardware. it's software we're living in a pretty high tech era. We've come a long way in medicine but still so many men die of prostate cancer. What are we messing up here in. We have to do to fix this. So you know in this time of covid and so many people dying of kobe. You know it's an infectious disease. We gotta do better and we tend to forget about these other illnesses that are plaguing the planet you know if you look around the world. Ten million people a year are dying of cancer in the us. Six hundred thousand people are dying of cancer. Thirty thousand men die of prostate cancer. Every year and cancer of all kinds including prostate cancer is curable if you find it in time because we can do surgery or radiation in jewelry you but unfortunately in about fifty thousand men per year we find the cancer too late. We find the cancer. After it is escape the prostate and metastatic cancer virtually of all kinds is incurable and prostate cancer. Unfortunately metastasized spreads to the bones as first sight and it causes a lot of problems for guys in the bones including pain and eventually kills them and we can talk about how that happens but essentially we fail because we don't cure people because we don't find the cancer in time. Let me ask you a question about that. Actually because i've been quoted by colleagues that if you're fifty years old you have a fifty percent chance that you actually have prostate cancer and at sixty sixty percent chance that you've probably already have prostate cancer and so on and so forth and it would beg the question. Would it not make sense to prophylactically. Remove the prostate. And then obviously the the major impediment to that is the major side effects. What does the thought process about that in. Where are we in terms technologically of mitigating the terrible side effects of impotence and incontinence. So i think there's two aspects to that question steve that we just need to touch on because the other thing you hear. All the time is that oh prostate cancer. You don't have to worry about it. You're going to die with it not from it. You know we do see that. Eighty percent man age eighty if you look in their prostates. If they've gotten killed by a car accident you'll see prostate cancer. So essentially prostate cancer exists in two forms one form. Is this indolent slow growing low grade cancer. That probably shouldn't even be called the cancer. But it still is in we find it by screening and and those are the guys that can be treated with active surveillance. We don't need to treat their cancers where a lot smarter about that now than we were even a few years ago. The other kind of cancer is the aggressive prostate cancer. That is not the kind you find on all types whereas the kind that's growing quickly that we have to get out before it spreads so prostate cancer is definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a father or an uncle who had prostate cancer your your risk of developing prostate cancer is double if you have to family members. It's quadruples you had three family members. You're gonna get it so it is familial. There are some genetic drivers. Like vr rca to that lead to a higher incidence of prostate cancer. And we definitely say if you've have family history us should start screening sooner.

Prostate Cancer Pulmonary Disease Dr Steven Tae Cancers Kenneth Pinta Brady Urological Institute Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center First Research University William Oastler Johns Hopkins Dr Parton Johns Hopkins Medicine James Buchanan Hopkins Whiting School Of Engi Johns Hopkins Hospital Ostler Metastatic Cancer Steve
Hank Aaron, home-run-hitting baseball great, dead at 86

The Fix-It Show with Tom Feiza

01:18 min | 1 year ago

Hank Aaron, home-run-hitting baseball great, dead at 86

"Of baseball's all time? Great home run hitters hitters as as many many people people reflecting reflecting on on his his legacy, legacy, not not only only on on put put off off the the field, field, I I could could think think of of that. that. It It was was better better than than I I thought. thought. Hank Hank Aaron Aaron started started his his career career in in 1954 1954 at the beginning of the civil rights movement, 117 the truth, Dr. Ken Harris says his presence on the field pushed the equality message forward, saying that what they see is what they'll be, and that's one of the things Hank Aaron brought. Even after Aaron retired. His fight continued off the field, and he was able to show people that after baseball, you can actually take what you have. And leave a significant legacy. Melissa Barkley WTMJ News. Death of Hang Garin weighs heavy on many, including MLB commissioner emeritus Bud Seelig, he tells TMJ four news. He had a friendly relationship with Aaron that lasted more than 60 years. Remember saying to him not too long ago? This is what he said. Who would have imagined all those years ago? This is 1958 and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, by the way. That I a black kid from Mobile, Alabama with break Babe Ruth's home run record, and you, a Jewish kid from Milwaukee would become baseball commissioner. I've treasured our relationship ever since the legs that he considers Aaron to be the best baseball player of all time, sports

Hank Hank Aaron Aaron Baseball Dr. Ken Harris Melissa Barkley Wtmj News Hang Garin Bud Seelig Aaron Hank Aaron Milwaukee Babe Ruth Wisconsin Alabama
"dr ken" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"dr ken" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

"My doctor told me so really. Catchy title there. We're gonna talk about that in this interview. So dr barry. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks so much for having me doc. It's a pleasure absolutely while i like. Most people you know that are interested in low-carbon came across a lot of your videos on youtube. A great job of really breaking it down and making things simple for people. But how did you get started with this. I mean when did you come across. Low carb kito. Let's let's go into your story on that. So the reason that i started actually even giving a crap about nutrition because early my medical career. I didn't give nutrition thoughts at all. I i believe the old paradigm that that the human mammal is somehow magical that you could just feed 'em whatever kind of crap happened to be on the store shelf and somehow we magically turned that into lane tissue in and good healthy brain but a few years into my medical practice. I started game weight and my blood. Sugar started to go up and it might most unhealthy. I was morbidly obese. Six foot three hours to nine hundred ninety seven pounds and had become thoroughly pre diabetic. And was well my way to developing type two diabetes. I did not have an ultrasound or a ct. But i'm sure. I had fatty liver because my my Nasd were starting to pesky really elevate just lot not thought well must be drinking too much alcohol. But i'm sure that you. And i could go back in time and scan my liver. I was already getting some nice marveling in my liver which is great for rabab not that great human liver and so. I thought i'm i'm just eating too much crap. I've got to fix this. And so i went back and studied my old nutrition notes. And you know checked out. With the american diabetes association was recommending and started. I implement those things. And i can tell you what i learned in med school about human nutrition and actually the care and feeding of a normal human walking. The streets was to avoid all saturated fat. Eat lots of whole grains and john literally literally everything. I was taught med school about how to the to feed a human wild so to speak. Which is our our natural environment and so i implemented all those things it was really very very religious leap into that and gain more weight and it wasn't. It wasn't muscle that i was gaining. And so i thought you know. I obviously don't believe about nutrition but maybe just maybe these experts in air quotes out there. Maybe they don't know what they're talking about either. So i really pick my head up out of my little family. Medicine rose and i started looking around and very broadly. And so i found the the promo blueprint by marxists not found the paleo diet alarm core and i found a tattered copy of the doctor. Dr atkins seminal work. Guide for fifty cents. At a rummage sale. I read those three books. And i'm like this. All sounds nuts. Bled of these guys you know look healthy and it seems like a lot of people are getting benefit from this. What if the traditional model is just wrong. What if what if what if bat with..

fatty liver dr barry youtube american diabetes association Dr atkins Nasd
Retirement in America in 2020

Bull 'N Bears

08:29 min | 1 year ago

Retirement in America in 2020

"Happy to bring onto the program. Dr Ken Dike Wall, the founder and CEO of age wave. Can just keynoted, the financial planner retreat that we held here at Edelman financial engines last week. This time, of course, was done. Virtually Ken's clients include half the Fortune 500. He received the American Society on a Jing's award twice. He's one of the 35 most influential thought leaders in the financial services industry, according to investment news. Ken. Thank you so much for coming back on the program record is always great to be with you. Now. The reason that I asked him to come on is because of something can said at our retreat. That I've heard. Can you say that several times you and I have known each other for 20 years. I've seen you speak more times than I can remember. You're one of my favorite public speakers. And you said something again in this event, but this time it finally hit me and it got me thinking you gave the following statistic as part of your conversation with us. You said every year in America. We produce about four million babies. And we are also producing about 20 million caregivers. Now that statistic itself is shocking five times as many people are caring for elders as they are for babies. That was really your point reflecting the aging society, right? That was the point you were making. Yes. But it got me thinking it's even worse than that, isn't it? Because when you have four million babies that doesn't mean four million new moms, lots of mom's air having their second or third baby. Which means we're not producing four million new moms were producing Maybe one or two million new moms versus the 20 million new caregivers. The dispersion is even worse than the statistic itself. Suggests, isn't it? Yeah, it's something that sort of off the radar, but it's not off the radar. I'm sure for all of your listeners because nearly every one of us is touched by this in our life, you know, looking after a mom or a dad or a spouse or brother or a sister. It's become a major part of life now and There's a couple of valuables and erected, really pull it together. First, we a cz, you know, and your listeners know we're all living quite a bit longer than humans have ever lived before. The life expectancy in the beginning of the 20th century was 47. Today. It's about 79. But by the way, I'll also tell you that there are 33 countries in the world that have a higher life expectancy than we do. We are very middling when it comes to longevity. But the really interesting piece of it is what's called health span. So our health span doesn't seem to be matching our lifespan. What I mean In the United States. On average, we spend about 10 years sick at the end of our lives, and sometimes we can even spend years dying. Now what that does is, it creates an entire segment of our population. Turning that suffering for whom Our health care system has not done a good job preventing illness or disease but also causes family members. Tohave tow walk away from their jobs, their take every Tuesday afternoon off or relocate. In order to look after either their spouse or their mom and dad and the numbers are enormous. You mentioned 20 million new ones last year, but all in is over 40 million elder caregivers right now in America. And that number can on ly get bigger, right? Yeah, it's going to get bigger and a little more complicated, and I'll explain this. First of all, one of the major variables here has to do with the relation between Men and women and let me explain in America. The average woman who's partnered with a man has a man whose 2.5 years older than her. That's the average right now. The women live five years longer than men. So what usually happens then, At the end of one's life, the mangroves, Il begins to falter. The wife will put everything inside and care for her maid for her loved one. He dies, she might be emotionally depleted. They might even be financially depleted because they perhaps didn't have the resources. Handle what happens when someone is ill. But then she's going to live another 7 to 10 years. Who's going to care for her now for boomers. Now I'm a boomer, and I think you are, too. When our parents were having us. They were averaging four kids each, so the greatest generation in the silent generation had a lot of kids. And they were kind of close at hand. Boomers only averaged about two kids each and about almost 20% of the boomers had no kids at all. And so what happens is when we enter into our later years. Who's going to care for us? And so there's gonna be more of a caregiving crunch, which means at home care industries. They're goingto surge. More and more people are going to seek out housemates. More and more. I think we need to put pressure on the medical system and our scientific systems. Because if we could knock out diseases like Alzheimer's, if we could wipe out I know that's something you're committed to if we could wipe out some of the really nasty diseases of the later years. Then we wouldn't have so many older people suffering and therefore we wouldn't have such a need for caregivers. So we've got to get the lifespan and the health span to be more in sync exactly. So this is something that is as fundamental is a gets from a financial planning perspective what we were now referring to as life planning to help people realize what your future is likely to hold, and you've got to think about it in terms of your intergenerational aspects of your family. How many Children do you have? How many of them can you rely on either because of proximity because of willingness because of financial wherewithal to be able to be a caregiver to you, And if you have suspicions that that's not going to be available to you for any of the above reasons you need to start thinking about alternative ways that you can get the care that you're going to need and not just you, but also for your spouse. Right. And another thing that's happened, Rick is it during this horrible covitz situation? 46% of all the deaths have occurred in nursing homes and still nursing facilities. And they're probably not completely to blame because they housed some of the most struggling elders by half of whom have Alzheimer's and dementia. But what happened as a result of that Is that a whole lot of people are saying to themselves, man. I don't think I want to be in a nursing home. Well, okay, then. Then you need to sit down with your financial planner and make sure you've got some resources or talk to your family. So that you could be looked after the comfort of your home in the way you want to be looked after without having to worry about being parked in a nursing home can thank you so much for raising this issue it is. I think something that we're not giving a lot of thought of. We've got an election coming up in a few days. We have the midst of the covert crisis in front of us. Andi. It's very difficult for people to look beyond the here and now given what our nation is facing imminently to looking ahead 5 10 20 years into our financial future, but it's extraordinarily important that we do so especially in the context of the election because it's our nation's leaders who were about to send or return to Washington. That are going to be key for figuring out the public policies necessary to help protect tens of millions of aging Americans over the coming couple of decades. Exactly. Ken Dike. Well, thank you so much for mentioning this your book. As I mentioned what retirees want. It's hugely popular already hitting all the bestseller lists. You're subtitle really says it all, though, about what your new book What retirees want is all about. Subtitle is a holistic view of life Third age, and that's a lot of what I'm trying to put forward in this book for our grand parents when they reach retirement age. Had a couple of three years before their batteries were out today, most of us we had 60. We have another 30 years in front of us and trying to figure out how to make sure we can fund those years and also have a great time during that stage of our life, and maybe even make some great contributions. I think it's going to be the challenge of the future. So I encourage you to pick up a copy of Ken's brand new book What Retirees Want Available Booksellers everywhere. Ken Dyke, Wild founder and CEO of Age wave. Thanks so much Kan for being back here on the program. Stay healthy. Stay safe, Rick. Thanks.

Dr Ken Dike Wall Founder And Ceo America Alzheimer Rick Edelman American Society Ken Dyke Ken Dike United States IL KAN Washington
Operating in the Time of Coronavirus

Docs Dial Reps Podcast

06:20 min | 2 years ago

Operating in the Time of Coronavirus

"Dock style reps podcasts. We're here today with Dr Ken Hood a fantastic and reputable spine surgeon from Phoenix Arizona. Dr Hood it's great to have you on the show now. The novel Coronavirus Cova Nineteen has caused a sharp decline in elective spine surgeries as an esteem. Spine Surgeon Operating Multiple Times. A week during the middle of this global pandemic. We thought you would be uniquely qualified to talk about how the novel coronavirus has impacted your practice. But before we get started we'd like to learn a little bit more about your professional background. Hey thank you so much for having me on the PODCAST The first time that I'm doing this and I think what's exciting venue Be More than happy to answer some questions today. in regards to my background. I'm Orthopedic Spine surgeon up in private practice now for five and a half years Prior to becoming a spine surgeon night training in Orthopedic Surgery Residents in Riverside California there was during my residency program that I became interested in spine surgery itself as a sub specialty so after orthopedic residency which is five years then went on to do a complex in minimally invasive spine surgery fellowship at the University of California San Diego and that was a urine length and then thereafter A signed for my first job at the University of Arizona in Tucson. I was there for several years and then subsequently have moved to Phoenix Arizona where continued to practice today fantastic. Let's go back a little bit further though. When did you decide? That medicine was the career for you. What was what was the motivation for that. So my my interest in medicine actually dates back to well before attending medical school It was during my undergraduate years The University of Rochester where I was actually an economics major and during one summer break I had the opportunity to shadow a orthopedic surgeon I wasn't specifically interested in orthopedics at that time that I just on the back of my mind. Medicine was a potential possibility so It was able to shadow orthopedic surgeon during the summer months and see his day today and and see the the types of things that he was able to do in that really sparked my interest. My Mama's retired nurse. And so you know the medical field is always been a part of my life to in in that regard but UH specifically That that that summertime shadowing of the orthopedic surgeon so it really sparked my interest interesting that that's a that's a different sort of spark that I've heard from from other medical professionals. Now I understand that you're second child. The daughter was just boring. Congratulations thank you. Yes yes Just two weeks ago. Healthy baby girl so Everybody's doing well how. How was that process a during the pandemic how how is the whole process of having a birth and going to the hospital for for that specifically or did you yes? says the very interesting obviously with covid nineteen and restrictions in place. Most hospitals The process at least from my standpoint was much different. We have another daughter is one and a half years old and comparing the two experiences was Pretty interesting so With our newborn I wasn't presents at any of the the the the prenatal visits So just here for my wife thinks going because they wanted to minimize People in and out of the allocation offices When the pandemic broke out Luckily by the time that she was ready to deliver they did allow one visitor after the birth so I was actually not physically present during the birth itself but afterwards was able to visit which was great but definitely a different experience than with our previous child. Were able to be present for the entire process. Now how is it balancing your personal life and operating at a trauma one centers? Is it difficult or have you found your way into it? Pretty easily It definitely has its challenges. I would say that over time. I've been able to develop a routine and schedule. That helps me navigate the day today even with that though taking level one spine trauma call does throw curveballs into your into your plan. Schedule on a daily basis The the balance is key Between personal and Work Life. If you focus solely on either components the other will suffer significantly And it's tough because sacrificing time with your family friends it's hard And at the same time you know if you ignore your practice or your patients Bad things happen as well So what I tend to do is try to stick to it daily routine Monday through Friday. I usually get up between four thirty to five o'clock in the morning trying to get some exercise in before heading into work the day to day various between clinic and operating room as well as call stuff but most days. I'm done by somewhere between five and six. Pm and then once I get home. It's one hundred percents Family time occasionally. I'll get called in the middle of the night and have to go into operation. Fortunately most things can till the following warning but it is a challenge And I feel like There's no perfect answer. Perfect scenario you just have to try to find as much balancing your life account

Orthopedic Spine Surgeon Dr Ken Hood Coronavirus Cova Nineteen Orthopedic Surgery Residents Arizona Phoenix Arizona University Of Arizona Riverside California Tucson University Of California San D Private Practice The University Of Rochester
"dr ken" Discussed on Docs Dial Reps Podcast

Docs Dial Reps Podcast

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"dr ken" Discussed on Docs Dial Reps Podcast

"Dock style reps podcasts. We're here today with Dr Ken Hood a fantastic and reputable spine surgeon from Phoenix Arizona. Dr Hood it's great to have you on the show now. The novel Coronavirus Cova Nineteen has caused a sharp decline in elective spine surgeries as an esteem. Spine Surgeon Operating Multiple Times. A week during the middle of this global pandemic. We thought you would be uniquely qualified to talk about how the novel coronavirus has impacted your practice. But before we get started we'd like to learn a little bit more about your professional background. Hey thank you so much for having me on the PODCAST The first time that I'm doing this and I think what's exciting venue Be More than happy to answer some questions today. in regards to my background. I'm Orthopedic Spine surgeon up in private practice now for five and a half years Prior to becoming a spine surgeon night training in Orthopedic Surgery Residents in Riverside California there was during my residency program that I became interested in spine surgery itself as a sub specialty so after orthopedic residency which is five years then went on to do a complex in minimally invasive spine surgery fellowship at the University of California San Diego and that was a urine length and then thereafter A signed for my first job at the University of Arizona in Tucson. I was there for several years and then subsequently have moved to Phoenix Arizona where continued to practice today fantastic. Let's go back a little bit further though. When did you decide? That medicine was the career for you. What was what was the motivation for that. So my my interest in medicine actually dates back to well before attending medical school It was during my undergraduate years The University of Rochester where I was actually an economics major and during one summer break I had the opportunity to shadow a orthopedic surgeon I wasn't specifically interested in orthopedics at that time that I just on the back of my mind. Medicine was a potential possibility so It was able to shadow orthopedic surgeon during the summer months and see his day today and and see the the types of things that he was able to do in that really sparked my interest. My Mama's retired nurse. And so you know the medical field is always been a part of my life to in in that regard but UH specifically That that that summertime shadowing of the orthopedic surgeon so it really sparked my interest interesting that that's a that's a different sort of spark that I've heard from from other medical professionals. Now I understand that you're second child. The daughter was just boring. Congratulations thank you. Yes yes Just two weeks ago. Healthy baby girl so Everybody's doing well how. How was that process a during the pandemic how how is the whole.

Orthopedic Spine surgeon Dr Ken Hood Coronavirus Cova Nineteen Orthopedic Surgery Residents Arizona Phoenix Arizona University of Arizona Riverside California University of California San D Tucson private practice The University of Rochester
"dr ken" Discussed on The Roots of Leadership Podcast

The Roots of Leadership Podcast

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"dr ken" Discussed on The Roots of Leadership Podcast

"It's a hidden neural. And you go in there. You can get a full copy. There's no restricted sort of couple of chapters of my book. Look the quest for purpose in and if you want to ask more questions about all the exercises activities I get people. Actually write an autobiography in the book. And say what are all all the things in your life where you've been excited where you've been energized. You know inspiration is I'm drawn to it. I don't believe in motivation per se. Because I can't motivate anybody do anything I don't know why love doing what I'm doing right now. This podcast this is not work. Are you getting this. We're having fun. We're enjoying in a lot of people. Those wide number ought to be a podcast and never WANNA be on stages said listen Gimme five thousand people arena and I'm never more energized than there because the energy feeds back and just serving them in in helping them and not getting them you know like over excited about their life the giving them core beliefs and understandings and strategies so they go the next level. That's not work now. You don't want me to be an airplane mechanic Anthony because you are not going to survive the next flight. That is for sure so each of us have our gifts talents and abilities and everybody listening you have that you just have to go and confirm that and the other one is even just a validation for some people anthony. They're doing doing the right thing. But me being the wrong environment and what I mean by that. Is I culture who you're hanging out with can really affect our enjoyment in life. We know that most people won't quit jobs. They quit bosses. So if if I'm in an environment that's really not building and I'm still doing what I enjoy doing. Then maybe there's a shift to go into a different the different culture that will better serve who you are and what you're doing. Now thank you. Well said I think as we as we come to wrap on the podcast outcast as I as I heard you just speaking just now. What really kind of made me take a moment to think through through is that we have this? We all do have talent as you said we all have something valuable to say find your pathway to say it however it is whatever your job is your career. Whatever your chosen path is find? What's important important? You WanNa say to people and just say it and then as humanity our fabric will become tighter together Um for sure well I. There is a statement by kind of close with this is that you don't know what your purpose and direction is and your purpose is to find your purpose. Thank you can honored. Have you on his show my friend. Well thanks Anthony for the opportunity to serve US here today with Dr Ken Keyes Author Speaker. podcast hosts in coach. Coach is someone who works every day to make all of us better. This is Anthony Group and welcome to join today's episode on the roots of your important and believe in yourself believe others and let's do this to have a great.

Anthony Anthony Group US Dr Ken Keyes
"dr ken" Discussed on The Roots of Leadership Podcast

The Roots of Leadership Podcast

16:22 min | 2 years ago

"dr ken" Discussed on The Roots of Leadership Podcast

"Each guest will share their innovations innovations concepts and ideas that helped to make them and those they serve successful. Welcome to the roots of leadership. Hello everyone this is the Anthony Grupo and welcome to today's episode of the roots of Leadership. I have been waiting patiently to interview. Today's guest Dr Can keys can welcome to the show. Well Anthony thanks for having me on and and can you are accomplishing. So many areas a well known author a fantastic speaker podcast host and also of course a life coach for all types of of entrepreneurs and individuals. You Know Ken today as we you and I talk. There's so much that you've been involved involved in everything from Holistic living leadership and wellness self mastery emotional intelligence. Where where did you get the Genesis Ken to take this journey? Well I grew up on a dairy farm. So that's pretty close part apart and it's interesting that's that's my background crown. And I was I was getting up one morning. I actually had my own heard because it could work with my dad and I was in my twenties and I got up one morning. I sit on myself itself and this is for your listeners. As well said would it be okay if I was doing what I'm doing right now. Twenty years from now under said well absolutely not and I I knew even when I was sixteen years of age that I wanted to be a speaker and communicator and really on a amateur level I was asked to be. Mc of many of the community banquets in awards nights. Even when I was eighteen. Nineteen twenty so. I already had that gift already. Had that gift for for communicating to others and then really in in when I was twenty eight I said listen you know how worldwide go and what does that mean so. I went on my own journey and hired a coach. Just you know. I help other people to kind of realize their potential in in late eighties and Mike. McManus helped me to get clear about what my purposes and my purposes the help others to live lead and work on purpose in the journey is as there are a lot of people. Anthony had focused on a certain topic and so I have a diploma in nutrition genetics. My Phd's and leadership my MBA. In business so I said okay. Where'd it all come from because I just like to devour learning? That's just crazy but one of our anchor. Points is to develop the whole person you know. Some people people talk about emotional intelligence. But what if I'm sick and I'm not well people talk about leadership skills but I if I don't have vision and purpose and that doesn't work either so and a lot of ways as what we're seeing is how can I develop the whole person. Their whole potential and all the cogs in the wheel or important as part of this development pathway. Something you just said it really strikes me to as a listening to you is a lifetime learner and I think you and I would agree that that's a message that we really wanNA share with everyone. One is to never just to try to be diversified intellectual intellectual capital as you can when something you said is that it's never just one component opponent isn't just emotional intelligence or leadership or self awareness. It really does need all of it. Doesn't it absolutely and I think a lot lot of times people get a little myopic. We're getting a little too focused on certain things and mainly talk about this holistic model. That's you know Dr Dr Anderson founded the company and now owned The assessment company. I now own and we have ten core assessments lead into twelve results or twelve reports. And we're really trying to develop stop the whole person so we talk about south worth we talk about values clarification. We talk about personality. We'll talk about leadership skills learning styles wheels. I just redid are stress indicator and health planner and so all of those come to play and then of course my recent book on the quest for purpose so part of the mine. Kirkman is not the seat as burdensome burdensome but really releasing as clarity increases performance increases opening all the research around that even you know a fellow colleague Brenda Bouchard and his bestselling book. You Know Habits of high-performers me one of the items eastbound high-performance as they know who they are and they know where they're going in so part of what we're trying to do is create with all our tools and resources create clarity for people in all areas so that I can optimize realize my potential potential can. What advice? Do you have a two to this question. This I get asked this question a lot. Is that people say that they start. Start on a path. They start a New Vision. They WANNA be Achieving more areas but they feel like they constantly have to stop and explain themselves post to others around them they feel that they keep losing momentum and it could be loved ones around them. Khaliq your community based and they say you know Anthony. I'm I'm always explain why I'm trying to grow what I'm trying to grow into and a growth outcomes I'm trying achieve in my life. What advice do you have for? People who are who feel it gets stalled by others. Well it's interesting a lot of In my latest book I talk about you know. Don't worry what other people say about you because if I actually was to take everybody's advice about what I should or shouldn't do very soon in my life. Is Your Life not mine. Well and everybody. That's listening here. You're the only person could be in your head. You're the only person who could be in your heart. It in part of this journey is this vacation. And it's okay to go down a path and then change it and and that that's part of the discovery that's the beauty of it is to you to look at something experience something so you know what. That's not exactly what I thought it would be. And so that's okay but the reality is is that where you are going isn't isn't necessarily where all your friends and relatives are going. Now I will give credit to one of my mentors Dr Marshall Goldsmith and I was invited to a an event in New York not that long long ago where he you know he's giving back and see what when we move on our past relationships in many cases don't go with us so don't expect expect them to be connected so give an example. When I got my doctorate degree and I grew up in the dairy farm? We're having family dinner with with with my family in one of my Family members can were never calling you. Dr Les go unless they want reservations at restaurants. What what why would I not be surprised so I really shouldn't expect them? A lot of us are looking for this approval approval from other individuals but within my own circles. Like you said I've now. This is my thirtieth year. I'm dyslexic migrate. Nineteen said I would never amount to anything because I couldn't read or write and we're both Anthony and guessing at the age where we went to school before computers were there very much. Yes and so now. The invention of the computer and I started taping all of a sudden they notice all these underlying red. You know red lines underneath the words. That's what helped me become a writer. I'd never thought I was going to be typer. And of course the audio the podcast worked at both you and I do that me. That's awesome that's easy peasy to kind of do but if I would have listened to my great nine English teacher I would've never been a writer. I mean here I am for million words later three four books. All these assessments. Are you kidding just like no consciousness of that growing up on a dairy farm right so encouragement is that is yes. You WanNa are those previous relationships but those people aren't necessarily going with you anthony and you want to get advice from people that you trust. Who have been there and done that? I remember when we might. Kids are now in their twenties. But that I remember when we first had kids we had advice from everybody around us who never had kids about how to be apparent. Excuse true you know you're right to be the space to give me advice about how to be apparent you never been a yourself. And it's not that I was judging. You is just that you don't have the credibility with me to do that. You know I just want to recap a few pieces that that you said that I think needs to be well together and it's so powerful what you're saying can for the listeners and again I'm here today with Dr. Ken Keyes noted Author Speaker podcast hosts coach and humanitarian. Who helps others you know? Can I guess in some cases aces. We all grew up on a farm. We all grow up somewhere trying to grow bro. Our families help our loved ones. Grow our communities and you think about about the worth it work ethic of farmer. Perhaps we should all have some piece of that that you hired a coach. We all should think about that. Be a lifetime time learner and something that really resonates that you said with me. 'cause I always learned so much from my guess I am from you. Today is don't expect past relationships to continue as your journey goes and sometimes I think people feel guilty for leaving others behind when in reality you left them better after you left him stronger as they're on their own journey and we can't take everyone with us you know. Can I kind of get a feel for what perhaps inspired you but at the core of you as a man. What inspires you today? Well my as I said earlier my purpose to help others lead and work of purpose in it's interesting or I mean we don't even need to know the source of that now with a person of faith so I have sort of a spiritual sort of anchoring to my belief system but I do believe every single person is here for reason. Every single person has a contribution to make in what just gets me going is making a difference and I don't sound trade about it but really going learn. Learn helping others so that they can live lead and work purpose the stats are through galloper. Whatever who you want to listen to or review the research is the majority Jordan individuals are disengaged at work? They don't like what they do. They're they're mildly irritated to miserable and they're not doing anything about it. So if the global global engagement of the workforce is thirteen percent. Then how are we going to fulfill ourselves. If I dislike what I do every single day and I do and I do six or seven or eight eight or nine or ten hours and I think that's a disservice not only to the employer but to yourself because meaning really comes into engaging and doing what you love now not every moment is going to be that way. There's some day even in my own business and company where he's at. Oh Man I need a break be on the beach in Cancun south of you but the reality is is that can can the majority of what I'm doing have this intrinsic meaning and that is the journey that I encourage every listener to go through because you have to take responsibility ability for that. I was asking dimples. Who wrote the book? What color is your parachute in a bestseller on getting Chris and he just passed away at ninety three ish and I asked Richardson Wise? It there so many people that are confused. Don't know what they're doing. Don't know where they're going. He says in an instant he said people have not on been willing to do the work You got to do the work you gotTA show up. Ice Spent actually six months with that coach and I hand wrote a narrative over sixty pages to try to get clear about my direction and so they knew that my purpose was to help others to find their purpose and really my last thirty years he has has been unfolding in different ways to fulfill that so now technology here we are. We're doing a podcast is cool. It's awesome meeting. Great People like Anthony. Just this virtually that would never happen. Twenty years ago so how it's unfolding is being driven by sort of the environment and technology. But what I'm doing there's still the core is somewhere another having a message to say what you are worthy. Every person matters. Are you going to take responsibility to bring your best. And when you bring your best issue actually will have the highest level of meaning the highest level of contribution and I think that's one of the core things that people would like to achieve in life. At least I would assume so when when you said people aren't willing to do the work let's go a little deeper. Because I I really agree. I agree with your comment but.

Anthony Dr. Ken Keyes Anthony Grupo writer Dr Dr Anderson Dr Marshall Goldsmith McManus Dr Les Mike Cancun Kirkman New York Brenda Bouchard Chris Richardson Wise
Chickenpox, Epstein Barr And Jerome Kunkle discussed on Ben Maller

Ben Maller

02:28 min | 3 years ago

Chickenpox, Epstein Barr And Jerome Kunkle discussed on Ben Maller

"Here's a Kentucky teenager named Jerome Kunkle made headlines suing the health department of his town over there vaccination policy, and it seems that he's now come down with chicken pox. I don't know. I'm laughing. Dive into chickenpox for the most not in our country, but he has deeply held religious beliefs. He says and from the family's perspective they recognize that they ran the risk of getting sick. And they were okay. Matter-of-fact concl- sued the northern Kentucky health department after it ruled at all students who had been in his school Edmund vaccinated against chicken pox, couldn't come to class unless they got the shots. But there were thirty two confirmed cases of it at the time. And anyway, Mr. cocoa said he didn't believe that that vaccine was the only one they were trying to push as so the judge. They went to court the judge ruled against the family favor of the health department. And so they're in the midst of appealing it. Meanwhile, the kid gets chickenpox. That's if I were to ask Dr Ken about that he'd say, well, you know, it's better to get the vaccine once you have the chickenpox though, you don't get like the get it again. Chicken box. Yeah. Yeah. Because the first time that I had it was was very mild. And then a couple years later, I got it again. And the second time was bad. I've never heard of anybody. I had it's it's a branch of Epstein Barr mono and all that other stuff comes from shingles. It's all the same thing. And I had it once in. Well, actually now, you think that you made me think about this. I got Epstein Barr and mono in nineteen eighty eight. And then I got the shingles about twelve years later. Of the fun way. I did not. In fact, I got I got being very sick on a on a trip that I lead of Americans classical music tour that I took and I was no it was not it was a great the kissing on a classical music tour. I did. The person that I was kissing didn't have it didn't come from her until you came along.

Chickenpox Epstein Barr Jerome Kunkle Kentucky Dr Ken Edmund Concl Mr. Cocoa Twelve Years
"dr ken" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"dr ken" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Dr Ken, Kim, Stanford, and he's basically has a book mutual funds expose in addition. What you don't know may be hazardous to your wealth. And it is very very important. If you have mutual funds in your portfolio that you read this book, and if you come in if you ask me about I'll make sure you get a copy that's very easy to read, but at identifies a lot of mistakes and mutual funds. Plus, if you're paying a money manager to manager accounts, and he or she puts you in mutual funds. Folks, you're double paying and if it's a variable annuity, sometimes you're triple paying. Variable annuities. Not to be confused by their better brothers and sisters the fixed and fixed indexed and immediate annuities, which makes sense variable. Annuities have never been a fit for me, and you really need to have your variable annuities, analyzed if you have one to make sure that you're in the right place because I've seen a lot of mistakes made with variable. Noodles matter of fact, I've heard a lot of people on the radio peddling variable annuity that's right act Allston folksy. Nice to you get in there. And they put you in real estate investment trusts, which are bad in my opinion and variable annuities two of the black is in the financial world. Very very last segment. We were talking about being overcharged and fees or commissions. I've learned this from you coach one of the highest highest rated products as far as fees and commissions are concerned where people just get eaten alive are these annuities. They get the giant steak award not only for selling them. But also you need to put on your eyes. Because because you have blackouts cartoon where the guy had the big steak on his eye when he got punched in the face. Yeah. So we just have to be very careful in the financial world. There's a lot of unscrupulous group is advisor we're going to talk about the next section section about the top six complaints about. Financial advisors. But we've got one more of the ten commandments of investing to talk about this week. Right..

Kim Stanford Dr Ken advisor
Why a low-carb diet can help you lose weight and keep it off

On Air with Doug, Jen and Victoria

01:34 min | 3 years ago

Why a low-carb diet can help you lose weight and keep it off

"Listen, I love my cows on my farm. I don't know that I'd mixed PM their feces together better. But listen says may see aren't you? Glad we have enough DA. No. Wow. That's not true. I would like it. If the FDA were a little bit less precocious than it is how about that. The is a place. I'm just teasing. I know you are. But I can take a good joke. Sometimes. Will define the time. Dr Ken Cronos Stephan here. Now, let me help you were talking about wait the season of the year that were in weight loss, making sure you have enough energy and one of the other benefits that goes with Calatrava in the number one healthy choice for weight loss is the way you are supporting your joints. Because the main ingredient in Calla train is collagen and collagen is a protein that is made a couple of different digestive. Enzymes they help you absorb what's going on here. Callard Trinh absorbing the collagen into your body. It's the number one source of protein the protein helps you make more musty go to the gym with Dr Ken and develop the lean muscle. And and doing so you're exercising burning up the fat. And that's how you lose the weight pretty easy. Pretty simple. And what I like about. It is it's in maintaining your. Your weight loss weight control. There are absolutely no adverse effects because it's all natural. It stimulates your body to produce more collagen when you take Calabrian, and that's the building block. That's it.

Dr Ken Cronos Stephan Callard Trinh Dr Ken Calabrian FDA Calatrava
Just 6 hours of sleep loss increases diabetes risk

Made in America

01:51 min | 4 years ago

Just 6 hours of sleep loss increases diabetes risk

"There are a lot of research papers this week on not getting enough rest. It seems there's nothing new here though, anything in these studies. That's actually knew that we can relate to well. It's just proving what maybe you were smarter than. Everybody else. Thinking was correct. But the European society of cardiology mitt last week in Munich, and there were three studies reported and what we learned was getting a good night's sleep. Which in their reports was usually between six to eight hours can lower the risk of both heart attacks and strokes and sleep seems to influence biological processes like sugar, metabolism blood pressure, and inflammation, and all of these have an impact on cardiovascular disease, the recommendation, I give in which the American sleep society recommends is seven hours per night at least to keep the heart healthy and avoid mental lapses. So it's not just your heart. It's your brain. It's the movement. It's the activity in your brain that needs rest a lot of people don't think grasp that Ken how important it is for your brain to have arrest with you. Your body or for your brain to be able to do it's sort of like maintenance, the rain comes in at midnight doesn't go on again, it'll six and they work on it for six hours to get it up to speed with the what you need here. And if you're wondering why it's not functioning the way you would like it to function get some sleep and see how much better to work, and you know, what tells as much the regular six seven, eight hours or whatever. But if you take a nap, it can reset your who good and also minutes and also there's been recent studies showing the can catch up on the weekend as long as you.

Dr Ken Cronos Lake Cardiology American Sleep Society European Society Of Cardiology Mildura Florida Inflammation Munich Doug Eight Hours Forty Two Percent Seven Hours Six Hours
Stroke significantly increases the risk of dementia

Doug Stephan's Good Day

03:13 min | 4 years ago

Stroke significantly increases the risk of dementia

"Some study out this week suggests that aspirins don't reduce the. Risk of a first heart attack what the hell, we've been told for years decades take an aspirin because, it'll help. You not only after but before so why. Now the change is no. Change, this is a. Little confusing again grabbing headlines. Reading the newspaper can be confusing so let me untangle this There's what we call in cardiology primary prevention, versus secondary prevention not to get deep into the weeds but you have to, break, it down whether we're. Trying to prevent the first heart attack and stroke or the second or more heart attack and stroke and we know without any doubt if you've already had a heart attack. Or stroke that, taking just a low dose of baby eighty one milligram single dose. Of aspirin per day prevents the second heart attack or stroke that's where there's no controversy but where there has been controversy is. Whether it's helpful to take daily aspirin to prevent, the first episode the first stroke the first heart attack, and that's. What this particular report in Munich Germany the. European society of cardiology this. Week, reporting on on. Primary prevention preventing the first. But things have changed since Decades ago when we first started talking about this because now so. Many people even though you don't particularly. A fan of them are on statins. So so many people who have yet to have their first heart attack or stroke are on statin, drugs and statin drugs are remarkably effective at preventing the first heart attack or stroke and I think, the reason why they didn't see a lot of. Benefit in this study was because, so many of the patients are already on statins and that's why results change because you dealing with people people change and what we do for, them changes and the other important thing. Is you have to look. At individuals you have to deal with this not in the whole population goes in the whole population the. Risk of the, baby aspirin and there, is some of bleeding in the stomach or, intestines, outweighed the benefit of primary prevention but, that's looking at the whole population your medicine, is personal deals with one Doctor and one, patient so you have to individualize this so you have to look at each person so someone. Like you who doesn't have a lot. Of risk factors for for heart disease You know, we might not, use that, aspirin to prevent the, first one. Although you're, not on, a statin so, they asked me figured and also but the person, who has, a ton of risk factors high blood pressure high cholesterol. A lot, of stress they're obese they're smokers family history their high. Cholesterol and they haven't had a heart attack and they you know they may even have some coronary disease or maybe not but nevertheless they have all. These risk factors and that's what's important. I may want to put that person on a single, baby and very carefully watched their GI tract because that's the person. Who will get some

Aspirin Doug Stephan European Society Of Cardiology Dr Kim Krohn Dr Ken Krona Coronary Disease Google Dr Doug Munich Germany
Donovan Mitchell, Johnny Manziel and Menzel discussed on Waddle & Silvy

Waddle & Silvy

01:41 min | 4 years ago

Donovan Mitchell, Johnny Manziel and Menzel discussed on Waddle & Silvy

"The initial do something at the end of that game that i'm not aware of that caused not mitchell harden regardless donovan mitchell did the responsible thing for a young rookie in says hey i'm sorry and james harden is the mvp show some maturity speaking of maturity johnny manziel says he had a reaction to his medication in a post on his instagram page today menzel said unfortunately had a reaction to an increase dosage of lithium which i take for my life polar disorder according to tmz sports menzel was hospitalized in texas his spokesperson told the spn's kevin seaford the incident happened monday night so skid to the nonsense really kim jong is that how you pronounce it a dollar i asked you earlier he really is dr ken he is a comedic actor reportedly was called on his trainer had to call on his training as an actual physician this week to help a fan according to tmz jong was performing saturday at standup live in phoenix arizona when a woman in the audience appeared to suffer a seizure dr ken who gave up his medical practice to become an actor right into action it's fantastic i heather holmberg was in the audience in tweeted that yang initially thought the crowd was heckling him when they ask for help for the unidentified woman you know he went to duke as well didn't he do so you're going to spring into action for someone who was having a seizure.

Donovan Mitchell Johnny Manziel Menzel SPN Dr Ken Arizona Mitchell Harden James Harden MVP Texas Kim Jong Heather Holmberg
Ken Jeong jumps from stage to give medical aid to audience member

Radio From Hell

01:44 min | 4 years ago

Ken Jeong jumps from stage to give medical aid to audience member

"And your family have your own personal fortress of reassurance roussette lifetime roofing or simply better than everyone else's period the star of dr ken which i don't believe is on anymore but he's done justice to the title of his former sitcom during a performance at the standup live comedy club on saturday night in phoenix ken yang left the stage right in the middle of his set to assist an audience member who had suffered a seizure during the show representative for mr young confirmed to e w entertainment weekly that he he in an emergency medical technician help the woman until paramedics arrived he is in fact a doctor and and he was able to i think it was part of the act he was a pretty good he's a pretty good doctor actually but when he got into acting in the the hangover movies beck he kind of said well this is a lot more fun and making more money and ogden man shot and wounded a neighbor's dog who attacked him on sunday morning according to lieutenant will far of the police department the incident happened on ogden avenue farce at a man was mowing as long his neighbor's dog just attacked him well fortunately when you mow the lawn and ogden you always have to have a gun with you just in case you should have a gun with you when you're mowing your lawn and ogden and he was able to shoot the dog the dog was wounded but survived the da exact condition is not known the man's injuries were not lifethreatening but he was bitten a couple of times by this mixed breed dog the rock and roll hall of fame induction happened last night so last night.

Ken Yang Representative Technician Dr Ken Mr Young Ogden
Britney Spears Given Vanguard Award

All News, Traffic and Weather

01:21 min | 4 years ago

Britney Spears Given Vanguard Award

"Is now in clinical trials in four sites around the country including fenway community health in boston wbz's lana jones tells us it is a mixture of hiv dna and proteins designed to create an immune response in the patients who take anyways medical research director dr ken mayor says this is a very early stage trial early phase vaccine trial means that we're looking for people who are low risk for hiv this is very early days and there are a number of other vaccine studies underway at fenway health and other sites in boston such as brigham and women's hospital and beth israel deaconess that are also in early phases to develop anti vaccine total of sixty subjects will be involved in testing the safety of this vaccine it'll be years before they can determine its effectiveness but dr mayor says he's encouraged by early results in lab animals lana jones wbz newsradio ten thirty of the show this is us as it was named outstanding television drama at the glad media awards the twenty ninth annual ceremony also recognize the net series master of none for an episode in which later waifs character comes out to her family the night's biggest on here went to britney spears who was presented the vanguard award by ricky martin that award recognizes an entertainer that has made a significant difference in promoting equality and acceptance of lgbtq people wbz news time six fifty.

Boston Wbz Lana Jones Dr Ken Mayor Fenway Health Boston Brigham Ricky Martin Research Director Beth Israel Deaconess Dr Mayor Britney Spears