24 Burst results for "Dr Kathleen"

"dr kathleen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

03:18 min | 5 months ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"Replacing <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Music> its emergency <Silence> full <Speech_Male> approval for the other code. <Speech_Male> Nineteen vaccines <Silence> is expected. Soon <Speech_Male> though the practical <Speech_Male> distinction between <Speech_Male> full in emergency <Speech_Male> use authorization <Speech_Male> are minimal particularly <Speech_Male> considering that <Speech_Male> billions of people have had <Silence> these vaccines <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> the lack of full authorization <Speech_Male> may address <Speech_Male> any lingering legal <Speech_Male> questions over whether <Speech_Male> or not. Employers <Speech_Male> can impose vaccine <Speech_Male> verification. <Speech_Male> Which could open <Speech_Male> the door to a lot. More employers <Speech_Male> requiring <Speech_Male> their employees to be <Speech_Male> vaccinated. <Speech_Male> Meanwhile last week <Speech_Male> the administration recommended <Speech_Male> cove in nineteen <Speech_Male> booster shot for the general <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> public eight months. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> After date of the second <Speech_Male> dose. <Speech_Male> You've been hearing about <Speech_Male> this from me for quite a while <Speech_Male> then. My opinion <Speech_Male> hasn't really changed. <Speech_Male> See the <Speech_Male> cdc published three papers <Speech_Male> last week. The administration <Speech_Male> argues justify <Speech_Male> their position <Speech_Male> to or from new york <Speech_Male> showing that while the vaccines <Speech_Male> remained protective <Speech_Male> against hospitalization <Speech_Male> cove in nineteen overtime <Speech_Male> protection <Speech_Male> against infection <Speech_Male> with delta. <Silence> Over time may wane. <Speech_Male> A <Speech_Male> third showed that protection <Speech_Male> against infection among <Speech_Male> seniors in nursing homes <Speech_Male> wayne by larger degree. <Speech_Male> Some <Speech_Male> new data from israel <Speech_Male> shows that among people over <Speech_Male> sixty who received <Speech_Male> a third dose risk <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of breakthrough infection <Speech_Male> dropped to a sixth. <Speech_Male> But here's the <Speech_Male> thing in a world with unlimited <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> cova vaccines. <Speech_Male> A third dose <Speech_Male> would be just fine <Speech_Male> but we don't live in <Speech_Male> that world instead <Speech_Male> we live in a world <Speech_Male> where were debating giving <Speech_Male> third doses to people <Speech_Male> in high income countries <Speech_Male> while billions <Speech_Male> in low income countries. <Speech_Male> Still haven't gotten <Speech_Male> there first <Speech_Male> and in that world <Speech_Male> a new variant can zip <Speech_Male> between countries within <Speech_Male> weeks. So <Speech_Male> i'd rather we vaccinated <Speech_Male> the most vulnerable <Speech_Male> abroad to protect <Speech_Male> them and ourselves <Speech_Male> then giving <Speech_Male> ourselves with their dose <Speech_Male> after all. <Speech_Male> I thought we'd gotten <Speech_Male> past that. America <Silence> first thing already. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That's not ignore. The fact <Speech_Male> advisor and madonna <Speech_Male> stand to make billions <Speech_Male> by selling hundreds <Speech_Male> of millions of doses in <Speech_Male> a lucrative market <Speech_Male> and have been pushing <Speech_Male> the evidence of waning immunity <Silence> for some time <Speech_Male> while a <Speech_Male> booster is bad policy <Speech_Male> making <Speech_Male> the personal decision to <Speech_Male> forgo. It doesn't <Speech_Male> mean that your dose is going to <Speech_Male> go into an arm abroad <Speech_Male> so given <Speech_Male> its added protection against <Speech_Male> infection. It's <Speech_Male> worth taking. <Silence> I'll be getting mine <Speech_Male> for more on this. <Speech_Male> Check out my newsletter. <Speech_Male> The incision at <Speech_Music_Male> incision dot sub stock <Speech_Male> dot com.

"dr kathleen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

05:07 min | 5 months ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"I think gradually if you combine these things that that hopefully will start getting us towards a healthier landscape but it's it's also very much the case that nfl college football high school football a deep part of american life. I don't think this is something that's gonna be a light switch turn overnight. I think it's going to be the graduate work of public health advocates and parents snowboards to make this happen over time and this is a conversation we have all the time but is your perspective on it more about harm reduction or is it more about abolition. I'm i'm probably this way closer to the abolition side of things. I think harm reduction is possible. But i think especially for the younger kids i think it makes sense to not have tackle football being option for the six seven eight year olds to at least start there and the way i sort of think about it as i do think the responsibility there lies on the sports leader sports administrators the the analogy think of as sort of like over the counter medication. Like if it's available in the pharmacy assume this is this is fine. Doesn't have major side effects. I think if you're offering tackle football for six or seven year olds. A lot of parents will understandably Must therefore be an appropriate support for my six or seven year old to play because it's on offer and the people in charge of made that decision so i do think there is a burden of responsibility for leaks to say we gotta start somewhere in. Probably the best place to start is the same word knocking to the offering tackle or six and seven year. Olds we are just not going to put that as an option and instead we're going to offer lower risk alternatives. And i think that ultimately is what i would like to see happen. There is of course an equity challenger which is to say that a lot of high income school districts are already struggling to to field football teams because a lot of the higher income families aren't letting their their voice play and that means that you know a lot of the the consequences that we're seeing lower income folks were still remains Really dominant culture. How do you think about some of these equity challenges. And what will it take to make. Sure that the impact right. The impact of a ball isn't as Dramatically inequitable as it's starting to appear. That is a really important question. i think some of it. I guess this is like the really bird's eye view. But i think some of it won't change until we have fundamental social reforms. Such a college football. Scholarship is no longer it. Looks like the best possible option for kids who are trying to get an education and trying to move forward in life. And unfortunately i think a lot of the inequity we see is where we have communities where that might seem like. It's the only possible option and so building communities where it's not necessary to get a fault college football scholarship to the evil to go to college race of you know if you so choose to do that..

football nfl
"dr kathleen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

05:42 min | 5 months ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"Team sports where you can have one standout player who can pick up team and put them on their shoulders and still win games in football right. It doesn't really matter if you're a star if the rest of the team doesn't do what it needs to do. You will not succeed. And i think in that respect. There's so much that i learned about teamwork and leadership on the football field and i wonder what your response is around the the costs and benefits of football to folks who say well. There's a real. There's a real role in football in teaching teamwork and inculcating lessons of teamwork because of the implied vulnerability right when you when you get tackled you you actually feel some pain and it forces you to invest in your teammates in a way. That's beyond just saying. I don't wanna lose today. But that's i don't wanna get pinned to the floor and you know in hit from behind What's your response to them. When they teaches a unique sense of teamwork and leadership in a way that other sports just may not. I think i i. I totally agree that team. Sports are extraordinary. Benefits conferred as at least as a former soccer player The there is something just amazing about being part of the team. And i think you do make a good point that not not all sports are like in their certainly ones that Have more unique rules for different Position players than where you have to sort of Not depend on one single star. But i don't think football is totally unique and even if it were. I would argue that. We can teach pretty much all of those seem values that we cherish so much for kids learning discipline and teamwork and also just having fun. All the benefits lee. What was forced that can be done without the risk of repeated brain trauma and i think we could potentially modify the sport in certain ways again having no flag football or touch football option. We can also consider other sports. I mean advice for soccer but extra his other ones as well and even the soccer to we would be thinking about. Maybe kids don't need to be doing headers age. Nine there's ways to modify these sports where you can have those same social benefits but not have the same level of risk and to the point about the stakes. I don't think the way to teach kids teamwork is to.

football soccer lee
"dr kathleen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

03:41 min | 5 months ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"Where. I have trouble finding award and i'm like I wonder if that was one too. Many hits to the head both football but then also Playing lacrosse and other sports. And so when. I when i started to play rugby. It's interesting right because you don't wear pads but there's a split moment when you're about to make contact with someone where i think both players become imminently aware of their mortality and so the pop that you get when you're wearing pods when you're taught to hit through the other player you don't quite get as much in rugby. I'm wondering if there's any insights on whether or not you know the kind of padding that football players wear may actually ironically lead to worse Head injuries i think there is an certainly really good research on the history of spearing in football coaches effectively using your head as a weapon which obviously when do disarray in rugby. Because you don't have that protection and spearing obviously is associated both with brain injury but also with the potential for prowess a spinal cord injury. And there's great research that shows that you really have a whole lot of steering until plastic. Football helmets were introduced in the nineteen fifties nineteen sixties and that lead players to use their heads as a weapon in a different way that they hadn't before and cause more injuries and searing was subsequently banned happily for very good reason catastrophic. Injuries did go down. But i do think having that padding unfortunately does increase the risk for those more Subtle not always even diagnose -able sometimes called sub could cuss of hits where you can have that cumulative trauma because you are engaged in collisions. In a way that you wouldn't if you didn't have that kind of hard shell that hard padding rugby's a really interesting comparison there certainly no concussion risk in rugby as well But it's it's definitely the case that when you don't have the Head protection in the same way that you do in football you are going to be a little bit more cautious in how you hit or how you collide and so i think there really is some real potential there to think about. Are there ways. We could adapt. Maybe in some ways maybe reduc- mount equipment in a way that might make despite a little bit safer. Yeah there's one comparison actually for the first time in decades olympic boxers In two thousand twenty didn't wear headgear and what they found was that the headgear was not associated with low risk of concussion and there were good arguments to suggest that boxers who are headgear are not boxing defensively so they may actually take more hits to the head because they feel that they're artificially protected via the headgear so it's an interesting comparison there the other thing that any anybody who played football..

rugby football spinal cord injury Football olympic boxing
"dr kathleen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

05:16 min | 5 months ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"That was the moment where you really were worried about. Concussion and therefore worried about long-term consequences but you know there are a lot of plays in football where hitting your head against something that is either immovable or moving at it is just part of the game and what we've come to understand. Is these lower grade kinds of events can can also have their own consequences. What is it about football in particular that made it the focus of your work. And what would it look like to think of a football without you know without the kind of Potentially for c. t. causing damage. Those are great questions for me. The reason is sort of was drawn to focus on football in particular. Was i just that it's so popular. There's millions of kids mostly boys and some girls who play every year And something about the ball that the really distinguishes the is that you have these repeated full-body collisions as an inherent part of the sport. And there's not that many other school sports that have that there are certainly other sports. Do but as a good point of comparison ice hockey. Most kids aren't body. I can kids usually aren't allowed to body check until after age. Fourteen or fifteen depending on the league and boxing for example. That certainly has full-body collisions. But you don't typically have school programs for for kids so football. I thought this is uniquely popular and it has this mechanism of repeated injury kind of baked into the essence of tackling that poses a particular risk. Is there something in particular about these injuries. In youth that makes them substantially more dangerous There's a couple things that might make them more dangerous. One is just that the nature of of the risk for c. t. r. their chronic disease is that it does seem to be cumulative so the more exposure you have the higher your missile will be and if you start at age six or seven and play all the way through high school that would be ten years of exposure. That's that's pretty much double as compared to somebody that starts in high school may only plays three or four years of the ball. So part of the worry about kids is if you start at a really young age just increasing. Your potential length of exposure time other worries which. I think we're still learning about. I think we still have a lot. We don't understand about this that we do that. The brain is still developing and there might be risks at by having exposure to repeated brain trauma while your brain is still in the process of developing. That makes you especially vulnerable. And then the last sorta anatomical thing is that his hazard just a lot bigger proportionally to the rest of their body See tend to get a little bit more of that bobblehead effect where they have weaker next and bigger heads so even if the force of impact is lower. When you're small the anatomy might make you a little bit more vulnerable for that. He's You argue in your book That it's a moral abdication To allow young children to play football you know given what we understand about the cumulative impact what age do you think it is appropriate to allow kids to play football. If at all has a tough question. I i don't think there's a magic answer To answer this one is like my ideal world answer..

football Concussion boxing hockey brain trauma
"dr kathleen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

03:22 min | 5 months ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"Let's get started ready to go. You taping Yes yup it's on. I am good fantastic. Okay can you introduce yourself for the type absolutely. My name is catholic. Bishop ski. And i'm an assistant professor of public health at muhlenberg college in allentown pennsylvania dr kathleen but has been thinking about the role that sports and culture play on our health for a while. She's the author of no game for boys to play a deep dive into the origins of youth football in the united states and the public health crisis created. I wanted to talk to her about how we should be thinking about the growing evidence regarding football and chronic traumatic encephalopathy for c. t. We really appreciate you coming on the show in light of what i think is a really important book that you've written no game for boys to play. Can you tell us what is c. T. e. yes cc. She is short for chronic traumatic salafi. And that's a bit of a mouthful but it's basically a progressive degenerative brain disease and it has some similarities in terms of symptoms with other chronic brain diseases such as dementia or alzheimer's But it's characterized by a few unique things as well as in particular nc to there's a build up of a protein called tau which is t. a. You and normally that protein is in your brain in normal amounts nc t you see a build up of this protein where it kinda clumps together around your brain cells and those cells and up losing the ability to function properly of too much of that protein is clumping and c. T. e. has been associated with repeated head trauma and probably been mostly discussed in contact sports but there's also been cases as well And members of the military or intimate partner violence or pretty much. Any kind of situation where you might have repeated exposures to head trauma in. You focused your book on on football particular particularly youth football. What led you to write about it. Well i had a little bit of circuitous path. I never played football myself. I did play a high school and middle soccer. And i had a big injury. It wasn't a a brain injury. My case i riff my acl. Which is a knee. Ligament i had surgery in highschool and by the time. I went to do my master's in public health. I realized it wasn't just me. I had a bunch of friends and classmates who'd had a variety of sports injuries. So i really wanted to study sport injury as a public health. Issue at kind of selfishly. I i wanted to try to study knee injuries. Because i'd had a knee injury. I was sort of most impacted by that myself But it turned out. When i was doing my masters i was able to find an adviser who was a neurologist who kind of pushed me more in the direction of studying brain injuries and when i started to study brain injuries or i just got absolutely fascinated compelled because the brain is so complicated so precious and i thought it was so many wonderful things sports. Do i want us to try to prevent brain injuries. That people can enjoy the health benefits of sports as long as they. Can you focus in particular on On football and our our knowledge of and of the kinds of injuries that cause c. t. has has really evolved over time. You know when. I was young. It used to be thought that if you had one of those really really big open-field hits where you quote unquote get your bell rung..

football dr kathleen chronic traumatic encephalopat progressive degenerative brain chronic brain diseases muhlenberg college allentown pennsylvania dementia alzheimer united states soccer
CDC Recommends Immunocompromised People Get a 3rd COVID Vaccine Dose

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 5 months ago

CDC Recommends Immunocompromised People Get a 3rd COVID Vaccine Dose

"The certain people with compromised immune systems get that third dose of either the Pfizer or Moderna Covid vaccine. The committee voted unanimously to recommend a third Moderna or fighter covid shot for those with compromised immune systems. The city sees Dr Kathleen dueling. This recommendation is for moderately and severely immunocompromised people, which is Very clearly spelled out with specific reference to conditions that would constitute that category. Among those included in that category, cancer and organ transplant patients with both the FDA and now the CDC. Okay, this third dose shots could start immediately. Sabrina Cupid for

Moderna Covid Dr Kathleen Moderna Pfizer Cancer FDA CDC Sabrina Cupid
What is Pink-Collar Crime

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

01:37 min | 7 months ago

What is Pink-Collar Crime

"How common is pink collar fraud. And what exactly is it so pink. Color crime is low to medium level employees comma primarily women comma. Who's feel from the workplace. This turn came out and was popularized in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine by criminal just dr kathleen daily so. I didn't come up with it. But it is the one crime. Women really accelerate and for women in the audience. Don't get upset with me. Because i'm not picking on women. I'm highlighting the fact that they are in the lower to mid level positions. Only yet they know where every dime they come into a business and goes out of business so they are the ones who have access to the money and you know you said a little bit about. My background was a special agent with us customs. My idea of criminals were bad guys and most people think of criminals as bad guys. Well i hate to bring it to you. But it's not the bad guys that you need to be scared of. It's the nice people that you work with that you know ended up crossing the line and they might steal from you so it changed my view of criminals and i say i can't get out of bed in the morning if i think everyone is out to rip me off. We have to trust people. But it's trust but verify. Does that make sense. Well that makes a lot of sense and you know maybe if those lower level positions got paid more they wouldn't feel the need to steal but that's a separate conversation.

Dr Kathleen United States
"dr kathleen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rates. How the county do that by zip code industries in order to reach our our most impacted populations. We are using zip code of residents and also the zip codes where people work. We know who they're supposed to have our highest positivity rates in terms of testing. And so that's also the those were the neighborhoods that we're gonna locate Our vaccine centers in So we're reaching out. We're saving appointments for people in those codes, and we are making sure to do special efforts to get the news out to them that their interior income coming get vaccinated. Is part of Alameda County strategy to create a bigger pool of eligible people so it can administer as many doses as quickly as possible. And, you know, not be left holding onto any unused doses. We haven't had a problem with holding onto unused one to be vaccinated about 145,000 outdated county residents across our system. We know there are almost 200,000 people who indicated on our website that they're interested in being vaccinated. So we have no shortage of information about how to invite people, But we have a shortage of this vaccine. And given there's been an ongoing shortage of vaccine. How long do you expect it to take to get through this group? So we will be dependent on how much vaccine comes to us as each county. Is struggling with We'll find out later today on how many first doses will be getting next week. It has been between about 10 and 15,000. There are about 325,000 people in Alameda County who fit into one of these groups. So if we continued at that rate, it would be many weeks. They're hoping a czar all of the counties that we start getting more vaccine so that it doesn't take us that long. And then who would be next on the list? After people in these occupation groups. The state is interesting, interested rather and adding a tears. People who are younger than age 65. But have an underlying illness or a condition that makes them more at risk, or it was for dying or hospitalizations. So we suspect that that will happen in the next week or so. After that group that will be by H. Ben. Thanks so much Dr Clan in you bet Dr Kathleen Clan in is Alameda counties lead on vaccine planning.

Alameda County Dr Kathleen Clan H. Ben
"dr kathleen" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on WSB-AM

"At 701 30 degrees. I'll tell you when showers come back in five minutes. I'm WSB Me, Iran, says Kurt Mellish, live over West Freeway history crashed that knocked out two left lanes. 20 eastbound before exit 49 14 Industrial Boulevard. It's a parking lot of bruising six flags out of Douglas County, the absolute last chance to avoid the delays. 44th or road. Take that north. I wait. 78 live at the sky copters smiling like McCain 95.5 WSB. Somebody must reduce time is 702. This is Atlanta's morning news. Here's Marcie Williams and just hang about and some positive news when it comes to the battle against coronavirus, double the SPS Michelle write reports live hospitalizations in new case numbers are starting to trend down. They are judged. The seven day rolling average for both have tipped down, not just here in Georgia, but around the nation explains CDC director Dr Rochelle Wolinsky cases are now back to the level we were before Thanksgiving hospitalizations also down here in Georgia and governor, Kim says. We've crossed a milestone when it comes to vaccinations around the state providers across the state have administered one million Cove in 19 doses in the state of Georgia. There is a bit of concerning news, though the death rate from the virus still at its highest level ever in Georgia, and the more contagious UK, vary it It's probably widespread throughout the state, according to Dr Kathleen To me, Reporting live Michelle, right, 95.5 WSB research is now under way to test what happens when you mix and match covert vaccine virologist Matthew Snake has recruited 800 volunteers for the mixed vaccine trial. His findings could have global implications supply problems with one of the vaccines. Then you're protected against that being absolute knives, which the other vaccine is an alternative. It's possible mixing vaccines might even confirm better protection reporter Vicki Barker says. That turned out to be the case with Ebola results from this study or expected in June, the Biden administration launches a new federal state alliance to get more vaccine out to joint large scale covert vaccination sites will be in California, part of a strategy all across the United States. The 1st 100 days, the administration to get 100 of these sites up and operational Governor Gavin Newsom says. These sites are planned at the Oakland Coliseum and Cal State L. A. Here in Georgia. Gwinnett County opens a mass covert vaccination site tomorrow. The old Sears gonna play small in Duluth. Friday's the soft open to work out the kinks Saturday. More than 1000. People may get the vaccine. The city of San Francisco sues its own school board to restart in person learn a lawsuit backed by Mayor London Breed says school administrators are violating a state requirement that district's offer a clear plan to offer classroom based instruction whenever possible. Their breed says in a statement. Distance Learning isn't working for anyone. Reporter Allison Keyes says Schools in San Francisco been remote on Lee since March than half the world's airline pilots are no longer flying in the pandemic. Summer taking jobs flying hot air balloons, instead got Apple mints, president and CEO of Rainbow Ryders in Phoenix, existing aviators. They understand the rules of the race that apply above the ground, he says. His business is up 30% compared to last year's people Search for outdoor diversions. Apple develops a workaround face idea in the pants. Make masks make biometric authentic authentication a challenge. IPhone users sometime have toe enter passcodes multiple times a day. Now the latest IOS update uses the apple Watch on your wrist. Unlock your iPhone. It's in beta testing The Wall Street general reports Apple may restore upgrade a form of touch I d in future iPhones. Nobody has produced time. 70565 minutes after seven. Scott's leaving Marcy, would you Judge Higginbotham?.

Apple Georgia San Francisco Michelle reporter Governor Gavin Newsom WSB Kurt Mellish Lee Douglas County Iran Gwinnett County Atlanta Marcie Williams McCain Duluth CDC Dr Rochelle Wolinsky
U.S. hospitals prepare for coronavirus vaccine distribution

Atlanta's Morning News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. hospitals prepare for coronavirus vaccine distribution

"On the rise across the state. WSB is Michelle write reports live. The governor's rolling out the distribution plan for vaccines. That's right, according to the Health Department's website. More than 3700 Georgians tested positive for covert Tuesday alone. So the news of the vaccine distribution plan is quite welcome. Dr Kathleen to me, explains who will be getting the first. Wave of vaccinations go immediately to healthcare providers working through the largely through the hospital system, as well as our public health system and long term care facilities, both their staff as well as the residents, assuming the FDA gives emergency use authorization this week, the vaccine should be available here in Georgia in the next 7 to 10 days. Pointing live,

WSB Dr Kathleen Health Department Michelle FDA Georgia
Moderna to seek FDA emergency authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

What A Day

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Moderna to seek FDA emergency authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

"We're hurtling toward. What may well be a horrible and deadly holiday season as cova cases numbers and hospitalizations. Continue to reach alarming highs over ninety thousand. People are currently hospitalized in the us according to the cova tracking project that's compared to the previous high of about sixty thousand in the spring and summer. So more by half just terrifying. We're also moving quickly towards something that looks like hope to vaccines yesterday. Dern submitted its vaccine for fda authorization aaron. What's the latest on that. Well akilah thanks to the incredible work of scientists and researchers. We've now got to vaccines that. Could start to be distributed to americans within days or weeks maderna's mentioned and pfizer which submitted a couple of weeks ago. As soon as the fda reviews and approves either one for emergency use people can start lining up to get poked. Yeah i am also in line to get poked but as you've been talking about on the show with this first round vaccines were not going to have enough for everybody all at once and we don't have one official plan for who gets to be at the front of the line. That's why the cdc's advisory committee on immunization practices or ac ip is having an emergency meeting today hammer out some guidelines for states on who gets there. Kobe shot i. Yeah so what do we know about their thinking. Well much to the chagrin of the kardashians in everybody who would love to feel just a little more normal by having a massless dance party on a private island. The vaccine will not be distributed based on how many instagram followers. You have or even whether your father invented the toaster strudel I'm really bummed. I that's my dad. I know. I know grudging wieners. The has already decided that the first people in line should be healthcare workers and people who live in long term care facilities like nursing homes according to dr kathleen dueling medical officer at the cdc staff and residents at these facilities have accounted for almost forty percent of all deaths from covid nineteen even though there are less than one percent of the total us population if you add healthcare workers and people who live and work at long term care facilities. That's about twenty four million people even with fda approval and firing on all cylinders. There will only be about forty million vaccine doses available by the end of this godforsaken year and both cohen. Vaccines require two shots. Which means that those forty million doses will be barely enough to meet the needs of the very neediest in this group. Yeah and then. It starts to get a little bit trickier when you get into the other. Essential workers and people with high risk medical conditions. Or you know older people right. So according to the cdc there about eighty seven million essential workers one hundred million high risk adults and fifty three million people sixty five years of age or older. And of course there's some overlap between these categories. These are the people that would be prioritized next but as you can see there are a lot of them if all goes well you could see fifty million more doses ready to go in january another sixty million in february or march doing math divided by to carry the one that means about seventy five million people could be vaccinated against covid nineteen by the end of the first quarter of twenty twenty one which means the more people who are at an elevated risk from covid. Then there will be vaccines and there will not be enough vaccines to reach herd immunity at first and it's going to be a while before we get there and so this is just guidance. According to current lame duck secretary of health and human services. Alex as our love connick guy. Lame duck state governments will ultimately determine how the vaccine will be distributed. But who knows if that assertion will hold after biden takes office on january twentieth knows. Well it's a little bit of an elephant in the room. Here you know. America has a long history of ignoring the needs of and in some cases actively hurting the health of marginalized groups like indigenous americans living on reservations. Black people hello Non native english speakers people experiencing homelessness and the mentally ill among other groups. So how can we be sure that the cova vaccine will just pass them over. That's a really important question akilah. I'm sure there are already rich and powerful people trying to figure out how to skip the line. There's nothing more american than that but the acp seems determined to make sure americans have faith in the fairness of this process. All of their meetings are live streamed. So if you're looking for something to do today you can go ahead and livestream. The meeting in all the votes are public. The fda has also having meetings on vaccines on december tenth and seventeenth. This whole process depends on the public trusting the vaccine enough to let somebody shoot two doses of it into their arms and it seems like so far at least the folks in charge are taking that responsibility seriously and all this is happening with derna advisor will still be gathering more data and monitoring for adverse effects as the first groups of people get vaccinated and then the companies will have to go through the normal. Fda approval process as well. This first round of approval is a fast track process. So getting back to normal isn't site kind of if you squint. It's not that far. It's right there it's kind of kind of. Let's put it this way between now and when everybody who needs to be vaccinated is vaccinated. You'll definitely have time to relearn that foreign language tried to learn in high school and if mostly forgotten about by now

Akilah FDA CDC Maderna Dr Kathleen Cova Dern Pfizer America Instagram Aaron Kobe Cohen Connick Health And Human Services Biden Alex
"dr kathleen" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"They're engaging that part of their brain that is going to come up with solutions. And then is gonna make things seem more manageable. And so i think it's largely a the exercise of kind of putting the focus back on on the president and what being responsible and being kind to yourself. Looks like in the moment in on the other thought i had was. I think that going along the lines of kind of the boundaries between work and home being blurred. I think that also happens in our relationships. You know a lot of my work is on relationship focus. And i think what a lot of people have observed is that they start to become over responsible for their spouse for their kids maybe even for their co workers because these lines have gotten blurred and a lot of their energy and time is getting directed towards managing other people instead of themselves. So a lot of the work. I'm doing right now. With people is to help them observe when they begin to over function or direct the people around them in their house. And how they can kind of step back a little bit from that and reclaim some of that energy. Because i think it is such an automatic thing that happens when you're all cooped up together. I noticed that very early on my husband. And i were both working for home. And all of a sudden. I was telling him how to structure his day. And that's not my responsibility but it's just a thing that happens when you're stressed out and when you're close together and so i think it's i always encourage people to ask themselves you know. How do i be less responsible for everyone else and more responsible for myself right now and. I think that the people who are able to do that aren't getting burnt out quite as quickly as everyone else because they are. They're working on managing themselves in their own anxiety as opposed to being responsible for everybody else's screwed advice because taking care of i is crucial. Because you won't be able to take care of anybody if you don't take care of yourself i and setting those boundaries in doing the work and dealing with your own anxious thoughts and behaviors and thought patterns as really beneficial because that way you can like okay. Let's take a look at this. And i love the example. You shared by your husband where it's like okay. We're working together now boy. It'd make life so much easier for me if he would just do it this way. And and sometimes they may be open to that and realize. Hey that's actually a better way for me to do it. Or they may say well you know what now. This is actually the best way for me. A real quick story I have a lean certification and that was mostly healthcare but in other areas as well and there was a nurse at a hospital and there was a lean exa part of it. But i heard the story where this nurse had been working in this particular ward of the hospital for over twenty years so she knows every quarter inch of that floor and everything about it..

president
"dr kathleen" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"Call your parents to come help with your kids if they're at risk or if they're not around right you can't maybe make a big job change or switch things up that you would be able to do a normal time so people have to get more creative than they have to really think about what it looks like on a daily level to be more responsible for yourself in your anxiety and i'm happy to to think about that with people. I've seen a dramatic increase in in out and had a conversation with individual earlier this morning for a pre interview for show that i'm going to be on In a couple of weeks and we talked about burnout in how the traditional remedies and you alluded to that of how you deal with. Burnout aren't necessarily available. And also a lot of ingredients that can lead into burn which is of course. Prolonged stress is coming at a snatches from our work environment but everything else because for many of us our work environment and our home environment. Congratulations the same place. And then toss in the fact. That many of us became fulltime schoolteachers over the last few months. And we're trying to figure out the third grade math and we haven't done third grade math since third grade and it looked a lot different than than it does now or at least that's what we think square like. What in the world is this. And all of these stressors That are coming into pretty much. Every aspect of people's lives working on resiliency and finding that spacey talked about is so important because she said we may not have a private place to go to but going outside even walking. If you have a yard or an apartment or condo building you know walking around the building just yourself just to take a few minutes in and breathing some outside air Can help with that in..

"dr kathleen" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"Welcome back. I've got dr kathleen smith on the line. Dr welcome to the show. Thank you you can just call me. Kathleen i'm happy with that quantity at least give you your title and then from there. We'll go from there so that's awesome so great to have you on the show. He wrote a book a little while ago and During this time of this recording we're in the middle of a pandemic and the title of your book and what it's about is amazing and it's the message that i think a lot of people need to hear so sheriff's a little bit about your the book and some things you've discovered after releasing it. Yes so the name of the book is everything isn't terrible conquer your insecurities interrupting zayed's and finally calmed down and came out at the beginning of this year. And little. did i know that. I already seemed. It was going to be an anxious year. But i had no idea how anxious it would be for so many people and you know i'm a therapist i Have a practice in dc. And i am trained in a theory called in theory which is Sort of a family systems way of thinking or a relationship way of thinking about anxiety. And i wanted to write a book that i could give to my therapy clients. You know because i live in. Dc have over achieving clients. They always want homework and things turn. And i wanted a book that kinda summarize the theory. I was trained in in a way that's acceptable in narrative and is not to to academic to it at the same time and so you know. The book is just stories of various clients. That i've worked with obviously details are changed to protect their identity. But just what it looks like to to grow up slowly and calm down slowly over time because that's the only way it happens anxieties Thing that challenges so many people And even in quote unquote normal times anxiety can be really problematic..

dr kathleen smith dc Kathleen zayed
Atlanta - Gov. Brian Kemp, state health officials warn of ‘Twindemic’ of COVID-19 and flu season

Clark Howard

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Atlanta - Gov. Brian Kemp, state health officials warn of ‘Twindemic’ of COVID-19 and flu season

"A small bump and Corona virus cases here in Georgia, with cases down 67% since the peak in July. The slight bump over the last two weeks is not of great concern to Governor Governor Brian Brian Camp Camp in in public public health health director director Dr Dr Kathleen Kathleen to to me, me, citing citing more more kids kids going going back back to to school school and and Auntie Auntie Gin Gin tests tests added added his his probable probable cases cases both both now now are are emphasizing emphasizing flu flu shots. shots. This is particularly important This year or trying to prevent twin de mix of covert plus influenza, which could be devastated. Center Parish 95.5 double USB And for the

Dr Dr Kathleen Kathleen Governor Governor Brian Brian Director Influenza Georgia Center Parish
"dr kathleen" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"What's the story here with the governor of Georgia Bryan camp and the reports that he had no idea that the corona virus can be spread by people that were not exhibiting overt symptoms well it appears well they got some audio we can play here the reports OR that the governor Georgia and his top health official it meant that they were unaware that the corona virus can be spread by people that were a symptomatic no symptoms I mean this is been in the news for months I mean this is been known I've got the audio here it's a camp governor camp in Georgia and his health commissioner Dr Kathleen Toomey both called the supposedly new info a game changer what they're what hi here's the audio let me play some of this this is the governor earlier today in Georgia and while you listen here do not think is the reason I'm taking this action dislike of continued tell people I'm following the datum following the advice of Dr tumi her not both mentioned in our remarks you know finding now that this virus is now transmitting before people see signs so the what we've been telling people from directors from the CDC for weeks now that if you start feeling bad stay home those individuals could.

Georgia Bryan camp Georgia official Dr Kathleen Toomey CDC commissioner
Atlanta: New Coronavirus Task Force Appointed By Gov. Kemp, Meets For The First Time

Clark Howard

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Atlanta: New Coronavirus Task Force Appointed By Gov. Kemp, Meets For The First Time

"A coronavirus task force appointed by Georgia governor Brian can't meet for the first time at the state capitol to assess Georgia's preparedness the eighteen member task force which includes the GM of Hartsfield Jackson the head of Gina and the state school superintendent is being led by Dr Kathleen Toomey commissioner of Georgia's public department of public health we have a robust plan in place a plan initially developed for this type of outbreak pandemic influenza and we're currently working with other state agencies and state wide partners to ensure we have all the systems in place to respond she says so far ten people of tested here in Georgia but none have tested

Georgia GM Hartsfield Jackson Gina Superintendent Commissioner Pandemic Influenza Dr Kathleen Toomey
"dr kathleen" Discussed on PowerUp Your Presence

PowerUp Your Presence

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on PowerUp Your Presence

"A mix of stories tips insights and conversations with trailblazers. Speak candidly about their journey to leadership. And in this episode will be talking with Dr Kathleen Weird in on how we can work together to empower women Dr Kathleen Reardon is a professor America. Uh of Management and organization at the University of Southern California. She's a leading authority on persuasion leadership workplace politics and gender issues. It's Dr Reardon is the author of ten books and numerous articles published in journals including articles in the Harvard Business Review she authored the HP HBO Reprint Bestseller the memo. Every woman keeps in her desk and courage as a skill Dr earned her m a PhD SUMMA cum laude and with distinction from the University of Massachusetts. We have been collaborating with Dr Reardon for the past five years and it's wonderful to have her on today's Today's show. Hello Kathleen how are you. I'm fine how are you. I'm doing well thanks. We're so happy to have you join us today. I'm glad to be here absolutely and I know we've been working together for quite some time now but I would love for you to share with our listeners. What inspires inspires you about your work? Well my work whether whether it's writing or a book or whether it's blogging or or whether it's painting I think for me. There's always the quest for insight. You know the quest to see beyond on the surface of things to to find something new to see something differently And then also also to share that it with other people and to get their feedback with the conversation to me is really important as well. So keeping your mind open to to to what other people's thoughts are and how they might be inspired. What you buy what you've said or are you by what they've said and so it's a mutual endeavor for at that point when the end there's just not just me you know with my paintbrush but But other people involved in the conversation and to be able to share those insights with them in spark different conversations. Yeah I think that's a thing becoming a professor. You know you do that in part because that's what you do you want to share what you've learned and also also learn back from them and in a lot of the research and the writing that you've done gender under issues is one of the topics that you focused on. So what would you say is the difference between gender equality and women's empowerment. Well we tend to think of gender our equality I mean that gender. Equality's is part of our empowerment but we tend to think of it in terms of apple pay and promotions whereas I think cup empowerment broader term and a larger coal. And and that would have to do with you know us being heard really Establishing our own power and not being the least you spit deterred because of women about having power Having confidence and you know just busting through some ah those stereotypes that hold us back. That are for a lot of people unconscious and so it. It's up to us. Sometimes to help people will recognize.

Dr Kathleen Reardon Kathleen Dr Kathleen Weird University of Southern Califor professor America Harvard Business Review professor University of Massachusetts HP HBO apple
"dr kathleen" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"That's designed to continually regenerate adapt evolve so if we're going to look at prophet in nature nature would defined prophet is evolution of the whole system. Wow it's loud so that again nature would define prophet as the evolution of the whole all system so what happens in nature is that as <hes> we have some disruption it forces an adaptation tation and those adaptations bill more specialization in the ecosystem and that ecosystem than with specialization becomes more diverse first and then it becomes more complex. It's kind of like a spiral and then after it gets more complex you begin to realize as species that it you don't <hes> if used to just harvest all of your own nutrients that in this greater diversity kind of like food web that one mm species waste can be your fuel your nutrients and so it then it begins to shift towards interdependence and then you build these a predisposition to cooperate because you begin to see these reciprocal relationships that instead of extracting resources from the soil which is what previous ecological stages do they begin to exchange resources among the living species in an ecosystem system and then they start contributing back to the soil so that's where you begin to get to the generative design and then that's where you get to emergence and new synergy oh gee and then the whole system evolves and has more capable of being a resilient thriving system and able to handle disruption without losing function see i stunning it. Is i think if people could i mean i highly recommend that people do reach out to your ram gonna make sure that they know how to do that but if they could just grasp that piece that you just gave their on those five levels and and the the self reflection and the organizational reflection of these five levels to say you know if we're really honest about this you know you might not believing global warming. Oh you might believe in global warming but you might think it's got nothing to do with mankind. Whatever you believe that's let's finance your stuff but you can self assess and you know the truth of the matter is we are either operating as beings who are always looking after self fine you wanna do that but there's a cost all cost operating at inch a inside of a system and we understand that were part of that system and it's not the cost of the individual because that's how the mind works the mind mind says oh well if i'm part of the collective than of lost the self well you kind of do in an intellectual sense but you don't in the truth you grow and you become tom bigger so well and i it's actually give up the restrictions of being right the the thing well and why do we have why do we i keep defaulting either or you know <hes> i used to work at a benedictine college here in minnesota and they their their whole community fifteen hundred years of finding a place putting their roots down place looking up to see what needs to happen in that place when you look at how that community works it's filled with these tensions of individual freedom and community of a conversation and and core values so you keep adapting an event and inventing with the current generation but it's always within a framework of deep wisdom and core values of the community so they it's filled with these kind of creative tensions is kind of how i look at it. Look at it and i i think if you just didn't if you wanted to take climate change right out of this and just say okay look at those stages and look at.

minnesota fifteen hundred years one mm
"dr kathleen" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"Our communities are <hes> educational systems are nonprofits all the way across usc 'cause that gets us to regenerative a regenerative world as opposed to a world. That's degrading as we speak so you know what you just said that i think is incredibly powerful and i want people to get it like you know 'cause it. We you and i both know that people listen to podcast in their car in the background whatever it was going to bring this because what you just said is profound and vitally important because <hes> <hes> i think the most not all but most people can get to the do no <hes> walkers because through those steps again which end of course in the regenerative but what each of the pieces so we can go okay the hours of us to do who is to even write the woods down and even go which stage of my in which phase if this is the evolution of leadership if this is the evolution of business if this is the volition of inhumanity where am i on that scale the bun and devastate and ears whatever the hell i like at the top end like walker serve you would again just so people can really grasp so you start with kind of a degradation and almost all of our prevailing conventional wisdom and practice about leadership and management and business is all imbedded in that it's all it's it's extracting resources for private profit but it diminishes the ah ecological not just environmental but the ecosystems in that ecosystem could be your future business or it could be an ecosystem of community pretty. You know when we <hes> anyway so i won't go down that path but so that's that's the extraction degradation degrading literally then you go up and say okay. Let's be green. Let's be a little better and that helps but then you go to sustainability which is do no harm <hes> and but now we have a huge kind of disruptive environment that we're living in because of the connective city connectivity drives more and more wild cards and it keeps throwing these things at us that disrupt and the you know. We just had a week in <hes> in the u._s. In the oklahoma area where there was like five hundred tornadoes touched down a very short time span and it just the weather pattern just kept hitting the the the communities while this restoration ration- the ability to restore is as get you if you're looking at a minus one hundred that's the degrading sustainability sustainability is zero. Green is maybe minus twenty. Five restorative is like a plus twenty five so basically you're taking taking the environment or you can apply this to people to you know are we take are we able to restore the people that have withdrawn from from our organizations because they have passion they have commitment but they've been hurt by the processes that are part of our degradation tation and so they'd withdrawn their talents and time for organizations. Can we restore that trust. Can we restore that relationship. Then in the top. One is like the plus one hundred would be regenerative design so can we literally build a a system an organization business business..

usc oklahoma walker Green
"dr kathleen" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"I'm uh-huh. I'm the leader you know. I'm i'm the senior while i'm the junior will i'm young and what it is that i i don't give a crap about the next generation ration- <unk> and so if fades away and and and when we look at what what was the intent not purpose but the intent of bob starting the business initially very often simple intent was i want to make a better life for myself and for my family that was the intent and often times the the founder doesn't hasn't even considered purpose until later on until it was established then the second generation of already lot they. They don't know what the purpose this was. They don't have the intent because they've already got a great lifestyle and this is not thinking in multiple generations straight other than maybe money but not not beyond that you're talking about is greater impact and again. I love this analogy of nature because it it allows us us to consider business at the level of sustainability. That's never been considered. We think about sustainability as in well. We're going to a use less power in our company going to source materials batta. We're going to not use child labour. We're going to you know whatever robert is but when you think about it in a even beyond global way of thinking global even limits as to the physiological but materialistic but at a great level we then have to think about you know. How does we think don't push crap into the ocean poisoning the coral what we don't think about well what aides to carl about well you know i love we walking down the st the day and a notice the fish sign like painted fish by by the manhole doesn't mean this fish down the manhole. It means when you pull crap down the manhole. That's going to reach vichy essentially and you're going to be in the paint thinner. You just pull it all comes around. It all comes down recently. I began in leadership yeah. There's a there's a ripple effect where the where you are on the other side of that tied ride. It's gonna come back to you anyway because it's it's an interdependent system and eventually what you put out. We'll come back and i think i've done a lot of work working the leadership in sustainability world but now i don't think sustainability is the final stage i think if you think about degenerative practices those that's basically all of our conventional wisdom about leadership management it degenerates or <hes> degrades aids are not just our environment but our human capital our <hes> capacity to create better organization that will thrive in in one hundred years from now. It's all about extraction but then you go to green and that's a little improvement then you get to sustainability and sustainability i see he is kind of a neutral place. It's do no harm so you're basically <hes> not harming the next generation but you're not restoring all the ways do you <hes> diminished the environment and the people before you so then you get to restore so restorative practice is literally how well l. can you build resilience in design resilience into your organizational system so that.

bob founder carl robert one hundred years
"dr kathleen" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"dr kathleen" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"And taking initiative and when i was working with an organization and we wanted to build out more distributive leadership we use this principle of self organization station and said how can we design the systems within the organization so that we unleash the self organizing capacity that exists not only in nature but in every single person that's working for us so we changed <hes> the performance review and in addition to re <hes> evaluating people's capacity to <hes> do their work. We also asked them. We also evaluated people on on whether they could initiate and organize their own work and their own learning we evaluated them on their ability to <hes> be a self aware so they would continue to get feedback that would help them evolve and grow we evaluated them on on their ability to align and <hes> actively contribute to the larger core mission and purpose of the organization because you can't have self organization without direction and we allot we asked if we ask questions around their emotional intelligence can manage and and are they aware and can they manage their own emotions so they're not spreading drama and chaos throughout the organization nation that would be a very simple way and then we went back and <hes> into the job descriptions and we went back to the supervision so we basically redesigned the whole h._r. System to complement reward and reinforce that we were serious about self organization in this this in this organization and it was stunning it it worked then we also designed the way we did the performance reviews so it fit the self organizing in capacity so we asked them to actually go out and talk to people about these four questions to get their feedback feedback around their ability to align with mission initiate an organizer learning <hes> manage their emotions and be self aware right so the the process of filling out the performance review actually modeled the four things that were critical for us <music> to demonstrate and support the self organizing principle. I mean there's a lot of and i will say this in in quotations a lot of talk about <hes> dismantling the hierarchy of power flattening nisa the organizational authority those kinds of things but the problem is is talk and and the reason i the reason i believe it's let's talk <hes> is because we have grown up in a high rocco system and what i mean by that is spoken about many many times right here on this podcast is that we do leadership the way we did leadership in the roman empire right so it's not changed. Much is pretty ingrained leaned. <hes> people like rupert sheldrick would say we've built a mall for genetic field around the whole line of <hes> of what leadership is and we keep falling into into the moffett field of what that is so. How do we break that field because this is so quote unquote knee jerk so this is what i you know i i love the idea but now i'm under stress and under stress we regress so distressing. I go right back to being the authoritarian leader. Even though i i being who that is the leader might believe entirely highly in a in a decentralized organization self leadership principles. How do we help them to to break through that knee-jerk that mall well i find the people that are really first in in line to break through and.

rupert sheldrick
Collapse Of Health System Sends Venezuelans Fleeing To Brazil For Basic Meds

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:03 min | 3 years ago

Collapse Of Health System Sends Venezuelans Fleeing To Brazil For Basic Meds

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast. Here's one sign of how deep the crisis in Venezuela is it's healthcare system has collapsed. Regional officials say a measles outbreak that began. There was not controlled. It's now spreading throughout South America, and some basic medical supplies and medications, even surgical gloves are no longer available in clinics in Venezuela. And peers Jason Bogan has more by just about every measurement possible. Venezuela's once impressive medical system has fallen apart the Latin American nation with the largest oil reserves in the world is now dealing with an ongoing measles outbreak that last year sick and thousands of people and killed at least seventy four clinics have run out of basic surgical supply. Lies and anti-biotics routine. Vaccination campaigns have been suspended even patients dependent on saving HIV medications have seen supplies of their anti-aids drugs. Disappear. Dr Kathleen page recently visited camps in northern Brazil for some of the three million Venezuelans who fled the country that was not a doctor in the nineteen eighties. When the as make started. But I know what happened and I felt that in these wars I was going back to the nineteen eighties page in infectious disease specialist at Johns Hopkins Medical school says she was shocked to see aids. Patients from Venezuela dying of opportunistic, infections, honig diarrhea infections in their brain things that that we know are treatable and preventable page traveled to the Brazilian Venezuelan border late last year as part of a fact-finding trip for Human Rights Watch I interviewed over one hundred people crossing the border, and I would ask them. Why did you come ubiquitously? The answer was food or healthcare. Many people told her they'd been surviving for months on a diet. Only of Yuka a rugged shrub that has a potato like root in the late nineteen ninety s Hugo Chavez promised free universal healthcare in Venezuela and the country quickly met most of the US healthcare targets by twenty ten but since then the country's much fond in healthcare system has collapsed. Infant mortality the rate at which kids under the age of one or dying is widely viewed as a barometer of a nation's overall health. A recent study in Lancet global health found that the nation's infant mortality rate has risen all the way back to where it was in the nineteen ninety s Jimmy Garcia is one of the authors of that study choking. I mean, we have eighteen years of broiler study is choking and kids are suffering and dying from simple things at the Brazilian border. Dr page met a woman in her ten year old daughter who just come out of Venezuela. The girl was in a wheelchair and needed a catheter. They had been using the same catheter for a year. These theaters is supposed to be. Changed every time you use them. And now she had infection those affecting her kidney. And there was no antibiotics, so they actually pushed her, you know, two hundred miles across the border two hundred miles on foot for a catheter and some antibiotics page who's originally from Uruguay says the health conditions. She saw among the Venezuelans were startling, particularly given Venezuela's reputation as a relatively wealthy Latin American country and these refugees weren't fleeing a war zone, the devastation that you're seeing is not war. It's mismanagement is were economic decisions corruption there's a lot of complicated factors, but it's totally manmade. This is not an actual disaster or something that was inevitable, and that makes the Venezuelan health crisis. She says even more disturbing Jason Bobi, an NPR news.

Venezuela Comcast Johns Hopkins Medical School Jason Bogan South America Jason Bobi Dr Kathleen Jimmy Garcia Hugo Chavez Brazil Uruguay NPR United States Eighteen Years