8 Burst results for "Dr Keith Norris"

"dr keith norris" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:48 min | 10 months ago

"dr keith norris" Discussed on KCRW

"So it Zagat question about when it will be approved, But it looks like it will be all right. Not approve your authorized authorized that is NPR's Joe Palka. Thank you, Joe. Okay? Public health experts are worried that some of the people who are skeptical of a Corona virus vaccine are those who need it the most that includes Latinos and African Americans who make up a disproportionate number of people hospitalized or killed by covert 19. NPR's Adrian Florido reports on some of the efforts to fight vaccine skepticism within those communities. Maria Reyes does not intend to get vaccinated, at least not right away. I think if I get the vaccine that I'm gonna get whatever like Kobe house and I'm going to die, so I definitely will be one of the people that won't take it, you know? In the beginning later says she is not generally a vaccine skeptic, but this one since this new, I am not comfortable of getting it. Surveys show that kind of skepticism about the Cova vaccine is widespread. Nearly 40% of Latinos told Pew researchers they would probably or definitely not get the vaccine. Or than half of black respondents said the same white people have also expressed hesitancy. But the reluctance among African Americans and Latinos is especially worrying because their rates of infection are so much higher. It's a major concern. Dr Keith Norris's among an army of people, ramping up efforts to ensure Latinos, African Americans and other people of color trust the vaccine. He's hearing a wide range of concerns, many stemming from a long history of racism in medical research. Concern about being a guinea pig concerns about farmer and the federal government. And then there's lots of social media messaging. Downplaying the importance of coronavirus..

Joe Palka Maria Reyes NPR Zagat Dr Keith Norris Adrian Florido Cova Pew Kobe
"dr keith norris" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:18 min | 10 months ago

"dr keith norris" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Hey, Joe. Hi. There else, All right, So can you just catch us up on exactly what This committee was discussing today about the vaccine. Well, it was. It was a long day, and the committee was asked to address well to vote on one specific question, which is Do the benefits of the Fizer by on tech covert 19 vaccine outweigh its risks for use and people 16 years of age and older. I have to tell you that the discussion was long and there were a lot of questions, But in the end, the vote came down to a very positive one. It was 17 to 4 to one And one abstention. That is 17 in favor for opposed and the concern for the people who were opposed. Seemed to be whether or not 16 was too young. There wasn't a lot of data For people, 16 and 17 years old and there was a question about well, maybe we should make it for older, older people. But then they decided. Look, this is the This is the question. This is what we're gonna vote on. And maybe we could modify it at some later date, But for now, it's approve. It's this committee thinks it should be approved for that use. Okay, So one concern was the age of people who may be getting this vaccine pretty soon. But what were some of the other concerns that this committee flag today? Well, you probably heard that there were a case of an awful axis. Among two people with this is a severe immune reaction to among some people who got the vaccine in the UK earlier this week. And the committee wanted to know more about that. And so the FDA also wants to know more about that and whether that should be included as a warning to people that you know if they're inclined to have severe allergic reactions, Maybe they shouldn't get this vaccine that's still to be determined. There's also a question about pregnant women and whether there's any advice to give them and younger Children younger even than 16 not data to answer the question of whether this is going to be good for them or not. Okay, But generally the committee was pretty positive about this vaccine, right? Like we've heard health experts on our show called this vaccine, a slam dunk. Yeah, I mean from well from an efficacy standpoint, it zah Grand slam. I mean, this is this was a vaccine that prevent prevented 95% of the cases of covert. That came up among the 40,000 participants that were in this study, and the FDA was saying, Well, if you get a vaccine that's 50% effective. We might consider Approving that, and they got 90% or even higher in some cases, So yeah, From an efficacy standpoint, it's very good. There is one other interesting question, which is OK, People don't get sick, but do they not get very sick? Well, there's not a lot of data to say that it may prevent mild disease that usually would prevent severe disease, but that's not sure. And there's also the question of whether it still lets people be get infected, not get sick and possibly transmit the virus to others. So there's there's still some questions to be answered. Okay, so tell us what happens now at this stage. Well, procedurally. This is a committee that gives advice to the FDA and the FDA frequently takes this committee's advice. But the FDA has to still decide whether to grant this thing called an emergency use authorization. And it was interesting to me that one of the people from the FDA was speaking said Well, we should be able to do that in the next couple of weeks, and then she corrected herself. And they said next couple of days and then she said, or possibly sooner. So it Z. Good question about when it will be approved, But it looks like it will be all right. Not approve yours authorized authorized that is NPR's Joe Palka. Thank you, Joe. Okay? Public health experts are worried that some of the people who are skeptical of a Corona virus vaccine are those who need it the most that includes Latinos and African Americans who make up a disproportionate number of people hospitalized or killed by covert 19. NPR's Adrian Florido reports on some of the efforts to fight vaccine skepticism within those communities. Maria today is does not intend to get vaccinated, at least not right away. I think if I get the vaccine that I'm going to get whatever like Kobe house and I'm going to die, so I definitely will be one of the people that won't take it, you know. In the beginning there says she is not generally a vaccine skeptic, but this one since this new, I am not comfortable of getting it. Surveys show that kind of skepticism about the Cova vaccine is widespread. Nearly 40% of Latinos told Pew researchers they would probably or definitely not get the vaccine. More than half of black respondents said the same white people have also expressed hesitancy. But the reluctance among African Americans and Latinos is especially worrying because their rates of infection are so much higher. It's a major concern. Dr Keith Norris's among an army of people, ramping up efforts to ensure Latinos, African Americans and other people of color trust the vaccine. He's hearing a wide range of concerns, many stemming from a long history of racism in medical research. Concern about being a guinea pig concerns about farmer and the federal government. And then there's lots of social media messaging. Downplaying the importance of coronavirus..

FDA Joe Palka NPR Fizer allergic reactions Dr Keith Norris UK Cova Kobe Adrian Florido Pew Maria
"dr keith norris" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:48 min | 10 months ago

"dr keith norris" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. A cove in 19 Vaccine may soon roll out to millions of Americans, The Food and Drug Administration is a step closer to granting emergency authorization to a vaccine made by Fizer and buy on Tick. A group of independent experts met today to help the FDA make its decision and NPR's Joe Palka, listen in on what that advisory committee meeting. Entailed and joins us now. Hey, Joe. Hi. There else. Alright. So can you just catch us up on exactly what This committee was discussing today about the vaccine. Well, it was. It was a long day, and the committee was asked to address well to vote on one specific question, which is do the benefits of the Fizer by on tech over 19 vaccine outweigh its risks for use and people 16 years of age and older. I have to tell you that the discussion was long and there were a lot of questions, But in the end, the vote came down to a very positive one. It was 17 to 4 to one And one abstention. That is 17 in favor for opposed and the concern for the people who were opposed. Seemed to be whether or not 16 was too young. There wasn't a lot of data For people, 16 and 17 years old and there was a question about well, maybe we should make it for older, older people. But in the end, they decided, Look, this is the This is the question. This is what we're going to vote on. And maybe we could modify it at some later date, But for now, it's approved. It's this committee thinks it should be approved for that use. Okay, So one concern was the age of people who may be getting this vaccine pretty soon. But what were some of the other concerns that this committee flag today? Well, you probably heard that there were a case of an awful axis. Among two people with his is a severe immune reaction to among some people who got the vaccine in the UK earlier this week, and the committee wanted to know more about that. And so the FDA also wants to know more about that. And whether that should be included as a warning to people that you know if they're inclined to have severe allergic reactions, maybe they shouldn't get this vaccine. That's still to be determined. There's also a question about pregnant women and whether there's any advice to give them and younger Children younger even than 16 not data to answer the question of whether this is going to be good for them or not. Okay, But generally the committee was pretty positive about this vaccine, right? Like we've heard health experts on our show called this vaccine, a slam dunk. Yeah, I mean from well, from an efficacy standpoint, it zah Grand slam. I mean, this is this was a vaccine that prevent prevented 95% of the cases of covert. That came up among the 40,000 participants that were in this study, and the FDA was saying, Well, if you get a vaccine that's 50% effective, we might consider approving that, and they got 90% or even higher in some cases. So yeah, From an efficacy standpoint, it's very good. There is one other interesting question, which is OK, People don't get sick, But do they not get very sick? Well, there's not a lot of data to say that it may prevent mild disease that usually would prevent severe disease, But that's not sure. And there's also the question of whether it still lets people be get infected, not get sick and possibly transmit the virus to others. So there's there's still some questions to be answered. Okay, so tell us what happens now at this stage. Well, procedurally. This is a committee that gives advice to the FDA and the FDA frequently takes this committee's advice. But the FDA has to still decide whether to grant this thing called an emergency use authorization. And it was interesting to me that one of the people from the FDA was speaking said Well, we should be able to do that in the next couple of weeks, and then she corrected herself. And I said next couple of days and then she said, or possibly sooner. So it Z. Good question about when it will be approved, But it looks like it will be all right. Not approve your authorized authorized that is NPR's Joe Palka. Thank you, Joe. Okay? Public health experts are worried that some of the people who are skeptical of a Corona virus vaccine are those who need it the most that includes Latinos and African Americans who make up a disproportionate number of people hospitalized or killed by covert 19. NPR's Adrian Florido reports on some of the efforts to fight vaccine skepticism within those communities. Maria today is does not intend to get vaccinated, at least not right away. I think if I get the vaccine that I'm going to get whatever like Kobe house and I'm going to die, so I definitely will be one of the people that won't take it, you know. In the beginning there says she is not generally a vaccine skeptic, but this one since this new, I am not comfortable of getting it. Surveys show that kind of skepticism about the Kobe vaccine is widespread. Nearly 40% of Latinos told Pew researchers they would probably or definitely not get the vaccine. More than half of black respondents said the same white people have also expressed hesitancy. But the reluctance among African Americans and Latinos Especially worrying because their rates of infection are so much higher. It's a major concern. Dr Keith Norris's among an army of people, ramping up efforts to ensure Latinos, African Americans and other people of color trust the vaccine. He's hearing a wide range of concerns, many stemming from a long history of racism in medical research. Concern about being a guinea pig. Concerns about Pharma and the federal government. And then there's lots of social media messaging. Downplaying the importance of coronavirus..

Food and Drug Administration Joe Palka NPR Fizer Ari Shapiro Los Angeles Washington Elsa Chang Dr Keith Norris UK Pharma Kobe Pew Adrian Florido Maria
"dr keith norris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:43 min | 10 months ago

"dr keith norris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Los Angeles. A cove in 19 vaccine may soon roll out to millions of Americans. The Food and Drug Administration is a step closer to granting emergency authorization to a vaccine made by Fizer and buy on tick. A group of independent experts met today to help the FDA make its decision and NPR's Joe Palka listened in on what that advisory committee meeting. Entailed and joins us now. Hey, Joe. Hi. There else. Alright. So can you just catch us up on exactly what This committee was discussing today about the vaccine. Well, it was. It was a long day, and the committee was asked to address well to vote on one specific question, which is do the benefits of the Fizer by on tech covert 19 vaccine outweigh its risks for use and people 16 years of age and older. I have to tell you that the discussion was long and there were a lot of questions, But in the end, the vote came down to a very positive one. It was 17 to 4 to one And one abstention. That is 17 in favor for opposed and the concern for the people who were opposed. Seemed to be whether or not 16 was too young. There wasn't a lot of data For people, 16 and 17 years old, and there was a question about well, maybe we should make it for older, older people. But in the end, they decided, Look, this is the This is the question. This is what we're gonna vote on. And maybe we could modify it at some later date, But for now, it's approved. It's this committee thinks it should be approved for that use. Okay, So one concern was the age of people who may be getting this vaccine pretty soon. But what were some of the other concerns that this committee flag today? Well, you probably heard that there were a case of an awful axis. Among two people with this is a severe immune reaction to among some people who got the vaccine in the UK earlier this week. And the committee wanted to know more about that. And so the FDA also wants to know more about that and whether that should be included as a warning to people that you know if they're inclined to have severe allergic reactions, Maybe they shouldn't get this vaccine that's still to be determined. There's also a question about pregnant women and whether there's any advice to give them and younger Children younger even than 16 not data to answer the question of whether this is going to be good for them or not. Okay, But generally the committee was pretty positive about this vaccine, right? Like we've heard health experts on our show called this vaccine, a slam dunk. Yeah, I mean from well, from an efficacy standpoint, it zah Grand slam. I mean, this is this was a vaccine that prevent prevented 95% of the cases of covert. That came up among the 40,000 participants that were in this study, and the FDA was saying, Well, if you get a vaccine that's 50% effective, we might consider approving that, and they got 90% or even higher in some cases. So yeah, From an efficacy standpoint, it's very good. There is one other interesting question, which is OK, People don't get sick, But do they not get very sick? Well, there's not a lot of data to say that it may prevent mild disease that usually would prevent severe disease, But that's not sure. And there's also the question of whether it still lets people be get infected, not get sick and possibly transmit the virus to others. So there's there's still some questions to be answered. Okay, so tell us what happens now at this stage. Well, procedurally. This is a committee that gives advice to the FDA and the FDA frequently takes this committee's advice. But the FDA has to still decide whether to grant this thing called an emergency use authorization. And it was interesting to me that one of the people from the FDA was speaking said Well, we should be able to do that in the next couple of weeks, and then she corrected herself. And they said next couple of days and then she said, or possibly sooner, so it Z good question about when it will be approved, But it looks like it will be. All right, not a plane Peers authorized authorized that is NPR's Joe Palka. Thank you, Joe. Okay? Public health experts are worried that some of the people who are skeptical of a Corona virus vaccine are those who need it the most that includes Latinos and African Americans who make up a disproportionate number of people hospitalized or killed by covert 19. NPR's Adrian Florido reports on some of the efforts to fight vaccine skepticism within those communities. Maria Reyes does not intend to get vaccinated, at least not right away. I think if I get the vaccine that I'm gonna get whatever like Kobe house and I'm going to die, so I definitely will be one of the people that won't take it, you know? In the beginning later says she is not generally a vaccine skeptic. But this one since this new, I am not comfortable of getting it. Surveys show that kind of skepticism about the covert vaccine is widespread. Nearly 40% of Latinos told Pew researchers they would probably or definitely not get the vaccine. Or than half of black respondents said the same white people have also expressed hesitancy. But the reluctance among African Americans and Latinos is especially worrying because their rates of infection are so much higher. It's a major concern. Dr Keith Norris's among an army of people, ramping up efforts to ensure Latinos, African Americans and other people of color trust the vaccine. He's hearing a wide range of concerns, many stemming from a long history of racism in medical research. Concern about being a guinea pig concerns about farmer and the federal government. And then there's lots of social media messaging. Downplaying the importance of coronavirus..

Food and Drug Administration Joe Palka NPR Fizer Los Angeles allergic reactions Dr Keith Norris UK Maria Reyes Kobe Pew Adrian Florido
"dr keith norris" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:44 min | 10 months ago

"dr keith norris" Discussed on KCRW

"Public health experts are worried that some of the people who are skeptical of a Corona virus vaccine are those who need it the most that includes Latinos and African Americans who make up a disproportionate number of people hospitalized or killed by covert 19. NPR's Adrian Florido reports on some of the efforts to fight vaccine skepticism within those communities. Maria today is does not intend to get vaccinated, at least not right away. I think if I get the vaccine that I'm going to get Whatever, like Kobe house and I'm going to die, so I definitely will be one of the people that won't take it. You know, In the beginning, you says she is not generally a vaccine skeptic, but this one since it's new I am not comfortable of getting it. Surveys show that kind of skepticism about the Cova vaccine is widespread. Nearly 40% of Latinos told Pew researchers they would probably or definitely not get the vaccine. More than half of black respondents said the same white people have also expressed hesitancy. But the reluctance among African Americans and Latinos is especially worrying because their rates of infection are so much higher. It's a major concern. Dr Keith Norris's among an army of people, ramping up efforts to ensure Latinos, African Americans and other people of color trust the vaccine. He's hearing a wide range of concerns, many stemming from a long history of racism in medical research. Concern about being a guinea pig concerns about farmer and the federal government. And then there's lots of social media messaging. Downplaying the importance of coronavirus. Norris works for U. C. L A, and is leading a California effort funded by the National Institutes of Health to build Vaccine Trust. Strategy is to get clear, concise information to.

Dr Keith Norris Maria Adrian Florido NPR Cova National Institutes of Health Pew California
"dr keith norris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:55 min | 10 months ago

"dr keith norris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. An FDA advisory panel is meeting right now to consider Fighters Cove in 19 vaccine. If the panel likes what it hears, they could vote to recommend its use in the U. S. And the first doses could be given in a matter of days. But the initial supply is limited. And there's some concern about when the U. S will buy more and whether the Trump administration already missed its chance. NPR Pharmaceuticals correspondent Sidney Lumpkin is here to talk about all of this with us. Hey, Sydney. Hey, Elsa. Hey. So, as we mentioned, there is a possibility the Trump Administration has missed its chance to buy more. The Fizer vaccine for Americans. Can you just tell us more about what That means? Yeah, well back In July, the federal government agreed to buy 100 million doses of the Fizer vaccine. That's if the the FDA authorizes it. For nearly $2 billion, But it's a two dose vaccine, which means that it only inoculates 50 million people. The U. S population is more than 300 million, so that doesn't nearly cover everyone. The government has the option to buy more. But negotiations with visor seem kind of bumpy. It's not entirely clear what happened. Okay, So what do we know? Earlier this week, The New York Times reported that the Trump administration was offered the chance to buy more doses but turned it down and because other countries want the vaccine to the federal government might not be able to get Maura until next June. Senior administration officials almost immediately said the report was inaccurate. Then Pfizer board member Scott got Leave, said on CNBC that Fizer offered to sell the government more doses multiple times, but an agreement for a second allotment never happened. So find her has gone ahead and entered in some agreements with other come countries to sell them some of that vaccine in the second quarter of 2021. And that could mean there's less available for the U. S government to buy when it's ready to do. So. You would think. Okay, So what does the Trump administration's say? I mean, did they turned down more doses, so not necessarily Alex is our who oversees the Department of Health and Human Services went on PBS Tuesday, He said there was no offer for the federal government to turn down. Fizer never gave them a definitive number of doses or when they would be delivered. So he says, there really was nothing to pass on. I'm certainly not going to sign a deal with visor, giving them $10 billion to buy vaccine that they could deliver to us 5 10 years Hence, that doesn't make any sense. But these are says they're still negotiating and making progress. Okay, well, ultimately, how big of a deal is. It's like Should we be worried there won't be enough vaccine. I think it's important to remember that the federal government made agreements to buy doses of six different Corona virus vaccines that are being developed, not just visors. That means we're buying 800 million doses in all. Of course, these vaccine candidates might not all be proven safe and effective, so some may never get used. That's why a lot of these contracts include options that allowed the government to get more doses. Fizer contract has the option to buy 500 more doses, but it requires a separate agreement, so we'll just have to wait and see how this plays out. Religious turn out to this FDA meeting that's happening right now. I can just tell us how it's going. So far. It's going well. This is a panel of outside experts. They're meeting to advise the FDA on whether to authorize the Pfizer vaccine. They started early this morning, and they've heard from the company, government officials and members of the public. So far, it's been mostly positive, with some discussion about side effects and how to monitor study volunteers going forward. But basically a recommendation for authorization seems all but certain. Okay. And then once the panel makes that recommendation, what happens next after that, it's up to the FDA to authorize it, and then distribution can start pretty quickly. Hope so. That's NPR pharmaceuticals correspondent Sidney Lumpkin. Thanks, Sidney. You bet. Public health experts are worried that some of the people who are skeptical of a Corona virus vaccine are those who need it the most that includes Latinos and African Americans who make up a disproportionate number of people hospitalized or killed by covert 19. NPR's Adrian Florido reports on some of the efforts to fight vaccine skepticism within those communities. Maria Reyes does not intend to get vaccinated, at least not right away. I think if I get the vaccine that I'm going to get Whatever, like Kobe house and I'm going to die, so I definitely will be one of the people that won't take it. You know, In the beginning, you says she is not generally a vaccine skeptic, but this one since it's new I am not comfortable of getting it. Surveys show that kind of skepticism about the Cova vaccine is widespread. Nearly 40% of Latinos told Pew researchers they would probably or definitely not get the vaccine. More than half of black respondents said the same white people have also expressed hesitancy. But the reluctance among African Americans and Latinos is especially worrying because their rates of infection are so much higher. It's a major concern. Dr Keith Norris's among an army of people, ramping up efforts to ensure Latinos, African Americans and other people of color trust the vaccine. He's hearing a wide range of concerns, many stemming from a long history of racism in medical research. Concern about being a guinea pig concerns about farmer and the federal government. And then there's lots of social media messaging. Downplaying the importance of coronavirus. Norris works for U. C. L A, and is leading a California effort funded by the National Institutes of Health to build Vaccine Trust. Strategy is to get clear, concise information to.

federal government FDA Trump Administration government Fizer Sidney Lumpkin NPR U. S NPR Pharmaceuticals Ari Shapiro Department of Health and Human Dr Keith Norris Fighters Cove Elsa Chang Los Angeles Sydney Washington Pfizer National Institutes of Health
"dr keith norris" Discussed on Coronavirus Daily

Coronavirus Daily

05:11 min | 10 months ago

"dr keith norris" Discussed on Coronavirus Daily

"Public health. Experts are worried that some people who are skeptical of coronavirus vaccine or the people who need it the most including latinos and african americans who make up a disproportionate number of people hospitalized or killed by covid nineteen but there are efforts to fight vaccine skepticism within those communities. Here's correspondent adrian for ito who reports on race and identity for npr. Maria does not intend to get vaccinated. At least not right away. I definitely will be one of the people that won't take it. You know in the beginning players. She is not generally a vaccine skeptic. A discipline since this new i am not comfortable of getting it surveys. Show that kind of skepticism about the covid vaccine is widespread. Nearly forty percent of latinos told pew researchers. They would probably or definitely not get the vaccine more than half of black respondents said the same white people have also expressed hesitancy but the reluctance among african americans and latinos is especially worrying because their rates of infection are so much higher. It's it's a major concern dr keith. Norris's among an army of people ramping up efforts to ensure latinos african americans and other people colored. Trust the vaccine. He's hearing a wide range of concerns. Many stemming from a long history of racism in medical research concerned about being a guinea pig concerns about pharma and federal government. And then there's lots of social media messaging downplaying the importance of coronavirus. Norris works for ucla and is leading california effort funded by the national institutes of health to build vaccine trust. The strategy is to get clear. Concise information to black and brown communities with help from so-called trusted gers people with existing relationships in communities with high covid risk. People like tony. Wafer a longtime los angeles-based hiv educator in may he lost five close family members to covid. He's talked about that a lot as he's encouraged black friends and neighbors to volunteer for vaccine trials and now to take the vaccine is hard to say. Get getting this trial and these were people gonna help you win. These are the same white. Have been kicking your ass alway. You know what i mean. He says he acknowledges people's skepticism and meets them where they are. I tell people what are you. Won't they say well. I'm all blood pressure medicine. I'm taking central cholesterol. So you know before you've taken that pill clunk child out of thin air then they go really yeah. It was the clinical shelters. Ucla's keith. norris says this outreach. We'll take many forms in person on the airwaves and in virtual town halls. He says researchers will track. What messages about the vaccine. People respond to to see if there are certain areas that tend to have a greater impact moving people from being reticent to being willing. I'm not gonna go. Set is with sonny seattle health san diego clinic that serves a large mexican and mexican. American population fears about vaccine. Safety are compounded by language issues and concerns about immigration status. The clinic trained community outreach workers to answer questions about.

dr keith Norris npr adrian pew Maria Ucla pharma guinea national institutes of health federal government Wafer hiv tony california los angeles norris sonny seattle health san diego clinic
Some Americans are skeptical of a COVID-19 vaccine

Coronavirus Daily

04:05 min | 10 months ago

Some Americans are skeptical of a COVID-19 vaccine

"Health. Experts are worried that some people who are skeptical of coronavirus vaccine or the people who need it the most including latinos and african americans who make up a disproportionate number of people hospitalized or killed by covid nineteen but there are efforts to fight vaccine skepticism within those communities. Here's correspondent adrian for ito who reports on race and identity for npr. Maria does not intend to get vaccinated. At least not right away. I definitely will be one of the people that won't take it. You know in the beginning players. She is not generally a vaccine skeptic. A discipline since this new i am not comfortable of getting it surveys. Show that kind of skepticism about the covid vaccine is widespread. Nearly forty percent of latinos told pew researchers. They would probably or definitely not get the vaccine more than half of black respondents said the same white people have also expressed hesitancy but the reluctance among african americans and latinos is especially worrying because their rates of infection are so much higher. It's it's a major concern dr keith. Norris's among an army of people ramping up efforts to ensure latinos african americans and other people colored. Trust the vaccine. He's hearing a wide range of concerns. Many stemming from a long history of racism in medical research concerned about being a guinea pig concerns about pharma and federal government. And then there's lots of social media messaging downplaying the importance of coronavirus. Norris works for ucla and is leading california effort funded by the national institutes of health to build vaccine trust. The strategy is to get clear. Concise information to black and brown communities with help from so-called trusted gers people with existing relationships in communities with high covid risk. People like tony. Wafer a longtime los angeles-based hiv educator in may he lost five close family members to covid. He's talked about that a lot as he's encouraged black friends and neighbors to volunteer for vaccine trials and now to take the vaccine is hard to say. Get getting this trial and these were people gonna help you win. These are the same white. Have been kicking your ass alway. You know what i mean. He says he acknowledges people's skepticism and meets them where they are. I tell people what are you. Won't they say well. I'm all blood pressure medicine. I'm taking central cholesterol. So you know before you've taken that pill clunk child out of thin air then they go really yeah. It was the clinical shelters. Ucla's keith. norris says this outreach. We'll take many forms in person on the airwaves and in virtual town halls. He says researchers will track. What messages about the vaccine. People respond to to see if there are certain areas that tend to have a greater impact moving people from being reticent to being willing. I'm not gonna go. Set is with sonny seattle health san diego clinic that serves a large mexican and mexican. American population fears about vaccine. Safety are compounded by language issues and concerns about immigration status. The clinic trained community outreach workers to answer questions about the vaccine the reason why this is working is because people are not relying on a government entity posed information especially due to the last four years. People rather i hear from someone that they already have a relationship with. She expects the vaccine to gain acceptance over time but she also says many of the clinics patients are already eager for the vaccine because they've spent months risking themselves in essential. Jobs have lost friends and family. Don't wanna see anyone else. Any other loved one. Have to go through that for these people. The vaccine means being able to continue to provide allies for their loved ones and to be there for them in the long run. She says that's the message. She intends to keep driving home. That's npr national correspondent. adrian florida.

Dr Keith Norris National Institutes Of Health Ucla NPR Adrian Maria Pharma Guinea Wafer Sonny Seattle Health San Diego Federal Government Tony Los Angeles California Keith Jobs