27 Burst results for "Dr Kelly"

What is Anxiety?

TED Talks Daily

02:26 min | 5 months ago

What is Anxiety?

"Think about a time when you're feeling really anxious what was making you feel that way. Maybe a big test or serious conversation. You had to have with someone important to you or when you've had to drive at night during a rain store. How did that anxiety. Feel in your body. Did your heart start to race. Did you start sweat. Anxiety isn't just happening in your mind. It's a full body reaction. So how does it work. I called up. Dr kelly cyrus and brings got things set up perfectly and they were just. Yeah jen jen. And i are just technological mac. Ask she's a psychiatrist in washington dc. I asked her to give me the basics so anxiety is generally i would say a form of fear or form of worry either. You are afraid that something is going to happen or you are just increasingly worried. You're kind of Maybe apprehensive you're not sure something bad is going to happen. You are maybe overly focused on the expectation of some kind of outcome. Like you just can't stop thinking about something you know. One thing i sometimes is that you know you should just be less anxious to just try to be anxious but i mean you know that sounds like trying to say to someone. Why don't you just have high blood pressure or you know. Why don't you have just less abnormal cells in your uterus. It's that's exactly the case. It's just that we don't think about feelings and emotions in that way for some people it's actually part of your genetic makeup or there was something in your environment where you were predisposed to so many circumstances where you you were alert and if you can't control your environment you certainly can't control your genes. You can't just get rid of your anxiety. Dislike yourselves or your high blood pressure. Anxiety is a normal emotion that all humans experience just like happiness sadness and anger it turns out all feelings have purposes looking at evolution can give us some insight here for example joy and affection tie families together to create stronger bonds of support. Anxiety exists to keep us alive. It's part of our threat response. System and anxiety and fear are closely

Dr Kelly Cyrus Jen Jen DC Washington
Palms Through Deep Time

In Defense of Plants Podcast

01:43 min | 7 months ago

Palms Through Deep Time

"All right. Dr kelly matsunaga thank you so much. For coming on the podcast. It's an honor to have you here. And i'm really excited to talk to you today. But first let's start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is. You do all right. Thanks for having on the podcast. My name is as you just said. Kelly matsunaga currently an assistant professor in ecology and evolutionary biology at the university of kansas. And i'm also curator of paleo body in the biodiversity institute which is sort of the collection of natural history museums Here at ku. That's really exciting. Paleo botany to me. Is i have to live vicariously through people like you. Because it's something that was has always interested me but i want a different path with my career. So i'm really excited to pick your brain about this but one of the things that always interests me is how you came to paleo botany in the first place where you a fossil kid a plant kid. Where did the combination of the two really find their way into a fruitful career for you. Yeah so i I would say that. I came to paleo botany through a lot of sort of happy accidents home. I was not a paleo kid. Or a plant kid numb. I got interested in plants when i was in college. I was not a science major. But we all had to take intro. Some kind of intro. Biology works as a general education requirement. And so i took introductory botany in. That's what really got me interested in plants Specifically the the whole evolutionary story of plants that the professor that taught the courses frank shaughnessy at humboldt state university. Who was able to sort of weave through the course of the class.

Dr Kelly Matsunaga Kelly Matsunaga University Of Kansas Biodiversity Institute Frank Shaughnessy Humboldt State University
"dr kelly" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

07:18 min | 8 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"Rent or anything like that or no while i owned building. So they're really. I ain't a known for building The good thing is because i do that as ba. Nine months anthony's only talk best. That's gone in june. And i know going to be open by hand up paying for mortgage without being open. That's going to be tough. Yeah now now. The delays hurt a little bit more. You know because of course you need her. Yeah no i. I can't i can understand so then throughout this time. Kelly last question to ask you is. How has this affected your personal life. Well my husband. He's been very very support. He held me to They've they've building and case to help. He has helped me a lot you know. Turn things for the practice but You know. I had a baby that he's only one year ago when we were You know when. I was very stressed out with the it'd be nice weather permits i will Spend a lot of time Calling the city. 'cause i recall avery bay was calling voice now. bad Because sometimes i would call on my time with the baby but over all my husband is being being very supporting you know. I know but you know that that wasn't that's i hope. I hope because there is no more times. Maybe in the build up like what. I went to construction By you know. I'm learning to perfect. Right they stress from the clock You know what you see on the baby on My life You know my priorities number one. You know my finding so I'm learning to say three things to disconnect Every time that i come home and try to connect and we came to an agreement by you know when they me to baby my husband. I'm trying to stay away from my phone and taking the kermit's taking it all the time and that's why they could be my lunchtime finish when you know but in my well i've seen it happen today and on what i'm doing now because tuesday afternoon. He's my date. And i when my husband so do they have vague with friends at folks. There are the morning and You know we just came to an agreement to try to do things. Yeah that's good. That's good who works for you guys to do that. And then at the same time. It is stressful like speak about a lot of the startups. We document mom guilt right. Where like a lot of the times. We are now not a mom but like a lot of the times they your business owner you're entrenched into the business and everything like that and then at the same time when you're sometimes with your child you're thinking about the business and then when you're in the busy you're thinking about your child and then it can be. It's a tug of war. You know yes do. Yeah we we we did. It are when You know construction period. That's when i have been the most that i ever be during. The construction delays another construction. Because you know what he's studying obstruction now. I mean with the city departments. Come forward and we were having with the city. That's what i've been his trip but My husband. I came out with his schedule. And you know you know. After working for because i you know i have any schedule because i you know i have. You know i wake up seven to pain baby. They tend to fi- work and come home. You know. I mean my lunch time. I do a lot of billions that have to. Oh when my car. I answer the phone call and then you know my meeting with mighty career nine thirty after the baby went to bed so now. He's in better if better because they have any schedule That's good yeah like organization and something to follow which is really really good. It's awesome awesome. Kelly all right. Thank you so much. Kelly for being with us. It was the pleasure but before we say goodbye. Can you tell our listeners where they can find you. Yes well they can find me and now. I'm what might you sarah mcconnell. They'll kill even silas altogether. That's my incident. I also on the basement is my fellow may kind of Of manic wessex on On my website is www. My tree fell my email I'm very open and very flexible to talk. You know when. I met on my schedule but i yeah i'm responsive on an open to any suggestions Because i'm just starting out on him any advice you know. I really appreciate it Anybody that have gone through You know The startup process you know is open to any comments. Any mommy said that it would if my baby's doing any of the child And that's it Michael thank you so much for being been of my face and my speeding with my section. I hope that you know we can do. Peace gang. And i can give you feedback. How it up. Yeah definitely it's going to be great. Awesome so guys. That's all going to be in the show notes below so if you wanna reach out to kelly pick her brain a little bit more or anything like that are just conversation with. You can definitely go on the show notes below and click on links. We shall to her but kelly so much for being with us. It was a pleasure or hear from you soon. Okay thank you guys. Thank you so much for tuning in truly appreciate it. Remember please you can wait. Wait wait before you go rumor to share this episode with one other person or if you want. You can just pose this episode on any of your social media on instagram on your instagram stories in a facebook group or facebook. Anything like that even lincoln and just post it. You can tell me You can find me on the dental marketer on instagram and also on facebook. My name is just my us. You can find me on there. Just telling me if you want and a lot of you guys are sending me screenshots of you listening to a while you're cooking or you're listening to an episode while you're driving. I love that. And i will always reposted it so please please please continue to do that. Don't forget if you want to continue the conversation about this episode or any other episode. You've heard in the past. You can join the dental market or society. Facebook group and on there is where you're able to. You're able to speak to kelly. You're able to speak to a lot of and continue the conversation and ask more questions and concerns. So thank you guys so much for tuning in. I appreciate it. An-.

Michael Kelly tuesday afternoon sarah mcconnell Facebook facebook instagram Nine months anthony today june one year ago kelly nine thirty three things seven one other lincoln billions avery bay
"dr kelly" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

07:44 min | 8 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"I wanna have a good Staff you know. I wanna take my staff I learned my staff to be with me loan term because you know every kind of have a news stand or have unease there beijing. Actually come me you know. I don't know but he's going out with the bath itself. I just know that you know. Change ambitious get previous correct. But i really like. It's called. you know why she left. And that's something that. I don't wanna be answering my practice I wanted to i. Hopefully you know i. I hope that. I'm looking to find a long-term kristap because that's yeah. I've seen that because you know you could be a pretty often doctor. We training well do the best. You did it for war but you need to have a strong staff supporting you. Otherwise you know patients had an who say that's true. Yeah that's actually really really good Advice you know. They're the to especially the frontier like they're the ones who see the patients. Greet them talk to them. Enter the phones. And i remember. I don't know if you're familiar with sandy pardew. But she talks about how the front team is going to be the one to determine like where you live. What you drive and everything. 'cause a lot of money flows through them so they have to be fantastic. You're absolutely right. That's good throughout this time. Kelly what's been some of the best companies you've worked with. And then some of the people like the worst or not so good ones okay My favorite plays no. I don't know he's on life. I so okay so maybe there is an office. What i practice right now. That cheese on like me you know. She started she'd go to her Building and she build it up. She has a wonderfully staff you have a gracie stem She's very very seriously hoping only for maybe two years. But i just love. I love the that crack every meal. Pickups in -nology You know the staff cared a lot about everything you know Since amazing they up for the patients. I honestly i wanna be like that office. I'm going there. It also multi me to to be my interest rate and you know we are not going to be pretty far apart. you know. Almost an hour's drive competition in any way. So i can answer. It has many questions and and she's she's awesome. Okay yeah good. Yeah i it was. She is rough to there you know but he just what it takes a lot of traction at the beginning in point on. That's so good though that you're able to talk other you know what i mean. practices practice owners and and dentists in the community. Help each other. That they're really good. what's one of the worst companies. They worked with so far. I don't want to answer it or or if you could give me like what happened for them to have been one of the worst companies you not say the name but what happened in this scenario because I want for infant rempac. That's what i love for quite a few years on I was very high for the for the company and then My left on good terms. Everything okay I'm meeting my baby h. And after that. I didn't like that because i took some time off to have my baby. I took six months off. And then you know i came back to work in a few patients Came and told me that you know. I have let that office and i have Taking some of the patients which is not true and that i had Lipson who pay bills. Which i was like. I don't know what i want for that. you know. this is patience that came to me. Tell him you days. So i decided not to comply on countless office. I just medical and let it be Because that's not that's that that's gonna try that good patients you know me. They'd be with me with dares i'm very transparent and created with my thing so I say i you know it's just off. You know while you have to talk about another doctor like that. Yeah yeah that's that. They call me. Because i was a donkey on the love life. They need to pay them after being you know doctors and and then you know i. I don't know. I never did like gilded. Exit would ask you know. Yeah so i decided to pay fees Out of your own pocket. Yeah i did anyone. You talk and i just wanted to i to my life on you know but these oldies happened after i left. So he was queered weird. Yeah that's not good thing especially if this is not good in general so i can completely understand through this whole process kelly from the moment you decided i'm going to do a start up till today right now what has been some of your biggest struggles or fails or pitfalls or al hung the whole process where the city know they build up there A was that's to me. I couldn't understand why what's going on If i talked to this if you say like my contract or if i talked to my contract for they will say like the city so these people watched they tweet where At the an ivy question meeting did actor of the city That was actually 'cause i was still just traded with the process And i win there. And i request a meeting today so he came out even though my plan on. You know michael. Chapter west ride You know somebody into city what we might had even review and that they changed made so that was tough for me. Because i'd say why. Why is this happening. I don't really person. I don't know why he said we had taken the change. You change that. I guess he didn't see it. I don't know what what's the were males over him on wow too. The delays have been the biggest struggles for you. Yes maybe lace Being the storm. Yeah said he happened to process but yeah delays and laze mess. You miss with you mentally. 'cause you're thinking like hurry up and open and hurry bill. Do you have like Free do they give you like a couple of months. Free.

Kelly six months two years sandy pardew today michael one kelly kristap worst companies Lipson worst an
"dr kelly" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

08:35 min | 8 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"Not okay. So then you're scheduled to open in august. How do you envision this going so far have you. What are you doing right now. Are you interviewing people for your team. Are you doing any marketing. Or what are you doing right now. Right now will I studied working on the students. Credentialing i and my. I'm playing much my own my getting But i would company Maybe be later in the process. And when i wanna say i go in everything myself. I'm doing a video Instead i'm posed on my facebook page you know. I'm not doing heavily. But eventually i will have to decide you know. He's really really that what county is pretty saturated. So you have to get it mike. Otherwise he's going to be tough i'll saturated would you say it is right now like i have not. I have like next to me. Nice to dental offices in education complex that says wanted to these they right next to lease an older kapito and then the corner is another one if brady efface counties priante everywhere wow that's insane okay so i mean like i cannot take my chance. I'm move no right now. You would have to start doing your own or right now. Honestly i would just start documenting everything you know what i mean with your with your practice. However these coming along on social media so people can can feel like they're part of it you know when it comes to your insurance credentialing. Are you working with a company ear. Gas you started working with Ambient into enzymatic. Some having hoti so. Yeah we use high first meeting. Maybe a monaco are committing discovery schedule. Thawing waiting to to say committing going and and see how that goal and then you mentioned you were going to do. You're gonna work with the marketing company. A little later. Do you have one in mind already. Yes actually they wanted dave. My website. They colton resource. Oh digital resource. Oh okay i never heard of them. How'd you find well. Dan local the local on south florida. And he's they own own and fonder on You know they use locally they you know they. I am a lot of Study clubs and they they our were county internationalization and a few meeting and I was lucky enough to win an hour And then from that. Pretty much relationships started a couple of years. Ago tonto awesome. Okay so then right now. What would you say. Kelly is like the vision of your practice. Like what your mission statement. What's your vision. What do you hope. Let's just impatient right. And i'm going in and i'm walking out. What do you want me to tell my friends about your practice. Alan my privacy. And i finally betty modern stuff and i just take kelly. You know you know i. I base a lot on Educating myself like i'm abide the latest technology and for Patient care. And i wanted to see that i wanna make when there's only my doors see that you know they're getting on trip friendly they feel comfortable and They feel that are getting latest analogy and the best possible a half mile. Okay so then what would it be. You guys is mission statement. You know having gone i. I can't can't lie. I use you know. I feel my west. I am working on. I know to defense up to know you think okay. Can we pay you know. But i work on my nation. I'm basically saving. I need to know right from right now. Like a as you as you're like feeling the the personality of the practice like you'll get the mission statement you know and then put it in there. So then what do you plan to start hiring your team. I'm gonna tell you the next few months. Okay yeah that's gonna be that's gonna be good and then when you open up. Do you plan to open. Are you going to lebron associates ship and then completely full-time be in the practice. Or you're gonna kinda like seattle ain't going to transition i'm gonna say Today's corporate still. They had okay. We me doing that. They want me to a We also have that conversation yesterday. So i've been today's them to on today's my practice and friday to reach between two and a half and half as i would be practice tattoo. How do you have a conversation with the the person you're associate right. So how did you approach that. How would you recommend other people who are like in the shoes or going to be your shoes. Because that's kind of nervous. You know what. I mean you can be like. Are they gonna let me go right now or or maybe not. I hope not has competition. I don't know how did you approach it. Well i always be very very honest on the woman that That open community about getting the building the to me. I knew that if i get the building. Ottawa took it back as ability practice. So the moment that has a better opportunity I have a conversation with my manager in the original manager and i say look I looking to get my impact. 'cause you know how big care for seven years I feel comfortable talking to her. She's very open She's always been based throw me My hyper loose for a so I guess that helps on him. Yesterday we used to have the conversation. Say like know. We can't do that i. I'm building my office. That's why i have a student to do my social media All that letter. When i you know yesterday i approach her. She was nice about it. You know when the doctor good And we want to have to stay came and I you know. Luckily on that. I would be would then two and a half as and i will stay with actress to have pace. I was scared at the beginning but she was very understanding. And i'm i'm very grateful for that. Yeah that's good. That's really really good because you can't be scared. Some people are like what you're opening up. And how far is the me asking from your practice that you're starting up so ship. How far are they It could be a the driving. Is like fifteen twenty minutes. Oh okay so yeah. I mean you never know like patients can still be like i still wanna go. See dr kelly you know and then go to your practice. Fifteen twenty minutes. Isn't that far. You know what i mean. Well I don't you know no. Yeah like at getting money non. Yeah i guess. When i feel my and you know i i won't be on my own patience and it had someone being associating another word on you know that patients that go to any offices that i work and those patients They will continue to. I mean what i am. Those ones patients that you know they'd being prescribed for media members if any stuff like that so that mild patient base is being whatever practice out you know. I get you from this association that you've been working out right now even with you. How many years here. One at bain Six thousand fourteen but working officer has well. Yeah okay so in the one right now since two thousand and fourteen. I guess in all of those social. Since you've been in what are some of the main lessons that you've learned from these ships that you're going to be taking to your ear practice. I think that they found this. That aren't phones. Patient bodies enough income cursor on the gosh because a related content that patients have were making on.

Kelly friday august fifteen twenty minutes Fifteen twenty minutes yesterday south florida seven years today Yesterday Dan Alan Six thousand Today two thousand One lebron two and a half facebook kelly
"dr kelly" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

05:15 min | 11 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Back everyone listening to one line. Radio this is burned up. And junior with dr kelly rider. We are broadcasting live from dallas texas on iheartmedia as well as in southern california. Dr rider is one of the concussion. Experts in the united states and the is represented many concussion case cases as an expert witness. He has worked with over four hundred professional athletes and is recognized as one of the top doctors in the field by his colleagues and fellow industry. Professionals website is writer. Clinic dot com. Okay let's get back to this topic today. Nick oxygen therapy traumatic brain injuries. And genetic genetic mapping okay so You know. I'm going to talk about the coup collar here first. So the fda just approved it over the counter device called the q collar for reducing traumatic brain injury. How does it work. Kelly and do you approve it. Yes so i. I i really stand behind it. It's a pretty interesting device Arteries trump provide basically his blood flow into the brain Basically the way the q. Works that it's putting pressure on internal juggler so basically allowing the blood to stay into the brain where it's not really flowing out of the brain as fast as it's going in so it's causing a little bit of a backup so the best way that i can describe how the collar worker to is effectively kind of like a fire. Hose hooked up to a fire hydrant. That firehose you can easily move it if it doesn't have water in it right but the moment that we turn the water on that fire hose stiffens up and it's it doesn't allow any movement in that you can still move but not as it's not as flexible and not as pliable correct so Effectively what that q collar does it. Put enough pressure on internal juggler where it keeps the blood volume in the head and prevents the shaky on the the head to an extent It doesn't stop and all the way but it. It does reduce you know by what their numbers are saying is about fifty percents. So the fda gave the stamp of approval and the device you know seems to be very effective and and that i think the biggest thing that people have to understand is that it does not prevent right Any injuries from from abilene 'cause the majority of the questions that i see Soda do the object. The subject actually hit the ground hidden. Object is to simply whiplash so You know the brain still gonna slosh around in a coup counter coup injury where there's still going to have side effects posting questions enroll so we've only got about three minutes. Unfortunately but i understand that you are using genetic. Excuse me. Genetic mapping in your practice out. Now how does this help when treating injuries. Yes so what we're looking at is able the the bodies abel's ability to actually absorb vitamins and minerals and nutrients because what we're seeing a lot of times with these people that have concussions and posting cushion injuries. they start to get very manic. They start to get depressed is starting to have anger outbursts which is offering a low what we're finding out now. Is it genetically the university of southern cal. No i'm sorry you. Ucla came out with this study. A few years back that actually showed that there was a genetic linkage of between head trauma and be vitamin absorption and actually manic attacks and panic attacks and and follow dysfunction. which is anger outbursts. Those types of things so A lot of its demarcated and noted. Now where the studies are starting to show. We'd been talking about for years. I know people. I'm a i'm a provider. I'm not a you know a research nerd in the sense that i do research all the time actually see patients so all i can tell you is what i see my patients and what what what we find and what we were finding what we were reporting is now come true with research actually done in the lab and so now we can back up and validate what we had been doing So we used unedic mapping in a sense to find out how to get that patient recovered quicker sooner faster stronger than anywhere else in the in the country. So we've got about thirty seconds okay. Football season just ended. You believe that the safety rules put in place to reduce the traumatic brain. Injuries are helping know the numbers. Don't lie the numbers are showing that they're still having the same amount of injuries They're not doing the safety protocols the way they really need to be done And unfortunately there's gonna get exposed yet again My by somebody poking and prodding into that and so always always. Yeah always great to talk to you so good to have you back on the air with us. Dr kelly writer. Yeah it was great. You'll have to come back again sooner rather than later. Dr kelly rider. Check them out he's a rockstar in the doctor. In the world of chiropractic check them out at writer clinic dot com always a pleasure. Thank you so much for listening and everyone enjoyed. Yeah yeah and. I don't know what the weather's like louisiana but it's great here in dallas so everyone have a great day and remember you get one body you get one mind and you get one life..

Kelly dallas kelly rider united states today southern california louisiana writer clinic dot com kelly writer iheartmedia one mind one line over four hundred professional dr kelly rider Nick about three minutes about thirty seconds one body one dallas texas
"dr kelly" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

01:35 min | 11 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"You can't harm yourself right. No no you can't really hurt yourself right. So that's a beautiful part about it is You know when you talk about. Mild hyperbaric oxygen therapy. You're not talking about traditional either barrack where they're using one hundred percent oxygen and you have to jump into these tanks with you know cotton clothes on it has to be washing certain chemical so that way. It doesn't cause a spark or any bad thing to happen to you. We're we're talking about mild hyperbaric. We're actually taking just regular twenty one percent oxygen up again into a tank of you can bring your cell phone in there. You bring it pad whatever you want and enjoy yourself and still get the same benefits without having the hazardous benefits of true hyperbaric oxygen therapy. So you get the same. Overall facts bodies repairing regenerating restoring get. You don't have the dangerous. So yeah i love this. I love it. We're talking about today. And we'll be right back more coming up with dr kelley rider. We're talking 'bout hyperbaric oxygen therapy traumatic brain injuries and genetic mapping when we get back stay tuned. You're listening to one life radio.

today one hundred percent dr kelley rider twenty one percent oxygen one life radio hyperbaric oxygen
"dr kelly" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

08:22 min | 11 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"To one life radio. This is bernard at with junior broadcasting live from dallas texas on iheartmedia as well as in southern california on. Abc news talk. I have my friend. Dr kelly rider back. He hasn't been with us in a couple of years. He is a board certified doctor of chiropractic. Certified active release techniques provider board-certified practic sports practitioner and founder of rider clinic sports chiropractic center. He is one of the top concussions experts in the united states and has represented many concussion cases as an expert witness Dr rider was the only chiropractor. The us invited to participate in the invitation. Only university of pittsburgh medical center team approach meeting on october of two thousand fifteen. He has worked with over four hundred professional athletes and is recognized as one of the top doctors in the field by his colleagues and fellow industry professionals. His website is writer. Clinic dot com. Good to have you back. How you doing dr kelly. I'm good. I'm good so good to have you back on the show. And i love what we're talking about today. Yeah of course been so long. I mean it's been a couple of years since you've been in studio with us but our topic today. Yeah it's hyperbaric oxygen therapy traumatic brain injuries. And genetic mapping so for people that don't understand or know what hyperbaric oxygen therapy what it is. Could you explain it to them. Yes so we're basically putting a person into a pressurized tank that there then breathing oxygen than the pressure pressure typically builds up to one point three atmospheric pressure which is about fifteen feet below the water surface effectively. So the same way that you feel years ears popping when you go down to the deep end of the pool. You'll feel that same pressure gradient difference in in in the chamber while you and there And what that allows the red blood cell to do is actually invert and when it inverted causes the red blood so the have about ten thousand percent increase in oxygen binding capacity. So it's kind of like saying we need a sip of water but would break the hoover dam to give you drink water. So rapidly accelerates the body's ability to heal and then get blood flow oxygen to the tissue. And you've been doing this for a long time. Because i know i've known you for about nine years and i know that you were doing it for years before that And so dame your wow sixteen years Yeah it's amazing. A lot of celebrities. Use this for anti-aging isn't doesn't like Oh my gosh. Didn't michael jackson used to sleep in a hyperbaric chamber or something like that right. So you yeah. We used to laugh at my cool and and people talk and you know make comments but actually michael and his physicians were ahead of the time and the recent study that just came out of israel showed that it actually reverses the aging Effects of the telomeres were actually able to look at the telomeres. And you're in the human body and actually show that there was an improvement in telomere left by you know effectively reversing about twenty to twenty five years of the aging process naturally without any drugs without any medication without anything by simply doing fifty heidelberg sessions. And so you know. We poke fun at michael but michael was ahead of his time. There's there's another Celebrity real famous Female oh my goodness. I can't think i can see your face. I just can't put. I'm thinking beyond state but it's not the on say it's a latino are latino Thinking of who is it. I love this. Yeah yeah jennifer lopez. She sleeps in one two and we all know how great she looks right. And you know there's a bunch of professional athletes at sleepover covering and and boosting their body's immune system and recovery cycle so. It's it's noted out there. It's it's catching more wind. Has we like to say in the industry and people are starting to get a you know aware of what it is. It's real potential. So it's kind of interesting and fun well and you've been working with the nfl. For many many years. I know the last time we talked you. Were like the official chiropractor for many of the nfl teams out there So what kind of sport. Injuries are sports injuries. is it used to treat. I mean we use it from concussions from getting oxygen and blood supply back to the brain to using it for soft tissue injuries as as hamstring pulls ankles knees hips. I mean it's good for anything because ultimately the body repairs by simply one thing and one thing only which is Oxygen blood flow. You need oxygen blood flow to that tissue to repair and so inside. The chambers were able to to really produce large amount of oxygen to get to the tissue and speed up and on top of that. Its reducing inflammatory. Response the kind response and try the human body so it's affecting many many many different levels other than just getting blood and oxygen to tissue some do most of the nfl teams have a hyperbaric oxygen tank or are in their in their training facilities. Some do majority of them don't Most of the players by them individually and put them in their house People like i mean the reason. I can say this kind of stuff is because it's public knowledge. Whenever he was actually with the cavaliers he actually Had one inside the the training facility and then have one at home so When he moved to from. Cleveland to Los angeles the same type of setup was actually Put in for him. So i mean this is all public knowledge. We're not giving away anybody's formation or anything by saying this but I mean it's documented out there from you know last two To i you just looked. Nfl high to ward back is still playing They've done espn Articles on it. So the people using them so I a lotta times. The nfl is typically Way more advanced when an open mind when it comes to these types of treatments right for quicker recovery and for injury prevention to you know because if your body is regularly in a hyperbaric oxygen therapy. I would imagine that you are less likely to get his injured right as well. You're you have more blood flow and more oxygen to those you know if your body's not inflamed you're less likely to take that same injury that you might have taken not fully healed up and rested and you take you take that little ball. You know. it's not. It's not as bad so we're funny. Is these these individuals are showing that. Hey you know what yeah. Maybe it'd take those little things that used to cause major injuries and i'm not having major injury offset so it's kind of interesting to to see the mindset start to ship more about maintaining the body and taking care of themselves and he looked like tom brady who who accessibly talks about You know the what he does to take care of. Maintain his body wilson. I spend over a million dollars a year right on on the size and doxygen be and he goes on and on and on about what he does. Those guys that take themselves end up being a longer in the league and make more money and the klay longer and must show. Yeah case in point tom brady. I was going to bring him up to and steph curry and the dallas cowboys. Because i'm going to flotation therapy. Which the cowboys were the first. Nfl team To have a float tank in their facility back years ago You know i don't even remember. I mean i wasn't delivering with stan. But it was many many years ago with their first training facility which i think was somewhere in north dallas but yet they had a float tank and now and i remember steph. Curry was the one that said because somebody asked him you know why are you so good at what you do. And he he said it was because the flotation therapy really really helped a all. These therapies are so good for you and the thing is all natural too so.

jennifer lopez michael michael jackson sixteen years Los angeles steph curry Cleveland Curry today iheartmedia tom brady southern california steph twenty five years united states one first stan one thing first training facility
"dr kelly" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

06:09 min | 11 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Ready. We're back everyone. This is bernard mit junior. You're listening to one life radio. We are broadcasting. Live from dallas texas on iheartmedia as well as k. m. t. in southern california on. Abc news talk. And we've got show gardner continuing on with us. We are talking about cultivating the habit of always learning. Okay so how important is it should lead to ask questions. Well i think really that the basis and the beginning of everything new that we learn absolutely that A lot of that is we need to only you know. Just ask we. We ask questions of books as we're reading them but that also brings up the idea of asking questions to realize people and cultivating an environment and our own home where we invite people of different opinions and different levels of education and different life experiences into our home for you know. Do you remember when we talked about crappy. Dinner parties bernadette. Oh yeah yeah i do. Let's talk about it again. Well as a refresher it's open the doors you know. Clean the toilets. Don't worry so much about the dust on the mantle but have people over serve pizza out of a box or whatever is easy but really make those relationship times happen Really have those evenings for your children get to watch you. Interact with adults. Ask questions and learn new things absolutely and the converse. The conversation should be rich as the food. And just you know open. Minded is the food and trial new. Have it all together. I forget we did that. We talked about that. I don't know a couple of years ago. But i thought it was as well fascinating conversation because i think it's important that you open your mind and not just who sits at your dinner table but that like you said the type of books that you read as well and that's what happens when you start reading books from you know a lot of different. If you will lot of different thought leaders you have the ability then to connect the dots and understand things at a much deeper level at. I totally agree. You said that so well and you can. What's really amazing to me is that the world is becoming smaller. Every day and we can reach out We can reach out to the authors. If we want to ya. I think in fact i have zoom call scheduled with the author of a book that i'm currently reading called Beyond racial gridlock embracing mutual responsibility. And what's exciting is. This is a topic. I think you know. That's on a lot of our minds and in order to understand another person's perspective. Dr yancey says we need to ask questions find common ground so it's not just about learning you know being a lifelong learners but that also feeds in to building relationships in consensus. With exactly what you were referring to with people who don't see the world exactly like we do and look at knucklehead continue we can so it's a wonderful thing to think of this world as being smaller and being able to build not only those crappy dinner parties but build relationships with people all over the world who have information that we wanna exchange or the that we need. Yeah no Do you belong to a book club killing you know i do but i'm thinking i i'm part of a book club that reads a lot of fiction. You brought up an a topic that i really been processing and thinking about quite a bit because there are women all over the country who are part of book clubs that read novels and as wonderful and lighthearted and thought provoking as they can be what if we decided to turn those times together and into clubs that discussed books that were That had something to do with race relations. Or how do we better at business or how to improve our minds. What if they were nonfiction book clubs. And i think that's gonna be another action item on my list of things to do coming up next. Yeah so. I read a lot of everything and that way. I can come to my own conclusions. I mean you know if you read enough. You know when somebody's lying or you know when somebody's not putting the truth out can have a couple of different newspapers. But you know we're trying to manipulate the reader But if you're well rather than you and you and you know that's part of my job is to read a lot of different things about a lot of different industries and people thought leaders and so forth but You can tell when somebody's lying if you read enough it. You really can't. Do you know what i'm talking about. Yes most definitely and you can tell when people have an agenda say when they have an agenda absolutely well and then if we open those books together like when you and i have read books at the same time. What's great is. We can be a check. 'cause sometimes people will get past you you know. And but it's nice to be able to discuss these things in this type before him and then in those crappy dinner parties. And that's one reason i have gone back to school and i'm educating myself is really so that i can be discerning when i hear information particularly for me personally about the bible about scripture about how we interact with that because i don't ever want to be in a position where i have to receive information and don't understand how to process it. Does that make sense. Yeah and. I think that it's interesting you know. We talked about amazon earlier. And i'm a big fan of amazon. I get a lot of my most of my books from there but amazon bands books for undefined. Hate speech and it goes on to say that amazon is adopted. A rule against books that contain anything the company labels as hate speech. It appears there was no announcement. This new rule it was just only noticed by media after online retailer recently banned book that criticizes transgender ideology. And it isn't clear. What amazon means by hate speech a speech who i almost.

amazon southern california bernard yancey bible iheartmedia one reason dallas texas couple of years ago Abc news one life radio bernadette junior
Accidentally Trashed, Thawed or Expired: Reports of Covid Vaccine Spoilage

All Things Considered

02:52 min | 11 months ago

Accidentally Trashed, Thawed or Expired: Reports of Covid Vaccine Spoilage

"Of covert vaccinations picks up, So do the reports of doses going to waste and it's more than just a handful here and there. We're talking 300 doses in Lee County, North Carolina. 1000 doses in Palm Beach and in Tennessee. Nearly 5000 doses have gone to waste. In the last month, Blake farmer of member station to be PLN in Nashville looked into it. Most clinics or experience to giving vaccines but not ones that are so precious and so sensitive to temperature that definitely have been losing since Sleepover. This pressure, Beth Ann Wilmore manages the covert vaccine inventory at a community health center in Franklin, Tennessee. Nonprofit clinics in the state started receiving shipments a month ago. I was definitely waking up in the mill a knife. Wondering how the temperatures were doing and they get okay. I hope it's good. She knows the horror stories one from a county over happened Just a week ago, The local school district received 1000 doses for a teacher vaccination event, but they were put in an unapproved freezer. The temperature sensor on this shipment gave an error code and out of caution. They were advised to throw them all away. It hurts my heart. Dr. Lisa Pearcey is the health commissioner in Tennessee, which has seen one of the country's biggest spikes in reported spoilage. But it's one of the risks in having so many places to get the vaccine as a way to increase access. There are now more than 700 sites across the state. It definitely raises the level of Concern when you have more partners, particularly partners that aren't under your direct control. In Knoxville, 1000 doses were thrown out, apparently confused for a shipment of dry ice in Memphis. The county was slow to disclose that nearly 2500 doses were allowed to expire on several occasions. Local health director resigned, the state has stepped up audits and cold in staff from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to monitor. There's so many opportunities for doses to go Bad in Florida workers turned the power off to a fridge in Connecticut. A fridge door just didn't close and Dr Kelly more of the immunization action coalition says a little spoilage is expected. Would be more worried if I saw reports of zero doses. Wasted transparency is the real concern. You want to see some waste because that means people are paying attention and that real world accidents happen and that they're being responded to properly. You could just don't want to see negligence. Reports of spoiled doses still come too far less than 1% of the total, even in states with big losses. There is hope that mishaps will be easier to avoid. With the newly authorized Johnson and Johnson vaccine. It can last in a normal refrigerator for months

Tennessee Beth Ann Wilmore Dr. Lisa Pearcey Lee County PLN Palm Beach Blake Nashville North Carolina Centers For Disease Control An Franklin Dr Kelly Immunization Action Coalition Knoxville Memphis Connecticut Florida Johnson
Weighing the risks of travel amidst coronavirus

The John Phillips Show

02:52 min | 1 year ago

Weighing the risks of travel amidst coronavirus

"Coronavirus questions with the one and only Dr Kelly victory. Let's get to his many calls is we Can everyone holding I want to try to get to you before we run out of time. So let's go to Raina in Northridge. You're on with Dr Kelly victory. For high doctor, This is Vienna. My husband passed away last year on by my daughter lives in New York, and she hasn't come down to Away because of the cold dead and I had made it. I have taken a trip to thinking of taking a kid toe quota Vallarta so weekend. You know, huh? Take a break and you know, mental for mental house and all of that So on both of us leave, I know buyout sounds and also Motive was our in house in a good health condition. She's 30 to 1 57 and I looked up the point put away Artur cases, and it's the highest was 66,000. And now it's only like 1500. I just want to get your thoughts on, you know of it to take the trip or not. It's been very difficult for both of us without you know, my husband, you know, especially during the holiday. Well again, and this is without rendering on official medical advice. All I can tell people is that I think you need to assess your overall risk factors. And it sounds like from the very little you said that you and your daughter. Both are in good health. You certainly are both in a lower risk category based on your age on if you don't have any underlying health conditions. I am not one bit concerned personally about going to an area that has quote a lot of cases. Because these cases as we know the vast majority of the people who are testing positive are not symptomatic and the chances that they have virus that they can even spread to somebody else or virus that is capable of causing illness is relatively low because we are testing people who have no symptoms asymptomatic people. People are walking around without a fever, cough or running nose. And those things are very unlikely to spread the illness. And furthermore, if you were to get it there, chances are very low that you would have a bad go of it. So I am a huge supporter of people doing the things that they want to do in their lives. And if this trip is important, and it sounds like it is sounds like you've been through a very stressful Recent time. Then I would really support the idea of you going and taking reasonable precautions. You should always wash your hands after you sneeze or cough. You should always avoid people who are actively ill. You should always do those sorts of things. This is nothing new Just because we have covert 19 around. Thanks so

Dr Kelly Raina Northridge Artur Vienna Cold New York Cough Fever
"dr kelly" Discussed on Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

"Know whether it's more bad days and good days or more leaking than not or just kind of how you said that nearing of your quality of life in narrowing the options that you have on a daily basis. Start to get to where it so bothersome and you start to think about treatment. What are some of the the treatments virgin continents so the the bread and butter the going down to super basics. I always say this is the only one with no side. Effects is pelvic floor physical therapy and so when you ask that question about like even if it's mild with just a pad should they do you know one should they do. It's like teller. Physical therapy can really benefit anybody. Even if you think your problem is mild and there's no side effects to it. The only side effect is a little bit of time. But i think women art new women's sometimes need to be pushed prioritize. Their own health is like why wouldn't you take an hour to make your body stronger. Body deserves that right. So i think about physical therapy very different than a woman who might be like. I don't time or what's the i think of. It is like of course. You're going to help your body be as strong as it can. The great thing about pelvic floor physical therapy as it helps both overactive. Bladder and stress. Incontinence the pelvic floor. Physical therapists are trained in bladder. Retraining urge suppression pelvic floor muscle strengthening and a lot of women there mis perception about that is that it's just key goals and it's so much more than it looks at your habits. It looks at how much you know all the bladder triggers that you're drinking like you know cups of coffee and alcohol and spicy food and kind of all those things that aggravate the bladder and then your overall muscle strength as well. So pelvic floor physical therapies absolutely wonderful for any sort of incumbents. Yeah i ap so lutely agree. I have a few episodes with my good friend. Melissa gallo episodes back on pelvic floor physical therapy..

Melissa gallo
"dr kelly" Discussed on Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

"I am live from my office at the brigham and women's hospital where it is still. I moved in a year ago. And it's still not really decorating. I will just blame the virus. That shall not be named an. I have with me my friend. Dr kelly kaspersen board certified urologist in the state of washington. And she's also the host of an incredible podcast. That if you have not listened to is an extraordinarily complimentary podcasts to this one called you are not broken and i am so so excited i have been on her show. She gets to be on my show and so welcome. Kelly how are you today. I'm so good. Thanks for having me. I'm so excited. This has been a long time in the making and we are together. Virtually at a sexual health conference this for the next three. To friday's the ish usually educational conference now in phoenix. Now virtual wherever you may be right so both of us are taking this extra course From the international society for the study of women's sexual health it's mouthful. So we call ish. And i know i'm super excited because i have a lot to learn and even though we are going to be talking more on e. incontinent today again. I really recommend Kelly's podcast you are not broken because she talks a lot there about sexual health from the perspective of urologists and kelly. Tell us more about your podcast before we get into incontinence. Y- kind of birth did self..

brigham and women's hospital Dr kelly kaspersen international society for the Kelly washington phoenix kelly
"dr kelly" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"This at the hunter. Thank you guys once again for tuning in really really appreciate it now usually do not do these type of introductions for The facebook lives in just a little sad reminder. I remember that we do. Facebook lives every monday seven thirty. Pm eastern standard time always tried to have different guests are just speak about relevant issues. And things like that. So Usually do not do these types of introductions but i want to thank you all so much for tuning in For subscribing sharing and liking into remind. You ought to do that just recently. I got a little note from some podcasters association. That that kind of keeps tabs and podcasts. And my podcast growing actually on apple podcasts so the numbers are increasing. And i really really appreciate you all sharing subscribing liking and of course for tuning in so. Please continue to keep up the good work. There's an episode that you like or anything like that. Just make sure that you are telling your friends and your neighbors and your family members and coworkers about about what we got going on over here at captain hunters podcast so today. We're going to be speaking with kelli. sues her doctorate and really smart lady in a really appreciate her coming on. Another reason i wanted to do this. Introduction is because of course we know. Now as i record this that joe biden in his running mate miss Kamala harris are the president elect vice president elect respectively and so I want to you know i did this. Show with With dr hope about Just the importance of women and nakajima in the strides. That women are making just in life in general and so. I thought it would be a great time to release this episode. Of course it's already on facebook but just to release the audio version of this. I thought was very very important. Considering the times we live in. So if you're black We've had a black president we've had a now we've had a black in southeast out south asian mixed woman the bp very really proud of the accomplishments of these particular people. We've got more mayors more In more elected officials going on and going on in this country. I didn episode with another doctor. Dr turner who Just talked about the importance of of black people entering into The medical field. So all these great great episodes and i really want to encourage people to continue to go on to grow on So to my daughter into everyone else's daughter whether you're black white hispanic No matter what or who. You are you can do it. You can thrive and you can go forward in life. We just have to have the chains take off of us. Had removed the restrictions. And there's nothing that we can't do. So that's the reason. I wanted to do this little introduction so as we go close out with the introduction here remember to rate subscribing share please consider supporting capital hunters podcast. Greatest thing you can do to support is to subscribe share in like giving that financial donation dollar in episode Five dollars a month Fifty dollars for one hundred dollars for the year. Whatever you can do to help to this podcast continue to go into grow. I really really appreciate it. We have a lot of great episodes coming up This is a record. This is now dis- november twenty twenty. I'm taking the month of december. Don't worry i got episodes already booked up until Already booked for january twenty twenty one all the way up into february twenty twenty one so we got a lot of great episodes on. I'm always looking for more guests. More more suggestions for topics and everything like that so Not gonna be any more. Here is the into interview with dr kelley. Hope so yes so. I'm not very familiar with new haven. New does newhall sexual right as a kid. I would would go down to the way the avenue section break because there was a church off of there and these trinity temple church. We go there all the time as kids. Well we will go there all the time as part of my my church in water go there. I was the deputy insurance. But that was pretty much all i know about even of course the war section of the wall okay. Long were six. But i don't know. I don't know too much of the certain areas and sections of the city. We have a new bill section. You have the hill section. You have a very various sections in the city of new haven. And i was fortunate enough to grow up in the new wholesale section. So my support on it while. It's a nice part town for me. It's my neighborhood my hood absolutely but most folks will no science park. Yell is within close proximity. It's right in the middle of albert magnus nearby ios nearby and Yeah i enjoy growing up in the new however You know the violence as is with most urban areas but absolutely new avail. absolutely okay. sounds good. Sounds good so we got a couple of viewers. I want to say hello to them. i'm gonna put this banner up because we cannot see the the people who are joining. I said all the time. But i wish i stayed again. Someone puts his banner up. So thank you for joining us if you want your name said or if you have a comma question make sure that you chime in. 'cause i see who's here you know the particular program that we are using so i wanna say hello and thank you to my friend here. My new friend dr. kelly. Hope i really really appreciate you coming on the podcast and agreeing to be here and share your wisdom and knowledge and thank you and welcome. Thank you for having me. I am excited to be here and definitely grateful thankful for connecting meeting you and you giving me the opportunity to chat with you for a little bit and i'm just excited or wherever the russians going to go with what we're gonna get into on this evening. So folks come in the rule shan people and tell them to come on in here. Let's get into some robust conversation. Absolutely absolutely so i wanna say hello to the tricia rahmael. Thank you so much for for coming on in really really. Appreciate it So let's let's talk about how he met so We met at a community center in waterbury where you are teaching African american and latino history to a community Sensitive can tell us a little bit about that. Were absolutely so i met warn leach in a row out of waterbury and he was looking facilitator to put on classes for our young people are middle high schoolers of around african american studies. And let's neck studies in so i Responded to his all facilitator in he and i connected and one of the thing that was important for me in the reason why i reached out about the initiative. He was launching through. The group was because i realized that our history our literature the things about black and brown culture is usually sprinkled in the curriculum in our schools. Insult to have the opportunity to spend eight weeks to spend four weeks to spend any amount of time solely focusing on that was right up my alley and so i spent a number of weeks about eight weeks working with young people and teaching them about the history pre enslavement. Because that's really important us so we started with talking about african origin. Civilization and then we journeyed.

facebook president waterbury joe biden captain hunters Dr turner Kamala harris nakajima dr kelley tricia rahmael apple trinity temple church albert magnus kelli. newhall leach vice president dr. kelly
"dr kelly" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

"What a great opportunity and a meaningful position that it sounds like also gives you a little bit more bandwidth to do other things like you know, , write a book during the pandemic. . Yeah exactly. . Yeah. Why . don't you tell us about the logistics of that since a lot of folks feel like there's a zero extra bandwidth how did you? ? How did you pull that off I know so I, , I was trying to do it all between March. . And June, , you know watching my two and a half year old helping my son was zoom kindergarten and working part time from home like four hours a day and it was really difficult and my my little girl started carrying around a toy phone and saying I'm unaware Komi and I was like, , okay, , something has to change. . So in June I took a leave of absence normally have the summers off every anyway but I went out couple of weeks early. . And in July, , I started to send out a newsletter and I compiled everything. . I had written about Corona virus just in bits and pieces on instagram captions and it was fifty pages and I said my has in like it's like a lot of content I've already written like This and you know he said like, , yeah, you , should. . You know you have. . My background just fits really naturally with the topic like I did my college thesis about Stress Management in Psychology, , and then in residency idea research on Kawasaki Disease, which , is Kinda like misc and I did you know I know more than the average person about complex conditions and I published also on when you have respiratory illnesses and you're hospitalized as a child so it just felt like Kinda destiny that I should try to compile a resource to help families so I did it in in a month. . <hes> mostly like from eight to midnight men sometimes in the morning and it was really fast and I think one of the things. . That I learned from the experience was how important passion is professionally because when you get a project that you think is really important and when you believe in something, , you can just you make it work. . I hadn't had anything that I have been like so excited about in committed. . In a while and so that was a nice experience to remind me like why we are we do we do. . It sounds like you are perfectly positioned was that you did a conventional publishing deal writers itself. . I did everything myself. So . I've I've tried to learn a lot about like covers and book layouts in audio books I recorded my own audio book in my closet. . About how we do podcasts over here? ? So Thankfully, , totally with you on that. . and. Anything . writing about this other places to women. . So Sarah and I saw what you had written in Emily. . Newsletter of course, , she is a previous podcast guests use the author of a couple of books like crib sheet expecting better about you know the actual research and what it says on on pregnancy in child raising and things like that, , and she has a very balanced. . Approach on risk and such like that <hes> which sounds like it fits a lot with your. . Philosophy as well. . So can you talk to our listeners a little bit about what you wrote for her newsletter about about code? ? Right, , I you know I was so happy to connect with Emily Austria this this pandemic because. . You. . Know it's been a rapid fire <hes>. . Some scientists say it's like we're getting hit with a fire hose of information about corona virus because it's so new and everybody is thinking about it and talking about it. There's . so much data to take in an analyze, , but I was so happy and reassured to see that. . When we all read all of the studies we kind of interpreted them in a similar way with regards to children's health, , which is that while we don't know everything everything we do know so far is. . Is On the more reassuring sign regarding children regarding the severity of illness, , more similar to other respiratory illnesses like the flu and RSV that four children that that krona virus doesn't seem to be worse than other viruses. . Now I think is important for a general audience that I emphasized these these regular respiratory viruses we see are a problem for children. . Thousands of children are hospitalized every year for RSV and flu. . So I'm not trying to dismiss or minimize the risk. . There are children who have died of corona virus and it's a tragedy but I think it's also important that we take it in context as we make our decisions like what's different about this or what's new about this and how does it affect? ? Our decision making as parents. So . what I tried to address for her her newsletter was about. . How worried parents should be about the long term side effects of Corona virus for children because there's been a lot in the news about about long haulers, , adults and children who have prolonged symptoms from coronavirus. . So, , we obviously have a lot to learn about this because it hasn't been very long but I tried to give my best guesses as a pediatrician about how to put this in context for families because statistically, , for example, , the MISC which is the sort of immune system overreaction that some children have from corona virus that lands them in the hospital. . It's a scary disorder, , but thankfully, it , has been rare and treatable. . So, , while awareness about it is important, , I don't think it's the kind of disorder that has to change parents opinions or keep them up at night worried about it because it is it is so rare at this point. . So while they're certainly may be some long term side effects from Cremona. . Virus. . I think parents can leave that to doctors to worry about and research and learn about and and not worry about them. . Now because I don't think we have evidence that they exist in a meaningful way. . That should alter your decision making now. .

DIMICK Freidan Cova Journal Laura Kelly Hemmitt Sarah New York Alex
Parenting in a Pandemic with Pediatrician Dr Kelly Fradin

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

05:54 min | 1 year ago

Parenting in a Pandemic with Pediatrician Dr Kelly Fradin

"What a great opportunity and a meaningful position that it sounds like also gives you a little bit more bandwidth to do other things like you know, write a book during the pandemic. Yeah exactly. Yeah. Why don't you tell us about the logistics of that since a lot of folks feel like there's a zero extra bandwidth how did you? How did you pull that off I know so I, I was trying to do it all between March. And June, you know watching my two and a half year old helping my son was zoom kindergarten and working part time from home like four hours a day and it was really difficult and my my little girl started carrying around a toy phone and saying I'm unaware Komi and I was like, okay, something has to change. So in June I took a leave of absence normally have the summers off every anyway but I went out couple of weeks early. And in July, I started to send out a newsletter and I compiled everything. I had written about Corona virus just in bits and pieces on instagram captions and it was fifty pages and I said my has in like it's like a lot of content I've already written like This and you know he said like, yeah, you should. You know you have. My background just fits really naturally with the topic like I did my college thesis about Stress Management in Psychology, and then in residency idea research on Kawasaki Disease, which is Kinda like misc and I did you know I know more than the average person about complex conditions and I published also on when you have respiratory illnesses and you're hospitalized as a child so it just felt like Kinda destiny that I should try to compile a resource to help families so I did it in in a month. mostly like from eight to midnight men sometimes in the morning and it was really fast and I think one of the things. That I learned from the experience was how important passion is professionally because when you get a project that you think is really important and when you believe in something, you can just you make it work. I hadn't had anything that I have been like so excited about in committed. In a while and so that was a nice experience to remind me like why we are we do we do. It sounds like you are perfectly positioned was that you did a conventional publishing deal writers itself. I did everything myself. So I've I've tried to learn a lot about like covers and book layouts in audio books I recorded my own audio book in my closet. About how we do podcasts over here? So Thankfully, totally with you on that. and. Anything writing about this other places to women. So Sarah and I saw what you had written in Emily. Newsletter of course, she is a previous podcast guests use the author of a couple of books like crib sheet expecting better about you know the actual research and what it says on on pregnancy in child raising and things like that, and she has a very balanced. Approach on risk and such like that which sounds like it fits a lot with your. Philosophy as well. So can you talk to our listeners a little bit about what you wrote for her newsletter about about code? Right, I you know I was so happy to connect with Emily Austria this this pandemic because. You. Know it's been a rapid fire Some scientists say it's like we're getting hit with a fire hose of information about corona virus because it's so new and everybody is thinking about it and talking about it. There's so much data to take in an analyze, but I was so happy and reassured to see that. When we all read all of the studies we kind of interpreted them in a similar way with regards to children's health, which is that while we don't know everything everything we do know so far is. Is On the more reassuring sign regarding children regarding the severity of illness, more similar to other respiratory illnesses like the flu and RSV that four children that that krona virus doesn't seem to be worse than other viruses. Now I think is important for a general audience that I emphasized these these regular respiratory viruses we see are a problem for children. Thousands of children are hospitalized every year for RSV and flu. So I'm not trying to dismiss or minimize the risk. There are children who have died of corona virus and it's a tragedy but I think it's also important that we take it in context as we make our decisions like what's different about this or what's new about this and how does it affect? Our decision making as parents. So what I tried to address for her her newsletter was about. How worried parents should be about the long term side effects of Corona virus for children because there's been a lot in the news about about long haulers, adults and children who have prolonged symptoms from coronavirus. So, we obviously have a lot to learn about this because it hasn't been very long but I tried to give my best guesses as a pediatrician about how to put this in context for families because statistically, for example, the MISC which is the sort of immune system overreaction that some children have from corona virus that lands them in the hospital. It's a scary disorder, but thankfully, it has been rare and treatable. So, while awareness about it is important, I don't think it's the kind of disorder that has to change parents opinions or keep them up at night worried about it because it is it is so rare at this point. So while they're certainly may be some long term side effects from Cremona. Virus. I think parents can leave that to doctors to worry about and research and learn about and and not worry about them. Now because I don't think we have evidence that they exist in a meaningful way. That should alter your decision making now.

RSV Emily Austria Instagram Kawasaki Disease Corona Komi Cremona Sarah
Todd White on Biohacking for Longevity and Disease Prevention

The Keto Answers Podcast

06:31 min | 1 year ago

Todd White on Biohacking for Longevity and Disease Prevention

"Today on the show I, welcome my friend Todd White, who is the founder and CEO of dry farm. Wise if you drink alcohol. This is a tricky thing. I mean we we talk a lot about why he may dry farm. He does she like alcohol he thinks it's a narrow talks should be drinking it and but he has this company that. He loves one he wanted people to access it and have the healthiest possible. Imaginable and so if you're a wine drinker and your Kito or trying to be healthy removed out, there's a lot of Stephens episode that frequent blew my mind when we do have into it and I've been drinking his death and dry wines. Very often, but a couple of times a year special occasions I pops dry farm. Wise. It happened last five years but I had no idea about the ridiculous nature and how process and how much garbage is traditional winds. Tons of Info there which wines you choose and why if you want to be as healthy as possible. We him and I both sentiment that alcohol. There's nothing positive about it. But you know sometimes you want to enjoy life and have some why not a big deal? No judgment there and also todd is just a really really interesting guy when it comes to his intention digging a little bit about how he sort of crafted his business in life. Overall, he said interesting background I've known for a while and a great conversation. So tune in and I hope you guys enjoy. This episode is brought to you by neuro collective. I've been using their products on and off last few years in a huge fan of how they form the products their dosing in dumbest around. So Dr Greg Kelly. Their lead product formulator is actually on the podcast previously upset out but you can trust that knocker collective is always doing one hundred percent dosing backed up by research, a lot of companies where they do. They sprinkling amounts of ingredients. So that way you're not actually getting the full amount that is required to have physiological effect. He just get a little sprinkling and dosing and their their practice. So expected that Dr Kelly actually recommends taking two days a week and they're servings is is seven really huge capsules which just shows how much active ingredient actually put in their product I am personally a huge fan of the caffeine. Free. Version of their product quality mind and I take it on an empty stomach with exogenous ketones in the morning when I know that really want to get a bunch of an interrupted deep work hours done I feel in his own literally hours and the best part is there's no crazy crash afterwards if you're not a neutral person, sales have an amazing product called attorneys that contains all the precursors to d which is. Far More effective than taking direct d supplements to reduce oxidative damage to yourself. Again, love the formulation and how they went about making this. If you want to try out any neuro hacker collective products had two neuro hacker dot com and use the code aged one five for fifteen percent of all the products. That's any you are O. Hacker Dot Com Code Eight, G one, five for fifteen percent off all of their products. This episode is brought to you by Paleo Valley. I've been a huge fan of this company for years ever since I met the founders at a conference, I'd say four years ago plus in have been eating their hundred percent grass-fed grass finished beef sticks ever since then the because reading the recently, why asked them to come on the show's sponsor? Is that? They do a lot of support in regenerative farming. They actually continue to reinvest into helping small farmer scale in really building on an amazing supply chain to help regenerative agriculture scale. The only that they're beef sticks aren't dry bone and leave that weird slim Jim style waxy coating, your mouth, they are plump in. In in a weird way, we gobble these guys up at the perfect offices when we don't have time to get a full meal in perfect real food snack if you're looking for one of the best beef sticks around, that are not only great tasting but responsibly sourced checkout Paleo Valley and great news is listeners of the podcast get fifteen percent off. So just go to Paleo Valley dot com slash one five or use code ag one five at checkout epithelial Valley Dot Com fifteen percent off that's p. E. L.. V. A. L. L. E. Y., DOT COM SLASH E G, one, five talk. Thank you for joining me today. Hey, I'm looking forward to it. It's going to be a great discussion. You're one of the first people that I met. That were sort of early Keitel Angeles. Before this whole boom happened years. It started with Christmas, you guys three or four years ago when you first were up. It's been almost odd years but yeah, we were or I should say many people on the team as well. But. We We were super early adapters before it became a thing. Kid Genyk Guy. It was starting to circulate in the biohacking community about five years ago. Maybe five miss closest six years ago when I started and and you know it was it was getting around biohacking community had not yet gone mainstream. But. Yeah, we were there early and still still big believers. Yeah I mean what was it? That got you into everything being was just the sort of request to optimize your personal health. It was an actually that would be a little bit more glamorous but it was really about vanity I had I had reached a weight loss plateau. It wasn't really overweight and in any way because I've been biohacking and sort of. been. In, and out Akita Genyk. Diet. Really since the eighties with the Atkins Diet but I had been eating a lower car diet for quite some many years. So it wasn't really overweight but I really wanted to lean out. And I I was at a weight loss plateau and low carb just wasn't doing it, and so that's I experimented with Kito that way and then the weight loss went away pretty quickly as it tends to do for most people in fact, lost a lot more weight than I had anticipated. And then sort of what I thought was a set point and a place I wanted to be but I continued the Ketogenic Diet in fact. Double down on it and really became therapeutically Ketogenic, which is different than Akita. Diet. or a modified Keto Diet, which is the way I would describe my diet today but. But I experimented with really therapeutic Ketogenic, which is super high fat and and and a lot of blood testing and a lot of kind of quantification and. You know the cognitive benefits for me. became. So extraordinary that I just stayed on the Diet, even though I didn't have any plans of further white. House.

Paleo Valley Todd White Valley Dot Com Biohacking Founder And Ceo Dr Greg Kelly Dr Kelly Stephens Kito Akita Genyk Genyk Guy Caffeine Keitel Angeles JIM A. L. L. E. Y.
How Does Stress Trigger Physiological Conditions?

Not Another Anxiety Show

06:17 min | 1 year ago

How Does Stress Trigger Physiological Conditions?

"Hey guys welcome to not another anxiety show I'm your host Kelly Walker and joining me today as my co-host Erica late them. My, Darling. Good sweating just existing. It went from the dead of winter in a like distortion. What was that show that I never watch game of thrones like the white walkers are coming to the Sahara chocolates too Humid Sahara. If the Amazon. My hair is huge right now I've got some curly hair, so my friend was like. Why is your hair so curly? Did you check the humidity? It's like a thousand percent. That's what. Science! Science it can become a thousand I am drinking the air so. In such rated we'll. However you tell me everything. All besides that, you know just. Just hitting up the Instagram, where I saw an interesting, a really great question. Right like we have a great question. We got a great questions, but this one was. And I will read it to you any second now, but this one was something that we both went. Okay okay, we can talk about this like it's even beyond. Anxiety bites because it's sort of getting back to the basics of song. Yes, so. and. I think there's like you know I WANNA make sure. We sort of answering a no read it in a second here but I wanNA. Make sure we sort of answer the question, but there's a little more to it underneath the surface that I, also WanNa touch on, which is why it's not just like a simple anxiety bites because it was like sort of an evocative question for us and I definitely thought it was worth probably something we've touched on here and there, but never like dedicated an entire episode to so Yeah I think it's. It's definitely worth taking some time. Okay Ready. I understand that things like heart palpitations may lead one to think that they have a heart condition, which is not actually present. I'd like you to do a segment about how stress can trigger actual physiological conditions. Love. This thing I mean you remember this coaching? air-cooled heart palpitations, but I was like yeah, okay, thanks a lot for the vice. Mine's real. And, it's no less real, but. Yes. Yep Yep and so I WanNa make sure I answer this listeners question about stress, and how it, how it impacts our bodies, so I'll take a second to sorta like dive into a biology lesson, which is my favorite thing. Ever sorry Erica bear with me. There's going to be I listen. I love. The biology I just don't understand sixty two percent of it. To Hey. That's passing right on. Oh. Yes, that's passing. That's a New York it is. That's passing. So yeah, I do WANNA speak to to how stress can trigger actual physiological conditions I don't want to share them here, but she she sort of shared a few things that have arisen for her as the result of anxiety so. It is it is well researched documented that chronic stress is one factor keyword one factor of so many others that can contribute to the development or exasperation of physiological conditions. Right stress makes chronic pain worse. It makes gastric issues worse. It makes cardiovascular issues worse. It makes it really exacerbates everything because. Stress touches every single one of our system, so I mean it really does make sense since chronically elevated stress, hormones like cortisol disrupt so many of our body's metabolic functions, but let's hear Mon. that's the one I can remember cortisol. I. Bet you know more than you, thank. For years later. Okay so! I wish it was as simple. This a little more nuanced I wish it was a simple saying. Anxiety and stress caused sickness right, but. We've sort of touched on this or mentioned it in a few previous episodes Dr Kelly mcgonagall. She's a psychologist from Stanford and go watch Ted Talk She's. She's very. He has a Tedtalk But to like basically some up her ted talk on and her and her research She's focused on how. Our understanding, of. Stress. And how it affects the body so. Finding was that when we change our relationship distress, or whatever are currently ship is, we can change how stress affects our body. More, specifically yet right like it always feels like an end. She says this in her Ted Talk. She's like you know I came into practices as a psychologist demonizing stress, eliminate stress managed stress, control, stress, right, but so many of us in the anxiety. Psycho are well. Of how trying to control stress or anxiety goes tension rises, anxiety rises. It's not very effective and Her major finding was that when we change our relationship to stress, right, we change how stress affects our body more specifically when we relate to stress as a natural response that exists to prepare, motivate and protect us than we don't suffer the same negative health outcomes is someone who relates to trust to stress as something to be entirely. Avoid it when we relate to stress as the former, a completely different physiological response occurs different ratio of stress hormones in addition to protective hormones are released mitigating the effects of stress on our body.

Anxiety Erica Bear Dr Kelly Mcgonagall Ted Talk Amazon Kelly Walker Cortisol Darling New York Stanford
"dr kelly" Discussed on Beyond Your Wildest Genes

Beyond Your Wildest Genes

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Beyond Your Wildest Genes

"She's board certified in psychiatry psychosomatic. Medicine and integrative holistic medicine, and is specialized in root cause resolution approach to psychiatry, Psychiatric Syndromes and symptoms. She's a certified K. R. I couldn't leany Yoga. Teacher and mother of two got broken. Welcome back to the show. And thank you so much also. Could you just give people a little bit deeper background on yourself and why you took on this challenge of writing a second book. So it's interesting, because this book has a very different feeling, not only within me, but also the feedback I've gotten from from those of you who have interviewed me you know in in both iterations it seems like there's been some some evolution and on reflection. I wrote a mind of your own. Probably around twenty, fourteen, Twenty fifteen, and published in two thousand sixteen, and that was really fueled by no small amount of righteous anger. I mean I Put My hushing Motos thyroiditis into remission and you'd think I would have had you know rainbows sprouting out of my head, but instead I had like scene coming out of my ears, because at that time you know, I had just completed my fellowship, so I gave a decade of my life, blood, sweat and tears in two hundred thousand dollars of debt to learn what I was. You know quickly. Finding out was a very small sliver of the available science around health and disease. And so I, you know hit the books and I determined to figure out what else I hadn't been told about. And I explored all of the sacred cows whether it's cholesterol, medications are acid blockers are antibiotics, or you know vaccines or of course second. I had been prescribing not just to general patients, but specifically to pregnant and breastfeeding patients. That's how much I believed in that model so I put that all into a book and I thought you know when when people have this information, they'll never touch a medication again. You know and I I really thought that it was just about winning the information war. Winning, the science war, and as somebody who of course has been on both sides of the aisle. I figured well I have more science because I have the science to defend prescribing, and now have the science to defend de Prescribing and lifestyle medicine, and so I am going to beat Goliath and soon I learned that that's not what this is about and in fact. The the engaging of of warfare, whether it's outside, or it's a civil war within continues to perpetuate a kind of A stasis in our growth healing evolution, and plus you can't change somebody's mind with information I knew that because my mind only changed because of a lived experience, because I changed my diet and I went from pooping once a month to having totally healthy Gi function for the first time in my adult life, I had a lived experience of how small decision could have a huge reverberated. On my wellbeing and so that's when I you know I. Really dedicated myself to creating the conditions for others to have this experience of health reclamation, and then I really focused my activism on shining a light on the radical outcomes, so the people who walked away from chronic disease labels and medications that they were definitively told were or life, and the reason that I did that was really in honor of informed consent, because if you know what is possible. Then and only then can you make a true informed decision about what is right for you, and so it's really in that spirit that this book. Is An offering to those who feel ready you know feel ready to level up. Feel ready to get stronger..

Psychiatric Syndromes leany Yoga thyroiditis Goliath
"dr kelly" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

KSCO Pet Radio

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

"Campaign so that that's kind of how it works and I'll I'll send you guys some extra Information but you know. We're really really excited. We're trying Again really hard To to advance animal cancers. We always have a lot of cancer grants every year. It's something that we've become known for. We've done a lot of work. I mean just name and pretty much every cancer in animals at one time or another. I think we've we've done work on some more than others. I think the more common cancers Los Angeles come on Komo Which the bone cancer and With Foam Mastel tumors. Those are those are some of the biggies Squamous cell carcinoma and cats injection sites sarcoma. Another cancer that people may know from cats often caused by vaccines But really any injection can do it and learning and little bit more about about that type of type of cancer lymphoma in cats as well. They one of their most common cancers and so so there's a lot out there and a lot of those are very similar to human cancers. There's a good analogy S- again what we learn can go back and forth between human and animals and back and again these are not cancers that are induced like sometimes you wrote it and these cancers that spontaneously rise which makes them more attractive because that's how are cancers arise are often spontaneous with may have a risk factor but or come in contact with of course in and Again dogs make a really nice Especially dogs Really Nice Model for human cancer. Sounds wonderful definitely will be blocked. The Monterey people yeah. We'll talk to the Monterey Bay Dog Training Club people and see if there's some way we can all tied together and do a virtual walk and still support Morris Animal Foundation. That would be awesome. Would be fun too and we will work on that and we'll be promoting it on the radio and on the website. What else Dr Kelly we have? Oh what two minutes left. What else can we talk about for two minutes? Oh I don't know so.

Monterey Bay Dog Training Club Monterey Dr Kelly Morris Animal Foundation Los Angeles
"dr kelly" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

KSCO Pet Radio

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

"Even before the study is you know totally complete. But we're at least can start looking at the genetic were. It's a big job. It's a lot of you know our. Dna is big and dogs. Dna is big and looking through all of it. It's very complex. But we're able to start doing that. And we're really grateful to them for giving US funding that they made that Testing available to us. Laura I have been monopolizing the conversation is I want to do. Do you have a question for Dr Kelly Yeah I do. This is kind of back to the virtual walk. I've never done a virtual lockwood. What's involved with your. You're about to do one because that's going to tell. Kelly will sponsor a local listener K. Seo Walk that somehow so if you get your people send me. All the artwork in everything will start promoting it so tell us how virtual walk works right. So it's really similar Laura to if you were going to walk for a Another organization where you get pledges from people like I'M GONNA walk this far and raise as much money rape maybe per mile or whatever and some people just say here. I'll give you pledge rate And other people do it by Biol- or whatever and what we have done in the past is People would go out and do a walk and We had team sometimes it and it doesn't have to be a hand to go walk ten miles but but it was a way of raising money through the virtual walk. And so we're we're really.

US Dr Kelly Laura I Biol rape
"dr kelly" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

13:27 min | 2 years ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"Help people build communities when you recognize physical sensations like fatigue or exertion that you're sweating that your heart is pounding that you are becoming breathless and you have to take a break. Study showed that when people interpret those physical sensations as I'm amazing. I'm doing this hard thing. I'm tough or this is evidence that my heart is getting stronger and this is part of how I get braver in the world. This is how I trained myself to show up in world When people are able to make those sort of appraisals of what you otherwise could just be like. This is hard. I don't like this amount of shape. Why does this have to feel this way that it makes people enjoy movement more? It increases their positive memories of it. It changes the stories that they tell about themselves not related exercise but about you know their capacity to endure or to engage with life it brings out the good even more powerfully so. I think that that idea of choosing to focus on movement something that brings out the good. Neil as opposed to something that corrects what others or you judge about yourself which is so often the mindset people bring to Movement. I want to say it. I'm so tired of even like mimicking the sort of phrases that you hear in advertising or in you know unintentionally harmful exercise queuing in a gym. I'm not even you know what I'm talking about. The seventy one hundred percent and that and that mindset basically is is a huge obstacle to experiencing the joys of the mental health benefits of exercise. Yeah it's certainly not motivating and you tell so. Many incredibly inspiring stories throughout the book about people who have overcome barriers and wear exercise has been something that's made them feel powerful and like I can tackle anything something that I didn't think that I could tackle in the past and just reading it reading that take on it rather than some of these other negative things you're talking about which certainly has been my experience in the past. It motivated me so much so much more to really want to be out there and find my movement and do it with other. People has that translated into action. Have you moved since reading the book? One hundred percent. So I've actually rookie question to ask you. I didn't want to say yeah. No saw also. I'll tell you I'll tell you my story. This is probably related to vote. One of the things I want to talk about. Is the obstacles that people face to doing this right so like all actually let me let me quote you to you so you say quote like highly addictive substances regular exposure to exercise will overtime teach the brain to like want and need it and quote and when. I read that I was thinking. Yup that totally makes sense. But how do we get there right? Like sometimes starting as the hardest part or someone will make a new year's resolution and they're all excited and motivated to start. But then they peter out and that it can be difficult to get going and so two can answer your question. This has always been a challenge for me and the way that I was finally able to make movement part of my life in a way that I really wanted it to be part of my life was to connect to a true value of mine and I used to tell myself. Oh physical health. I WANT TO BE HEALTHY. And it just wasn't doing the trick. I think it's still sort of felt like should and I had this. Aha moment one morning where my whole family was together. We were sitting on the Sofa and I just thought. Oh my gosh. My children cannot grow up with too sedentary parents. I have a husband who looks amazing. Looks he exercises in eats well but he's just genetically blessed and does not exercising you well and I thought you know. They can't grow up with too sedentary parents. Someone HAS TO MODEL. That movement is just a regular part of your life and that's what it really took for it to click for me And so I have been moving for that. Was maybe a year or so ago but since reading the book started to get more creative like instead of just being on my treadmill in my garage which served an excellent purpose because when I had two little kids in taking three naps day and didn't have time to go to the gym or take three hours to drive to a Yoga Class. Workout for an hour and a half. It served a great purpose and I love my treadmill. It's also where I read and prep for podcasts. And feel like I'm killing two birds with one stone but I've started getting outside. I've started bringing my five year old son and having him bring his scooter and you know the joy of just watching him be outside. Moving makes me being outside moving so much more exciting. We go on hikes together and it is like everything is just awe and wonder for him and that makes me experience in a new way. And all of that has really. Did you like the stories in the book through it. A few stories here and there about Parents and caregivers who are exercising with their children and all those magic moments I think about like the father with his dance parties in his living room with this little girl and dancing and targets target. Yes and said I don't care I'll yeah exactly. There's so many things in what you just said. I WANNA highlight but I want to because I often feel like people who Who are just coming to my work for. The first time might have some misperceptions that I want to to clear up right away which is awesome. Nice people think that one of the barriers to movement is going to be the things that are barriers to physical movement in general such as age injuries disabilities neurological disorders size. The things that that if you were to think star typically who somebody who loves to exercise and his quote unquote good at it. You might think of a young stereotypically physically fit thin. Whatever kind of person and as you know from reading the book I was very intentional about making the book you know. Ninety percent of the stories in the book are not people who would fit that stereotype. Whether it's the dance class for people with Parkinson's disease whether it's the woman who started running half marathons in her sixties who identifies as fat and. It's not doing it to lose weight. But is doing it because she loves it. The Gym where people have serious physical disabilities whether they're in wheelchairs or recovering from stroke and their boxing and strength training Sort of whatever the idea is that I think a lot of people think I'm not talking about them because they have chronic pain or because whatever the situation is I really want to emphasize on talking about everybody everybody including people with serious physical and mental health challenges and even though it may be that Amina for example. There's a story about a woman dealing with the loss of her son in tremendous grief which is just about any condition. You can imagine other than being in a coma. Grief is about the one thing that makes movement and experiencing joy through movement almost physiologically impossible. Because of the way that grief hijacks the brain and the body and Her story so powerful to me because of how exercising in nature and also finding the support of a running group really allowed her to using her language. Embrace life again So I just wanted to put that out there because that you asked about what are some of the barriers getting started and I found a big one is people have been told. This isn't for you or we have our own fears our own experiences where we've been led to believe. Maybe this is not about me and it is about you and the body that you have and what you're capable of today and there's a version of it that can bring you joy and hope and meaning and community so that's one of the barriers and the other thing is that you said that. I think is so important which is to throw out. Your ideas of what exercise has to look like and if you think about in terms of movement and I often define movement as using your body to engage with life and if you think about is there anything that you already love or like or enjoy that you want more of that you could do by engaging with life through your body so if you like being outdoors if you've noticed that your mind quiets down or you feel more optimistic in nature which is a very common psychological effect. Could you hike walk swim? Run Play Sports. Find a you know. A park can find a way to be outdoors garden you know. Do some physical Labor outdoors. Do some restoration do some volunteering if you love music. Music is one of the easiest ways to bring joy into movement. But while you're giving your brain time to catch up. It seems to take the the length of time I kept coming across in the neuroscience. Research was about six weeks that seem to take about six weeks for your brain to be like this thing that I hate that so uncomfortable and why am I doing it too while this feels amazing? And I'm so glad I did it and if you tell me I can't do it tomorrow. I'm going to be cranky because this is something that my body and brain needs so if you think it's GonNa take at least six weeks to get there. Is there a playlist that is going to set off the endorphins and dopamine and adrenaline in your brain because you feel so empowered listening to it? It just brings that out of you. Which music often does that's going allow you to be on the treadmill while your brain catches up to enjoying feels to exercise It doesn't have to end the treadmill but anything you can do to. Music is spending time with your kids or with other people movement can often get closer to things that are already intrinsically enjoyable and movement actually seems to amplify what is enjoyable about that whether it's community cooperation mastery nature In each chapter in the book sort of tackles one of those core human capacities for joy. And what it looks like in movement. Yeah absolutely the things that you're saying are making me. Think about other ways. This has shown up for me So one example. I was at the pool last weekend. I live in southern California and we had a couple days of really nice weather and we were at the pool and my kids were begging me to come swimming with them and normally I would sit on the sidelines and not only did I get in the pool with them because it was a way to be engaging in movement with these two little human so I love so much but my son wanted to throw you know the things that sink in the pool and you dive. After which he doesn't know how to do he can swim but he can't dive down to the bottom of the deep end and we. We just played this ridiculous game of him throwing all these symbols in me diving them in getting them and he was having so much fun that. I was willing to do that with him. And of course it ended up being so much fun for me and I was really tired at the end because I'm a middle aged mom who doesn't usually do a lot of pull diving and that was something. I think I've just started saying Yes to more opportunities for movement and the other thing this makes me think of is that if I'm exercising exercise because I think I should My mind tells me all the time you should do more. You should do faster you should do. You're only running and you need to be lifting weights like it's all rule governed right and and I feel like reading. The book has helped me to let go of those rules. That aren't actually helpful. In really just inhibiting and to allow movement to be playful. There's joy again riot the joy and the connection and some of these Lesser Training for the Olympics. I don't you know I do not take that sort of physical training mindset where you have to do x Y and Z to maximize your physical performance or your physical appearance. That's just not how I think about movement anti once. You get rid of this idea that you're looking for the thing that burns the most calories or there's a recommendation that you need to stretch and strength training and do aerobic exercise and do calming movement. And Oh my gosh. It's like who has the time to do all of that but even said you think alley. How do I wanNA feel in the moment? And how do I wanNA feel about myself? And what relationships do I want to strengthen? Those are some really good questions to ask when you're thinking about what types of movement to prioritize. How do you WanNa feel when you're doing it so for me like the exercise that gives me the most positive feelings? While I'm doing it is dancing. It's like an automatic route to joy. No matter how I feel when I start. How do you want to feel about yourself? You know for me doing physically challenging things that were while I'm doing it. There's voice my head the whole time saying When is this over like core training but afterwards I know that that using my strength released my anxiety that I feel brave and better able to face the world so the I might choose that sort of training. It's actually typically what I do first thing in the morning because I know it it alter my personality to do some hardcore training or what relationships you want to strengthen you mentioned swimming with your son and one of the things it you'd asked about fascinating scientific findings one of my favourite scientific findings that showed up with really every form of movement. Is that when you exert yourself? At a moderate level you are releasing brain chemicals that make Social Connection More enjoyable and easier..

Neil Yoga Class California coma peter dopamine Amina Sports Parkinson Olympics
"dr kelly" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

11:45 min | 2 years ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"Powerful antidote to the modern epidemic of depression anxiety and loneliness. And if that's not enough. She's also passionate about animal rescue and adoption and is trained as a Cat. Adoption counselor and matchmaker so welcome. Kelly. I am so happy to have you here with us today. On psychologists off the clock. Thank you thank you for mentioning my favorite personal credential. The cat matchmaker volunteer important. One I feel I feel like that's true. Well let's talk about this book. I loved this book the Joy of movement and I will admit I've always had what I would consider a slightly complicated relationship with exercise so I wouldn't normally be drawn to a book about exercise and I think that's probably because a lot of my exposure to movement has been authority figures sort of shaming me. That this is something that I should be doing and that I'm bad if I'm not doing it and what I loved so much about. This book is that it is just the furthest thing from that and it truly earns its title and being called Joy of movement. And you make the point that the joy of movement is not necessarily about fitness. But it's about the joy of movement that it simply in the moving and so we'll talk much more about this idea but to start in a totally different place. I'm really curious. You make it pretty clear in the beginning of the book that you have been a huge movement lover since you were a little girl I think you said you started working out to VHS tapes which dates you a little bit age size mid Jazzercise Aj Yeah early eighties right and I believe if I have this right. This is your sixth book. The Joy of movement is that right. I depends what you count as a book. I have some books that are only available in non English languages. So I think I have four in the. Us that are okay while it's so Somewhere between four and six books And so this is a question that therapists often ask clients when they first walk in. Why now like? Why are you coming to therapy now? So why are you writing this book? Now as opposed like. Why wasn't this your very first book given how passionate you clearly are about this topic? Every book that I have written has been because somebody else asked me to write it so when I was first working in the field of Yoga and people saw the work that I was doing with Yoga Practices to help with things. Like pain or or stress Somebody said hey we see what you're doing. Can you write a book about it so I did? When I was teaching the science of Willpower at Stanford and it was a super popular class and it started to get media attention. Very sexy topic willpower. Somebody asked me to write a book or agents started calling and I said okay. Same thing with stress. I had that Tedtalk This is the book I probably always would have wanted to start with actually can remember when I was a graduate student in college. I'm I'm very like so. There are always two sides my personality. I've been teaching group Movement Yoga Dance and traditional fitness. For twenty years. I started as a graduate student actually while I was getting my PhD in psychology. I also was secretly doing the track in a masters and dance education through the dance department. My advisor did not even know that I was doing and I remember in your secret layers. Yes there were just two of us in this class on strategies dance education. I remember we were reading something about the relationship between emotions and movement and I was being like super critical because it really wasn't scientific. It really wasn't integrating what we know about the mind. Body relationship from fields like psychology and anthropology and neuroscience. So remember making some sort of you know young twenty two year old snide comment and The instructor looked at me and said I think one day. You're going to write the book that really gets at this topic and it just sorta stuck with me and I was like. Oh yeah sure when. I'm you know when I'm not busy doing my PhD research. But actually I feel. That's that's true that this is the book that I've always wanted to write because movement has always been my favorite form of do it yourself ashes a do it together because I love group movement so much When you say that I have been a lover of movement as I was a little kid. Some people might have a misperception thinking. Oh doing sports. Maybe you were like that fit kid or that kid who could do flips on the jungle gym bars. I was a kid who was in remedial gym class. I was the slowest runner. I was so clumsy. I've never played a team sport. So it's not that I was a love of mover in the sense that I had any athletic ability. I mean I didn't learn how to do cartwheel and I was in my twenties because it felt like some sort of milestone I should like a meaningful milestone to try to reach but I was a lover of movement because despite feeling humiliated in gym class and on the playground I found through moving to music moving rhythmically moving with intention -ality that like an instructor would say this bicep curl failure failure failure muscle that there is a sensation to it and that you were synchronizing with both the beat of the music and other people like. That's the joy of those original aerobics and calisthenics tapes is. We're all doing this together. There's often a pop soundtrack in the background in jazzercise. They would encourage you to sing along and it was ridiculous and it was wonderful and that was how I found my joy of movement in that it gave me a way of being in my body that felt like I was a good version of myself rather than the humiliation of athletics and also because I have a tendency towards anxiety. Depression and other mental health challenges And growing up at a time when kids really were not did get help for that move in. An exercise became away from me to deal with stress and anxiety very early on. So that's what what it means for me to be in love with movement is that it's it's part of how. I take care of my mental health and also has given me tremendous access to to literally to joy and humidity and thank goodness. I finally got to write the book. Yes well let me our. I showed up for myself. Raid will and I agree I think it clearly is the book that you've always been meant to right but things happen at the time that they're meant to happen. I think And those those stories are so powerful and. I'm so glad that you wrote the book and I think you know I'd have to say one of your best talents as a writer as you have this ability to weave science your own personal experience. The stories of other people you interview into this really compelling cohesive narrative and I learned a ton from reading this book and found the research incredibly fascinating which is not an easy. There's that's no mean feat to be able to make research interesting is not something that everyone is able to do. And some of the findings you discuss are the links between movement and not just joy. Of course that's in there. It's the joy of movement but also the links between movement and human connection. Hope finding a sense of purpose and even recovery from addiction and there were there. Were even more in there too. It was so interesting and I'm curious as you were doing the research for the book. Were there any findings that surprised you or that? You found particularly exciting or interesting. Yes I'll let me see if I can give you my top three but I wanNA mention since you're talking about how to communicate science and I know that many of us are interested in sharing science with people Who might help? I actually teach a class on this at Stanford for graduate students how to talk about their research How to communicate why it's important why it matters and one is always think about is that there are certain emotions that I think are intrinsically connected to scientific discovery that are contagious. And so when I'm looking for research I'm looking for the research that gives me a feeling of wonder or all or surprise or common humanity that sense of like wow. I'm not the only one who's had this experience Sometimes relief so I feel like science can create these emotions into when I'm reading the literature. I'm looking for that scientific. Finding that study design That that turn of phrase that gives me a feeling of wonder or all or surprise and then I try to sort of capture that and how I explain it so let me give you a few examples One this is going to be a very recent and almost like a very small finding but it perfectly captures to me that emotion of surprise. So anyone who's ever worked out is probably heard people talk about lactic. Acid that thing. That accumulates as a metabolic byproduct of exercise that you are using energy and your muscles produce lactate and people blame it for the burn that you feel when you exercise and so you can exercise class will be like you gotta flush that lactic acid out So there's a thing that has been blamed for muscle soreness. It's big been called the villain in the exercise world and the latest research suggests that first of all it's a natural byproduct of exercise. It's part of how your body exercises in uses energies. There's nothing wrong with it and that when it travels through your bloodstream. After exercise it actually can cross the blood brain barrier and in your brain. It acts to make your brain more resilient to stress. It has antidepressant as I don't even know if this is in the book. I think I like snuck it in like a final edit like it's a half a sentence somewhere in there But it's an antidepressant anti-anxiety metabolic byproduct of exercise and like. That's the kind of finding that I think it. It's almost like what this thing that I thought was just making me feel sore after a workout. It's almost like you can begin to link. Even though lactate actually probably doesn't cause muscle soreness but we all think it does so. Imagine if when you're feeling tired soar after a workout instead of thanking like I must be really out of shape or that was so hard that you actually start to link that sensation to you know if I worked out enough to have this feeling that means my brain is being transformed or what I did is well that that. That's that's really. He's making my brain more resilient distress. That's one example and it reminds me to of your your stress book in your stress. Ted Talk where you talk about. How the way? We APPRAISE STRESS IMPACTS. How much stress impacts us that it essentially mitigates the negative effects of stress when we appraise it in a positive way and this reminds me of that that think about the healing powers of appraising the difficult parts of movement in a different way and the research that you sight allows us to do that. That's one of the interesting things I I should also say with stress I mean just to be pragmatic about it. There's no amount of thinking about stress. It can get rid of all of the harmful effects of chronic traumatic stress. So he's like that's a super important caveat whenever anyone brings up That my work on stress. But the the key thing about stresses we know that when you have a mindset that allows you to recognize the potential positive side effects of experience or how something can bring out the good. That's in you can bring out your natural strengths. You understand that. Humans have a capacity to rise to a challenge to learn and to grow to connect with others. Know the ideas that recognizing that capacity helps you harness it and the same is very much true with your mindset towards exercise when people recognize that exercise is powerful for mental..

graduate student Stanford instructor Kelly Ted Talk feeling tired advisor Depression writer
"dr kelly" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

KSCO Pet Radio

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

"There there's a lot of interest in corona viruses cats. I think everybody knows that Feline Infectious Peritonitis which is fatal. Unfortunately infection of hats is a type of corona virus. And it's been around and recognized a long time but there are sort of benign Intestinal Corona viruses. We know there's one for dogs. There's one for cats and You know they've been around for a while but with the advent of Sars many years ago so severe Yard acquire right A long time ago on. There was a resurgence in interest in corona viruses in animals. There's no evidence that we get corona viruses from our dogs or cats Right now and but we had a lot of phone calls as you could imagine the last couple of weeks at the foundation because people are worried about the you know novel coronavirus that's affecting people and Because we know that it came from animals You know that bats have a lot of corona viruses. But there's no evidence right now but dogs are. Cats can get this corona virus or that we get krona viruses from our you know cats and dogs that live in the House with us. Would there's been a lot of talk about the novel Corona Virus I? It was snakes that we got it from then it became bats and now Laura was saying pangolins of all things are being blamed for Corona viruses. I think what all these things have in common is China where pigs and ducks. Which is how we get lots of flu. Pigs and ducks passing it back and forth over and over again. Do you have any from a veterinary point of view concerns about what's going on right now. Well you know. I think what we know is.

Yard Laura China
NASA ScienceCast 299: The Lasting Impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9

NASA ScienceCasts

03:59 min | 2 years ago

NASA ScienceCast 299: The Lasting Impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9

"In the lasting impacts of Comet Shoemaker Levy nine presented by science at NASA at the close the last century a comet captured into orbit around a planet traveled to close and was shredded by gravity into multiple pieces some as large as half a mile or one-kilometer-long those fragments would plunge engine to the planets atmosphere in a series of impacts. Would the impacts be spectacular or would the comet fragments disappear without a trace in July nineteen ninety-four astronomers around the world watched with bated. Breath as the fragments of Comet Shoemaker Levy nine slammed into the planet Jupiter Dr Kelly fast was one of the impacts observers and is now manager of Nasr's near Earth Object Observations Program. It was just incredible to watch such an impact event had never before been witnessed. Let alone studied ground based telescopes around the world and spacecraft like Nasr's Hubble Space Telescope and even the Galileo orbiter on route to Jupiter were used to to observe the impacts the discovery of the comment by Caroline Jeans Shoemaker and David Levy gave us about a year at a plan observations. The impacts proved to be impressive the fragments some twenty one in all plunged plunged into Jupiter's atmosphere over the course of six days at impact. They were travelling at a speed of about thirty seven miles per second or sixty kilometers per second heating the atmosphere to at least fifty three thousand degrees Fahrenheit. Fahrenheit or thirty thousand degrees Celsius like the splash from throwing a rock into a pond the impacts created giant plumes of material from Jupiter's lower atmosphere which rose as high as nineteen hundred miles or three three thousand kilometers above the cloud tops into the stratosphere in the aftermath the Plume Splash Bax scarred Jupiter's atmosphere with dark clouds of impact abry which could be seen for months as they were gradually dispersed by Jupiter's was wins so what scientists able to learn about Jupiter itself as a result of the impacts for one thing those dark clouds of impact debris acted as tracers of the winds in Jupiter stratosphere and by following their motion over. Over time scientists could measure those high altitude wins temporary changes in the Aurora on Jupiter showed scientists at Jupiter's magnetosphere was influenced by particles from the impacts. We are still able to see changes changes in Jupiter's atmosphere that resulted from the impacts when the fragments of shoemaker leaving nine slammed into Jupiter they deposited their own chemical compounds. The impact processes produced some and others were exhumed from the lower atmosphere here. Some molecules like ammonia were destroyed by sunlight in the weeks and months after the impacts but others like hydrogen cyanide and water are still seeing today all of that tells scientists about how chemistry works in Jupiter's bidders atmosphere come at shoemaker leaving nine showed us at large impacts still happened in the solar system and were a factor in NASA developing programs to address the impact risk to Earth from comet science to Jupiter.

Jupiter Comet Shoemaker Levy Caroline Jeans Shoemaker Nasa Nasr Dr Kelly Hubble Space Telescope Galileo Fifty Three Thousand Degrees F Thirty Thousand Degrees Celsiu Three Three Thousand Kilometer Sixty Kilometers One-Kilometer Six Days
NASA ScienceCast 287: You Light Up Our Night

NASA ScienceCasts

03:12 min | 3 years ago

NASA ScienceCast 287: You Light Up Our Night

"You light up our nights? Presented by science at NASA. People around the world have the opportunity to participate in the study of comet in December of twenty eighteen when a hyperactive comet that orbits between Jupiter and the sun will be closest to earth. It will be so close in fact that you may be able to see it with the naked eye within a week or two before and after its closest approach on December sixteenth, come at forty six. P Werthan is a ball of rock dust and frozen gases. A little over a Colomer in diameter that was discovered in nineteen forty eight by astronomer Carl Werthan at the liquor observatory in California were an orbital period is around five and a half years as the comet and the earth travel in their different orbits around the sun. There are times when we're in is observable from earth, depending on how close it gets to us. It's appearance in twenty thirteen for instance, was very faint and only a few distant measurements were obtained its appearance in twenty twenty four. We'll be equally faint, but it's appearance in December. Twenty eighteen is expected to be very bright passing. Just thirty lunar distances from earth or only thirty times farther from earth than the moon, this encounter will occur just a few days after its perihelion, which means it's closest point to the sun. The result is that wirtten will appear very bright from earth for a comet, and it's likely to be visible in Benach Yalies, and maybe even to the naked eye. Additionally since it will pass by earth on the side away from the sun, it should be visible for many hours during the night from both the northern and southern hemispheres. This presents a unique opportunity to study the object. Dr Kelly fast is the program manager of the near earth object of survey ship program at NASA headquarters, and she's eager to watch this event unfold at NASA, she notes we normally send spacecraft missions to solar system targets. It's always nice. When the target comes to us. This is a wonderful opportunity for comet science and for the astronaut community around the world who will be studying the chemistry coma changes and other processes taking place at comet wirtten. Dr Tony farnum is a principal research. Scientist at the university of Maryland, he is leading a multifaceted campaign to provide information about wirtten and to encourage observations of the comet throughout its appearance. Farnum says this effort is targeted to both professional astronomers and citizen. Scientists of all types, this is the tenth closest comet approach of the modern era, and because its orbit tracks the earth's for many months, it will remain observable for between two and. Eight hours per night for over a year as it brightens and then fades around its closest approach come at Wharton. You light up our night. For more illuminating information about comments. Visit science dot NASA dot gov.

Comet Wirtten Nasa Dr Tony Farnum Dr Kelly Scientist Carl Werthan Benach Yalies California Wharton University Of Maryland Program Manager Eight Hours
Medical Marijuana Expansion Bill Allows Cannabis As Opioid Alternative

Wintrust Business Lunch with Steve Bertrand

06:10 min | 3 years ago

Medical Marijuana Expansion Bill Allows Cannabis As Opioid Alternative

"Here you know the governor earlier this week signed a Bill to expand the medical marijuana experiment in, Chicago which is a big deal because governor Rauner by and large has not been I don't want, to say he's been a big. Supporter of the program, but he's. Not been big when it comes to expanding it in and he certainly did this. Week and it has to do, with opioid deaths almost two thousand people died of opioid deaths in Illinois in two thousand sixteen seventy two thousand around the country and the governor is going to allow medical. Marijuana to be used in replace of what. In. Percocet vicodin Oxycontin and things like that What do you make of the governor's move Well I think it is an. Interesting approach to thinking about the opioid epidemic the idea presumably is that a significant component of the opioid epidemic reflects people who develop problems with opioid addiction after receiving prescriptions from their physician for. Any number of things that might require opiates and the idea is that if you can use an alternative, to opiates to help manage those patients symptoms perhaps you can minimize some of the addiction and some the. Problem that, we're seeing that a good assumption I mean how big of? A, problem does come from prescriptions. From doctors well that's a really good question I think that we're just really now learning more about How the epidemic has developed and there are some data that show that some people develop. Addiction problems, after receiving, prescriptions but but someday to show that there's really not a lot of. People, in fact there was a recent study that was published looking at people. Who hadn't been hadn't been using opiates and had some kind of procedure and were prescribed opiates and it turned out that less than one percent of the people who had prescriptions developed problems so. It's a little bit unclear if that's gonna make a big difference in the opioid crisis or where all, of this is coming from and I think the thing for me that's so important about all this and. Raising awareness, is the need for us to know more about it we? Need, we really we really need. More research on who's who's developing problems why they're developing Problems and what is their pathway to that issue so even if it isn't going to alleviate a greatly alleviate the opioid crisis when it. Comes to addiction could you make the argument that it's still medical marijuana is still overall a safer and perhaps maybe not more effective but at. Least a. Safer and, effective replacement for these drugs or do we not even, know that yet Well I think, those are two different questions in terms of the safety issues you know. They're they're they're they're really guests from marijuana alone is highly unlikely we've seen it happened probably in. Kids so at their children are, more susceptible to that kind of extreme, problem but so in in that respect perhaps maybe medical marijuana is, safer, the question about efficacy though I think is an unanswered question and that's in my opinion where we need really a. Lot more work there's some good data that shows that medical marijuana helps improve, nausea in patients who are, receiving chemotherapy it helps adults with chronic pain and it helps adults with multiple sclerosis and some of the specificity issues, there's emerging data about its use I but I don't think? We have great data about whether or not Not marijuana's better than an opiate, for say you. Know an orthopedic. Procedure like if you, broke, your bone and had had a, surgery that way so that I think there's a lot of questions about. Efficacy that remain and you know marijuana maybe safer in some ways and opiates but there's there's huge. Problems with marijuana to you can, have marijuana abuse that's a that's a problem there's you know all kinds of issues related to marijuana use, in, pregnancy and its impact on the unborn child or young children so There's just a lot of unanswered questions so those of us who know nothing about it but has strong. Opinions You. Know well this is obviously the doctors were over prescribing this whole. Thing these opioids they're giving about like candy you seem to be making the case that that's not necessarily true I would like to say that, I don't think we entirely know when you look, when you look at when you look at the NIH website when you look at a lot, of reputable websites there is definitely, this contention that a lot of prescription prescribing patterns have led to this issue and I'm, not necessarily refuting that but what I am trying, to bring awareness to is the fact that if we us. If we sort of pivot how we do, things we need to really think carefully about what, we're pivoting to and if we're. Pivoting to the right, thing we don't know a lot about. Medical marijuana yet. And we need. To learn more if we do pivot it's going to be a big. Pivotal seems like right there. Were forty two thousand patients are approved. Now in the medical marijuana program in Illinois last year about two point Three million. Patients received opioid. Painkiller prescriptions so it has the ability to to dramatically expand the medical. Marijuana experiment in this state Yeah potentially potentially a. Could I think. That, that's to, be

Marijuana Illinois Marijuana Abuse Dr Kelli Michelson Feinberg School Of Medicine Chicago Bill Director Governor Rauner Northwestern University Allstate Skyline Studio Lurie Children Sean Vincent Maywood Giants Salesforce NIH Dr Kelly Michelson WGN