25 Burst results for "Dr Kelly"

"dr kelly" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

05:53 min | 6 d ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"To enter in to secret code words that were hidden throughout the episode. I'm gonna give you the first one right now. It is darla d. r. l. a. Both the secret code. Words are courtesy of our special guests. Dr kelli mcconnell darla you might remember as the little girl with all the headgear from the movie finding nemo the the one who kills all the fish you know fund memory of a fun film darla and with that. Let's get back to our discussion with dr mcconnell and we are back talking with dr kelly mcconnell out dental visit tolerance and training and research on the subject so when we left off we were talking about where the researcher taken us in recent years with hangar. It was real real real. The students get into the dentist office. That brings us to to your article. Kelly so in terms of let's take a quick tangent before i..

dr kelly mcconnell darla d. r. l. Dr kelli mcconnell dr mcconnell researcher
Weighing the risks of travel amidst coronavirus

The John Phillips Show

02:52 min | Last week

Weighing the risks of travel amidst coronavirus

"Coronavirus questions with the one and only Dr Kelly victory. Let's get to his many calls is we Can everyone holding I want to try to get to you before we run out of time. So let's go to Raina in Northridge. You're on with Dr Kelly victory. For high doctor, This is Vienna. My husband passed away last year on by my daughter lives in New York, and she hasn't come down to Away because of the cold dead and I had made it. I have taken a trip to thinking of taking a kid toe quota Vallarta so weekend. You know, huh? Take a break and you know, mental for mental house and all of that So on both of us leave, I know buyout sounds and also Motive was our in house in a good health condition. She's 30 to 1 57 and I looked up the point put away Artur cases, and it's the highest was 66,000. And now it's only like 1500. I just want to get your thoughts on, you know of it to take the trip or not. It's been very difficult for both of us without you know, my husband, you know, especially during the holiday. Well again, and this is without rendering on official medical advice. All I can tell people is that I think you need to assess your overall risk factors. And it sounds like from the very little you said that you and your daughter. Both are in good health. You certainly are both in a lower risk category based on your age on if you don't have any underlying health conditions. I am not one bit concerned personally about going to an area that has quote a lot of cases. Because these cases as we know the vast majority of the people who are testing positive are not symptomatic and the chances that they have virus that they can even spread to somebody else or virus that is capable of causing illness is relatively low because we are testing people who have no symptoms asymptomatic people. People are walking around without a fever, cough or running nose. And those things are very unlikely to spread the illness. And furthermore, if you were to get it there, chances are very low that you would have a bad go of it. So I am a huge supporter of people doing the things that they want to do in their lives. And if this trip is important, and it sounds like it is sounds like you've been through a very stressful Recent time. Then I would really support the idea of you going and taking reasonable precautions. You should always wash your hands after you sneeze or cough. You should always avoid people who are actively ill. You should always do those sorts of things. This is nothing new Just because we have covert 19 around. Thanks so

Dr Kelly Raina Northridge Artur Vienna Cold New York Cough Fever
"dr kelly" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

04:02 min | 3 weeks ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"Being sure what not not being confident that they were being in living up to their potential in so i was just like wow i want affirm in a way that You can take with you wherever you go. So the book of affirmations is a a book. I put together that provide some short staying before. Just remind you that you are more than enough on war worthing in so both of these are located on amazon. The this will care. Is republican peter lang in so i let me give this or if you go on amazon and you find this. Please note that i. This is my first time using publisher. I wanted to go through a publisher. I can have experienced so that. I can help other folks through that process of getting. Your perspectives accepted inch. So there are wearing differences between publishing in with publisher and one of the differences in this. Is that hawk casper. What are those differences is when you stopped publishing. You get to determine how much your book costs which is why this book is ten ninety five and when you probably still publisher they determine how much your book costs which is why this is dramatically. More and of so you'll see that reflected but those are the two very good. Thank you for that to all those author who think about the book that it's definitely important So let's see maryland in in that. Thomas cut on you for promoting this positive prominent voice to your listeners. Start to hope has type of set. Our community needs listed from bel air maryland. A form new haven resident with family insurance in connecticut. Thank you for tuning in less than Thank you sir from debbie says. Thank you sir. This was amazed form. Look forward to more soon We need more combos like this. Listen i'm trying. I'm going to Promote myself a little bit. I put up the banner at the end at the bottom of the screen. There you can go back and listen to previous episodes. It's got a lot of lawyers. Phd's people talking about Black women hair. I have another episode coming up about talking about many women who are bleaching their skin. I believe that it's very important to love yourself. I don't care what you look like. A what color your hair is. If you are white with your white person with red hair you gotta love that that. You've you're black With dark skin iota love that in this idea bleaching her skin and bone on this kind of stuff to your head that which is ultimately damaging in the long run. Things very very helpful i can. That's why i appreciate when you say that it's very important for how you present in the classroom and we need positive images in the class. I always thought it was very important for me when i was a police officer When i showed up on scene. I thought it was very important today. You know. sometimes. I wore white shirt that let everybody knows i was in charge right. Sometimes as bruce con con. No if he's still here that we wore two stripes at our shoulders that showed everyone else that we would supervise. So it's important. How you present yourself. And i believe that and i was so i appreciate your thoughts about that Let's see here Benny hopes senior says can hope the tables be prepared for. You read table. I don't know he's talking by their. Okay okay okay John lewis says thank you. I really enjoyed the conversation. Good job good job doctor. I agree thanks so much for coming on. I really want to have you back on to talk about some more stuff to so much more. we can talk about. Thank you so much for coming on the show. Thank you so much for all the listeners. You have over the continued to tune in yes So thank you everyone. I really appreciated it and Learned a lot that so much and so without any more ado no more questions or comments within a cutoff right here. Thank you so much Much love and much peace. Thank you buddy..

publisher amazon peter lang bel air maryland Phd maryland Benny debbie Thomas connecticut officer John lewis
"dr kelly" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

07:44 min | 3 weeks ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"This at the hunter. Thank you guys once again for tuning in really really appreciate it now usually do not do these type of introductions for The facebook lives in just a little sad reminder. I remember that we do. Facebook lives every monday seven thirty. Pm eastern standard time always tried to have different guests are just speak about relevant issues. And things like that. So Usually do not do these types of introductions but i want to thank you all so much for tuning in For subscribing sharing and liking into remind. You ought to do that just recently. I got a little note from some podcasters association. That that kind of keeps tabs and podcasts. And my podcast growing actually on apple podcasts so the numbers are increasing. And i really really appreciate you all sharing subscribing liking and of course for tuning in so. Please continue to keep up the good work. There's an episode that you like or anything like that. Just make sure that you are telling your friends and your neighbors and your family members and coworkers about about what we got going on over here at captain hunters podcast so today. We're going to be speaking with kelli. sues her doctorate and really smart lady in a really appreciate her coming on. Another reason i wanted to do this. Introduction is because of course we know. Now as i record this that joe biden in his running mate miss Kamala harris are the president elect vice president elect respectively and so I want to you know i did this. Show with With dr hope about Just the importance of women and nakajima in the strides. That women are making just in life in general and so. I thought it would be a great time to release this episode. Of course it's already on facebook but just to release the audio version of this. I thought was very very important. Considering the times we live in. So if you're black We've had a black president we've had a now we've had a black in southeast out south asian mixed woman the bp very really proud of the accomplishments of these particular people. We've got more mayors more In more elected officials going on and going on in this country. I didn episode with another doctor. Dr turner who Just talked about the importance of of black people entering into The medical field. So all these great great episodes and i really want to encourage people to continue to go on to grow on So to my daughter into everyone else's daughter whether you're black white hispanic No matter what or who. You are you can do it. You can thrive and you can go forward in life. We just have to have the chains take off of us. Had removed the restrictions. And there's nothing that we can't do. So that's the reason. I wanted to do this little introduction so as we go close out with the introduction here remember to rate subscribing share please consider supporting capital hunters podcast. Greatest thing you can do to support is to subscribe share in like giving that financial donation dollar in episode Five dollars a month Fifty dollars for one hundred dollars for the year. Whatever you can do to help to this podcast continue to go into grow. I really really appreciate it. We have a lot of great episodes coming up This is a record. This is now dis- november twenty twenty. I'm taking the month of december. Don't worry i got episodes already booked up until Already booked for january twenty twenty one all the way up into february twenty twenty one so we got a lot of great episodes on. I'm always looking for more guests. More more suggestions for topics and everything like that so Not gonna be any more. Here is the into interview with dr kelley. Hope so yes so. I'm not very familiar with new haven. New does newhall sexual right as a kid. I would would go down to the way the avenue section break because there was a church off of there and these trinity temple church. We go there all the time as kids. Well we will go there all the time as part of my my church in water go there. I was the deputy insurance. But that was pretty much all i know about even of course the war section of the wall okay. Long were six. But i don't know. I don't know too much of the certain areas and sections of the city. We have a new bill section. You have the hill section. You have a very various sections in the city of new haven. And i was fortunate enough to grow up in the new wholesale section. So my support on it while. It's a nice part town for me. It's my neighborhood my hood absolutely but most folks will no science park. Yell is within close proximity. It's right in the middle of albert magnus nearby ios nearby and Yeah i enjoy growing up in the new however You know the violence as is with most urban areas but absolutely new avail. absolutely okay. sounds good. Sounds good so we got a couple of viewers. I want to say hello to them. i'm gonna put this banner up because we cannot see the the people who are joining. I said all the time. But i wish i stayed again. Someone puts his banner up. So thank you for joining us if you want your name said or if you have a comma question make sure that you chime in. 'cause i see who's here you know the particular program that we are using so i wanna say hello and thank you to my friend here. My new friend dr. kelly. Hope i really really appreciate you coming on the podcast and agreeing to be here and share your wisdom and knowledge and thank you and welcome. Thank you for having me. I am excited to be here and definitely grateful thankful for connecting meeting you and you giving me the opportunity to chat with you for a little bit and i'm just excited or wherever the russians going to go with what we're gonna get into on this evening. So folks come in the rule shan people and tell them to come on in here. Let's get into some robust conversation. Absolutely absolutely so i wanna say hello to the tricia rahmael. Thank you so much for for coming on in really really. Appreciate it So let's let's talk about how he met so We met at a community center in waterbury where you are teaching African american and latino history to a community Sensitive can tell us a little bit about that. Were absolutely so i met warn leach in a row out of waterbury and he was looking facilitator to put on classes for our young people are middle high schoolers of around african american studies. And let's neck studies in so i Responded to his all facilitator in he and i connected and one of the thing that was important for me in the reason why i reached out about the initiative. He was launching through. The group was because i realized that our history our literature the things about black and brown culture is usually sprinkled in the curriculum in our schools. Insult to have the opportunity to spend eight weeks to spend four weeks to spend any amount of time solely focusing on that was right up my alley and so i spent a number of weeks about eight weeks working with young people and teaching them about the history pre enslavement. Because that's really important us so we started with talking about african origin. Civilization and then we journeyed.

facebook president waterbury joe biden captain hunters Dr turner Kamala harris nakajima dr kelley tricia rahmael apple trinity temple church albert magnus kelli. newhall leach vice president dr. kelly
"dr kelly" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

02:27 min | 2 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

"How worried parents should be about the long term side effects of Corona virus for children because there's been a lot in the news about about long haulers, adults and children who have prolonged symptoms from coronavirus. So, we obviously have a lot to learn about this because it hasn't been very long but I tried to give my best guesses as a pediatrician about how to put this in context for families because statistically, for example, the MISC which is the sort of immune system overreaction that some children have from corona virus that lands them in the hospital. It's a scary disorder, but thankfully, it has been rare and treatable. So, while awareness about it is important, I don't think it's the kind of disorder that has to change parents opinions or keep them up at night worried about it because it is it is so rare at this point. So while they're certainly may be some long term side effects from Cremona. Virus. I think parents can leave that to doctors to worry about and research and learn about and and not worry about them. Now because I don't think we have evidence that they exist in a meaningful way. That should alter your decision making now. You're there's a certain thing of of risk and I'm sure you see this all the time in your work that when something is new, a new risk people perceive it as far scarier and bigger than existing risks that we have already priced into our behavioral model. So we live through flu season every year in which children are hospitalized children die of influenza. Children babies die of RSV their hospitalized. Alex was in the hospital with S V when he was a baby, but we've price that in to our behavioral model whereas this novel coronavirus, we see as new and so people inclination to see it as very. Scary beyond what you would you know? With these other things that are already priced in. I mean so. With with that in mind canoe, tell us about the risks that you are concerned about a lot with a sorry I, we're Sarah telling us. We need to take a break. We'll get back to risk in one minute. We're happy to welcome.

Sarah corona Alex flu Cremona
"dr kelly" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

05:54 min | 2 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

"What a great opportunity and a meaningful position that it sounds like also gives you a little bit more bandwidth to do other things like you know, , write a book during the pandemic. . Yeah exactly. . Yeah. Why . don't you tell us about the logistics of that since a lot of folks feel like there's a zero extra bandwidth how did you? ? How did you pull that off I know so I, , I was trying to do it all between March. . And June, , you know watching my two and a half year old helping my son was zoom kindergarten and working part time from home like four hours a day and it was really difficult and my my little girl started carrying around a toy phone and saying I'm unaware Komi and I was like, , okay, , something has to change. . So in June I took a leave of absence normally have the summers off every anyway but I went out couple of weeks early. . And in July, , I started to send out a newsletter and I compiled everything. . I had written about Corona virus just in bits and pieces on instagram captions and it was fifty pages and I said my has in like it's like a lot of content I've already written like This and you know he said like, , yeah, you , should. . You know you have. . My background just fits really naturally with the topic like I did my college thesis about Stress Management in Psychology, , and then in residency idea research on Kawasaki Disease, which , is Kinda like misc and I did you know I know more than the average person about complex conditions and I published also on when you have respiratory illnesses and you're hospitalized as a child so it just felt like Kinda destiny that I should try to compile a resource to help families so I did it in in a month. . <hes> mostly like from eight to midnight men sometimes in the morning and it was really fast and I think one of the things. . That I learned from the experience was how important passion is professionally because when you get a project that you think is really important and when you believe in something, , you can just you make it work. . I hadn't had anything that I have been like so excited about in committed. . In a while and so that was a nice experience to remind me like why we are we do we do. . It sounds like you are perfectly positioned was that you did a conventional publishing deal writers itself. . I did everything myself. So . I've I've tried to learn a lot about like covers and book layouts in audio books I recorded my own audio book in my closet. . About how we do podcasts over here? ? So Thankfully, , totally with you on that. . and. Anything . writing about this other places to women. . So Sarah and I saw what you had written in Emily. . Newsletter of course, , she is a previous podcast guests use the author of a couple of books like crib sheet expecting better about you know the actual research and what it says on on pregnancy in child raising and things like that, , and she has a very balanced. . Approach on risk and such like that <hes> which sounds like it fits a lot with your. . Philosophy as well. . So can you talk to our listeners a little bit about what you wrote for her newsletter about about code? ? Right, , I you know I was so happy to connect with Emily Austria this this pandemic because. . You. . Know it's been a rapid fire <hes>. . Some scientists say it's like we're getting hit with a fire hose of information about corona virus because it's so new and everybody is thinking about it and talking about it. There's . so much data to take in an analyze, , but I was so happy and reassured to see that. . When we all read all of the studies we kind of interpreted them in a similar way with regards to children's health, , which is that while we don't know everything everything we do know so far is. . Is On the more reassuring sign regarding children regarding the severity of illness, , more similar to other respiratory illnesses like the flu and RSV that four children that that krona virus doesn't seem to be worse than other viruses. . Now I think is important for a general audience that I emphasized these these regular respiratory viruses we see are a problem for children. . Thousands of children are hospitalized every year for RSV and flu. . So I'm not trying to dismiss or minimize the risk. . There are children who have died of corona virus and it's a tragedy but I think it's also important that we take it in context as we make our decisions like what's different about this or what's new about this and how does it affect? ? Our decision making as parents. So . what I tried to address for her her newsletter was about. . How worried parents should be about the long term side effects of Corona virus for children because there's been a lot in the news about about long haulers, , adults and children who have prolonged symptoms from coronavirus. . So, , we obviously have a lot to learn about this because it hasn't been very long but I tried to give my best guesses as a pediatrician about how to put this in context for families because statistically, , for example, , the MISC which is the sort of immune system overreaction that some children have from corona virus that lands them in the hospital. . It's a scary disorder, , but thankfully, it , has been rare and treatable. . So, , while awareness about it is important, , I don't think it's the kind of disorder that has to change parents opinions or keep them up at night worried about it because it is it is so rare at this point. . So while they're certainly may be some long term side effects from Cremona. . Virus. . I think parents can leave that to doctors to worry about and research and learn about and and not worry about them. . Now because I don't think we have evidence that they exist in a meaningful way. . That should alter your decision making now. .

DIMICK Freidan Cova Journal Laura Kelly Hemmitt Sarah New York Alex
Parenting in a Pandemic with Pediatrician Dr Kelly Fradin

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

05:54 min | 2 months ago

Parenting in a Pandemic with Pediatrician Dr Kelly Fradin

"What a great opportunity and a meaningful position that it sounds like also gives you a little bit more bandwidth to do other things like you know, write a book during the pandemic. Yeah exactly. Yeah. Why don't you tell us about the logistics of that since a lot of folks feel like there's a zero extra bandwidth how did you? How did you pull that off I know so I, I was trying to do it all between March. And June, you know watching my two and a half year old helping my son was zoom kindergarten and working part time from home like four hours a day and it was really difficult and my my little girl started carrying around a toy phone and saying I'm unaware Komi and I was like, okay, something has to change. So in June I took a leave of absence normally have the summers off every anyway but I went out couple of weeks early. And in July, I started to send out a newsletter and I compiled everything. I had written about Corona virus just in bits and pieces on instagram captions and it was fifty pages and I said my has in like it's like a lot of content I've already written like This and you know he said like, yeah, you should. You know you have. My background just fits really naturally with the topic like I did my college thesis about Stress Management in Psychology, and then in residency idea research on Kawasaki Disease, which is Kinda like misc and I did you know I know more than the average person about complex conditions and I published also on when you have respiratory illnesses and you're hospitalized as a child so it just felt like Kinda destiny that I should try to compile a resource to help families so I did it in in a month. mostly like from eight to midnight men sometimes in the morning and it was really fast and I think one of the things. That I learned from the experience was how important passion is professionally because when you get a project that you think is really important and when you believe in something, you can just you make it work. I hadn't had anything that I have been like so excited about in committed. In a while and so that was a nice experience to remind me like why we are we do we do. It sounds like you are perfectly positioned was that you did a conventional publishing deal writers itself. I did everything myself. So I've I've tried to learn a lot about like covers and book layouts in audio books I recorded my own audio book in my closet. About how we do podcasts over here? So Thankfully, totally with you on that. and. Anything writing about this other places to women. So Sarah and I saw what you had written in Emily. Newsletter of course, she is a previous podcast guests use the author of a couple of books like crib sheet expecting better about you know the actual research and what it says on on pregnancy in child raising and things like that, and she has a very balanced. Approach on risk and such like that which sounds like it fits a lot with your. Philosophy as well. So can you talk to our listeners a little bit about what you wrote for her newsletter about about code? Right, I you know I was so happy to connect with Emily Austria this this pandemic because. You. Know it's been a rapid fire Some scientists say it's like we're getting hit with a fire hose of information about corona virus because it's so new and everybody is thinking about it and talking about it. There's so much data to take in an analyze, but I was so happy and reassured to see that. When we all read all of the studies we kind of interpreted them in a similar way with regards to children's health, which is that while we don't know everything everything we do know so far is. Is On the more reassuring sign regarding children regarding the severity of illness, more similar to other respiratory illnesses like the flu and RSV that four children that that krona virus doesn't seem to be worse than other viruses. Now I think is important for a general audience that I emphasized these these regular respiratory viruses we see are a problem for children. Thousands of children are hospitalized every year for RSV and flu. So I'm not trying to dismiss or minimize the risk. There are children who have died of corona virus and it's a tragedy but I think it's also important that we take it in context as we make our decisions like what's different about this or what's new about this and how does it affect? Our decision making as parents. So what I tried to address for her her newsletter was about. How worried parents should be about the long term side effects of Corona virus for children because there's been a lot in the news about about long haulers, adults and children who have prolonged symptoms from coronavirus. So, we obviously have a lot to learn about this because it hasn't been very long but I tried to give my best guesses as a pediatrician about how to put this in context for families because statistically, for example, the MISC which is the sort of immune system overreaction that some children have from corona virus that lands them in the hospital. It's a scary disorder, but thankfully, it has been rare and treatable. So, while awareness about it is important, I don't think it's the kind of disorder that has to change parents opinions or keep them up at night worried about it because it is it is so rare at this point. So while they're certainly may be some long term side effects from Cremona. Virus. I think parents can leave that to doctors to worry about and research and learn about and and not worry about them. Now because I don't think we have evidence that they exist in a meaningful way. That should alter your decision making now.

RSV Emily Austria Instagram Kawasaki Disease Corona Komi Cremona Sarah
Todd White on Biohacking for Longevity and Disease Prevention

The Keto Answers Podcast

06:31 min | 4 months ago

Todd White on Biohacking for Longevity and Disease Prevention

"Today on the show I, welcome my friend Todd White, who is the founder and CEO of dry farm. Wise if you drink alcohol. This is a tricky thing. I mean we we talk a lot about why he may dry farm. He does she like alcohol he thinks it's a narrow talks should be drinking it and but he has this company that. He loves one he wanted people to access it and have the healthiest possible. Imaginable and so if you're a wine drinker and your Kito or trying to be healthy removed out, there's a lot of Stephens episode that frequent blew my mind when we do have into it and I've been drinking his death and dry wines. Very often, but a couple of times a year special occasions I pops dry farm. Wise. It happened last five years but I had no idea about the ridiculous nature and how process and how much garbage is traditional winds. Tons of Info there which wines you choose and why if you want to be as healthy as possible. We him and I both sentiment that alcohol. There's nothing positive about it. But you know sometimes you want to enjoy life and have some why not a big deal? No judgment there and also todd is just a really really interesting guy when it comes to his intention digging a little bit about how he sort of crafted his business in life. Overall, he said interesting background I've known for a while and a great conversation. So tune in and I hope you guys enjoy. This episode is brought to you by neuro collective. I've been using their products on and off last few years in a huge fan of how they form the products their dosing in dumbest around. So Dr Greg Kelly. Their lead product formulator is actually on the podcast previously upset out but you can trust that knocker collective is always doing one hundred percent dosing backed up by research, a lot of companies where they do. They sprinkling amounts of ingredients. So that way you're not actually getting the full amount that is required to have physiological effect. He just get a little sprinkling and dosing and their their practice. So expected that Dr Kelly actually recommends taking two days a week and they're servings is is seven really huge capsules which just shows how much active ingredient actually put in their product I am personally a huge fan of the caffeine. Free. Version of their product quality mind and I take it on an empty stomach with exogenous ketones in the morning when I know that really want to get a bunch of an interrupted deep work hours done I feel in his own literally hours and the best part is there's no crazy crash afterwards if you're not a neutral person, sales have an amazing product called attorneys that contains all the precursors to d which is. Far More effective than taking direct d supplements to reduce oxidative damage to yourself. Again, love the formulation and how they went about making this. If you want to try out any neuro hacker collective products had two neuro hacker dot com and use the code aged one five for fifteen percent of all the products. That's any you are O. Hacker Dot Com Code Eight, G one, five for fifteen percent off all of their products. This episode is brought to you by Paleo Valley. I've been a huge fan of this company for years ever since I met the founders at a conference, I'd say four years ago plus in have been eating their hundred percent grass-fed grass finished beef sticks ever since then the because reading the recently, why asked them to come on the show's sponsor? Is that? They do a lot of support in regenerative farming. They actually continue to reinvest into helping small farmer scale in really building on an amazing supply chain to help regenerative agriculture scale. The only that they're beef sticks aren't dry bone and leave that weird slim Jim style waxy coating, your mouth, they are plump in. In in a weird way, we gobble these guys up at the perfect offices when we don't have time to get a full meal in perfect real food snack if you're looking for one of the best beef sticks around, that are not only great tasting but responsibly sourced checkout Paleo Valley and great news is listeners of the podcast get fifteen percent off. So just go to Paleo Valley dot com slash one five or use code ag one five at checkout epithelial Valley Dot Com fifteen percent off that's p. E. L.. V. A. L. L. E. Y., DOT COM SLASH E G, one, five talk. Thank you for joining me today. Hey, I'm looking forward to it. It's going to be a great discussion. You're one of the first people that I met. That were sort of early Keitel Angeles. Before this whole boom happened years. It started with Christmas, you guys three or four years ago when you first were up. It's been almost odd years but yeah, we were or I should say many people on the team as well. But. We We were super early adapters before it became a thing. Kid Genyk Guy. It was starting to circulate in the biohacking community about five years ago. Maybe five miss closest six years ago when I started and and you know it was it was getting around biohacking community had not yet gone mainstream. But. Yeah, we were there early and still still big believers. Yeah I mean what was it? That got you into everything being was just the sort of request to optimize your personal health. It was an actually that would be a little bit more glamorous but it was really about vanity I had I had reached a weight loss plateau. It wasn't really overweight and in any way because I've been biohacking and sort of. been. In, and out Akita Genyk. Diet. Really since the eighties with the Atkins Diet but I had been eating a lower car diet for quite some many years. So it wasn't really overweight but I really wanted to lean out. And I I was at a weight loss plateau and low carb just wasn't doing it, and so that's I experimented with Kito that way and then the weight loss went away pretty quickly as it tends to do for most people in fact, lost a lot more weight than I had anticipated. And then sort of what I thought was a set point and a place I wanted to be but I continued the Ketogenic Diet in fact. Double down on it and really became therapeutically Ketogenic, which is different than Akita. Diet. or a modified Keto Diet, which is the way I would describe my diet today but. But I experimented with really therapeutic Ketogenic, which is super high fat and and and a lot of blood testing and a lot of kind of quantification and. You know the cognitive benefits for me. became. So extraordinary that I just stayed on the Diet, even though I didn't have any plans of further white. House.

Paleo Valley Todd White Valley Dot Com Biohacking Founder And Ceo Dr Greg Kelly Dr Kelly Stephens Kito Akita Genyk Genyk Guy Caffeine Keitel Angeles JIM A. L. L. E. Y.
How Does Stress Trigger Physiological Conditions?

Not Another Anxiety Show

06:17 min | 5 months ago

How Does Stress Trigger Physiological Conditions?

"Hey guys welcome to not another anxiety show I'm your host Kelly Walker and joining me today as my co-host Erica late them. My, Darling. Good sweating just existing. It went from the dead of winter in a like distortion. What was that show that I never watch game of thrones like the white walkers are coming to the Sahara chocolates too Humid Sahara. If the Amazon. My hair is huge right now I've got some curly hair, so my friend was like. Why is your hair so curly? Did you check the humidity? It's like a thousand percent. That's what. Science! Science it can become a thousand I am drinking the air so. In such rated we'll. However you tell me everything. All besides that, you know just. Just hitting up the Instagram, where I saw an interesting, a really great question. Right like we have a great question. We got a great questions, but this one was. And I will read it to you any second now, but this one was something that we both went. Okay okay, we can talk about this like it's even beyond. Anxiety bites because it's sort of getting back to the basics of song. Yes, so. and. I think there's like you know I WANNA make sure. We sort of answering a no read it in a second here but I wanNA. Make sure we sort of answer the question, but there's a little more to it underneath the surface that I, also WanNa touch on, which is why it's not just like a simple anxiety bites because it was like sort of an evocative question for us and I definitely thought it was worth probably something we've touched on here and there, but never like dedicated an entire episode to so Yeah I think it's. It's definitely worth taking some time. Okay Ready. I understand that things like heart palpitations may lead one to think that they have a heart condition, which is not actually present. I'd like you to do a segment about how stress can trigger actual physiological conditions. Love. This thing I mean you remember this coaching? air-cooled heart palpitations, but I was like yeah, okay, thanks a lot for the vice. Mine's real. And, it's no less real, but. Yes. Yep Yep and so I WanNa make sure I answer this listeners question about stress, and how it, how it impacts our bodies, so I'll take a second to sorta like dive into a biology lesson, which is my favorite thing. Ever sorry Erica bear with me. There's going to be I listen. I love. The biology I just don't understand sixty two percent of it. To Hey. That's passing right on. Oh. Yes, that's passing. That's a New York it is. That's passing. So yeah, I do WANNA speak to to how stress can trigger actual physiological conditions I don't want to share them here, but she she sort of shared a few things that have arisen for her as the result of anxiety so. It is it is well researched documented that chronic stress is one factor keyword one factor of so many others that can contribute to the development or exasperation of physiological conditions. Right stress makes chronic pain worse. It makes gastric issues worse. It makes cardiovascular issues worse. It makes it really exacerbates everything because. Stress touches every single one of our system, so I mean it really does make sense since chronically elevated stress, hormones like cortisol disrupt so many of our body's metabolic functions, but let's hear Mon. that's the one I can remember cortisol. I. Bet you know more than you, thank. For years later. Okay so! I wish it was as simple. This a little more nuanced I wish it was a simple saying. Anxiety and stress caused sickness right, but. We've sort of touched on this or mentioned it in a few previous episodes Dr Kelly mcgonagall. She's a psychologist from Stanford and go watch Ted Talk She's. She's very. He has a Tedtalk But to like basically some up her ted talk on and her and her research She's focused on how. Our understanding, of. Stress. And how it affects the body so. Finding was that when we change our relationship distress, or whatever are currently ship is, we can change how stress affects our body. More, specifically yet right like it always feels like an end. She says this in her Ted Talk. She's like you know I came into practices as a psychologist demonizing stress, eliminate stress managed stress, control, stress, right, but so many of us in the anxiety. Psycho are well. Of how trying to control stress or anxiety goes tension rises, anxiety rises. It's not very effective and Her major finding was that when we change our relationship to stress, right, we change how stress affects our body more specifically when we relate to stress as a natural response that exists to prepare, motivate and protect us than we don't suffer the same negative health outcomes is someone who relates to trust to stress as something to be entirely. Avoid it when we relate to stress as the former, a completely different physiological response occurs different ratio of stress hormones in addition to protective hormones are released mitigating the effects of stress on our body.

Anxiety Erica Bear Dr Kelly Mcgonagall Ted Talk Amazon Kelly Walker Cortisol Darling New York Stanford
"dr kelly" Discussed on Beyond Your Wildest Genes

Beyond Your Wildest Genes

05:18 min | 6 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Beyond Your Wildest Genes

"She's board certified in psychiatry psychosomatic. Medicine and integrative holistic medicine, and is specialized in root cause resolution approach to psychiatry, Psychiatric Syndromes and symptoms. She's a certified K. R. I couldn't leany Yoga. Teacher and mother of two got broken. Welcome back to the show. And thank you so much also. Could you just give people a little bit deeper background on yourself and why you took on this challenge of writing a second book. So it's interesting, because this book has a very different feeling, not only within me, but also the feedback I've gotten from from those of you who have interviewed me you know in in both iterations it seems like there's been some some evolution and on reflection. I wrote a mind of your own. Probably around twenty, fourteen, Twenty fifteen, and published in two thousand sixteen, and that was really fueled by no small amount of righteous anger. I mean I Put My hushing Motos thyroiditis into remission and you'd think I would have had you know rainbows sprouting out of my head, but instead I had like scene coming out of my ears, because at that time you know, I had just completed my fellowship, so I gave a decade of my life, blood, sweat and tears in two hundred thousand dollars of debt to learn what I was. You know quickly. Finding out was a very small sliver of the available science around health and disease. And so I, you know hit the books and I determined to figure out what else I hadn't been told about. And I explored all of the sacred cows whether it's cholesterol, medications are acid blockers are antibiotics, or you know vaccines or of course second. I had been prescribing not just to general patients, but specifically to pregnant and breastfeeding patients. That's how much I believed in that model so I put that all into a book and I thought you know when when people have this information, they'll never touch a medication again. You know and I I really thought that it was just about winning the information war. Winning, the science war, and as somebody who of course has been on both sides of the aisle. I figured well I have more science because I have the science to defend prescribing, and now have the science to defend de Prescribing and lifestyle medicine, and so I am going to beat Goliath and soon I learned that that's not what this is about and in fact. The the engaging of of warfare, whether it's outside, or it's a civil war within continues to perpetuate a kind of A stasis in our growth healing evolution, and plus you can't change somebody's mind with information I knew that because my mind only changed because of a lived experience, because I changed my diet and I went from pooping once a month to having totally healthy Gi function for the first time in my adult life, I had a lived experience of how small decision could have a huge reverberated. On my wellbeing and so that's when I you know I. Really dedicated myself to creating the conditions for others to have this experience of health reclamation, and then I really focused my activism on shining a light on the radical outcomes, so the people who walked away from chronic disease labels and medications that they were definitively told were or life, and the reason that I did that was really in honor of informed consent, because if you know what is possible. Then and only then can you make a true informed decision about what is right for you, and so it's really in that spirit that this book. Is An offering to those who feel ready you know feel ready to level up. Feel ready to get stronger..

Psychiatric Syndromes leany Yoga thyroiditis Goliath
"dr kelly" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

KSCO Pet Radio

01:40 min | 7 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

"Even before the study is you know totally complete. But we're at least can start looking at the genetic were. It's a big job. It's a lot of you know our. Dna is big and dogs. Dna is big and looking through all of it. It's very complex. But we're able to start doing that. And we're really grateful to them for giving US funding that they made that Testing available to us. Laura I have been monopolizing the conversation is I want to do. Do you have a question for Dr Kelly Yeah I do. This is kind of back to the virtual walk. I've never done a virtual lockwood. What's involved with your. You're about to do one because that's going to tell. Kelly will sponsor a local listener K. Seo Walk that somehow so if you get your people send me. All the artwork in everything will start promoting it so tell us how virtual walk works right. So it's really similar Laura to if you were going to walk for a Another organization where you get pledges from people like I'M GONNA walk this far and raise as much money rape maybe per mile or whatever and some people just say here. I'll give you pledge rate And other people do it by Biol- or whatever and what we have done in the past is People would go out and do a walk and We had team sometimes it and it doesn't have to be a hand to go walk ten miles but but it was a way of raising money through the virtual walk. And so we're we're really.

US Dr Kelly Laura I Biol rape
"dr kelly" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

16:36 min | 9 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"That I talk about it this way but I think of it. Like a trilogy. Joy of SAX joy of cooking joy of movement Sachs is key to how humans survive and it's really It's it can be a source of pleasure meaning in connection so is food and cooking is absent. You have to eat to survive. And also it's a source of joy and pleasure in meaning connection and I think movement is the it's the Trifecta it's the other thing that is necessary to survive and is just as richly embedded in what it means to be human. Yeah I think you're so right and you do talk a lot to about Kind of the evolutionary having an evolutionary understanding of why movement actually is incredibly rewarding. And you know the runner's high which actually turns out to be more of a persistent high right that people can get with any type of prolonged move gap. The somebody who doesn't run. I appreciate the fact that you don't need to run to get the high exactly. Yes yes that you can get it from any kind of persistent movement because not everyone is a runner. Yeah or even continuous. Another good way to describe it because you can get it in flow yoga or Tai Chi or swimming or dancing. Anything where you're just you. Just keep moving and that we really are built to move and we have internal processes that make continuing to move reinforcing. Like we're meant to do it. We just have to break free from some of these old complicated negative messages and find the joy and connection and this is part of the understanding that your brain is adapted to reward you for the things that help us survive as individuals and that help us survive as community is so you know in my in my previous work. You mentioned that. I work on compassionate empathy. Part of compassion. Is We actually get a high from being able to help others and feeling like we've made a difference and that looks a lot like an exercise high by the way and it looks a lot like the high that we get? When we've done we've been working on something really difficult. And we succeed for the first time that the human brain rewards us for doing things that are really important to our survival individually and collectively and movement is one of them and I like to put sort of the the exercise high in that same category as the warm glow of compassion or the helpers high or the thrill of triumph and overcoming obstacles a lot of things that we just intrinsic like. Oh yes like. Our brains celebrates us when we do them. A movement is one of them. Right makes us feel more alive. Yeah Yeah You tell so many wonderful stories about the people that you interviewed for the book and I think one of my favorites. I think she's the same person that you mentioned about how she didn't start. Running half marathons until her hastily. Nora yes much. Oh my gosh. She found running later in her life and she talked about how she would almost always are sometimes anyway. She would often finish last but really took pride in her. Perseverance and a lot of our listeners myself included Do Acceptance and commitment therapy with our clients in our own lives and one of the tenants of acceptance and commitment therapy is that it's important to focus on values and process and steps and choices rather than on outcomes that aren't always within our control and I thought this was such a good example of that that when you're focused on persistence and overcoming obstacles That it it it helps you to persevere and continuing to not give up versus focusing on winning for example although that story where there was such a dramatic storm during that she got she got I because everyone else dropped out that I in our age group. Everyone else dropped out. Even though she was the last person to cross the finish line but everyone else raised was like. There is no way that I can run a half marathon in this kind of crazy weather. yes absolutely. Part of the whole story is like her. Persistence ended up really paying off. So He's just highlights for people who haven't read the book about why you and I love this woman so much one is that she did start later in life She told me this very moving story about how she grew up before title nine which required schools to offer athletic opportunities to women as well as men and she grew up thinking that because she was a girl. Sports were in for her racist. Weren't for her and she also has been fat for. I think most of her life and she thought that she wasn't allowed to do movement that like movement as I've heard from so many people movement is what you do to erase your fat your end end. Maybe like do it in secret before. You've actually lost the weight. And then you're allowed to be a part of the movement communities shed all these stories and lots of people have and she realized through direct participation that it was for her starting with walking and moving up to a five K. And then moving out to these half marathons. Now she's done. I like a hundred by now. Every time I've kept fact checking it was more than in the past in over two hundred events. I think ten years and I think like a hundred. I think at the time I wrote it. It was seventy five half marathons and it just kept increasing every time I checked with her and she did mention that she often finishes last and one thing she said was that she doesn't mind because for two reasons one. She's happy to do it. Somebody else doesn't have to finish last. Which I think is you know you talked about feeling connected to your values and like that's just it's such a simple idea but what a like a kind connected to common humanity idea that like she doesn't mind it and she knows when she finishes last that she's held the space for every other person who might not have her own capacity for self compassion to not have interests and also. She mentioned that people cheer the person comes in last harder than anybody else. It's like so that's the story that you have that you'll be rejected in your failure if you come in last even by paying attention to her direct experience it's actually the opposite that people will celebrate users. Anyway there's so much in her story and how she she will often try to do an event with other people who are thinking about doing the first five K. As she encourages them in tries to do it with them so they will feel that they belong in aren't alone and that is a recovering alcoholic wanted to include that in her story. Because it's part of how she stays sober and she talks about it as drug of choice. I mean there's so much in her story that highlights so many elements of every story that I was looking for was a story that for me didn't just reveal what was good about exercise or movement every story that I shared I thought also revealed what was good about human nature and and I wanted the book to make people feel a certain way. Which is that humanity is. Don't despair about human nature that there's a lot of beautiful things about human beings and who they are and how they show up in the world and I think the book absolutely one hundred percent achieved sad and I think you said maybe in the introduction how after each of these interviews you would have you at. Just think to yourself. Oh I love people every single ones if my husband horrible I would come out and I'd be like to my husband you you. They said the most incredible thing. I have a play. You back this interview because you mentioned when people invite you to to move with them often. They're showing you the best version of themselves in a way. You might not expect and I found that more than any other book. I've written that people when they were telling me their stories about just why they love swimming or why they loved dance classes or why. They love rowing. They were telling me about who they were in a really deep and meaningful in beautiful way that that somehow managed to illustrate both who they were an individual and what people are capable of. And that's why would end these interviews sometimes like you know all teary and be like it's just love this person so much and I fell in love with all my The people in my book. Yeah I did too and I mean nor was one of my favorites. Your grandparents are definitely probably tied for favorite. And that was I think when I got teary was reading your grandparents story. They're they're a great love story in my family. I always. It's the how my grandfather took care of my grandmother to the end of her life and the story in the book is about how they met and they met at a dance My my grandfather had just returned from World War. Two and my my grandmother. Was you know someone who went to the dance halls to meet the returning soldiers and they fell in love at first to the Irving Berlin Song? Always which is about how love you always hit the rest of your life anyways. There's a lot more to that story about the role of music and dance in in helping my grandparents over time but I feel like that good want got me in the fields and seems like that's where your your love of dance might have. I been stimulated right that. Hey and thank goodness. My grandfather loved to dance because he was supposed to become a priest. So you know. Wow praised me that he would not exist. We would never have this book. So you know you talk to so many people who had these inspiring and triumphant stories about finding the joy of movement. And I assume those are the kinds of interviews that you were looking for so this. This question may not may not make sense. But I was curious if you interviewed anyone who's really struggled to incorporate movement and if there's anything that we can learn from that or like are the people who find maintain a movement practice and find joy in movement are they different from those actually. Transform People Ray Question. They're all the same stories. I just didn't spend a lot of time on like the the before rather than the after You know I think about so almost everyone. Who's in the in the book? There would have been another version? How depression made them think they? They couldn't begin. Or how a one person in particular who had incredible body image issues and that her it was when she started doing martial arts training that a lot of that changed. And then you'd have sort of a gateway into other forms of movement. But I think in everyone. I talked to had their own version of that. I have my own challenges with movement as somebody who had lived with chronic pain. And actually when these funny things is moving actually used to be a trigger for my pain and now it's like the thing that actually is most likely to relieve my pain but it took a while for my nervous system to figure that out. It's it's actually. It's incredible to me to think about it that it was getting my heart rate up used to reliably be one of the easiest ways to trigger stomach pain for me and now it's the opposite And I feel like that was the case with a lot of the people that I talked to. They all struggled in extreme version. You Know Bernie Salazar. We've talked about the guy who has dance parties with his little girl in target. He actually was the winner of the biggest loser. He was one of the winners of the biggest loser and we had to repair a massively destructive relationship with movement that was induced by that show. And you know. He spent quite a bit of time trying to maintain extreme weight loss with exercise that was basically punishment and it took him. It took him years to recover and find a form of movement that was about joy and strength and enjoying himself and not about punishing himself for having eaten. You know so yeah so I don't think people are different and I think that we all have our challenges..

Joy Nora Bernie Salazar rowing Sachs
"dr kelly" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

10:42 min | 9 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"At every level so I- contact is less threatening stranger. Somebody's high fiber. Hug will feel more pleasurable in your body. Play that you know. Sometimes it's hard to get into play when you're moving. Your Body. Suddenly play is more enjoyable. Delightful cooperation is more satisfying and it strengthens relationships. So that afterward you feel really close connected to the person that you moves with so you know you're doing that with your son. We do that every time we exercise with anybody or or not even exercise but but move or dance or do some sort of physical project together with somebody you feel closer to them afterwards and that can be a way to think. About what movement do I want to choose is to think what can I do with someone else and the other thing? I just want to point out which I think is so critical. You know so. I know a lot about psychology one of the things that I've always remembered. Is that if you want to strengthen a relationship when someone makes an invitation to you about something that is sort of expressing who they are and what they care about like just say yes to it. Allow yourself to be somebody who affirms that and they feel seen by you and celebrated by you movement. This is a big one for people. If you have someone in your life who has subtly been nudging you to join them in an activity. Maybe they just want you to see it. I can't tell you how many women teach dance class with women in their sixties seventies eighties. How many of them will bring their children to class? Even just once. I think they want their kid to see who they are when they're dances. And so I was talking to another Interviewer who really wanted his father to come. Watch him surf. Even though his father could never serve that he didn't have to serve but he he wanted his father to see was when he was in the water on his surfboard. So if somebody in your life is making that sort of bid to play with me come in the pool. Mom come to this yoga class. I've been going to come. Cheer ME ON MY Five K. This is such an amazing way to strengthen our relationship to let go of your inhibitions to make it a priority because when people are moving and they are telling you this is a movement formed that's meaningful to me. They're really telling you who they want to be who they want the best version of themselves often. And they're inviting you to see that uncelebrated. Yeah absolutely I really light Going back to what you were saying about some of the research and the moving together there was one finding that specifically looked at music dancing with other people and then specifically moving in synchrony select these exercise classes that you do that showed that dancing in unison actually led the participants to feel even more bonded than those who danced together but not in synchrony and that the dancing in synchrony also increase their ability to tolerate pain. Yeah this bonding and connection thing is just really critically powerful. It is and there's so many different applications for this so one thing I think of this as being sort of a big hoffer me When I first started teaching I I was asked to develop a program for people with chronic pain and I ended up spending over a decade working on this movement program that met twice a week and for an hour we moved and breathe together and stretch and did some strengthening and people loved this classic. I couldn't get people to stop taking this class even if they were recovered from their surgery. Or whatever and I remember thinking like I don't know we're not. It's not not physical therapy. We're just moving and breathing. Took me years to figure out what was probably happening is that we were moving and breathing together. And even if you are doing relatively gentle movements like lift- lifting an arm on an how lowering the arm as you exhale when you sense it you're doing that. As a collective with other people it increases endorphins and probably other brain chemicals as well that relief pain not just in the short term but actually teaching the brain and the nervous system How to process physical sensation differently so that you experience less pain in general in life and I took I feel so silly that it's GonNa be years to realize it was probably the group of fact and we're moving slow enough to breed together rather than like any brilliant stretch that I was coming up with you can think about synchrony as a really powerful way for people who are dealing with difficult physical challenges that That moving together is often more effective. The moving on your own learning your PT exercises in doing them at home Something powerful about the group of fact and also translates to our ability to feel like we can handle the challenges in our lives so there's also a hope effect and part of that's endorphins. Probably other stuff as well that when people move in synchrony with others. They report a greater sense of confidence in their ability to handle challenges. They report more hope. That very difficult problems can be resolved. There's something about feeling this collective self that makes you feel like bigger and more open and more capable and more powerful and I think that's another really interesting side benefit and so both of these are in addition to the fact that also they make like other people more and feel greater sense of belonging. So it's one of the reasons why I continue to teach group movement classes. I teach one or two classes a day and I think it's the most important work that I do so cool and it makes so much sense to me. I mean when I had this. Aha moment about my kids in need of apparent models movement. I set a goal from. I was never a runner. I still don't know that I would consider myself a runner but I set a goal for myself to run a five K. And I did the couch to five K. program and I signed up for a race. That was actually on Mother's Day and my husband my two kids came and they cheered me on and they were there at the finish line and I actually. I framed my BIB AT I. Keep it in my office as and I've never done a race since then by the way but it's this reminder to me that I never thought that this would be possible for me to do and it was. It was such an accomplishment and the other thing that really stuck out to me that was very surprising was when I went to the race that day. They did this whole humongous group. Warm up and I didn't know in two races where I don't know how many people were there. But it was a lot of people and all of us were on this field together. Essentially doing kind of like aerobics together to get warmed up for this race. And I I mean it might be the most pumped up and the Melissa close to a bunch of strangers. I've ever felt in my life and very different from running alone on my treadmill in my garage which also also serves its purpose but is a very different kind of emotional experience and I feel like that high lasted for quite a long time. I mean it is really proud moment and I have such strong memories tied to it when I see the picture of me holding my kids after I finished the race. How several years later? I'm just instantly filled with the memory of of you know just how amazing that experience was and I think it had less to. If I had run five K by myself it would have been a completely different experience. Really relate to that connection. This is something. I cannot emphasize enough to people who are trying to figure out how to make movement a part of their lives. We often think that the the solution is going to be defined the smallest most convenient thing. We can do because it's easier to do in the moment today like I'm going to do the I'm gonNA climb the stairs instead of taking the elevator wants and we've been given a lot of what I think is poor advice when it comes to movement about trying to shrink the dose as small as possible. Make it as convenient as possible. Just Park your car a little bit farther away and you'll get your activity in that way and then maybe you can look at your stab count at the end of the day and feel good that you got more steps in and when one of the things that. I learned from talking to people that I've seen over the years. Is that if you could just allow yourself to imagine that the movement you do could be really meaning fall. People choose different activities. They do invest more time and energy into it but often in a way. That doesn't become a distraction from their lives but allows him to create these kind of meaningful moments. Like you described with your kids in the finish line. That's different than if you were doing like you can do a five k. On Your treadmill by yourself at the gym when nobody cheering you on and like no photograph to put on your wall and I am always encouraging people to think. What if you believe this could be really meeting for? What if you believe? This could be a metaphor about what you're capable of. What if the experience itself could bring joy or community into Your Life? What if the movement itself could do good for your community? I give examples in the book like good gym where they combine Running or walking with community service projects green gem where they're out there creating natural environments in city environments for other people to enjoy. There's a lot you can experience through movement that has real meaning to it. I think that is a much smarter. Way To approach it than the convenience factor which often seems logically like. That's the way to begin right in. There may be benefit to doing those things. It's not that those things are shouldn't be done but you don't get the payoff and you're less likely to stick with it and so much more as possible you know. It almost reminds me of like people who are really excited about the fact that someday we might be able to never eat food and just take a pill you know there how funny studies terrible like half of humans would be happy to give up all relationship to food it became possible to just take a pill once a day that replaced food. And I'm thinking really because of the pleasure in food because of the relationship you can have to where your food comes from to being able to make the food and share food and how we use food to communicate other people that we love them. Like why you'd give all that up for a pill and I feel that way about movement to that yet it's complicated. We're GONNA have a very complex relationship with it like you started our conversation saying and also they're so much that's linked to our humanity tied into it. I actually believe that movement is when the reasons I called the book the Joy of movement and my publisher is not really thrilled..

publisher Melissa
"dr kelly" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

11:45 min | 9 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"Powerful antidote to the modern epidemic of depression anxiety and loneliness. And if that's not enough. She's also passionate about animal rescue and adoption and is trained as a Cat. Adoption counselor and matchmaker so welcome. Kelly. I am so happy to have you here with us today. On psychologists off the clock. Thank you thank you for mentioning my favorite personal credential. The cat matchmaker volunteer important. One I feel I feel like that's true. Well let's talk about this book. I loved this book the Joy of movement and I will admit I've always had what I would consider a slightly complicated relationship with exercise so I wouldn't normally be drawn to a book about exercise and I think that's probably because a lot of my exposure to movement has been authority figures sort of shaming me. That this is something that I should be doing and that I'm bad if I'm not doing it and what I loved so much about. This book is that it is just the furthest thing from that and it truly earns its title and being called Joy of movement. And you make the point that the joy of movement is not necessarily about fitness. But it's about the joy of movement that it simply in the moving and so we'll talk much more about this idea but to start in a totally different place. I'm really curious. You make it pretty clear in the beginning of the book that you have been a huge movement lover since you were a little girl I think you said you started working out to VHS tapes which dates you a little bit age size mid Jazzercise Aj Yeah early eighties right and I believe if I have this right. This is your sixth book. The Joy of movement is that right. I depends what you count as a book. I have some books that are only available in non English languages. So I think I have four in the. Us that are okay while it's so Somewhere between four and six books And so this is a question that therapists often ask clients when they first walk in. Why now like? Why are you coming to therapy now? So why are you writing this book? Now as opposed like. Why wasn't this your very first book given how passionate you clearly are about this topic? Every book that I have written has been because somebody else asked me to write it so when I was first working in the field of Yoga and people saw the work that I was doing with Yoga Practices to help with things. Like pain or or stress Somebody said hey we see what you're doing. Can you write a book about it so I did? When I was teaching the science of Willpower at Stanford and it was a super popular class and it started to get media attention. Very sexy topic willpower. Somebody asked me to write a book or agents started calling and I said okay. Same thing with stress. I had that Tedtalk This is the book I probably always would have wanted to start with actually can remember when I was a graduate student in college. I'm I'm very like so. There are always two sides my personality. I've been teaching group Movement Yoga Dance and traditional fitness. For twenty years. I started as a graduate student actually while I was getting my PhD in psychology. I also was secretly doing the track in a masters and dance education through the dance department. My advisor did not even know that I was doing and I remember in your secret layers. Yes there were just two of us in this class on strategies dance education. I remember we were reading something about the relationship between emotions and movement and I was being like super critical because it really wasn't scientific. It really wasn't integrating what we know about the mind. Body relationship from fields like psychology and anthropology and neuroscience. So remember making some sort of you know young twenty two year old snide comment and The instructor looked at me and said I think one day. You're going to write the book that really gets at this topic and it just sorta stuck with me and I was like. Oh yeah sure when. I'm you know when I'm not busy doing my PhD research. But actually I feel. That's that's true that this is the book that I've always wanted to write because movement has always been my favorite form of do it yourself ashes a do it together because I love group movement so much When you say that I have been a lover of movement as I was a little kid. Some people might have a misperception thinking. Oh doing sports. Maybe you were like that fit kid or that kid who could do flips on the jungle gym bars. I was a kid who was in remedial gym class. I was the slowest runner. I was so clumsy. I've never played a team sport. So it's not that I was a love of mover in the sense that I had any athletic ability. I mean I didn't learn how to do cartwheel and I was in my twenties because it felt like some sort of milestone I should like a meaningful milestone to try to reach but I was a lover of movement because despite feeling humiliated in gym class and on the playground I found through moving to music moving rhythmically moving with intention -ality that like an instructor would say this bicep curl failure failure failure muscle that there is a sensation to it and that you were synchronizing with both the beat of the music and other people like. That's the joy of those original aerobics and calisthenics tapes is. We're all doing this together. There's often a pop soundtrack in the background in jazzercise. They would encourage you to sing along and it was ridiculous and it was wonderful and that was how I found my joy of movement in that it gave me a way of being in my body that felt like I was a good version of myself rather than the humiliation of athletics and also because I have a tendency towards anxiety. Depression and other mental health challenges And growing up at a time when kids really were not did get help for that move in. An exercise became away from me to deal with stress and anxiety very early on. So that's what what it means for me to be in love with movement is that it's it's part of how. I take care of my mental health and also has given me tremendous access to to literally to joy and humidity and thank goodness. I finally got to write the book. Yes well let me our. I showed up for myself. Raid will and I agree I think it clearly is the book that you've always been meant to right but things happen at the time that they're meant to happen. I think And those those stories are so powerful and. I'm so glad that you wrote the book and I think you know I'd have to say one of your best talents as a writer as you have this ability to weave science your own personal experience. The stories of other people you interview into this really compelling cohesive narrative and I learned a ton from reading this book and found the research incredibly fascinating which is not an easy. There's that's no mean feat to be able to make research interesting is not something that everyone is able to do. And some of the findings you discuss are the links between movement and not just joy. Of course that's in there. It's the joy of movement but also the links between movement and human connection. Hope finding a sense of purpose and even recovery from addiction and there were there. Were even more in there too. It was so interesting and I'm curious as you were doing the research for the book. Were there any findings that surprised you or that? You found particularly exciting or interesting. Yes I'll let me see if I can give you my top three but I wanNA mention since you're talking about how to communicate science and I know that many of us are interested in sharing science with people Who might help? I actually teach a class on this at Stanford for graduate students how to talk about their research How to communicate why it's important why it matters and one is always think about is that there are certain emotions that I think are intrinsically connected to scientific discovery that are contagious. And so when I'm looking for research I'm looking for the research that gives me a feeling of wonder or all or surprise or common humanity that sense of like wow. I'm not the only one who's had this experience Sometimes relief so I feel like science can create these emotions into when I'm reading the literature. I'm looking for that scientific. Finding that study design That that turn of phrase that gives me a feeling of wonder or all or surprise and then I try to sort of capture that and how I explain it so let me give you a few examples One this is going to be a very recent and almost like a very small finding but it perfectly captures to me that emotion of surprise. So anyone who's ever worked out is probably heard people talk about lactic. Acid that thing. That accumulates as a metabolic byproduct of exercise that you are using energy and your muscles produce lactate and people blame it for the burn that you feel when you exercise and so you can exercise class will be like you gotta flush that lactic acid out So there's a thing that has been blamed for muscle soreness. It's big been called the villain in the exercise world and the latest research suggests that first of all it's a natural byproduct of exercise. It's part of how your body exercises in uses energies. There's nothing wrong with it and that when it travels through your bloodstream. After exercise it actually can cross the blood brain barrier and in your brain. It acts to make your brain more resilient to stress. It has antidepressant as I don't even know if this is in the book. I think I like snuck it in like a final edit like it's a half a sentence somewhere in there But it's an antidepressant anti-anxiety metabolic byproduct of exercise and like. That's the kind of finding that I think it. It's almost like what this thing that I thought was just making me feel sore after a workout. It's almost like you can begin to link. Even though lactate actually probably doesn't cause muscle soreness but we all think it does so. Imagine if when you're feeling tired soar after a workout instead of thanking like I must be really out of shape or that was so hard that you actually start to link that sensation to you know if I worked out enough to have this feeling that means my brain is being transformed or what I did is well that that. That's that's really. He's making my brain more resilient distress. That's one example and it reminds me to of your your stress book in your stress. Ted Talk where you talk about. How the way? We APPRAISE STRESS IMPACTS. How much stress impacts us that it essentially mitigates the negative effects of stress when we appraise it in a positive way and this reminds me of that that think about the healing powers of appraising the difficult parts of movement in a different way and the research that you sight allows us to do that. That's one of the interesting things I I should also say with stress I mean just to be pragmatic about it. There's no amount of thinking about stress. It can get rid of all of the harmful effects of chronic traumatic stress. So he's like that's a super important caveat whenever anyone brings up That my work on stress. But the the key thing about stresses we know that when you have a mindset that allows you to recognize the potential positive side effects of experience or how something can bring out the good. That's in you can bring out your natural strengths. You understand that. Humans have a capacity to rise to a challenge to learn and to grow to connect with others. Know the ideas that recognizing that capacity helps you harness it and the same is very much true with your mindset towards exercise when people recognize that exercise is powerful for mental..

graduate student Stanford instructor Kelly Ted Talk feeling tired advisor Depression writer
"dr kelly" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

01:39 min | 9 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"And anxiety during this time and then of course for therapists. This is a great time to dig into some of your online learning. Because right now you're being needed more than ever and the practice has online training and continuing education or therapists they offer Two types of high quality online training one is live online courses and the others on demand courses. You can learn more about them from our website on the sponsorship page and there's some discount cooks there as well great. Thanks everyone and enjoy this episode with Dr Kelly macgonagall. Hey everyone is Jill here and I am beyond thrilled to be interviewing the incredible Dr Kelli macgonagall about her new book. The Joy of movement Kelly macgonagall is a health psychologist and lecturer at Stanford University who specializes in understanding the mind body connection as a pioneer in the field of science help. Her mission is to translate insights from psychology and neuroscience into practical strategies that support personal wellbeing and strengthen communities. She is the best selling author of the willpower instinct. And the upside of stress through the Stanford Center for compassion and altruism she helped create Stanford Compassion Cultivation Training. A program now taught around the world that helps individuals strengthen their empathy compassion and self compassion. You might know her from her. Ted Talk how to make stress your friend which is one of the most viewed. Ted Talks of all time with over twenty million views. Her new book the Joy of movement explores why physical exercise is a.

"dr kelly" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

02:47 min | 9 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"When people recognize that exercise is powerful for mental health? That can help people build communities when you recognize that.

"dr kelly" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

03:05 min | 11 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"The conversation was focused on the various ways that movement of all kinds can have a positive impact on our lives and particularly how movement can draw us into connection and relationship with other people and even serve as an antidote to the experiences of loneliness. Dr macgonagall shirt. Some of the research on just how movement can dross to greater connection and some of the fascinating in which our biology is activated by movement. One of the first things that we talked about was how movement can be a source of agency in our lives and how many people who have maybe a anxious or uncertain or more sensitive temperament myself included can be really aided by developing a strong movement practice. Rick talked about how movement can be away into our common humanity and idea that Dr mcgonigal's strongly support it and some of the ways that everyday movement even little things like grabbing can from a counter can help us activate both that sense of connection and that empowerment inside of ourselves. We spent some time talking about the challenges that can be presented by society around movement practices and also the ways in which our inner critic can get in the way of establishing a strong movement practice and Dr macgonagall really offered some great suggestions for both of those things operating at two levels. The first level is how to sort of set the scene to maximize your success with adopting any kind of new movement practice and the second was what to do when things get tough one of the great pieces of advice that you offered was to find things that maybe aren't the exact thing that you're struggling to do in that moment. But that activate the same sense of purpose and goal that you're movement practice furthers so that way you don't have to think about it like falling off the wagon and can instead maybe think of it like taking maybe a little detour for a moment throughout. Dr mcgonagall offered a lot of practical advice. And I'd like to sort of a personal moment to say here that various forms of positive movement practice for me dancing in particular have had an enormously positive impact on my life and I would strongly cosign everything that she offers in this episode. I think that if you WANNA make a big meaningful change in your life and the New Year one of the best ways to do it is through. Adopting a consistent movement practice again. The book is the Joy Movement. If you're interested in learning more about the book or maybe even purchasing copy we've included a link to it and the description of today's episode. I'd also like to you about Rick's foundations of wellbeing online program. The program is still accepting registration. And if you would like to learn more about that I've also included a link to it in the description of today's episode. If you've been enjoying the podcast we would really appreciate it if you would take a moment to like it subscribed to it through the platform of your choice and maybe even leave a rating or a positive review. It's really one of the best ways to help us out so until next time. Thanks for listening..

Joy Movement Dr macgonagall Dr mcgonagall Rick Dr mcgonigal
"dr kelly" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

09:52 min | 11 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Yeah I'm that's interesting. So a lot of people do feel some discomfort when they first start to send a different aspect of themselves through Movement for some people. It's about being powerful taking up space for some people. It's about expressing their sensuality for some people. It's even the sense that taking the time to do. This is selfish at if I'M CHOOSING TO SPEND TIME IN MOVEMENT. I'm not doing something else that is for my family or for my work and I think that often you know bringing it back to direct experience how you feel and then bringing your focus to something bigger than yourself to community now. Think that a lot of the stories that are right about in the book are about communities of movement where there's an aspect of celebration and witnessing other people and encouraging other people. I think that when we feel discomfort ourselves sometimes it's too much self focus. And if you take the focus off yourself and you say look around you know so I teach a dance class for example where most of the women are over the age of seventy and you could imagine being self conscious in that class and we're dancing in in all sorts of ways in different styles and feeling if you look at what was happening in that class and to watch the women move with grace and then the fierceness when we're punching and the the sexiness when we're dancing to Liz. Oh it's so extraordinary to watch because it's human and it's real that my sense is people lose their inhibitions because they're like wow look at that woman and same thing happens in places like cross fit for when you're watching somebody struggled to cross the finish line in our outer breath than they're slowing down and you don't think in that moment while that's pathetic you think. Wow that's incredible so it's one of the reasons why I encourage people to find a community or they feel like they belong. They could belong. They feel welcomed and then to spend time really celebrating other people's successes admiring other people's bodies movement qualities. It's similar to. I think when we're trying to cultivate self compassion and I always tell people this is not like a do it yourself do it by yourself. Project one of the things that really unlocked self compassion is the sense of common humanity and looking at you know strangers. Zang just like me. This person wants to be happy but also knows what it's like to be angry or lonely that being able to celebrate other people's humanity and every aspect of themselves movement will really help people overcome their own inhibitions. It's You know it's like it's like the circle of compassion. All comes back to south. Another great one has two questions I could. So one is. I'm thinking about movement in a much broader way now through talking with you and in addition to those sort of masked forms of movement or someone will do a workout to run to a class. Okay fine we're still moving throughout the entire day as you. Well Know Right. We're breathing. We're shifting your shifting in your chair different. Yoga pose in my chair so during the I dunno ninety percent of a person's day even someone who's doing structured intense super-duper movement ten percent of the time during the other ninety percent of the time including rolling out of bed in the morning or something like that or just working. You know talking with other people. How can people bring into those More everyday movements walking down the street to get your Coffee Cup. Can people bring in the enthusiasm? The Wisdom Democracy. You're talking about here about you. Know Intensive Movement into that other ninety percent. Oh my gosh so I have. I have some ideas. Some will be immediately rejected by people listening being ridiculous. They're probably good ones them. While you were saying that I was thinking about how sometimes I will crawl into the kitchen where you'll get the Sova and crawl into the kitchen like I'm an animal or I will hear song that you know a car driving by and I'm on the sidewalk and I will dance for ten seconds. If I have to move a heavy box I won't just sort of you know about it. Haphazardly and be like gosh of it be like I'm lifting. Something heavy now squat tower that there are every day movement. Has these different qualities to it that you can for somebody who loves the idea of an elegant Puerto Bra and ballet the way you stretch your arm and you you look in the direction that you're reaching. Why could not do that when you open the kitchen cabinet in you reach out for the can of beans look at a new draw? I mean once you have a movement practice that you love you will discover that your body is capable of all different qualities of movement in everyday life. So that's the I feel like that is probably a stretch for some people but I gotTa tell you the people in my life and I'm we play in that way and we are. We like free in our bodies and parents know how to do this with their kids. Just do it when your kids aren't around also so that's one idea another is. There's something called the feel better effect. Which is that if you have been inactive like sitting still lying down for a period of time and you move your body in any way it gets your heart rate up just a tiny bit that gets your joints moving that requires you to breathe a little bit more which is like almost anything that you can imagine doing. It tends to immediately shift people interstate of having more energy and being more optimistic. It's a really funny precise psychological effect. I think of it as I call. It embodied optimism that when you go from being enacted to active you have more hope you feel more confidence you feel better equipped to handle the challenges in your life. You feel the energy to do it and no matter where you start you could start. Being sort of bored depressed anxious. Any sort of movement seems to move in that direction of having more energy and a more positive mindset. So you can choose to do that anytime. You need a reset when you find your thoughts spiraling in a negative direction and you realize that you've been sitting still for the last hour get up and do something else and you can choose these movement resets at a really powerful doing them throughout the day and it doesn't matter if you burn any calories it doesn't matter what it looks like it's literally effect of using your body to be more fully alive. That's a great reflection and a really awesome piece of advice that now of course. I'm going to be thinking about when I leave this interview and I go to make my lunch about. How am I chopping the care or whatever it is doing so and also this is not a joke? I agree bounds so ridiculous. I recently started giving talks on the topic of this book and I will bring people up on stage and ask them to do certain movements for like twenty seconds and say. How do you feel and it doesn't matter who they are if you have them? Do a certain movement had these. Ceo's is male CEOS. I had them literally do a ballet Puerto Bra and they were like I feel beautiful. I feel graceful. I had them imagine picking battle ropes and just swinging back just in your imagination. You not and people feel powerful determined so it seems silly but we know again if you spend any time with children you know the power of imagination and you know the power of using your body to produce Pacific states of mind and we should never lose that capacity now. I think that's absolutely true. And speaking of children child south whatever it might be. There's one question that we also ask everyone who shows up on the podcast and I'm really curious as to your response to it because so much of what you've talked about here is the transition that you've made if you had the opportunity to go back in time and talk to that younger version of yourself. I'm imagining you at eight. To twelve years old what would you wanna tell that person I would say to that girl? You have an incredible intuition and you can trust it which I essentially have a bad has been. I think everything good in my life has come from being willing to listen to this. I feel like I've been last with the ability to stands when I should move in a certain direction even when other people tell me it's a mistake and I've always listened to that it's a physical sensation around my heart. It feels like I'm being pulled forward and I would tell her. Trust your intuition. It's going to serve you and get over yourself as soon as you can. There was a screw. It was a moment when I graduated. It was the summer after I graduated college. I had this really clear insight that if I if I actually wanted to help keep what which I did my whole life. I remember the thought you need to get over your own stuff like you need to make that happen because your ability to help other people is going to require you to be strong and be resilient and so whatever you need to do to deal with your own stuff like do it because that is going to be required to to move into this next step. Tim. That's a really wonderful reflection and Kelly. Thank you so much for taking the time today to do this. Oh thank you for this conversation. That was really wonderful and also really personally useful. So today we had the pleasure of speaking with Dr Kelly.

Puerto Bra Dr Kelly Liz Tim Zang Ceo
"dr kelly" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

11:53 min | 11 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"In other words I think back on the gyms I belong to and you know I probably four or five of them. I paid for the membership and petered out and also. I'm someone who really recognizes the Value Movement. My own background. I've which may know a little teeny bit. I was really young going through school. Skinny anxious kid pick lasts for sports teams. No censor myself then. Here's my story at age. Eleven may be joined. The Boy Scouts in our very first campout went to Joshua Tree National Monument in California. There's very specific place we went to and I walked away from the camp ground and start clambering all over these huge rock formations and something broke through for me much. As you've talked about yourself. I had a sense of boldness and capability as a scruffy animal. Moving over the rocks. None of my Alpha comrades were willing to do what I was doing and total really a total processes self discovery and. I've actually been back to Joshua tree several dozen times since then. So I'm someone who knows about this and yet also assorted program. And I'll just kind of Peter out I see other people. They sort of Peter out. They know it's good and they just don't stick with it. So what's up with that? And given your expertise. What can we do about that? Yeah so couple of reasons so when we've already talked about is often the context of the motivation. And anytime you pair an activity with self judgment or fear being judged and shame by others or the often the reality that you can enter some many contexts or physical movement or you will be getting that message amplified Akkad. You eat going to a fitness class and have people talk about. This is the movement you need to do in order to get rid of that gut or whatever I don't need to hear. So there's there's that and that will make anyone sort of lose the joy that's inherent to movement. Another reason is that so. We know that being physically active changes of the brain to make you like it more and enjoy it more and want it and need it but that takes time so if you're somebody who hasn't been active in a while maybe you're active. You know a decade ago but your brain is sort of forgotten. It seemed to take about six weeks on average for the reward system of the brain to be reshaped. I- regular physical activity and it's why people who are really hooked like people like me if I've been consistently active for decades. I don't really remember what it was like to like that sense of. I don't like this. I hate every minute of. It's hard because the brain actually changes in structure and function to make movement more rewarding and also desensitize Utah other joys in life as well as one of the main neurological effects of regular activities. No food tastes better and sunsets. More beautiful and laughter. You know funny. Things are funnier but like I said it takes about six weeks on average for that to kick him. So if you can't get through that first six weeks you could start and stop over and over and never understand what it's like to have a brain that has learned to love movement and really reward you for it so sometimes it's about getting people to stick with it and understand that we know what you feel in your first. Few workouts is not what you will feel in your body and in your brain. It's like we know that our muscles adapt so people know that that if they lift weights for six weeks they will have different muscles at the end of it. I think people don't understand. You also have a different brain at the end of it at just like your muscles find it easier to to lift weights and actually feels good. Even felt horrible. When you started your you have a brain that will enjoy it. Find it easier. Find it more pleasurable. So that's part of it. You have to find a way to get through that but I think the thing that will help people do that is. It's really important to find an activity that is linked to other joys. It's not that hard to do but it is harder than say maybe taking the first opportunity to be active so if the classic example of somebody who wants to to exercise more is to like bring their phone to a treadmill and scroll through social media while they walk on the treadmill this is not the most intrinsically satisfying form of movement. You mentioned you know going out into the Wilderness and climbing experiencing yourself as wild. I always tell people what's the video of somebody sent you a video of a movement. What's the the video you would slow down and watch and be like wow? That's incredible? Is it somebody pole vaulting? Is it? Somebody Pole dancing and the artistry athleticism of that. Is it a Beautiful Yoga? Pose is people struggling to cross the finish line at a five K. or a half marathon. Was the thing where when you watch it. You're like that's interesting. That's incredible and find a version of that movement that works for your body and that is accessible to you in your community and that is going to be a completely different experience than looking for the fastest way to do a workout and some combination of that may even do it with people you love since now. We know movements going to help you. Connect with others find a relationship you want to strengthen and find that extra social support and that can make it easier as well. That's a great piece of advice particularly at the end there. I love what I've seen in my own life and whether it's my own physical practices just the dance community generally aired whatever it might be is the extent to which those social bonds do get strengthened by doing things together with somebody else whether it's about having a workout buddy or a dance class buddy or whatever else they're going to yourself up to and I think that's awfully convenient here and probably not incidence. That part of what? We're talking about is willpower. And that's been a major focus of other areas of your work. You're talking here about really setting the stage for success moving into something buy even if you set the stage. Well even if you engage with the topic that you enjoy even if you do it with somebody love. They're probably going to be moments where it's just a lot easier to stay in bed or just a lot easier to do whatever the negative activity is rather than engaging with your movement practice so in those moments those like hard times or maybe creating the circumstances so those moments don't come up so often what have you seen from the research or your own experience. That's really helped people out. Yeah so it's it's worth pointing out so talking about willpower. I define it as the ability to do what matters most to you. Even when it's difficult or some part of you doesn't want to so one of the first things that can really support any sort of behavior. Change is getting clear on what matters most you absolutely and if it doesn't matter most to you I'm not here to control what you eat by. Do say this is about what matters to you to whether it's movement or any other sort of behavior change. You need to be crystal clear that you believe that committing to this is going to have a positive effect on your well. Being your relationships your ability to contribute to the world will relieve suffering in your life in some meaningful way and so that clarity is actually d most important whether you're setting a new year's resolution to exercise more. What do you believe is the best possible thing? You will experience by making that commitment and does it really matter to you and there. It may be that it doesn't that that is not the most important thing and to be really clear about what that value is. Research shows that when you're trying to make a behavior change even a one time reflection on that so if you were to think the reason I Sam GonNa go for a walk outdoors three times a week is because I believe it will contribute to my energy levels which is really important for me being able to balance right now being a caregiver and my job which I love that and I really believe I need to find a way to sustain my own energy so I can do both at the same time like. That's what your value is you spend a few minutes refunding on it. Research shows that actually increases your willingness to do that behavior when it's inconvenient it makes you more likely to remember what your goal is rather than get distracted by it and supports that behavior change over time so that. I think that's the most important thing. And then in those moments where you feel that other part of you rising the part of you who is dressed out or exhausted or in pulled by a different priority that you recognize it as a choice point and you give yourself permission to do anything that reinforces your value. Even if it's not the full blown thing that you hope to commit to bring him back to the value that's really cool. Yeah so it's like. Maybe you thought you were going to go for a long walk out doors three times a week and you discover there's a choice point and you can't figure out how to make work that day you don't say to yourself so. I guess my goal was wrong or I guess I'm giving up on this. You say while what was that thing. I wanted to enhance my energy so that I could do these. Two things that are at are important to me. Could I right now stand up and do a yoga stretch? Put on one song that I loved died three minutes to move my body. And if I don't even have that I put my hand on my heart and say you know what in this moment i? I didn't find a way to make it work but I'm not giving up on this goal. Not Giving up on myself and practice self compassion and again with the research shows. Is that when you start recognizing these choice points whether or not you succeed if you are bringing attention to them with mindfulness and self compassion. You are so much more likely to find a way to make it work eventually and this is often a big experiment. When you saying I'm going to change something. That is actually difficult and important. Very few people guessed correctly how that's going to unfold the first time it's a it's a process of figuring out house is GonNa work in my life. What do I need to do? What support do I need to get? What information do I need to find a way to be kind to yourself? Through the hearts of that process that can feel like failure. It's interesting so in a two parter here part one one of the things that I so truly appreciate about your word. Kelly is this combination of intellect research solid science really practical and hard and the magic ingredient. Moxie there's something very bold about what you do and tell thinking back in your on discussion of your own history about what you've done in any my own background you know. I've done a ton of rock climbing kind. Be Rooted in that breakthrough for me when I was about eleven years old. Which was a breakthrough of self concept? Just totally shifted by senator. Who I am so my point about this is that even as movement and exercise in particular are so valuable for people in part because they help people access these ways of Bien like moxie. That are really important. It's also true that many people are afraid of experiencing those ways of being or expressing those ways of being being seen being for example big bold aggressive power take up space take tents theme and movement including hello to the accents relevant around gender socialization for women to be big full and so almost in proportion to how valuable movement can be it can stir up fears that are related to the benefits of it and I just wondered what you're thinking is about how people can work with those internal inhibitions maybe related to movement and being big and taking up space on for example and how people can kind of be mindful of them and then worked.

Peter Joshua Tree National Monument Boy Scouts Joshua tree California senator Utah Bien Kelly
"dr kelly" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

11:46 min | 11 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"But tends to graduate school. I found that you could do this with other people. You can take group. Yoga classes and move and breathe as one could take group fitness classes and dance classes. I was so happy in those phases that by the end of my first year graduate school became certified to teach and began teaching dance and Yoga and other fitness formats. And it's been the most important aspect of my career shove ingenious for twenty years now and if you were to ask me what's the most important contribution you've made as a psychologist. I would say. It's teaching the group classes that I continued to teach above and beyond anything else even the interventions that I go out there and I encourage people to do from meditation to volunteer to adopting animals. All these things that are so good for your mental. How come convinced that exercising particularly moving community is is the single best and you can do for your Maha. That's great and a lot of what it feels like. You're alluding to is a absolutely major topic of the podcast in general and I would say Rick's work in particular which is activating the sense of agency basically feeling like a hammer and not a nail and one of the things that you said there is how growing up. You had a quote sensitive temperament you talk about having anxiety or a sense of uncertainty and the body or in your surroundings and how exercise and Movement for Year really served as an antidote experience to that so whether from your own individual experience or from the research more. Broadly what is that interplay between movement and agency and by moving more or moving better or moving with other people? Can we actually use that as a resource to drum up a greater sense of agency and effectiveness inside of ourselves? Yeah I think I would love to answer this question with two of what I think is the most different mechanisms so we could. We could talk about a thousand ways. That movement does that. Let's talk about the two that I think of is being deemed. Most distinct at the far polls of how movement creates resilient one is super molecular at the level of things that are floating around in your bloodstream. And the other is really the stories that we tell about ourselves. So let's start with the ladder. I was I was so inspired and and move by the stories I heard people share about how some movement milestone or some physical activity change what they felt was possible for themselves in their lives and wasted. How real real meaning people were recovering from grief recovering from major disabilities accidents and traumatic brain? Injuries people recovering from depression. The one one case that stands out to me. I don't know if you remember from the book this Young Woman who had planned to take your own life and she decided to go to the gym for one last workout and she dead lifted more than she had ever been able to lift before and literally in that moment of having her setting his personal record and sent literally sensing her inner strength. She decided she didn't want to die and that she wanted to see how strong she could become. And I think that is an extreme example of what I heard from so many people bad movement gives you direct feedback about who you are that often counters. Narratives you've heard from other people in a growing up or from people in society who don't believe in you who judge you the stories that you tell yourself the voice of the inner credit you can literally sense yourself moving with with speed and freedom or moving with grace and beauty or moving with power and strength and determination and when you send it in your own body and maybe you witness it in the mirror or other people see you as that version of yourself and they reflect that back to you you know. Humans are meaning making machines and physical experiences become metaphors they become these stories. We can tell ourselves about how I thought I couldn't do. This and I did amounts astonishing. And what else capable of so. I think that's one aspect of how movement gives US Agency resilience. Is it just a new story? And you can't argue with it. Somebody took a picture of you throwing an axe. For whatever reason I WANNA be lately about acts throwing Li empowering activities like that's that's just proof that's evidence and it changes. The inner critic can't really argue when you're watching a video of yourself crossing the finish line say of a marathon so that's one way but the other ways I said this really distinct mechanism. This is this is as deep into our biology as you can get so the finding that I I thought was most remarkable when I looked into the research is the recent discovery that our muscles actors endocrine organs. So we know you've got endocrine organs that pump out hormones like your adrenal glands you're gland but what we've only recently discovered is that your muscles also secrete proteins and chemicals into your bloodstream. That have an effect on every system of your body especially the brain and the only way to get access to these really healthy and helpful chemicals is by contracting your muscles so imagine that you got this pharmacy in your muscles. Your muscles are literally manufacturing molecules at when you contract them when you walk when you run when you swim when you dance when you lift weights any kind of exercise your muscles start these chemicals out into your bloodstream. That can make your brain resilient to stress that can possibly even for treatment resistant depression and there are these amazing studies both with a non human animals as well as with humans. Looking at how exercise changes that again was happening. The chemistry of your blood. How it passes the blood brain barrier and these molecules can act as an antidepressant can help your brain learned from experience can increase motivation can help you recover for trauma and one of the first papers that I found that was writing about these molecules called them. Hope Molecules is the research showing how the molecules that are secreted by your muscles. When you exercise help you recover from trauma and depression that literally create that sense of hope and this phenomenal. This is bypassing any store. You might tell yourself about lifting weights or crossing the finish line. This is literally the biology of being active. Is Making your brain more resilient distress because that's how humans thrive yet? They're great points here and it's really interesting honestly fascinating stuff for me as somebody. Who's very engaged with movement in my own life as Rick alluded to earlier one of the things that I have seen inside of that engagement and so interesting that here. We're talking about the kind of battle between the the inner critic and the sort of more quote unquote absolute benefits of movement and exercise and the ways that it's challenging for that inner critic. Sorta go to war with either a what we actually have accomplished in the real world that you can see in a picture capturing a video or b. what's happening bio chemically inside of us. That is sort of supporting our good instincts. As opposed to our negative inner critic and at the same time certainly as somebody who's taught a fair few dance classes or been in the gym a couple of times and talk to my friends about it man at the beginning of those processes. There can be a lot of self recrimination whether it's discomfort with the idea of walking into a gym or somebody in a dance class who gets down on themselves because they've tried to do it for times and they just can't do it and I think that there are a lot of sort of cultural narratives that we have around this around. The idea of going to the gym is really hard. And it's really challenging to be consistent and your fitness practice or whatever it is and I'm sort of trying to wind my way to an actual question here but it's really I suppose. More of a reflection on this On this battle between these two warring things and I just love your take on that yeah okay so let's separate things one is. Is it hard to go to the gym or be active? Sure Gas yes it is. It can be challenging to find the time to prioritize it if you are doing if you were doing really interesting things with your body. You're going to face some physical difficulties. That's how we become stronger faster. It's how we achieve mastery improvement so I'm definitely not the person sometimes people who are trying to sell people on exercise or like you only need to spend ninety seconds and you can find out on you do it and you know you don't have to get your heart rate up when we can have a whole separate conversation about how intensity and endurance amplifies pretty much every benefit of movement. So the more you do and the harder it is often at every level from those molecules I mentioned to how you censor self. Even the newer chemistry of connection in the more you get your heart rate up the stronger. The effect of collective joy so almost every positive effective movement can be enhanced by doing things that are hard it can feel like a barrier but people should know that it also is the path so but putting that aside. Let's talk about the thing that actually really does drive me crazy. Which is our cultural conversation about movement. I mean not only do we have the human instincts to judge ourselves all the time to find it difficult to go into a new environment where we don't know people or to try new activity where we haven't mastered it yet. There's all of that but when we talk about movement in our culture specifically. It's so tied to stigma and shame and body judgment that many people are actually entering the arena in a mindset that that just reinforces suffering so people assume. The point of movement is to burn calories so you can lose weight or build muscles so that your body is more acceptable to other people when people come in with motivations that the motivation itself produced a suffering. And then you you have that interaction with. Maybe it is difficult the first time you try a new movement form or your with strangers and you start to wonder if they're judge in your body so there are a lot of things where when you enter movement with that mindset so dominant in our society it can really get in the way of experiencing the intrinsic joys of movement so one thing you may have noticed in the book as I. Don't mention weight loss or calories. Watts and that was not an accident. If people want to experience the biggest benefits of movement whether it's the fact that it's such a powerful antidepressant or such an amazing social glued help us bond with others the way it produces hope. The weight increases south confidence. The way contribute to our join meaning all of that. You have to abandon the idea that the point of exercise is to improve some part of your body that you or others find unacceptable it cannot be the mindset with which you enter movement and whether or not it changes your body. I would argue that even if even if movement had no benefits for physical health which of course is not true but even if that were true the effects aren't psychological health and belonging are so powerful that you wouldn't even need the physical health benefits to make this one of the most the best uses of your time given the benefits. I find myself just wondering why does so many of us me included flame.

Rick Yoga US Agency depression Watts
"dr kelly" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

11:44 min | 11 months ago

"dr kelly" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Hello and welcome to being well. I'm Forrest Hansen. I'm joined today as usual by Dr Rick Hansen. And today we have the pleasure of welcoming Dr Kelli Magog to the show. Dr mcgonagall as a health psychologist lecture at Stanford University and Award Winning Science Writer. Her scientific research focuses on the mind body connection and how to cultivate resilience and compassion. She's the author of several wonderful books including the international bestseller the willpower instant the upside of stress and her newest book the Joy of movement. She's appeared on the today show. Good Morning America. The Anderson Cooper Show and CNN's vital signs. Her twenty thirteen tedtalk how to make stress. Your friend has been viewed over twenty million times. Which is a crazy number so doctor thank so much for taking the time to join us today. How are you doing? I'm doing great? How are you great? Yeah it's really good to have you here today. Recently we posted a couple of episodes related to loneliness and interacting with your newest book. Really made me think about that topic again. So I'd like to kind of throw something around and basically get your your thoughts on your response to people have become more isolated in a variety of ways than ever before it seems. I think that you could look call loneliness a legitimate epidemic that we're facing certainly in the United States and globally as well there was a I think twenty eighteen cigna study or survey. That was done. That said that fifty percent of people feel alone always or a lot of time and probably not coincidentally only about fifty percent of people felt that they daily had a meaningful human interaction with somebody else out in the real world. I can't imagine that those numbers are correlated. But it's worth throwing out there one of the interest in statements that you make inside your newest book. The Joy of movement is that exercise and movement in general can actually draws into connection with other people and exercise has many benefits. I may exercise advocate. But that's not necessarily the first one that I would have immediately thought of before interacting with your work so I wanted to start there. What is it about movement that can help serve as an antidote experience for something like loneliness? I'm so glad that you want to start here because I am obsessed with this. Finding that exercise primes is to connect with others. You know all of my work from way back in the day when I first started doing research in Psychology. This has been one of my core interest. How do people form social connections? And when I started writing this book and looking into the neuroscience of exercise I was not expecting to find what I found which is that exercise primes. Our brains in our bodies to connect with other people probably more powerfully than than anything else you can find in the research. Everyone knows that exercise can make you feel good. There's an endorphin rush and I think people have focused a lot on that sort of feel better fact that if you go from not being active to being active most people have more energy in a better mood when you actually look at what's happening in the brain. What you see. Is that the chemicals that are released when we're physically active anytime you get your heart rate up a little bit. You stay in that activity. It's not only endorphins that are being released but it's also neuro chemicals like Endo cannabinoid and possibly even oxytocin which in combination seemed to prime us to a more likely to trust others. Find it easier to bond with others and these chemicals specifically enhanced the warm glow that we get when we cooperate when we share in laughter when we listen to other people tell stories in fact it seems like what people call the runner's high is basically the neuro chemistry of cooperation and connection. And so when you go from being sedentary inactive into a state of physical activity. You're literally putting yourself into this. I O chemical state that makes you less likely to withdraw from others makes it easier to get over. Social Anxiety increases the pleasure that you get from any kind of clay or shared work or even just being present with other people and this allows physical activity to do a lot of things if you are being active by yourself and then you return to your family you are in a neurochemical state that makes it easier for you to to be that great partner or if you are being active with other people strengthens those bonds in that relationship. And even if you're active with strangers can build this tremendous community of support over time so I thought that was fascinating. That exercise is really not about making us feel good. But it's about making us this version of who humans need to be to survive which is really you know our social selves. I find that really interesting. One thing that forced as is west coast swing and he does it at a really high level and so it teaches and does it professionally and he also gets very involved in these events. I've seen these events I don't know if you've seen them. They've kind of blew my mind. Hundreds of people up to maybe a thousand people in a hotel ballroom of all levels of skill cheering each other on really supporting each other. It's mildly competitive. But it's massively cooperative and mutually celebratory and there's something about people moving together. I wanted to see if you could talk more about in addition to the ways that movement. Let's say primes US sets us up to move into relationship. I've been reflecting since exploring your material which I think is fantastic. What a fresh take on movement and I want to get to by the way the second word in your title the first substantive word joy like that's such an interesting angle on all this so anyway we're going with. This is what happens when people move together and even how can we in our imagination through an awareness of all those on our planet who are breathing to in this moment walking also in this moment moving with us together in this moment at a large scale as well as in a smaller scale like a hotel ballroom or a really really small scale just holding hands with someone as you. Walk down the street or going for a walk together. How can that sense of being with others while moving together also support the sense of connection and the reduction of loneliness? Yeah we'll so first of all you're using so many interesting questions. Let's name the phenomenon I so you're talking about collective joy which is the particular euphoria and and sense of connection and even self transcendence that people feel when they are moving in synchrony with other people and you can see this when people are moving in ritual and people are moving in dance when people are moving together an exercise class or even people are just walking in stride with one another that when you move in synchrony with other people it changes how you literally how you perceive yourself. One neuroscientist called it the aesthetics of togetherness that when you are moving with other people and you can see them. You can see other people's movement at the same time you feel the movement in your body the areas of your brain that craft your sense of south they begin to include everyone else you can see moving in synchrony with you in your sense of self is a literal visceral feeling that you are not a sort of an individual confined by your own skin and bones that you're part of something bigger than yourself. There is that sense of collective and again it comes removing in synchrony with others. Because of how we seem to be hardwired to perceive ourselves as part of something bigger than ourselves music by the way enhances facts aren't sure it's part of what's happening with west coast swing so that's collective joy and again. It seems to be rooted in our our human need to actually connect with one. Another and transcend are sort of most self-focused or individualistic impulses. Is why you see things like dance and ritual and celebrations so often includes synchronized movement so that we can come together and feel like we're part of something bigger than ourselves and you asked about how this can sort of go beyond when we're actually moving together and it's an interesting thing because in my work on my research on meditation meditation that I often will encourage people to do is kind of an imagined collective joy of breathing together. You know whether we're doing the practice like imagining doing Tanglin Glen imagining other people in the world who maybe are in the same situation as you. A kind of a shared eight or struggle and then imagine breathing for them and then imagine breathing with them and imagine that you could breathe in the kindness compassionate. They might be sending to you and there is something about having experience in your body that I think makes it more possible to engage in these template practices. It's less abstract. You know if you go to. You could just go to occur fitness class in your step clapping with other people or you're at a sporting event or concert and you're clapping with other people. You know what it's like in your body to be in that state of self transcendence in connections. I think it makes it easier to access at sense of common humanity and not being alone in moments outside of that sort of peak version. When you're in the full-blown collect enjoy thing. I like to do is imagine what people are doing right now in places that I've been to like Tokyo or New York City or Bhutan walking around. What are they doing right now? So think about what time it is and how the mood coming in and out or restaurants or bars or getting up in the morning and there's that funny feeling that we're all in this together even though the other person would say as ten thousand miles away so I wanted to ask you your own personal connection with this material if you could just speak to that a little bit how you yourself have engaged the joy of movement and maybe how you find a sense of connection with others in part through moving together. Yeah it's funny. So a lot of people know me primarily as a psychologist and some of them are surprised like Oh. When did you get into this exercise but I have been using movement for mental health support since I was probably seven or eight years old? It's like it's the first practice that I found to help me. So the origin story is I was born as a child with one of those sensitive temperaments where I was scared of everything overwhelmed by everything all those sort of psychosomatic problems with headaches and digestive problems and now she's like the most anxious sensitive scared kid and at some point my mother started bringing home exercise videos from garage sales as if she was going to eat 'em where my family is big on garage sales and thrift stores and that sort of thing so she's bringing home these changes if she was going to do them and she never did but I did we have vr. And is the early tapes jazzercise the original workout. And I had been a total Klutz in gym class. I was always the slowest kid. I could not catch the ball. There was something about moving in synchrony to music and falling along other people's bodies that sense of moving in synchrony with what I could see on the TV that made me feel so good. It made me feel. Empowered made me feel graceful and beautiful. I was Iraq hat and I could sing along because you know jazzercise. They're like sing along to the words. It's just a totally different experience of being in my body and bury quickly. I developed I what I think is a healthy dependence. Somehow that exercise helped me regularly my mood and my anxiety. By the time I was in graduate school at Stanford I finally had a place to do it with other people in my whole life. I've been doing it basically at home in my little studio apartment or in my living room.

United States CNN Dr Rick Hansen Dr Kelli Magog Stanford University Forrest Hansen Dr mcgonagall Writer headaches endorphin oxytocin Tanglin Glen Iraq partner Tokyo New York City Bhutan
NASA ScienceCast 299: The Lasting Impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9

NASA ScienceCasts

03:59 min | 1 year ago

NASA ScienceCast 299: The Lasting Impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9

"In the lasting impacts of Comet Shoemaker Levy nine presented by science at NASA at the close the last century a comet captured into orbit around a planet traveled to close and was shredded by gravity into multiple pieces some as large as half a mile or one-kilometer-long those fragments would plunge engine to the planets atmosphere in a series of impacts. Would the impacts be spectacular or would the comet fragments disappear without a trace in July nineteen ninety-four astronomers around the world watched with bated. Breath as the fragments of Comet Shoemaker Levy nine slammed into the planet Jupiter Dr Kelly fast was one of the impacts observers and is now manager of Nasr's near Earth Object Observations Program. It was just incredible to watch such an impact event had never before been witnessed. Let alone studied ground based telescopes around the world and spacecraft like Nasr's Hubble Space Telescope and even the Galileo orbiter on route to Jupiter were used to to observe the impacts the discovery of the comment by Caroline Jeans Shoemaker and David Levy gave us about a year at a plan observations. The impacts proved to be impressive the fragments some twenty one in all plunged plunged into Jupiter's atmosphere over the course of six days at impact. They were travelling at a speed of about thirty seven miles per second or sixty kilometers per second heating the atmosphere to at least fifty three thousand degrees Fahrenheit. Fahrenheit or thirty thousand degrees Celsius like the splash from throwing a rock into a pond the impacts created giant plumes of material from Jupiter's lower atmosphere which rose as high as nineteen hundred miles or three three thousand kilometers above the cloud tops into the stratosphere in the aftermath the Plume Splash Bax scarred Jupiter's atmosphere with dark clouds of impact abry which could be seen for months as they were gradually dispersed by Jupiter's was wins so what scientists able to learn about Jupiter itself as a result of the impacts for one thing those dark clouds of impact debris acted as tracers of the winds in Jupiter stratosphere and by following their motion over. Over time scientists could measure those high altitude wins temporary changes in the Aurora on Jupiter showed scientists at Jupiter's magnetosphere was influenced by particles from the impacts. We are still able to see changes changes in Jupiter's atmosphere that resulted from the impacts when the fragments of shoemaker leaving nine slammed into Jupiter they deposited their own chemical compounds. The impact processes produced some and others were exhumed from the lower atmosphere here. Some molecules like ammonia were destroyed by sunlight in the weeks and months after the impacts but others like hydrogen cyanide and water are still seeing today all of that tells scientists about how chemistry works in Jupiter's bidders atmosphere come at shoemaker leaving nine showed us at large impacts still happened in the solar system and were a factor in NASA developing programs to address the impact risk to Earth from comet science to Jupiter.

Jupiter Comet Shoemaker Levy Caroline Jeans Shoemaker Nasa Nasr Dr Kelly Hubble Space Telescope Galileo Fifty Three Thousand Degrees F Thirty Thousand Degrees Celsiu Three Three Thousand Kilometer Sixty Kilometers One-Kilometer Six Days
Judge blocks Republican-backed Wisconsin early-voting law

24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Judge blocks Republican-backed Wisconsin early-voting law

"Zoning of a residential nature or improvements of residential nature. That is decidedly not the same thing as stating that someone lives in the property. Dr Kelly has been under

Dr Kelly
NASA ScienceCast 287: You Light Up Our Night

NASA ScienceCasts

03:12 min | 2 years ago

NASA ScienceCast 287: You Light Up Our Night

"You light up our nights? Presented by science at NASA. People around the world have the opportunity to participate in the study of comet in December of twenty eighteen when a hyperactive comet that orbits between Jupiter and the sun will be closest to earth. It will be so close in fact that you may be able to see it with the naked eye within a week or two before and after its closest approach on December sixteenth, come at forty six. P Werthan is a ball of rock dust and frozen gases. A little over a Colomer in diameter that was discovered in nineteen forty eight by astronomer Carl Werthan at the liquor observatory in California were an orbital period is around five and a half years as the comet and the earth travel in their different orbits around the sun. There are times when we're in is observable from earth, depending on how close it gets to us. It's appearance in twenty thirteen for instance, was very faint and only a few distant measurements were obtained its appearance in twenty twenty four. We'll be equally faint, but it's appearance in December. Twenty eighteen is expected to be very bright passing. Just thirty lunar distances from earth or only thirty times farther from earth than the moon, this encounter will occur just a few days after its perihelion, which means it's closest point to the sun. The result is that wirtten will appear very bright from earth for a comet, and it's likely to be visible in Benach Yalies, and maybe even to the naked eye. Additionally since it will pass by earth on the side away from the sun, it should be visible for many hours during the night from both the northern and southern hemispheres. This presents a unique opportunity to study the object. Dr Kelly fast is the program manager of the near earth object of survey ship program at NASA headquarters, and she's eager to watch this event unfold at NASA, she notes we normally send spacecraft missions to solar system targets. It's always nice. When the target comes to us. This is a wonderful opportunity for comet science and for the astronaut community around the world who will be studying the chemistry coma changes and other processes taking place at comet wirtten. Dr Tony farnum is a principal research. Scientist at the university of Maryland, he is leading a multifaceted campaign to provide information about wirtten and to encourage observations of the comet throughout its appearance. Farnum says this effort is targeted to both professional astronomers and citizen. Scientists of all types, this is the tenth closest comet approach of the modern era, and because its orbit tracks the earth's for many months, it will remain observable for between two and. Eight hours per night for over a year as it brightens and then fades around its closest approach come at Wharton. You light up our night. For more illuminating information about comments. Visit science dot NASA dot gov.

Comet Wirtten Nasa Dr Tony Farnum Dr Kelly Scientist Carl Werthan Benach Yalies California Wharton University Of Maryland Program Manager Eight Hours
Medical Marijuana Expansion Bill Allows Cannabis As Opioid Alternative

Wintrust Business Lunch with Steve Bertrand

06:10 min | 2 years ago

Medical Marijuana Expansion Bill Allows Cannabis As Opioid Alternative

"Here you know the governor earlier this week signed a Bill to expand the medical marijuana experiment in, Chicago which is a big deal because governor Rauner by and large has not been I don't want, to say he's been a big. Supporter of the program, but he's. Not been big when it comes to expanding it in and he certainly did this. Week and it has to do, with opioid deaths almost two thousand people died of opioid deaths in Illinois in two thousand sixteen seventy two thousand around the country and the governor is going to allow medical. Marijuana to be used in replace of what. In. Percocet vicodin Oxycontin and things like that What do you make of the governor's move Well I think it is an. Interesting approach to thinking about the opioid epidemic the idea presumably is that a significant component of the opioid epidemic reflects people who develop problems with opioid addiction after receiving prescriptions from their physician for. Any number of things that might require opiates and the idea is that if you can use an alternative, to opiates to help manage those patients symptoms perhaps you can minimize some of the addiction and some the. Problem that, we're seeing that a good assumption I mean how big of? A, problem does come from prescriptions. From doctors well that's a really good question I think that we're just really now learning more about How the epidemic has developed and there are some data that show that some people develop. Addiction problems, after receiving, prescriptions but but someday to show that there's really not a lot of. People, in fact there was a recent study that was published looking at people. Who hadn't been hadn't been using opiates and had some kind of procedure and were prescribed opiates and it turned out that less than one percent of the people who had prescriptions developed problems so. It's a little bit unclear if that's gonna make a big difference in the opioid crisis or where all, of this is coming from and I think the thing for me that's so important about all this and. Raising awareness, is the need for us to know more about it we? Need, we really we really need. More research on who's who's developing problems why they're developing Problems and what is their pathway to that issue so even if it isn't going to alleviate a greatly alleviate the opioid crisis when it. Comes to addiction could you make the argument that it's still medical marijuana is still overall a safer and perhaps maybe not more effective but at. Least a. Safer and, effective replacement for these drugs or do we not even, know that yet Well I think, those are two different questions in terms of the safety issues you know. They're they're they're they're really guests from marijuana alone is highly unlikely we've seen it happened probably in. Kids so at their children are, more susceptible to that kind of extreme, problem but so in in that respect perhaps maybe medical marijuana is, safer, the question about efficacy though I think is an unanswered question and that's in my opinion where we need really a. Lot more work there's some good data that shows that medical marijuana helps improve, nausea in patients who are, receiving chemotherapy it helps adults with chronic pain and it helps adults with multiple sclerosis and some of the specificity issues, there's emerging data about its use I but I don't think? We have great data about whether or not Not marijuana's better than an opiate, for say you. Know an orthopedic. Procedure like if you, broke, your bone and had had a, surgery that way so that I think there's a lot of questions about. Efficacy that remain and you know marijuana maybe safer in some ways and opiates but there's there's huge. Problems with marijuana to you can, have marijuana abuse that's a that's a problem there's you know all kinds of issues related to marijuana use, in, pregnancy and its impact on the unborn child or young children so There's just a lot of unanswered questions so those of us who know nothing about it but has strong. Opinions You. Know well this is obviously the doctors were over prescribing this whole. Thing these opioids they're giving about like candy you seem to be making the case that that's not necessarily true I would like to say that, I don't think we entirely know when you look, when you look at when you look at the NIH website when you look at a lot, of reputable websites there is definitely, this contention that a lot of prescription prescribing patterns have led to this issue and I'm, not necessarily refuting that but what I am trying, to bring awareness to is the fact that if we us. If we sort of pivot how we do, things we need to really think carefully about what, we're pivoting to and if we're. Pivoting to the right, thing we don't know a lot about. Medical marijuana yet. And we need. To learn more if we do pivot it's going to be a big. Pivotal seems like right there. Were forty two thousand patients are approved. Now in the medical marijuana program in Illinois last year about two point Three million. Patients received opioid. Painkiller prescriptions so it has the ability to to dramatically expand the medical. Marijuana experiment in this state Yeah potentially potentially a. Could I think. That, that's to, be

Marijuana Illinois Marijuana Abuse Dr Kelli Michelson Feinberg School Of Medicine Chicago Bill Director Governor Rauner Northwestern University Allstate Skyline Studio Lurie Children Sean Vincent Maywood Giants Salesforce NIH Dr Kelly Michelson WGN