35 Burst results for "Dr John"

"dr john" Discussed on Burn the Haystack

Burn the Haystack

09:36 min | 6 d ago

"dr john" Discussed on Burn the Haystack

"Comfort and encouragement and motivation to move on that journey towards distillation which is. Promising coming. And this is my frustrations because I see this ongoing tension. So, if you're a an apologist or an opponent, you're kind of point. Is that what you're saying yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I think I think sometimes people because we are defending or we're criticizing we created two opposing camps. And so we meet the but. If. You look at the progressive growth of our church eastern development. It's a journey on the. Run. Through the reality of the change of wold and the issues that they had to confront. And in that conflict zone hey, they had to retain the conviction yet got his there with us for us in individual live and in history. But We seem to move into. This polemical discussions defending an adult understand me I believe understanding inspiration these important. Understanding Herman Youth Is. Important. But. My question is, how does that apply to my spiritual lives journey? Michael Vick Shen that God is for me. And for example. In one of the Biblical perspective that I have suggested the prophetic voice. Provides a pathway of secure inspiration folk that merchants, our spiritual life it impacts comfort encouragement and hope secure in the reliability of the. Prophetic, message. And I think I think this is the Progressive Journey that Ellen wide experience as an inspired the region. It was a very lenny progressive development over complication of God's unconditional love. Our show some insult practically. Emerges in which he straight. Yeah That's exciting. I like that. Yeah. So if I'm hearing you if I'm hearing you right, it's rather than the prophetic voice being used to stagnate condemn and sort of bring fear. It's actually meant to be for us to take the next step in understanding the hope we have in Jesus and to bring about that comfort that he has it all in control draw into a closer relationship with Jesus right? Yeah. So this study of the Bible. And that's. and. That's the that's the important pace though isn't it? It's not the. It's up the end it's the it's the means to the end due to the, and for example, in the context of the situation people use any wants quotations. Those even one, a quotation that I've noticed on the facebook taken from Minister of healing. And suggesting that Allen Wire was against wearing the masks. Face. Rotation was from Minister of healing. And I'm saying visit with. Our people had no concept. What that message was all about. Good. OWNED MY I. See. Well I said, let's let's let's dive into it. Then I guess how how do you think I mean? What is for those of you who may not be familiar she's You know we close her as a prophetess in church and she was a CO founder of our entire denomination So pretty big deal in history but I guess if we start on how how do you think we as? Christians like should relate to ellen what in her capacity in that role as being appropriate. That's a good question and let me let me be quite open and grief. I, believe. That ellen white in heroin. was spiritual voice for the Chech-. Inspired. An inspirational nurturer of faith. Unfortunately, the way we often use her, we change that all into a prescriptive authoritarian. So we use quotations left right out of context and apply them randomly of however. Whatever whatever ideas we want to support. Without, understanding the whole bit sort of picture. All a what did her specific as statement meant at that time in the context in fact, I, would like to suggest to you that the other letters that Chiro, all manuscripts that you wrote, all the books that she wrote actually behind all that there is a story. There's a story and I think when you re catch the flow of that story to make meaningful to suggest to people that email. The prophetic voice. OCCA- is given for specific merchant and Purpose to nurture this ritual condition of the judge to draw them back into a relationship with God. I mean that would sound quite surprising. I would sight to your average adventist who probably wouldn't agree with that definition that would probably they may not. They may not necessarily disagree but they might say wait isn't the prophetic voice to in order to tell me what is going to happen in the end of all things isn't that what the prophetic voice is primarily supposed to do? At yes, I agree mos over the the the largest spectrum of of of of people in our fates three-nation will privilege to come do that sort of you and but I, think they missing the point one important point. Let. Why why was actually creating a scene of a? Apocalypse the realism it's happening now it's happening now be ready for the second coming of Jesus. This was the main actually focus of the book elliptic, Rogers And now. But at the same time, what eat generally people miss that there's another developmental stage going through that lots Jenny who were people confronting live in the changing world. So she is a truly say be ready now. Okay. But plant as if he would come in thousand years because the journey will continue. And I will demonstrate you. He's directly actually the this is how got nurtured the church. In that way he was preparing the Movement for live that lady look even understand. Now imagine that up to about sixty and even more our tiny is believed that Jesus would come at any time. They were just waiting for him. Now you've got the prophetic voice that now. Challenges that Hang. On a minute maybe you need to refocus on Sunday. Stages other listen critical periods eighteen sixteen, nineteen hundreds where we can see that ellen white's emphasis as that prophetic inspirational voice changes. And you know what? It's exciting. and. I wished I. Wish that might change with embrace that view rather than getting these little pockets of patients understand the story. Of goods leading the passion of God's love for humanity and how but use that prophetic voice to help crown grow in understanding of what it means to be fully immersed in God's unconditional love. I think. I'm not sure what the I think. There could even be a bigger a bigger problem because you know people do the same thing with the Bible, that hall proof texting thing they just they like to pull like different versus here and there and use them for their. Their. Own Purpose, whatever they think is going on. Did maybe it's like a little bit of laziness because it actually maybe would take a bit of work to understand the story of the Bible and the story of Ellen Watt like understanding that before you pull a quite out whereas some people I think lack the ability to just be like all. Let's get that one for Ministry of healing because I don't WanNa wear masks and slam it on facebook. That kind of thing. I haven't seen the quite so I don't know what what the quite is but anyway..

Ellen ellen white facebook Ellen Watt Michael Vick Shen OCCA CO founder Allen Wire Chiro Jenny heroin. Chech
Censored? Joe Rogan Experience is missing episodes on Spotify

podnews

02:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Censored? Joe Rogan Experience is missing episodes on Spotify

"Hello. Everybody I have an announcement Hello Joe Rogan. What's your announcement starting on September first the entire Jr library will be available on spotify the entire. Library you say 'cause the Joe Rogan experience is now in spotify but forty-six episodes missing including conspiracy theorist Alex Jones far right journalist Milo Yannopoulos an anti Semite Owen Benjamin neither spotify nor Rogan is saying why Rogan's also announced that it becomes an exclusive on the first of December. In his podcast Adam Curry's says he's building something called podcast two point Oh. It's a new podcast that outlines an alternative to the apple podcasts directory. I. Think we've figured out some incentive for develop AC- says he'll also be on the first show from Joe Rogan's new studio in Dallas. spotify down rejecting new podcast served with non secure audio addresses according to e mail seen by pulled news audio served using HDP rather than https also doesn't play in chrome on embedded players. Apple podcast expressed a preference for https back in May two, thousand eighteen but haven't yet insisted on it. The vintage video podcasts spend three hundred and fifty dollars on ads for their show in podcast APP overcast called them one hundred and nineteen new subscriptions they say quote the campaign was worth what we paid for it. That's Nice Hobby, radio has launched hard m. n. a new podcast APP built specifically for Minnesota Nice Idea Patriot has raised nine hundred million dollars in new funding says CEO Jack Conte Patriots. Valuation is one point, two, billion dollars, and the IRA has the full sheduled for the IB podcast upfront event in September and the host comedian Francesca Ramsey. And in Podcast News, Here's how to promote your podcast a stunning story of a plastic surgeon asked by wanted terrorist to make them look unrecognizable full marks to plastic surgeon podcast for that. News from the Ramsey network is the Dr John Baloney show a show that provides real talk about life relationships and mental health challenges. It'll come out three times a week and seventy million is back for season three starting on September the fourteenth each week that people denominated podcast from Antica? Williamson. Co brings localities taking action from the school to prison pipeline. To racialist policing to the spread of covid nineteen in jail.

Joe Rogan Spotify Apple Adam Curry Dr John Baloney Francesca Ramsey Ceo Jack Conte Semite Owen Benjamin Williamson IRA Minnesota Milo Yannopoulos CO Alex Jones Dallas.
New York - SUNY Oneonta Campus To Shut Down For 2 Weeks After Spike In Coronavirus Cases

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross

01:49 min | 3 weeks ago

New York - SUNY Oneonta Campus To Shut Down For 2 Weeks After Spike In Coronavirus Cases

"As some schools prepare to reopen, we have another college closing its doors. Tell me why SUNY Oneonta. Has 105 cases didn't tell us and we have to find out on the news. Just one week after SUNY Oneonta welcome students back to campus institutions do not about their students. A spike in on campus Corona virus cases is forcing the New York State University to shut down for at least two weeks. It didn't feel like they were doing their best and ensuring our safety in the first place. Sr Malaka Horizons, says she and her classmates were frustrated by what she says is the school's lack of testing, resources and transparency. They're going to open up the schools, and they're responsible for You know, communicating with us whether you were in danger or not of the virus. Colleges have not followed basic public health rules. They haven't done entry testing they haven't done quarantining Dr. Rashi, Sha and other public health officials are urging students already on campus to stay there to prevent the spread of the virus. If we were able to test everybody on campus twice a week that would make it dramatically safer to be on campus across the country, Colleges are struggling to contain clusters, of course. Bit outbreaks in Texas Baylor University ordered 55 students 21 of them positive to reside in place on two floors of the dorm. One. University of Alabama campus has reported more than 1000 positive cases since classes began two weeks ago, and cases at Arizona State University nearly tripled, reaching 480 cases in just three days. We can get colleges and universities open safely this fall, but only if you're willing to follow the public health guidance on the protocols, CBS Dr John

Suny Oneonta Oneonta New York State University Arizona State University Malaka Horizons Texas Baylor University University Of Alabama Dr John SHA CBS
Atlanta - Marjorie Taylor Greene Wins GOP Primary in Georgia

Dana Loesch

00:18 sec | Last month

Atlanta - Marjorie Taylor Greene Wins GOP Primary in Georgia

"Republican congressional candidate Marjorie Green Green wins wins the the GOP GOP runoff. runoff. In In northwest northwest George's George's 14th 14th Congressional Congressional District. District. She She received received 57% 57% of of the the vote vote in in her her contest contest against against Dr Dr John John Cowan. Cowan. Green will now face Democrat Kevin Van Oz Dale in November. The

Congressional Congressional Di Dr Dr John John Cowan Green GOP Kevin Van Oz Dale George
Atlanta - Georgia Runoff Election Day arrives Aug. 11

Dana Loesch

00:32 sec | Last month

Atlanta - Georgia Runoff Election Day arrives Aug. 11

"Runoff Election Day here in Georgia among the races, drawing the most attention, Fulton County District Attorney where Challenger Funny Willis looks to knock off embattled incumbent Paul Howard. Other contests of note, Fulton County sheriff to Cab County Sheriff, Gwinnett County Sheriff and Henry County Sheriff. There are three congressional run offs with Metro Atlanta ties, including the 14th District, where controversial Republican Marjorie Taylor Greene faces off against Dr John Cowan. 32

Fulton County Gwinnett County Cab County Henry County Marjorie Taylor Greene Funny Willis Paul Howard Atlanta Georgia Dr John Cowan.
Los Angeles - Doctors and sham patients in Southern California accused in opioid trafficking ring

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:57 sec | Last month

Los Angeles - Doctors and sham patients in Southern California accused in opioid trafficking ring

"Doctor's clinic operators and sham patients this week and Four counties in southern California who broke up with the Feds Cezanne Oxycodone Bring that sold hundreds of thousands of tablets illegally across the country, Assistant U. S Attorney Scott Tenley said. Dr. John Michael Cordelia's camera in a second doctor provided phony prescriptions for over 400,000 oxycodone tablets, which reported local pharmacies over two year period. Others arrested were involved in purchasing and shipping of the drugs. Some of the defendants were recruiting people who had no need for Oxy co tone and they would say, go into the clinics and get a prescription, but Give me the pills that you get from the prescription, and in that way they could accumulate tens of thousands of pills, which were then re sold across the country. During the course of the investigation agencies teddy Bear stuffed with this. Many is 13,000 oxycodone pills that were shipped across the country. If convicted, the 10 people named in the indictment could get a maximum sentence of 20 years in federal prison. Pete Demetriou Okay and extend 70 news radio you see, like

Oxycodone Dr. John Michael Cordelia Pete Demetriou OXY Teddy Bear Scott Tenley California Assistant U. S Attorney
Expert Says U.S. Current Trend in Coronavirus Cases Isn’t Sustainable

Mark Mason

06:55 min | Last month

Expert Says U.S. Current Trend in Coronavirus Cases Isn’t Sustainable

"With us. Dr. John Wade CI, the professor of the Global Health Programme, professor of health system and policy program. And the director of the Center for Global Health College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon. And Dr CI Welcome back to the Mark Mason Show. It's my pleasure to be back with you. Well, I'm glad to hear your voice again. I always use you is kind of our update into the really world of Corona virus. What's really going on and a lot has happened since we last talked. On that the virus seems to be more prevalent than ever. But we seem to be learning to live with it. I suppose one of the virus limits we can live with. I mean, we won't like it. But can we get by at this rate? No. We add a to high rate a TTE this great, many, many stay or counties there. Health care for city would not be able to 15 we We have to bring down because most European and Asian country at much lower levels, so they are able to lead you much higher level of activity, which we still cannot. And so if we maintain this high level or pandemic, it will hurt both our economy and people's life and health, and so we had to do something to bring it down to a much lower level. Wow. I don't know how we do that. The governor's talked about maybe travel restrictions. Is that one possible thing we should seriously look at where maybe people from high incident states are are not allowed to come where they if they do. Come there, quarantined. Well, it is. It's It's a good idea, in theory, but in practice will be very difficult to implement. Because he had to send lots of people to monitor to supervise and that costs money. So are you thinking another lock down or slow down? No, no, I think for the last Upfield. Early June, We duty our 2.5 months left town. And we see the serious impact on Mike, honey, and I don't think al economy can sustain more locked down. What we need to do is to learn how to live. Save it. How to operate our business. I work safety and one particular major. Uh, I know the difficulty but that's very critical measure, not just Oregon. But slowly, 90 states we were not able to implement and that is one of the biggest reason we are in this high level off epidemic. So remember in my early and Evi I mentioned that there are three step process. That's important. The first step is contact tracing. The second step is testing and so We're not doing a superb job, but we have the great improvement compare with March or April in term of the first step. But we still fail on the last step that is after the testing. What do we do with the confirmed cases So far, we only isolate people with moderate to see via symptoms. And completely neglected people with mild or no symptoms, and the latest studies, said just people with mild to know Simpson. They accounted for about 80% of total infection. But this 80% of total infection also, if we don't contain them, they also contribute to about 70 to 80% of new infection. Just think about this way. We pay attention to the Penta pus it with more moderate to severe symptoms contained them. But we let the other 80% continue to spread the virus free tea, and it will be a miracle if we don't have. Ah, hi. Hi. Cases continue to be in this house. How did we get more testing? I mean, we can barely my doctor tells me that he has no more tests because they've shipped him off to Florida and Texas and other states that need him. That's a problem I was comparing with Beck in March or April, Wright had done better dimension. We're not doing a super job during the testing as well, Well, I'm with you on the testing, and they and the containment. It's just a question of Why aren't we doing it? There are multiple reason one if people are still resisting the idea ofthe isolation and quality scene and the other financial Many Asian country. I don't know much about European country mediation country like Taiwan, they when they have a mandatory quarantine, isolation, government pay for the costs and company people. The example of Taiwan in their quarantine and isolation. Everyone who and the quarantine everyday received about equipment to certify us started per day for 14 days. So people who need to be quarantined need to be compensated because they lost income and we're not able to do that. I know we're on our financial crunch. So it's both financial reason but also political social reason, because people are not waiting. Yeah, I would have to be afraid, though. Doctors at the AA liberal Mike what would fake Corona virus just so he could sit at home for two weeks and get paid by the government? But there's you know, there's the question of you gotta have the test and it's got to come back positive. So I'm with you. I think a lot of listeners were with you test and contained testing contain, And maybe that's what they should be trying to come up with. In the way of money in Washington, D C right now, the World Health Organization says We should not expect a miracle where a vaccine is concerned. Are we being spoon fed in folded a cure A vaccine, If you will make may not be what we think it's going to be. So that I have some reservations because we still know ability to about the vaccine because there's no effective action available yet. I think I just saw the news. Russia has a plan to have a effective action by October, and we don't know how safe it is, but I think they're waiting between safe and effectiveness. For the U. S. I think the earliest might be the beginning of next year. And I cannot say anything about how effective it is because we haven't seen that yet. We don't know yet, but most likely given the nature of the disease, even an effective vaccine. The immunity may not last very long. If the image can last up to a year. That would be wonderful, but most likely will be somewhere between six months and 12 months. That means we may need to do more than one dose of

Center For Global Health Colle Oregon Professor Taiwan Corona Dr. John Wade Ci Global Health Programme Oregon State University Director World Health Organization Corvallis Penta Beck AA Mike Russia Simpson Washington Florida
Why it's more important than ever to get a flu shot this season

Sean Hannity

00:35 sec | Last month

Why it's more important than ever to get a flu shot this season

"Urging urging Texans Texans to to get get a a flu flu shot shot this this year. year. Dr. Dr. John John Heller Heller steps steps with with the the Texas Texas State State Health Health Services Services says says that that you you declining declining number number of of hospitalizations hospitalizations has has been been good good news news as we go into flu season. The even better news is that in the case of influenza, we have an excellent vaccine that says been proven to be very effective. In the flu season in the Southern hemisphere, and that's the flu vaccine that be using here, Dr Heller Stat says. For for physicians, the symptoms of seasonal flu and Covad, 19 are very similar. There's a Corona

Dr. Dr. John John Heller Helle Flu Vaccine Texas Texas State State Health Dr Heller Stat Influenza Covad Corona
NIH launches possible COVID treatment by using monoclonal antibodies

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

01:09 min | Last month

NIH launches possible COVID treatment by using monoclonal antibodies

"To to create create synthetic synthetic antibodies antibodies that that could could treat treat patients patients who who already already have have the the virus. virus. CBS CBS NEWS NEWS chief chief Medical Medical correspondent correspondent Dr Dr John John Lapu Lapu continues continues our our Siri's Siri's racing racing to a cure tonight. Eli Lilly, in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health, announced they're trying something new. A lab engineer treatment called monoclonal antibodies to stop the virus from spreading in the body. And I h director Dr Francis Collins, that monocle anybody sticks right to the part of this spike protein. It represents the part that binds to the human cell and that's the virus. Get inside. So you cover that up, and the virus has nowhere to go. In contrast to convalescent plasma taken from survivors, Blood monoclonal antibodies can be manufactured in large amounts in a lab. In a similar effort. Regeneron is working on its own synthetic antibody treatment. Doctor. Miss Gibbet Berhe is running the trial. But if I treat you now, can I prevent the possibility of progression and hospital admission? Can I improve your cabaret time? Can I also prevent transmission to other people. Meanwhile tonight, Maryland based

Dr Dr John John Lapu Lapu Siri CBS Dr Francis Collins Eli Lilly National Institutes Of Health Gibbet Berhe Regeneron Cure Maryland Engineer Director
Coronavirus out of control in US

News, Traffic and Weather

03:31 min | Last month

Coronavirus out of control in US

"The United States has become the global epicenter. After the initial shock and the lockdowns that followed. It seemed like we had it under control. Then around Memorial Day, people started going out again. Some states followed the phase reopening plans put forth by the White House Corona Virus Task force. And some did not. Now the world is watching us as the virus surges and spreads from region to region and school district struggle with how to reopen safely. ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos talked about the U. S response with a head of the Harvard Global Health Initiative. Dr Asheesh job They discussed how to turn things around and where the U. S stands now. Good morning. America is so clear that this virus simply is still out of control here in the United States were the richest country in the world. The best medical talent in the world. How do you explain why we're doing so poorly? What must we do to fix it? Indeed we are. We are the global hospital and we have mismanaged his virus in a way that I think much of the world simply can't believe on. The reason is that we just haven't taken us seriously. We have not followed scientific advice and guidance. When we opened up too early. We've opened up too much. We're still debating whether mass work or not, they actually do. There's no debate. So what do we need to do? Moving forward? We need to get mad people. There were maps. We need to fix our testing infrastructure. We have to close down bars and gyms and other things that cause outbreaks, and we just have to start taking the virus. Seriously. I think if we do all of those things, George Within the next couple of months. We can become one of the success stories as opposed to one of the global failures right now. Some optimism right there. Of course, over the next couple of months school is starting again. For so many millions of American Children. We're seeing big school district close stick with virtual All over the country. Everyone want schools to open safely. The question is how to do it. This is not a debate, right? We all want our kids back in school, and this should be priority number one for our country and we don't have a national plan. And we've left it. A state states are leaving at his local towns and officials. We can't have pandemics fought by individual cities, towns and superintendents. I really believe we can get kids back to school, but we need a national plan to suppress the virus. Improve the quality of the buildings of the schools, and we can do this. We can get kids back in. You know, we're seeing hot spots crop up here in the United States, but also coming back to places like China. New cases being reported in China, Australia. They have had great success. Now It's coming back there as well. Vietnam didn't have any cases now they're having is well, what are we seeing This now? Is this still a first way was at the beginning of a second wave. This is a global pandemic. That's going to be with us all the way until we have safe, effective vaccines that are widely available sometime. I'm hopeful and next year until then, countries will continue to battle a most high income countries have managed to suppress the virus. They get little flare ups and they're able to bring them under control. We're the only country with kind of a raging wildfire, and we really have to work on that. But even if we suppress it, we will still have little outbreak so we'll have to do and you're describing our current situation in the United States that were just in the fourth inning of this crisis. Yeah. You know, I was trying to explain to people kind of a timeline and I have thought of this. If everything goes incredibly well as sort of an 18 months pandemic that let's say began around January of this year. That's very optimistic. That puts us in about the sort of the beginning the top of the fourth inning. Just as a way of reminding people we have many more months ahead of us, and we do behind us. And if we don't get our act together, we're gonna have a lot more suffering and death, and none of that is necessary. We really can't prevent all of Dr John Thanksgiving every time and insight.

United States George Stephanopoulos American Children Harvard Global Health Initiati White House Abc News Dr Asheesh Dr John Thanksgiving Chief Anchor America China Outbreak Vietnam Australia
RIP Buddy: The first dog to test positive for the coronavirus in the U.S. has died

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:54 sec | Last month

RIP Buddy: The first dog to test positive for the coronavirus in the U.S. has died

"He was old. He had health problems, and now he has died, apparently of covert 19. But what really makes Buddy unusual is he's a dog. And that makes Buddy the German shepherd one for the medical history books. The first dog dog known known to to have have died died from from the the Corona Corona virus virus infection infection that that apparently apparently Buddy Buddy picked picked up up from from its its owner owner in in the the New New York York area. area. It's It's going going to to go go to to a a dog dog park. park. Let's Let's say say or or you're you're gonna walk your dog where lots of other dogs to walk. Don't let your dog jump upon somebody or let strange people come up and Petra dog, Dr John how is president of the American Veterinary Medical Association? Aviation, maintaining the social distancing that you would with people. Probably not let him go nose to nose with the other dogs there have now been millions have reported covert cases involving infected humans around the world, and not one apparently infected by a pet. Charles Feldman K Index, 10 70

Dr John New York York Charles Feldman American Veterinary Medical As Petra President Trump
Coronavirus-infected German shepherd, first dog to test positive for COVID-19 in US, dies

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:51 sec | Last month

Coronavirus-infected German shepherd, first dog to test positive for COVID-19 in US, dies

"Buddy, the German shepherd will go down in the medical history books as the first dog to apparently die from Cove it 19. But he was getting on in years and, like people with risk factors did have some other medical issues. But then came the Corona virus, which Buddy apparently caught from its owner makes it much worse of you. Conditions, and he may have had lymphoma on. Of course, when you have abnormal immune system, it's gonna really decrease your chances for getting over anything. Dr. John how is President of the American Veterinary Medical Association? Nobody is the 1st 1 that actually got sick enough to die. But being here I probably that cancer spread to his liver and spleen are never where else. There's just no way to survive that there have been no known cases anywhere in the world of humans getting covert 19 from their dogs or from any other pet for that matter,

Buddy American Veterinary Medical As Lymphoma Cancer President Trump Dr. John
California coronavirus watch list adds Santa Cruz County

KCBS Radio Midday News

01:07 min | 2 months ago

California coronavirus watch list adds Santa Cruz County

"New virus cases in the last couple of weeks, Santa Cruz County is now being added to the States Watch list this as yet another county is looking to get tough on people who won't wear masks or keep their distance. Here's KCBS is holic Juan Santa Cruz County added nine new cases yesterday to his running total of 907. About half of those are concentrated in the farming area of Watson Bill. Watchlist. Designation means gyms and salons could close this week, but retail, dining and beaches could stay open. Hospitalizations air down slightly in Alameda, Santa Clara, Marin, San Francisco and Solano counties up slightly in Contra Costa, where this week supervisors are expected to consider cranking up enforcement of mask and social distancing orders. To know what Marin and Napa County Zehr already looking at imposing hundreds of dollars in fines, Infectious disease expert and cow professor emeritus Dr John Schwartzberg. I don't want to say that masks or the solution and everything will go away if we all wore masks, but everything would be a lot better if we did. It's a big tool in armamentarium to control this pandemic. Places like

Juan Santa Cruz County Santa Cruz County Napa County Zehr Marin Watson Bill Dr John Schwartzberg Santa Clara Contra Costa Alameda Solano San Francisco Professor
The Year Without a Summer

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

06:24 min | 2 months ago

The Year Without a Summer

"The heat of summer is well and truly here in the Northern Hemisphere, the hot humid days just won't let up and living in new. York City I continue to be frustrated that central air conditioning is not as ubiquitous in homes and businesses, as it is in most parts of the southern United States where I grew up. Then, of course, it's always been substantially hotter in those southern states, although with climate change, the northeast is heating up more and more, but that does make me think sometimes. How the heck did people survive before? Joining especially in those very hot climates, farmers ALMANAC A few insights nothing to mind blowing people would take day trips to swing holes or up. To cooler weather, they kept windows and doors shut at midday to keep out hot air and delayed cooking or baking. Until the evening they ate refreshing. Cool treats and was available in homes, blue fans across blocks of ice, the biggest factor most likely however was it simply wasn't as hot as it is now at least in terms of extremes, quoting farmers, Almanac, the extra ordinarily hot summers that are commonplace today were virtually unheard of fifty to one hundred years ago in fact, seven of the top ten coolest, US summers on record occurred nineteen, hundred and nineteen fifty and quotes. There was one year however over two centuries ago now that it was a lot cooler. Eighteen Sixteen Aka the year without a summer quoting farmers. ALMANAC referred to by many names, including the poverty year and eighteen hundred and froze to death, the year eighteen sixteen was literally a year without a summer across much of the northern hemisphere throughout not only North America, but also northern Europe and parts of Asia in exceptionally cold summer, featuring killing frosts in July in August crippled food production crop failures in food shortages were. Were so widespread that rioting and looting became common in the United Kingdom and France on this side of the Atlantic. Many residents of New England and the Canadian Maritimes froze to death, starved, or suffered from severe malnutrition, as storms, bringing foot, or more of snow, hit hard during May and June. Many others from the region pulled up stakes and move to western New York in the Mid West where the cold was less severe. In fact, the year without a summer is now believed to have been one major catalyst in the westward expansion of the United States and quotes Nicole may have been less severe in the southern and Western us, but it was still highly unusual on July fourth eighteen sixteen. It was forty six degrees Fahrenheit in Savannah Georgia. For the record this year on July fourth and Savannah, it was ninety degrees. So. Why did this happen? It was due to one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history Indonesia's Tamboura. The volcano erupted on April Fifth Eighteen fifteen, continuing to up for a week and killing nearly all of the twelve thousand residents of Tim, Bora as well as almost all plants in animal life on the island, quoting the Paris review, countless tons of volcanic. Volcanic ash circulated in the upper atmosphere for years after the events blocked out sunlight and lowering average surface temperatures globally in parts, of North, America Europe temperatures dropped by more than eighteen degrees. Fahrenheit there was snow in New England July and dark rain clouds swept over Europe throughout the summer months in Hungary reports of Brown snowfall, tainted by volcanic ash and quotes. Understandably many thought the world was ending that the sun was dying. It's really fascinating. Though is some of the cultural ripples that this massive event caused. You may be familiar with the story of how Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was inspired to write Frankenstein as part of a spooky storytelling challenge when she percy shelley and Lord Byron and friends were holed up in a villa in Geneva. One stormy summer turns out. It was this dark, thunderous apocalyptic. Apocalyptic summer of eighteen sixteen. The crew had gone to Geneva, both to ride out the unusually rainy summer, but also to escape their various dramas in England, being stuck indoors for so much of their trip Lord. Byron challenged them all to write ghost stories to entertain one. Another Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein which would set the stage for all of science fiction to come? Also among the Geneva Villa guests was Lord Byron's personal physician Dr John Polidori. Who wrote short story for the challenge called the vampire, and this story is often credited with the birth of the Modern Vampire Romance. But those genre defining publications aren't the only cultural institutions to come out of the summer last year of Eighteen, sixteen among the mini shortages across Europe was a crucial shortage of oats which led to the starvation and deaths of countless humans and livestock, including at least ten thousand horses, not counting how many were also slaughtered to save money or become dinner German? Baron Carl Dreyer's and inventor in student of mathematics started trying to design a man powered form of transportation, while historians agree that he was inspired by the weather based os shortage. He also saw a need for an alternative to horses as crucial for war. Quoting the Paris review his first designs for human powered transportation involved complex conveyor belt, driven four wheeled vehicles, but raises breakthrough came when he turned his thoughts to balance drawing on his experiences, skating on ice ponds drains, put his faith in the power momentum and front wheel, steering to keep a two wheel vehicle rate. This idea became his love, machine or running machine and quotes, and this running machine would become the modern day bicycle. All of this makes me think about how many things will change or be invented from this moment that we're living through. And of course there's a lot of things we're already seen, and we're likely to continue to see some big cultural shift, but like who, out there is writing the next genre defining novel that people will still be reading two centuries later. Who's inventing something that will be innovated on for decades before becoming a ubiquitous ordinary mode of transportation. Maybe won't be those types of things specifically, but there are surely ideas happening and things being created that we won't realize the impact of for decades

Europe United States Lord Byron Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Paris Review Geneva New England Frankenstein Savannah Savannah Georgia Baron Carl Dreyer New York Geneva Villa Mid West Indonesia North America Atlantic United Kingdom
The Brain-Boosting Benefits of Exercise with Ryan Glatt

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

07:19 min | 2 months ago

The Brain-Boosting Benefits of Exercise with Ryan Glatt

"Welcome to the broken brain podcast I'm your host. Droop ruin and each week by team, and I bring on a new guest who rethink can help you improve your brain help feel better and most importantly live more. This week's guest is Ryan. Ryan is a personal trainer and brain health coach with over a decade of experience in the health and fitness industries. He currently works alongside clinicians and researchers to study the facts of cognitively. Enhanced and comprehensive exercise plants at the Pacific Brain Health Center, here in Lovely Santa Monica California Ryan constantly seeks to learn about the health neuroscience, research and Practical Strategies both health coaching and personal training in context, which is why we brought him here, Ryan has pursued education from aiming clinks the brain I training institute, the Neuroscience Academy that Kaddoumi for brain, health and performance and many other places. He's currently enrolled in. In a Master's applied neuroscience program at King's College of London, he actively consults with companies who leverage exercise for brain health and educates and fitness professionals with the first course to comprehensively address exercise and brain health called the brain health trainer, course talk more about that later on in which he's educated over a thousand health and fitness Professionals Ryan welcome to the brain podcasts. Thanks for having me drew and you also. And people really loved it. That's we've set the intention. We did a documentary by the way. If anybody hasn't hasn't watched that documentary before a broken bring to. Click on the show notes. We'll make it available for anybody who hasn't seen, and you can sign up and check it out and see some of Ryan's recommendations. rebuilt on today's conversation so. We set out the intention when we first did that interview that we wanted to do an interview for the podcast. I'm glad it happened at the first interview that I'm doing in person in the world of. Semi Corentin and social distancing so Thank you for coming into the office. It's an honor. Thanks for having me so I wanNA start off with something which is I want to talk about dance? DANCE REVOLUTION So tell US anybody who doesn't know what it is. Tell us what it is, and why he became passionate about. Yeah, so dance dance. Revolution is a video game. It's an extra game. Extra Games are things that incorporate. And Gaming And or active video games it was followed by the success of like Nintendo. We for instance that became very popular dance dance. Revolution's interesting because it was popularized when I was a kid. Probably before that I think in the eighties and nineties, and it's essentially a game where you're controller is a pad that you stand on in the middle is you're standing place? You have an Arrow pointing forward pointing backwards to left and went to the right. There's arrows coming up from the bottom of the screen, and you have this answer key at the top. Top with those different directionally facing arrows, and it's to music, and it was a Japanese video game developed by Nami, and it was super popular in Arcades at home on the playstation, two and I grew up as a very overweight sedentary kid I had a pretty severe concussion in preschool, and so that created some concussion induced adhd so I was addicted to video games, and I think I would then have met the criteria for video game addiction now, which is like it wasn't every day, but it was like four hours a day of video gaming. into early call of duty before it was like an e sports thing so if I kept on it, I could probably been pretty well right now. Playing golf duty but I actually came across the home version of dance dance revolution when I was a kid in high school, actually no middle school early middle school and I lost a lot of weight playing that in my living room and it got me into. That got me to lose weight and it was motivating had all the elements we might talk about being important for an exercise program that is sensitive to brain health. And then it got me into the gym, and when I was in high school I joined a gym across from my high school, started weightlifting, watching personal trainers, we can go into that later, but essentially kick-started my personal health, an interest in fitness, and with that fitness that is cognitively enhanced meaning that I wasn't on an exercise bike, watching the news or staring into space I was cognitively engaged in that program since then dance dance revolution has been present. Among a lot of research context and neuro rehabilitation in older adults. It's not really that accessible anymore. You can't just get it off the shelf as much as you could. Previously, but it's really paved the way for a whole industry of active video gaming extra gaming. And it has spun off also clinical or serious extra gaming games that are used for health and clinical contexts such as some of the solutions. We use it the Pacific Brain Health Center. For the listeners who are like way, why are we starting the conversation video game? This all make sense so you know in reading about your story and getting a chance to get to know you over the last year, or so as we've been introduced by our mutual friend, Dr Shawn Patel who's a regenerative medicine doctor here in Los Angeles who's been on the podcasts before linked to that. I got a chance to see how your struggle as child especially with weight fitness and being sedentary. You found something you found something that created joy inside of you, and that's actually really related to a big part of what you teach right now we'll start off with the basics and we'll talk about what brain health coaches and some of the science of it, but you found something passionate that you that got you excited to move. Move something that you enjoyed and I. think that such an important thing as simple as it sounds. This video game was the thing that got started. That was ultimately the thing that starting your journey down this pathway of understanding the power of really what exercise can do for the brain, so let's start there. Let's start off with the basics you know. We've done so many episodes on the power of exercise, but as a refresher. Tell US why exercise is so important and what it does for the brain. Yeah, and there's been an explosion of research and media coverage about this I. Like to say that the mainstream popularity around exercise. The brain was really kick started by the book spark by Dr John Radi ever grateful for the work. He's done in popularizing that and twenty eighteen, the second most popular Ted Talk. In that year was Dr Wendy Suzuki talking about exercise in the brain and a lot of mainstream coverage, and you know in New, York Times and medium covering on boosting these posts on exercising, the brain has become very popular, and that's amazing, because it's also jumping on the kind of. The coattails of neural plasticity research showing that the brain can change. I think this audience has been very well presented that information right we to our brains were fixed. We were taught in high school. They have a certain amount of brain cells. Will Never. It's all downhill from there and it turns out. That's not true exactly. Neuro plasticity, so the brain's ability to functionally or structurally change. In response to experiences,

Pacific Brain Health Center Ryan Nintendo Neuroscience Academy Golf Lovely Santa Monica King's College Of London Adhd Ted Talk Dr Shawn Patel Dr John Radi Nami Los Angeles Dr Wendy Suzuki York Times
Former Kansas State president Jon Wefald on college football amid pandemic

The Paul Finebaum Show

05:40 min | 2 months ago

Former Kansas State president Jon Wefald on college football amid pandemic

"Dr John We follow the former president at at Kansas state. Thanks for spending a few more minutes with a doctor. I wanted to ask you you mentioned. Where the college presidents are, but but some have pushed back and said while it wall. It is a dangerous decision to green light at cancelling. It might be even worse when you consider the financial risk You've sat in those chairs. You sat these NCWA committee meetings. You've been part of negotiations. What's at risk for college athletic departments and colleges themselves? Paul I'm already there because there's not going GonNa be a college football season this year, so I mean. Look at the the big ten's already canceled. But forty two games the the PAC twelve is canceled like thirty six. So and in the presence are are are in charge of the entire university. So you know when I hear Ross talking. I understand completely. He's got every scenario looked at. But, even if everything's perfect there and you get a multitude of students getting the covid nineteen, the president's are going to call the season off, but here's the deal I'm already. Looking at the consequences, and and they are bleak. the University of Minnesota did A. Long Study and was in the Minneapolis Tribune. Let's say they're athlete budgets one hundred, twenty three. And if there's no football season for Minnesota and the big ten. Their athletic budget, just kind of in half and say for. Let's say the sixty five power five schools. Paul. There's no football this year. Their athletes budgets are close to cut in half, and in some cases more in some cases less. But will you saw Stanford I mean Look Stanford is one of the richest universities one of the best universities in the world, and they've already cancelled eleven, so called Olympic Spring Sports and. You're going to see other schools in the power five conferences eliminating. Those sports left and right here in the near future, because they won't be able to afford like at the University of Minnesota if they go from one hundred, twenty, three, million and that budget's cut in half. They're GONNA have to start eliminating sport, so it's going to be devastating. Who wants to eliminate sports? But here you've got this great school. Stanford that's already eliminated eleven, and that's just the tip of the iceberg. And so for Kansas, state. Let's say our budget is like eighty five million well, it would go down to thirty eight to forty million, so we would have to cut sports to. So the consequences of the limited, he's coaches and telling teams We just can't afford anymore and their moms and dads are furious. No it's GonNa be very painful. And Athletic Departments Are Really important all of our schools and. And you know if you lose half your budget because of this pandemic call covid nineteen. Oh i. tell you what it is. It is GONNA be so devastating Paul I hate to think about it because you know once that college football season half the budget for most of these half-baked departments. It's gone into the night. Actually, we feel. Let me go back. Something I I know you've answered it and I don't mean to be repetitive, but. Okay, but we talked to people and you've. You've addressed one or two of the interviews and. I'm struggling because there's such a disconnect I'm talking to people every day. I had commissioner on from another conference earlier and they're optimistic. Glass half full and all this, and then you're. You're not even. You're not even taking a breath and just saying there's not going to be college football. The same thing you seven months ago and I'm I'm trying to figure out you know. If what you say is true. Why are they saying with? They're saying. Well. I suppose you could call wishful thinking. I'm a quintessential. I'd be doing the same thing Paul was. president or Director today. So I I, would all the I mean I'd be doing exactly what you're saying. They're saying. If you're not sure you don't think they really believe it. Well I. Don't think they've really looked at it. Seriously I don't think I think. Really. Underestimating is enemy called Cova nineteen. It's everywhere in in some cases in America is on the uptick, and it's had an increase that you know a lot of places are. Kind of dangerous to go. But you know I see. Here's the deal this covert nineteen. Let's say here. We have sixty five universities. In, hundreds of athletes and coaches that wanted to do a perfect job and start the season on September fifth and go through twelve games, and so forth in the problem is. They're not in control. This is an enemy. That's everywhere. Kind of little communist, running all over the place from China. And so they could just wake up one day and find out that three hundred fifty students at Kansas state have developed covid nineteen.

Paul Olympic Spring Sports Football President Trump Stanford Kansas State University Of Minnesota Dr John Ncwa Minnesota PAC Minneapolis Tribune Kansas China Ross Cova Limited Commissioner America
"dr john" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

Cross Examined Official Podcast

07:50 min | 2 months ago

"dr john" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

"My guest is Dr John Lennox from Oxford University author of many wonderful books, and by the way on a lot of video on his youtube channel or his website John Lennox Dot Org. He's also been on. Video recently with Justin Brierley's unbelievable. Some of that video you can see on our website. Our facebook page cross examined Dot Org, and if you do a search on Youtube for Dr John Lennox you'll find many wonderful presentations that he's done debates, he said with people like Christopher Hitchens and Richard Dawkins and Lawrence, Krauss and many others today. We're talking about a I artificial intelligence. And his new book twenty, eighty four, and by the way John I thought I heard. You say that it was actually a debate opponent Peter Atkins that gave you that title. Is that true? It is absolutely true that we were going to debate on opposite sides of the God question. We discussed what we were writing. When I told him what I was writing, he said I've got a great title for you. I have used it the knowledge of the book. Yes. Yes, it's a great title twenty four, for those of you that have no about nineteen eighty-four, which is about where we are in America anyway here maybe the K. as well. We're big. Government is everywhere in fact John a part of a I is government or just their surveillance state, which you write in the Book Twenty Eighty Four. That's already happening in China, isn't it? Well! It's happening everywhere. The whole question here is the AI. Systems are facial recognition technologies, and you can say a plus side to those police could recognize terrorists or criminals in a crowd, and so on, but the problem is that they're make these surveillance technologies, which are neither coming very advanced can be used to control an entire population, and it would appear that that's happening and sing young and China among the the weaker. and. They are being monitored to such an extent it's it's practically unbelievable and as a result if you step out of line. Deviate from the norms that are set by the state. You Find Yourself in a reeducation camp. And losing your culture, maybe even your language as well and there was a chilling Article Time magazine about this that I refer to the book. And the Chinese writers said at the end that the West needs to look because all the technologies that are being used and China are available in the West. The only difference is they haven't yet. All been brought under the control of a totalitarian central government, but they're all there, and it was very interesting to me that the very next day after reading this I, heard a senior police officer in our country. Saying that's exactly what we need. So this creates vast ethical problems. There are similar surveillance problems which may not always be video although they may who knows? Arising from our smartphones, because they are trackers, and here we are millions of us, if not billions wearing these things voluntarily and giving a vast amount of information, which becomes they I database, and you will know this. If you buy a book on Amazon few days later, you may get a pup saying people that that book will buy this book. But what we don't realize is that there's out what? Ju- ball. WHO's an expert from mit called surveillance capitalism? All the extra information that these things are harvesting. They may be listening to what you say the May. Even be watching you all your purchases, your habits, the people you meet, and so on this information is being sold on without your permission. This is a very serious infringement of individual rights and privacy and so. Even the narrow AI systems. If I put I'm talking at the moment that work that actually worked nive. They're not futuristic. They're working. Even though it was the book nine, thousand, nine, hundred and four, the predicted them big brother is watching you and we need to think about the ethics and frank the problem is that technology. Expands and develops far more rapidly than ethical considerations Do, and that's why a number of people serious people are worried by the direction of this is taking. Even some atheists are worried about it as certainly alerts, the ethical considerations are not confined to any group. Although you do write in the book that there are many atheists behind. What are their goals John? I hear I, read you talking about. Some of them think they can abolished debt. That debt is just a technical problem. That's one of the things what are some other goals that they want to accomplish. Turning to the artificial general intelligence. What's called the Trans Humanist Program. And the big name and writing about this is not a technology person a toll. He's a historian. Yuval Harambee from Israel and he's written two bestselling books. sapiens Homo deals and sappy ends is essentially a by the past. And Homo Deos its name means the God man or the man who is God is talking about they trans humanist project. What is project well as you say firstly? Harari believes death is not simply a technical problem, and we get very soon of technical solution. which will mean that allow, you can die. You won't have to die, so that's the first thing. The second what he calls Agenda Item for the twenty first century, is to enhance human happiness by bio-genetic engineering by drugs by implants and moving up towards making God's out of human spelt with a small G.. He says we passed the animal stage. Now we got minds, and we can take the future into our hands, and that could involve of course germline engineering where a group of scientists would alter the basic genetic program of all generations to come, and that concerns me greatly C.. S. Lewis sort in the nineteen forties, the danger of that and he made the chilling point that I've ever that happened what? The beings that will exist not be human. They will be artifacts created by a bunch of scientists. There for he says that the final triumph of science will be the abolition of man, and that's where I think it's very important that the Christian voices heard as to what humans really are made in the image of Gulbuddin John Date as atheists and many of them are atheists as you mentioned, although not all of them..

Dr John Lennox China Book Twenty Eighty Youtube Justin Brierley Peter Atkins facebook Oxford University Christopher Hitchens Dot Org AI mit Trans Humanist Program America officer Richard Dawkins Article Time magazine Yuval Harambee S. Lewis
"dr john" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

Cross Examined Official Podcast

02:31 min | 2 months ago

"dr john" Discussed on Cross Examined Official Podcast

"Does truth exist because you have faith. Does that make this book? Does God exist so when someone says? There is no true if you apply the claim to itself what you say. Is that true. They, don't think Christianity Group. There talked out of it. You know why. Because they've never been talked into it. Cross examining skeptical and. View! Welcome to cross exempt with Dr Frank Turek. So many demon that is how Tesla CEO Elon Musk refer to artificial intelligence. Is he right about that well artificial intelligence since he is here and Moore's coming in fact. A? Tesla actually has artificial intelligence on it, but we'll artificial intelligence bring us utopia or dystopia. Should we be enthralled, or should we be afraid? What is artificial intelligence? How is it being used? And how will it be used if it continues with these machines ever become conscious we. We see it in the movies. Is that possible? Well our friend, the Great Dr John Lennox from Oxford University who's been on this program many times before one of our favorite guests has written a provocative new book on artificial intelligence and check out the title the title is. Eighty four. What does that make you think of Yeah Nineteen eighty-four well. This book is called Twenty Four. It's just off. The presses and John is my guest for the entire program today most you know who John Lennox is, he's debated Richard Dawkins. Several wonderful books including. Including Gunning for God and seven days at divide the world among many others in this new book is called Twenty Eighty. Four a John is coming to us from Oxford England still in lockdown, John. How are you today? I'm very well. Thank you, but as you say, we're still a Nocturne, how are you? I'm doing wonderful and yesterday I saw you on a livestream that we broadcast with. With Justin Brierley of unbelievable. That was a wonderful program. We talk a little bit about you took. A number of questions that broadcast is still on our facebook page and John. You've been doing a lot of interviews lately. How many have you done in the past few months? Over one hundred. Amazing..

Dr John Lennox Elon Musk Dr Frank Turek Tesla facebook Oxford University Justin Brierley Christianity Group CEO John Oxford England Richard Dawkins Moore
The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

Short Wave

13:31 min | 2 months ago

The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

"At the beginning of an epidemic, it's essential to discover the source of the disease. For scientists who do that work, it's extremely challenging and without risk to their own health. But the scientists who played an essential role in discovering bulla way back in nineteen, seventy six doesn't always get the credit he deserves in today's episode. We explore the history of a bowl and the consequences of scientific exploitation. It's part of our week of episodes here on the show celebrating and recognizing the contributions of black scientists enjoy. You're listening to shortwave. From NPR. Safai here with none other than NPR East Africa correspondent Ater, Peralta Hey there ater. Hey, Mattie, thank you so much for talking to us all the way from Kenya. I know there's like an eight hour time difference. I am thrilled. But I want to open with a quick question. Who discovered Ebola and do not Google it. First of all. How dare you asked me a question? I should definitely know the answer to, and don't and yeah I already, Google Bet. Came up was. A Belgian microbiologist, but I think you're about to tell me. There's more to this there. Absolutely, there always is right so. Cheated. What you probably saw is a bunch of white westerners like. Dr John Jack. Yembeh does not yeah. He was not one of the people that came up. Yes, so, he's Congolese doctor and today he's doing really important work heading up the response to the current Ebola outbreak in Congo, but back in nineteen, seventy six, we embed. First doctor to. COLLECT ANY BOLA sample. His crucial role in discovering Bolla is often just a footnote, a lot of the history of people. Has Been Written? Without your name. Yes but. You know this Yes it. Did Not quite. Today on the show correcting the record on a Bola, the story of Dr, John Jack Mugabe and what he's doing now to ensure African scientists are part of writing it's. To some in the medical community, it's a controversial move. Okay Ater, so we're talking about a Congolese Dr John, Shaq. And his role in discovering a bola. When do we begin? So when I sat down with him at his office in Kinshasa. He said we should start in. Hundred seventy three. We had just gotten his PhD microbiology at the Riga Institute in Belgium, and he could have stayed in Europe, but he decided to come back to Congo, but when I arrive via. The condition of work were not I had no lab have no. Mice for experimentation, so it was very difficult to work here. Yeah, it's tough to do lab work without a lab, you know. Without a library to instead he took a job as a field epidemiologist and just a couple of years later in Nineteen seventy-six. was sent from Kinshasa the capital of Congo to the village of Yambuku to investigate a mysterious outbreak. it's the first recorded outbreak of Ebola, but no one knew that at the time they thought maybe it was typhoid or yellow fever, and he goes to this local hospital, and he says he finds it completely empty. Why was nobody there? Local residents thought the hospital was the source of the infection and people had died there. But in the morning when they heard Giambi was sent from the capital, the thought he had medicine till they started to come back to the hospital, and we started seeing patients. So so, what's he seeing? When the patients come in, he was seeing. People who were very weak fever? They had headaches I started to to make the physical time. But at that time will have no gloves. And, of course he had to draw blood, but when I removed. They're the sit inch. Both continue to spread out. What I am to see these phenomenal. And also my fingers or with a bow. Wow. Yeah, so he says he he would wash his hands a lot, but really he says it was just luck that he didn't catchable. Yeah, definitely I mean. That's amazing that he's in there and there's no gloves and there's patients and they don't really know what's going on, and he was able to not get it in at this point. We MP he was startled. But then three nurses died that night and a Belgian nun who was working in the village, also got sick with fever. All the nuns had been vaccinated against typhoid and yellow fever. So at this point me MBA was like. Oh, it's probably not those things. Yeah! I mean in the severity to the deaths with this outbreak. He started to realize that this was something different, so he. He convinced one none took back to Kinshasa with him. So what happens next? She died at a hospital a couple of days later, but he took blood samples, and he sent them to Belgium for testing and the guy on the other end that was Peter Piot. Who at the time was with the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium, the guy who turned up from Google search. Yeah. That's right, and so he and other scientists start working to identify the culprit. The CDC in the US gets involved and the realize. This is a new virus that caused hemorragic. Call it Ebola. They name it after a river by the village where it was discovered. So, what you saw out in the field, the blood samples guide all of this plays a crucial role in the history of right. It was huge, but it's PR who gets the bulk of the credit for discovering all up and you can tell this bothers John Jock membe. If you don't recognize the work done in the field, I, it is not correct. it is a team. You know it is a team. Pr Actually wrote a memoir no time to lose and he does mention. But just in passing as a bright scientist, whose constantly pestering him for more resources. Has talked about this well. Peter Pyatt, facetime video, so I got on the phone. He's now the director of the prestigious London, School of Hygiene and tropical medicine and I asked him if he felt at all responsible for writing. Out of his history of Ebola I think that's a comment, but my book less not an attempt to write than that's history of Boll and sold more. My personal experience is more biographies that sense. Was this kind of like an awkward conversation to have ater. Yeah I mean especially because he's Belgian and Belgium was the colonial power in Congo. Ultimately, he looks at it with a little bit of distant. That at the time African scientists they were simply excluded and white scientists parachuted in they took samples, wrote papers that were published in the West and they took all the credit he so he actually said he did. In that actually surprised me and I think. Part of the reason. I feel that he so comfortable. Talking about this is because he's in an academic setting. I think in universities across the world. Students are talking about privilege, so he seems like he is very comfortable having this conversation right now. I mean there's there's something very weird kind of about that coming from him right as a person who has admitted to taking part in exploitative science, absolutely and one of the good things is that he says that things are changing. We mbappe for example has received several international awards just recently for pioneering. The first effective treatment for Ebola reflects our stinky you. Say the politicians in global health in science, General. So okay. I want to ask you about the treatment in a minute, but to put it very bluntly. Have there actually been any concrete steps to try to change this power dynamic in the global health field? Because this is certainly not one of you know two stories. This is one of many many stories. There is I mean look. NBA has made a decision that many thought unthinkable leaving just a few years ago, he decided that all of the blood samples collected during this most recent Ebola. Epidemic will stay in Congo, so if anyone wants to study this outbreak, they will have to come to his institute. I bet that has ruffled some feathers though. I have I've heard from some American scientists. Who have privately expressed frustrations in the are really the ones who have led the way in studying Ebola, but peanut understands that decision when you think about how African scientists have been historically treated, and he says that Western scientists should just get over it. We have to wake up key things one. The world is changing too much endless Nah it's so weird to hear him say a matter of fairness, ater matter of fairness. Okay, so before we move on, tell me about the treatment that Mugabe worked on. So this is the thing that makes him smile right. We embiid calls it the most important achievement of his life, and it goes back to one thousand, nine, hundred, five during another equal outbreak in Congo. Eighty one percent of people infected with Ebola in this village were dying, and he wondered if antibodies developed bipolar survivors could be siphoned from their blood and used to treat new cases, so he gave sick patients transfusions of blood from a bowl of survivors. Too He injected Ebola patients with the blood of survivors. It vision. And seven survive, he says the medical establishment brought him off because he didn't have a control group. That's what they told him. But if this idea was accepted by scientists. We see a lot of life. Okay I mean to be fair. That is a really small group with no control among some other stuff. But on the other hand, it doesn't mean that he was wrong. You know that it should be totally dismissed, and maybe if more scientists looked into, it collaborated with him, maybe tried to replicate that data in some way, they could have learned something with him right because we now know that he was in fact correct about the antibodies. Yeah, I mean that's right in the context is important because I think what really eat set him. Is that maybe lots and lots of people could have been saved during the West. West Africa outbreak, which happened from two thousand, thirteen to two, thousand sixteen, and look just this year that science became the foundation of what is now proven to be the first effective treatment against the Bulla that is saving seventy percent of the people who are treated with amazing. Is He getting credit for that? At this point, he is yeah, absolutely okay, so how does look back on all of this week? What's what's his view on this is so he's he seventy seven, so he's obviously thinking about his legacy. One of the things that he told me is that he's always dreamed that big science could come out of Congo, and partly because of him, that's more likely happen. He got a commitment from Japan to build a state of the art research facility in Kinshasa and in the lab, just a few feet from his office where we talked US scientists were using advanced machines to sequence DNA of the Bulla samples that have to stay here in Congo Okay so moon bay, doctor and scientists who started in the Congo with no lab has a lab and is soon getting an even better one to do his work. Yeah, exactly, yeah, now I have my share. In. So I have my I have. A good subculture will bring joy. But he also has vice rate with micro biologist without Nice, I, asked myself that every day. And, so you know what he says, his biggest legacy won't be that. He helped to discovery or cure for it. It'll be if another young Congolese. Scientist finds himself with an interesting blood sample. He'll be able to investigate it

Ebola Congo Kinshasa Scientist Google Belgium John Jack Mugabe Fever Epidemic NPR Typhoid United States Dr John Jack Ater Kenya Mattie Dr John Africa Peralta
Scientists urge WHO to acknowledge virus can spread in air

WBBM Morning News

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Scientists urge WHO to acknowledge virus can spread in air

"Spreads. This is CBS News Medical correspondent Dr John Researchers around the world say the evidence shows the new Corona virus is likely airborne when we cost needs, talk or sing larger airborne droplets containing virus can travel usually up to about six feet. But smaller particles called aerosols can go farther and linger longer. In some circumstances. Those aerosols, Khun travel more than 30 feet more than the six feet recommended for social distancing and open ladders, supported by 239 scientists urges the World Health Organization and other public health groups to amend their guidelines to reflect the airborne risk. Of the disease, Another scorcher on tap today and for those wanting to

World Health Organization Dr John Researchers CBS
Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:03 min | 2 months ago

Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

"Today we. We have with US Dr Chandi John He is the Ryan White Professor of Pediatrics and the Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases in global health at Indiana University School of Medicine I should note that this episode was recorded before the pandemic started since then. Dr John's Infectious Disease Expertise helped lay the foundation for to covert related studies tactic, which is looking at how many. People in Indiana Wade. Actually be infected and discover which is looking at how immunity responses occur. After people are infected, we should also note that his research about sickle cell anemia, African children was recently published in the New England, Journal of Medicine and people might want to check that out as well Chandy. Welcome, thank you so you're the Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics. Who Is Ryan White? And what does he have to do? With Indiana Ryan White is in Indiana. Indiana heroes everyone in Indiana and the United States should know about him. Ryan White was really the first child in the United States, who was publicly known to have issued in make a secret and the reason he got into the news was because we lived. They didn't want him attending school with all the kids and he insisted on going to school. This is a very brave individual and kind of push this where a lot of. Of other people just kind of shrunk into themselves and bring it up because it's one of those things where it's like I remember I did live in Indiana at the time, but I remember it being in the news for people old enough. It was a huge huge deal I mean because up until that point. It felt like it was a pretty stigmatized disease were many people were blamed, but he seemed to be the face. If I'm remembering correctly. Correctly like the first quit I'm putting in quotes. Nobody else can see my equity. You're like innocent. Where we sort of public in this child at a big deal that everybody was so public about it. Yeah, it was a huge deal is very brave of him because he got a lot of discrimination and hate mail, and the rest of it, or you know hateful comments right to his face where he lived but he refused to sort. Back away from that and also I. Think very importantly. He also refused to be the quote unquote innocent face of it. He said that everybody who has HIV is say they should be respected. However, it was easier for the public to handle that than maybe to handle gay men who they thought of as other or or something he really did in the United States help to give face HIV that many people could relate to more And I'm the Ryan White Professor, of Pediatrics, and I always mentioned this because our whole division was supported. By an endowment for the Indiana University, Dance Marathon, and that endowment and the Indiana University dance, marathon itself were started by Ryan White's best friend from High Yeah To Stewart I believe her name was, and so she started at more than twenty five years ago and to start, it was started in honor of him, so he was supposed to start at you that fall and died before he could start the started, and she organized a dance marathons, and they've evolved this massive huge. Yeah, and if your local Indiana's a big deal with your kids and these guys are amazing, high school kids in college, kids and they raise funds for Hospital for children, but for the first many years they raised it just for our division, and so that was amazing. It's funny because I knew I knew there is money for Riley but I didn't know it was for that purpose and I. It's funny. One of those I knew Ryan White was, but when I moved here I was like. Why do they have the professorship year? Like didn't know He. INDIANA. No, it's it's amazing, and so now the funds from the Indiana. Brisy dance marathon go to the whole department of beating. US For the first twenty years it was to raise his endowment, and so when people ask me who this rich donor was, who gave the endowment that allowed us to create this amazing or build this amazing division It was It's the college kids, and and I should also very important dimension. The connection there is that writes. Doctor was Marty climate. Who is the? The founder of our division, so that was when they wanted a way to honor Ryan White and and support the things that were important to him. The sought out Dr Climate. He said supporting research in this areas is critical, and that's what they did. Well, that's great and not just completely veer directions, but you know the time what we wanted to talk about. About. Today is global health. So I like to always start by talking to you like. How did you decide? This is the area that what you wanted to be in in studying not just infectious diseases, but how they the impact, the world, not just even the United States. How'd you get here? Yeah, so there are many answers that question, but the beginning always starts with. With my parents so My parents are from India. They came here to do their residency I. always mention because this is a fact that. When they came here, they were paid to come here, so there was a doctor shortage. So when people are talking about all these terrible foreign medical grads and stuff boy. The US has relied on those foreign medical grads and. Show all the time. Yeah, it's it's a big deal and they've added a lot to the country. research wise clinical is an in every aspect of so. They came here for their residencies, and then they went back to India to work at a mission hospital

Ryan White Indiana United States Ryan White Professor Of Pediat Indiana University School Of M Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics Ryan White Professor Dr Chandi John He Indiana University Dr John Journal Of Medicine Director Of The Division Of In New England India Riley Marty Founder Stewart
"dr john" Discussed on LadyGang

LadyGang

05:58 min | 3 months ago

"dr john" Discussed on LadyGang

"It's not it's a fact that the just be more transmission, so we know that viruses do better. In the winter up attention because people are closer are indoors more closely, they also it's because of the dryness of the temperature. It allows for more effective disease transmission, so it's not actually it's going to be worth suggests more people might be infected. You're of this concept herd immunity. This is this idea that you need a certain amount of the population of been infected or vaccinated for virus release Peter Out. We're not anywhere near that you know maybe in the most product place like New, York City, or at twenty percent of the population in fact did. Most other parts of the country are blow ten percent. We don't know what percent is necessary, is it? Twenty is sixty percent of the population quite sure by given that so many more people being infected we, we have a long way to go, and that's. That's the issue I have a question about that, so there's been so much conflicting evidence with a dramatic people and how contagious they are or. Like if they have the antibodies, are they protected against catching the disease I mean I've seen on the coronavirus subrata every single morning, and there's it's everything just everywhere so in your opinion. Are Isn't matic people contagious and. It's. Yeah I. Get that, so that's a huge question. I. Think part of the issue. What made virus really tough to control? Is that so much of the transmission happens when you're a dramatic and that's how easily spread around the world, so you get the virus, you're infectious. You can spread it to other people, but you don't know and that's the that moment is. What creates so much problem because you're roaming around? That's why mask-wearing with so encouraged. You may not even know you're infected. So put on a mask and protect others. Others would protect you. So that's a big part of the equation is this is a dramatic transmission, and it could be upwards of thirty or more percent of people getting infected from asymmetric people. And then this issue of immunity. If you've got infected once, can you get infected the second time right now? The data suggests that you get some level of immunity. Now it. There's different experiments that are going on to understand. How long are unity might last for? This irises it six months a year a more. That will also make it complicated because if you think about if you're immune forbid and then you become sort of a vulnerable again that makes us virus, even more capable of spreading efficiently, and this is another big area of research teams. Right because you know how like every year there's a new flu. Yeah, like what? If every year we got a new corona virus actually have already several coronavirus. Cold cold season is proud of viruses. We have at least a freight circulating in the population. And yet, but this issue that like the changing to a certain degree, but also populations become more susceptible over time, and so it's the same thing here. We're GONNA have this new virus. The likely be with us for a long time. It's just a question of how how much immunity we can get format acted, or how on the backseat does his with the flu vaccine? It's not a perfect vaccine, right? It only works. You know some small percentage of time you know we're trying to hopefully be better with chronic coronavirus. The last thing before we go into like some of our specifics are You know obviously you've you've seen and been around these protests around the country and people are wearing their mass, but what are the ramifications of going to protests and being around these large groups of people at a time when we are I guess we're still supposed to be social distancing right i. mean clearly it's. It's a complicated time, but you know the way that we see it is that we have to public health crises better essentially operating the exact same time. Social injustice that exists it needs to be dealt with in the protests are absolutely critical to that, so there's real clearly there are researchers and thinking about the impact in what will will see increasing cases, but it at the end of the day. These are important events that needs to take place, so we hope that you know people are in. See the images, many people are taking this is social distancing aspect incredibly seriously, and so it should have of you don't we're going to have to understand how these things are linked? Unfortunately, these public health crises were actually already linked to begin with because we knew that that crow virus hits the African American community much harder, and so you know, there's all these health inequities that are already built into virus. He published a study. Study a few weeks ago, that showed the lack of of equity in access to testing, so is advantage populations, not having the same access to testing. So this was already baked in to the issues that people are protesting, so we just have to support the people as they do what they need to do, and how you know how we structurally changed the system That's you know unfortunately know. We're dealing with these two issues Semel, Tena. So. You want to protest you. Go you wear your mask. Bring a hand sanitizer. You shower when you get home. Wash clothes, etcetera. Well I have a question about that, too. I guess I can kind of move into our specific questions so. There's a lot of research thought it spreads less in outdoor settings than indoor settings, so the protests. Even if there is a lot of people in a smaller space, it is outside. So why is what are your thoughts like? If you're going to have a social situation with somebody outside versus inside and the safety of that, let me pause you for one second. Let's take a break and when we come back, we're going to get into this. This so just in case you've been living under a rock. We've been talking about. cowdrey, a bunch on this podcast and we are obsessed with this brand. cordray is a consciously crafted home and body care brand that combines thoughtful ingredients with delectable sense, making.

flu flu vaccine Peter Out York City Semel Tena
"dr john" Discussed on LadyGang

LadyGang

06:03 min | 3 months ago

"dr john" Discussed on LadyGang

"Different motivations on me in the economic motivation is clear merely incredibly painful. On lockdown for so long, and so it's understandable that people are ready to be done with it. But Yeah I mean I think that these days. How cases. Are you merge right so things quickly see if some basic roping like restaurants and and some relax social distancing the. He's. Slowly reopening, going back to this new normal guess. What do you? What's your take on the vaccine? Well Listen I. Mean Vaccines Take Years and years to develop. And the reason is you have to do all the right testing. You have to understand efficacy. We know how much pushback there is on vaccines general right Iran and EUBANKS movement out there people have a lot of distrust over Pharma, the government. You can't get this wrong and given that and all the safety guards need to be put in place. It takes time in as much as you want to speed up the process you know, so. I think you can't count on a vaccine right now is a wade to serve. Get Out of this. And then there's reports that you know that coronas is changing over time at like as more people get it. Our bodies learned to fight it, and it becomes less. You know I'm listen. I'm the one who didn't even apply for college I. Don't really know how to say this, but. What do you know what I'm talking about? Yeah, so looking viruses mutate. They mutate obviously over time to escape. You know they're the response of the host. It's the it's a common concept. We have not seen any real evidence. say that it shifted. There's a lot of people that sale looks different. Than it did in China. Has Different impacts across the world there are, it is changing over time. That change allows us to actually look at the. Clock of how spread around the world, so those mutations are helpful to understand the virus, but at the same time. There's no evidence that it's mutated to be something totally different I. Think Right. You know so far this at. Ask us who are pregnant or planning on getting pregnant. If they should stop if they should wait to see what's going on in the world before you know moving forward with any of that obviously if they're pregnant too late, but Right now you know so far. There's no evidence to suggest any real risk to pregnant women to to two babies and. All the evidence right now shows that kids do much better with infection than adults. There's different reasons for that some people think it's because they're mute. System isn't fully formed, so it's a little bit more flexible to a new virus. Some may say they get actually a lot of cold, so they had generally build up immunity to this virus. It's still they're still research on that you've probably heard in the news or some small subset of kids have had this complication immune reaction than sliver. That's in point one percentage point one percent of kids who got so I think that generally people shouldn't stop. Trying to get pregnant they we should worry about kids as important vectors of disease like it's kids are infected will bring that home in infect parents and grandparents, and that's where the real risk is so like just like flu season. Kids are a big part of how by spreads. Polls their little ABC Aspen vastly. We love, and they're so cute cute, but yes, they are part of. How epidemic spread but less sort of born as for the high risk of mortality I have a question about that, too so my mom, a teacher at a school. She's sixty four years old and so there's a lot of you know talk going on how to safely reopen schools. She teaches at a high school and I mean I. Never knew your mom was a teacher. Till right now. The job developer she helps kids, underprivileged kids get jobs anyways, but so I'm kind of worried for that situation, because you can barely trust adults to put on a mask and social distance. What are your thoughts about opening up schools and what? That might look like safely, right? We're in talks with our. Schools about trying to advise like what to do, you start to like create smaller groups to to eliminate recess the eliminate water stations, and all these things you, it's hard. There's no doubt being able to enforce these things, and as you mentioned, it's not necessarily about the risk to the kids themselves, but the staff the teachers of the schools that are potentially in high risk. Categories ager underlying chronic conditions. They're the ones that we have to be really careful about. They're the ones that are Redskins, so if you put harass people with people that are essentially assess fools that can lead to some some you know. And that's what the the big question is. And that's why there's this risk of schools opening in the fall, but then quickly shutting back down again. Do you think what the second wave? That's what we'll see in your expertise. Do you think we'll all try to go back to normal? And then we'll have a big breakout and have to be home again. It's hard to know for sure, but I it's. It's definitely reasonable chance that's going to happen hard the other issues that we're gonNA have a flu season on top of coronavirus. Oh, these things are going to be totally lined up at the same time, so you're gonNA. Have this sort of double whammy situation. So I think it's GonNa be. It's GonNa be hard. Pressed for schools. Keep Open if if the case is a really skyrocketing, which unfortunately if you look at past pandemics, the second can actually be worse than the first wave. Great thanks for coming on. Any July to me right now. We're very delegates. As the worst it gets worse. Do you think worse means more? It's home, Aegis or worse as in the symptoms for the person that gets it. It's not about worse symptoms. It's not it's a fact that the just be more transmission, so we know that viruses do better. In the winter up attention because people are closer are.

flu Redskins Iran Aegis job developer China epidemic
"dr john" Discussed on LadyGang

LadyGang

04:26 min | 3 months ago

"dr john" Discussed on LadyGang

"Now back to the Lady Gang. Our guest today. Maybe one of the most intelligent people we've ever had on lady gang and I say that because he's looking at zoom right now of one college graduate and blow one college dropout and one person who never even applied to college as a trained epidemiologist I practice out one hundred times last night. He's also known as a disease detective from Yale University. He is focused on infectious diseases like corona, virus, malaria and HIV advising the world health. Health Organization Homeland Security and the White House now I may only be the doctor of Tiktok, but our guest today and I actually have six degrees of separation. His sister is Jessica Who's now married Jessica Maruni he's she's married to Ben Mulroney and I. Know Ben Because he's a host on e talk and we spent a lot of time together. Press junkets Ben is also the son of the former prime minister of Canada Brian Mulroney and I am Canadian. Didn't they science into that? Did you break? We'll went. Back to John Minute when the heavy hitters oppressed like the New York Times Wall Street Journal needs someone away, and they go straight to him. Please welcome to the lady and a man that has somehow found the time to take a break from teaching at Harvard and practicing at the Children's Hospital Boston. Teach all of us more about Corona, and why? We haven't been together in months. Welcome to the Lady, Gang Dr John Brownstein. Thanks. John! A so first of all I didn't even know this was a job until yesterday. Well what do you do? Yeah, so the epidemiologists is now a job title that people know about I spent the last twenty years doing something that people barely could even pronounce but you know it was sort of this deviation from going the traditional medical school route where you could think about the health instead of an individual in taking care of a person you can think about the health of. Of a whole population, what can you do to understand risk? What can you do to prevent disease? What findings can you pull together? That ultimately can change the course of health for everyone, so for instance studying a vaccine because vaccine can save millions of lives or understanding the efficacy of treatment or changing our lifestyles around food and exercise. Those things are all those findings that you see on the news. News all done by epidemiologists. What what did you want to be when you were growing up? While it was likely that just the traditional path of a doctor then spent some time in Africa recognize how there's this combination of the environmental animals and an intersection between like our world in our health, and got really interested in infectious disease, because recognized that like all these diseases in animal populations quickly. Quickly jumped from a host animal host into a human population like we had with coronavirus like we have with the Bulla, Zeka, and all these diseases they they sit there in animal populations on the jump into a human, and then they spread, and I got very interested in that, and then recognize that was a whole field of epidemiology that you could. You could get into and study these diseases. I guess my question. Is You just brought up a good point? You study so many different diseases, and it seems like the media obviously coronas what we're talking about, but Zeke is still exists right because there was a whole time on lady gang. and Andy Bella we were deciding if we were going to go anywhere on a trip and get pregnant and. Zeka and so these things don't ever go away. Really Right? We're constantly dealing with new. Current infectious diseases that we deal with clearly there there are many there are many in parts of the world that we don't experience directly as much like malaria and dengue issue, clearly still a threat. And yet so these things keep popping up and will deal with these kind of emerging diseases over time now. Just coronavirus had one of the biggest impact that we've seen. Ever, because of the way that it it sort of moves, repopulation can talk about that, but yeah, this is just one of many things that were concerned about. So one of the things that I read. When we all started sort of social distancing and staying home was hey, if at the end of this, we feel like we overreacted, and we've done the right thing I've been on my. We've all been in our houses, not seeing anyone Lady Gang, you know. We cancelled a tour like a lot of things. you know we? We stayed home whatever? And now we're like. Wait the barbecue place around the corner opening.

Corona Ben Mulroney Lady Gang malaria Jessica Maruni John Minute Zeka Ben Yale University Brian Mulroney Health Organization Homeland S Dr John Brownstein New York Times Wall Street Jou Harvard Africa prime minister HIV White House Zeke
"dr john" Discussed on Breaking the Underdog Curse

Breaking the Underdog Curse

11:53 min | 5 months ago

"dr john" Discussed on Breaking the Underdog Curse

"Starving you get a shame but if you get the prey and the Predator together in a perfect balance you max well. When you have cash reserves you have long term vision you have patients that you educate and you basically reschedule them accordingly. Then you're more objective. You're less fearful of losing some Dan Lewis infatuated with gaining something. And so as a result of that. You're able to basically senator yourself. So the wise thing to do is to learn how to find an extract. Guinea out of the finding the meaning is finding me between the polarity. So you ask yourself okay. So I'm having bills come in power those bills serving me. How can I be using them? Join Communicate with these people and say right now. The cash flow And I'll be paying these increments along the way and manage it on. The boy did manage it. Be Honest and manage it prioritize. What you're doing in your practice trim the fat off make sure you're doing the most efficient and effective highest priority actions. You can't make sure you're targeting prioritizing your patients this is a great time right now if you're not able to be in the office to clean up the office. Organize the office streamlining things so anything. That's not priority and be thinking and memorizing every patient's name that you've never served it memorized because if they're in your mind they becoming your patience if you're outta sight outta mind be focusing on that when it comes you learned to make sure that you save a portion of it and stick it into savings into taxes and manage your money wisely in the future. So you're not in this situation or your cash for that. People are cash for not valuing what they're doing and not doing things and are not value in themselves or really and so what it does it forces them to learn how to master their lives and empower the areas of their life. Right now so by prioritizing what you're doing and find it upside store it you think is down and the downsides the fantasy about how you wish it would be because you compare your current reality to Athena say. How are we going to lead to depression? Anger but understanding what is an finding out how whatever's going on right now. I use to my greatest advantage. I think it's Bill Gates. Basically asked a simple question. What can I do today with the resource? I have to serve the greatest number of people in the most effective and efficient way that inspires me. That's what you do. There's a lot of opportunities right now to go online and to communicate with all the patients care about him. Think about indicate with them Tim. We'll reschedule at this time. Here's what you can do at home while we're waiting. Keep engage with your patients and care. Your job is carrying professional. And then be thinking of what I can do to make sure that when when they come back at the office. My Office is streamline its cream. It's efficient. It's ready for the greatest growth the practice. I would memorize every patient's name because I guarantee if you memorize all the patient's names you to how many of those people show back when you're back on and then you'll make up for this so-called setback. You'll see it as a slingshot effect of opportunity. Now that's awesome and I think too busy life for me for example for twenty one years. You'd busy I start to lose patients names. I know their face northern welcome but I don't know their names so that's an amazing thing that I'm actually going to go back some pretty bad in the eighties. I used to go to a lot of carpet officers. You know sometimes four five week in thousands of we did the old file and I'm sure they most everybody on this call will have done the foul dead where you actually take an divvy up. Osage twenty patients that are enacted that have not been in it six months and have everybody in the Office. Contemplates seek and read their files and about them and thinking about what they would do their primary solicitations their primary reason for coming in their parents their children their spouses names with a do and just devour the information about their lives and think about sir. We found out that twenty percent of those people showed up in the office than a week. That was a consistent number that repeatedly doctor that was in Chicago. We asked him to consult with them. And I came into the night before and I I said coming to you see on a daily basis. You said this amount I said I want to show you something and I said right. Now I'm GonNa take a piece of paper and you're gonNa tell me the names of all your patients and the second you pause for more than two to three seconds. I'm GONNA stop you and you're GONNA rattle off. Every name of every patient can think of until we have a pause and he goes okay and he said he started. Railing often chipper We've got a pause right at sixty eight patient and let me guess volume. These are the basics that we always got to come back to you. Forget about the guy told him. I said here's your first exercise before you to get the office tomorrow. Wants you to go to your get your files and I want you to memorize minimum two hundred fifty dollars patients. I want you to think about everyone of knowledge to memorize wants to be thinking about is if they're out of your mind they're out of your office and before we finish that day in his office he got forty patients which more than paid for my service. We had you in our office twice back in the day remember those little masterminds. We had to those things actually is funny because you'd be talking and then Bradley my wife would be elbowing me all the time and you said Joe Worry Brandy. You'll pay me a lot of money to do the same thing you are telling him. Because he's famous a spouse is a consult right exactly now. I just wanted to talk a little bit about the self-worth thing again. This is the biggest thing when he said when I asked you before. What's the biggest challenge you think isn't our profession and you said it was Enough money not just wondering Listeners that link between saving money and helping improving self worth and how it goes well anytime you know. Einstein said it beautifully. If your cat compare yourself to pitch you're gonNA beat yourself up Swimming if your fish comparing yourself to chat expected to climb you're not gonna you're GonNa beat yourself up if your car pector comparing yourself to. Mattis beat yourself up Liz your carpet honoring your own profession and honoring yourself as a master here. You'RE GONNA DO GREAT. But the second be comparisons to other people and expect ourselves to be somebody were not we soft appreciate an self? Depreciation is a natural feedback. Making this delicious. No we're not pursuing. We're not being true to our own highest values which meaningful to us. So you gotTa Know Yourself. You didn't know what we really highest values are. You need to live by priority. Now I did a very interesting exercise many years ago. And did it back when I was twenty seven twenty eight so it's been a few years ago. I'm almost sixty six now. So what's interesting is. I made a list of everything I do in my practice today and then I made a list of everything. What does it produce per hour that I made a list of? How much meeting does it have made a list of coverage would cost to delegate data entirely delegate at all costs onto salary but oh costs than what is the actual time spent on it and then what is the final prioritization and I went through prioritize and I found out that the highest priority thing that I do as a car factor surprisingly was going out and speaking and leveraging by message out in people if I did it break the stock for instance to sixty people get five be patients in cases averages three thousand dollars fifteen thousand dollars an hour? Talk the second thing. I've found that I can do is adjusted and that adjusting as the number one thing if you're not out speaking ensuring message live with leverage with speaking professional speakers while the greatest leveraging then you need to be adjusting and working at least one one and inspiring every one of those patients refer and then the third thing was actually doing the initial consultations and follow consultations with him. As you do this. So you're keeping communication and dialogue. Was your patient now. Everything else is important. But they're lower in priority and can be delegates and a car park to this. Not Delegating Lower. Party is going to devalue their jobs and they're gonNA lower their income and then they're gonNA place all higher probably playing small in the community of professionals because not honoring their own magnificent empowering and Seltzer delegation anytime. You're doing lower party things you deny anytime. You're doing the highest anything so getting out in speaking adjusting subway station locating adjusting suburb. Say should and keeping in communication directing guiding and teaching the patients. Those are the top three everything else needs to be knowing and is good that it took me a while to figure that out but once I did it freed me up and my practice grew faster when I delegate and I also found out that when I started to save for twenty seven years old I started two hundred dollars a month but amid a commitment to raise it every quarter some three hundred thousand five hundred fifty projects with us our dogs a month. Where would that be? Didn't stop at one thousand one hundred one thousand to ten one south three forty four. I kept increasing ten percent. Every quarter as result of it became two thousand and four thousand eight and sixteen thirty to sixty four thousand hundred. Twenty eight thousand a month and every time. I increased by savings in valued by self evaluate. What I was doing and pushing place to stabilize my business I attracted more business. More opportunities more leverage more lead and the people around me treated me as treating 'cause value myself and my profession because until you value you don't expect world to until you pay yourself. I don't expect your patients and until you actually accumulate cushion. A stability don't expect to have anything but volatility and so the lesson of Economics and self worth stabilizing getting into the executive center getting the priority. All these things work together in making sure your best in yourself and pay yourself and don't spend that money on Frivolous Party sang's appreciate value that are consumables at depreciate but to buy assets because if we do that and we build up a cushion in the profession and then we grow more people are going to want to be in the profession or people are. GonNa win referred to the profession. And we're going to end up having the cash to be able to compete in the professions. Because if not any air of our lives as a chiropractor that are not empowered other organizations overpower again. I've done this with you. Thanks to you but if you generally didn't have savings as one of your top values which I didn't and I learned how to do because you just tell listeners. Like if they're in this pointer came themselves Saint Man. I should have listened. I should've saved like what kind of thing can they do at home to help to kind of up either? Get that higher up on the valley links stuff to that value. So you'll be well there's a number of things you can do but the first thing I would do immediately immediately is to get you or me to come there to their business and get a financial institution I use shrubs. Mind THE FINANCIAL INSTITUTION TO HAVE IT. Automated out of your account. So you don't even know it's doing it's just going to say that's the first thing we do automate that day because it's not how much you save. It's a habit of doing it. You want to develop the habit of it. And he's the automated and Emotions destroy wealth but automation objectives strategies. Builder so what they do there. They would sit down and take everything that you've ever felt ashamed about or guilty about your life to write them down and write down. Whatever you did you feel shamed guilty about. How did it serve yourself? And the people involved and come aware of what you'd unconscious up to liberate yourself from unnecessary shame guilt which causes itself depreciation and causes. Now Trista giving away of services and not valuing yourself then I would start making a list of the benefits of building a chiropractor practice every greater numbers of people and write down the benefits of doing that the actual procedures and actual actions of building the practice. If you don't have a value on those actions have proven test trying to build it. You're not going to do the right of because every decision you may just based on what you believe the greatest advantage or disadvantage at any moment in time so if you have a higher value on doing things and benefits doing things.

Guinea Dan Lewis senator Bill Gates depression Athena Chicago Swimming Trista Einstein Joe Worry Brandy Bradley Seltzer Mattis executive Liz
"dr john" Discussed on Breaking the Underdog Curse

Breaking the Underdog Curse

08:46 min | 5 months ago

"dr john" Discussed on Breaking the Underdog Curse

"And when we have the way our brain is set up. We have a an executive center in the prefrontal CORTEX. Atone of central that is designed for his fired vision strategic planning executing plans self-governance in a higher degree of objectively. We also have an amid lab L. BELOW. Which is trying to avoid predators seek prey avoid pain and seek pleasure which is impulsive towards pleasure. Instinctual away for pain. And this one is trying to get a one-sided fantasy and trying to Buddhism it said the desire that which is unavailable fantasy czar toward that which is unbelievable. Nightmare is a sore successor so we must have objectively. There's absolutely no reason a chiropractor has to have this split. I'm speaking in MINNEAP. No Mississippi many years ago thirty seven years ago and I had Jimmy Greg and catalytic Jimmy. Greg was head of the is. She can't ludicrous. The on both sides of me at a conference and I was thinking in the middle and ironic. Isn't it that legend I? I was transcendental to their imminent thinkings. And I was trying to say that. There's no reason why you can't have belts. There's no reason why you can't objectively documents the impact you're doing but at the same time be inspired by a vision and be enthused and fervent in the expression of something you know is true and it's ahead of time so there's no reason why you can't have both those. I'm a firm believer in. I feel I do so in my practice when I would make an adjustment. I would also measure the impact. It was having and keep objective data on that impact and show repeatedly than I was making changes and range of motion changes in posture changing in pain threshold changing in physiology. I was keeping records that and documenting that so I can demonstrate that in a carpenter that doesn't have a kidney and there will not be able to govern the patient because they'll be subjectively letting the patient run them with reactions. Now they feel and they're letting your bigalow run nets. You must have objective data to do that. Now that's not subordinating to medicine. That's foolish it's just being smart in the sense of being objective of the data's you can guide the patient wisely by the data but at the same time you need to be inspired by the principles because scientists shooting now if you look very carefully just a few years ago they did send tastic research showing that nerve reflexes help the immune system and they're now creating a neuro immunology where they're actually stimulating nerve reflexes to maximize immune function J-. Well the very things that they're doing it's a new discovery as exactly what we've been saying practical law. Except we know that he has electrical effects and the positions and tensions and compressions Vertebra because of muscle contractions are impeding or accentuating these impulses and slowing and speeding of downing causing abnormal impulses in Gaza physiological psychological impact. It's not rocket science common sense and the only reason why I wouldn't use science to help them is because they don't understand it. 'cause applied sciences applied physiology and applied. Morality does nothing but support what we do. The evidence is overwhelming that direction. So there's no reason why there has to be a conflict conflict just because you're living in a subjective by survival mentality and you're trying to focus on just getting pain and only pleasure which is kind of this mixture model or you're sitting there going. I don't want to have to go through and be accountable. I just want to be a religious person. Both of those by themselves only split themselves. Great polarities subjective bias. Disempower divide the profession. Wisdom is integrating the two being inspired by omission having principles that you follow understanding succession does interfere with life. It's definitely documental and understand that if you just the subway stations and you do it with presence and you do it with certainty your loving what you're doing and you're grateful for doing it and you're actually present with it you. Amazingly are more efficient in the expression of your science objectively. And then you can document what you do. And the ones that do documented are the ones that love telling people about it. L. Any patients tell people about it and grow the practice absolutely is trying to get integrated down and again. That's what we really trying to teach with. All of our people is just really having objective measures. Because then you're almost like a cheerleader. Show always different things because people have oral memory is they don't notice those little changes like. Azure PHYSIOLOGY BREAKDOWN. You don't notice changes becomes barger and then as it's improving. They don't notice the rate so with that. I think that's really cool. Spilt attention to that. Will we used to have patients? We would save instead of asking. How do you feel today which is basically leading to a big little run there things they could be volatile they could have made love on a trapeze? Four those what they did. You can't based on that. You have to be able to basin on range of motion and based on tension and tightness muscular strengths weaknesses. You need to have some sort of objective measurement systems to guide the patient. Imagine this I use this analogy. It's an old analogy. And it may be a little bit outdated. Because I'm been around longer if you went into the dentist and you're laying it share and the dentist said how you're kind of like a doc. I came here to find out. I didn't care I don't know and think about how ridiculous it is. Your leading the chaos run the order instead the order on the cash the reason why people are having disorder it because they're not living by highest priorities are not filling your day with high party things not delegating Lower Parties Saints. Not Living with an inspired mission. They're living to eat steady eating till they're they're not living wisely. Your Job S. car factor in addition to adjusting so big stations as educate and inspire them unwise lifestyle choices and actions so they're less likely to have some education and if you guide them and direct them and use objective data you can change their lives and the more present. You are more certainly more inspired. You are about doing that. You will automatically have respect for people and they will not say. I'm feeling fine. I don't need to come in. They will say don. Let's see how I'm doing so I would tell the patient and they would come in. Let's see what your spine says? Today website your physiology reveals today and when I would tell them what it was reviewing objectively not asking them subjectively all the time. Because what you do is you just gave your power away to them in the sense of there chaos and you didn't guide them based on what your knowledge is. You're the one that's gone. For All years of Education to guide you want to have their power back by helping them live wisely. But you don't want to make them run. Your House is otherwise your office will be now. That's a good segue into this next part. Is that how this is all learn? If you went to the break through experience for chiropractors that are kind of like stress. Oh right now because like Closure office some people's had a Howard people can control the chaos in their own. Mind their will or districts is used stress distress distress has two forms and only reports the perception of loss of that which you seek and attached to that you infatuated with and the perception of gain about what you try to avoid which is also attachment. But you want to detach from it. But you're attached to. So alter stresses are either the perception of loss of that what you seek the perception of gain of that what you don't want the perception of bills you don't want the perception of income you want the attachment to one and the fear of gain of this and the fear of loss of this causes distress now. The more neutral. You are the less clearly polarized you are your perception arrest distress. That's called objectively. Jt means even mind your objective and you're even minded you know how to balance out your perspective and not be infatuated with one and resents the other seek and avoid is animal behaviour the objective center. The prefrontal CORTEX is objectively an objective. He knows that there's a two sides. Let me use an analogy an animal. The wild has two systems. It's dealing with a pray for food. And a Predator for being I it perceives pray as good and Predator is bad and only good and only back and no mid points. Then it's going to feel the loss of prey and it's going to gain Predator anxiety and it's GonNa live in survival boat but if it knows that if he gets pray without Predator it goes over each and becomes gluttonous becomes unfit and fat and slow and therefore predators targeted to eat it. If you get the Predator prey.

Jimmy Greg executive catalytic Jimmy Mississippi downing Lower Parties Saints Jt barger Howard
"dr john" Discussed on Breaking the Underdog Curse

Breaking the Underdog Curse

09:03 min | 5 months ago

"dr john" Discussed on Breaking the Underdog Curse

"Special honor as I bring on one of the biggest mentors that has had an impact on my life besides my wife. But this mentor. I met about two thousand five or jasmine for a breakthrough screens in Calgary and just happens to be the time that I met one of my best friends Dr Earnestly which we've had a previous podcast talking about all our learnings from dougherty Martini and I'm so proud to be able to bring him to you. Guys share we've referenced in Multiple Times stroke the almost two hundred thousand downloads. We've had so far on bypassed and so I just want you really Listen in because this is going to be amazing so welcome to marquee near the. Thank you for me. This is amazing so the first thing I wanna do I wanNA start off with some gratitude because I know you're always big into gratitude because that opens up your heart to things that I'm the most grateful for for you. The first thing is my wife. Because after that first breakthrough like I had this fantasy my brain everybody had to be on the same page in the family or bad. Do everything together line. And I didn't think you're allowed to have your own thoughts. And that was one of the biggest breakthroughs in my mind from that race through my wife was thank God. I don't have to so from that point on. We've developed into Beijing Relationship Inside. Iraq is all over the world and a lot of massive our marriage since this was really key principles at the Early up to help it back and then the second thing we just talk right before we went live was listen to some of your facebook page right now for the. Colby nineteen help you go through there. And you're saying you need to have savings and I wanNA thank you for that as well because I have destroyed six months of savings in cash and Suan we are forced is renowned. Canada will be forced to shut except for emergency cases. And I'm not stress like I don't mind using you'll I don't like using my I have it there so I just wanted to start off by. Just thank you so much for all cash for the crash chatter tub to by how their stone and this is the people who have Spanish. Their money wisely received more money right talking to those things later. But first of all make a Lotta heartless. We have a lot of students. Our students and young people practice and I just want you to. Maybe just tell them a little bit about your journey. Well when I was a teenager I was a long haired. Who'd be surfer and I nearly died. Seventeen tonight is led to a little evening class presented by Paul C Bragg and one one hour. This one man inspired me to do what I'm doing today which is built in teaching and healing and profession and I got an inspired to want to be involved in healing and I didn't believe that there was an excess of organs are deficiency of drugs in the world. I believe that there was a power that actually made this body could heal the body. I studied natural healing protests and found out about metro card practic Medicine all different fields and I wasn't sure which pass ago 'cause mentor that I got inspired by some natural cost but there wasn't a lot of natural pethick colleges and a lot of influence that had it seemed like kind of a second rate. If you will and one time I was getting ready to go surfing in the summertime. During an on the way to go to the surfing I ended up deciding to go instead to Peru and I got hijacked by Cuban hijacker and ended up in Peru. I ever served impetus mechanism and then I ended up meeting the governor of Peru and I stayed with him his son. It was a surfer and the governor told me to make sure we`ll. I'm here to go too much teaching. Just a fortress and so while I was on that trip I ended up going to a hitchhike all the way down towards chilly towards ought to keep a electric train ride into Cosco and then I hiked up too much agent and had a backpack with me and had a bunch of books with me and one of them was called the carpet story by Marcus Bach. If you've never read that book whoever's listening you might find that intriguing in trying to read. Now What's interesting? I read that book and I knew that I knew that I knew when I read that book. That was the philosophy that was the pathway so I got back into the states that tour for the surfing. I contacted the car to colleges and there happened to be one in Texas so I enrolled in that and I was allowed to enter into that and I knew that that was when I got there. I said this is a because it was not approaching it from a perspective that there was an extrinsic clause and extrinsic solution but it was an intrinsic. 'cause in your tragic solution and I was willing to give people their power instead of taking away if we blame a bug. We didn't take this potion out here. It's all external it's not honoring the magnificence of the hidden physiology the order of the body in a we would call it and Salafi this book outlined I think every carpet too could benefit. Reading is a habit updated for them. So that's what inspired me to be then went on Texas carpet college and I was introduced to a very lovely gentleman who had six. Phd's thirty five years old very bright guy and he introduced me to many many different things. In doctrine physiology reserve natural paths contractor. He was doctrine philosophy. Just theologians To God and I learned a great deal from studying. I knew when I got there. I was in the right place at the right time to meet the right people and I stayed everything I could about his Yala. Gee I I want to take down from the gross anatomy down just quantum and I literally would run that in my mind all the way down at till I did. I realize that the most magnificent structure found in the universe was the physical body and the brain and the nervous system. And that's the most intricate system. We found anywhere the universe and we're the specialist of that. We're we make an adjustment which means add change. We've dissenter just Balance and means the mind when we use the physical structure like an essential violin and Tunis and bring an adjustment and make it perfectly tuned. The power this made us body does bring healing to this body and we're not interfering with it. We're actually taking away. The Peden and allow the slowing conduction of impulses of the nerves to express themselves to the maximum capacity. And so I fell in love with the principals. And even though. I'm not practicing full-time today. It's the principles that inspired me. And still to this day every principles I use as I travel the world teach so. I'm a firm believer that we are gifted by the realization that we were called into the profession does not everybody resonated with that. Not Everybody had the majority of people conform to society. It's aboard mates external traditions and conventions mores and artificial hypocritical moralities and they just automatically assume that they're supposed to be extremely driven living dion to logically duty and conformity and in the shadows of people that they don't even question the authorities that are running our lives and many of the ideologies that read sacrifice are real. True potential with a stopping us from maximizing physiological psychological potential. And it's the chiropractor that helps people as a maverick and an innovator and a creative thinker in a square peg in around all at a misfit as jobs would say that has the courage to stand up and give people their power back and adjust the spines and subway station sub means less standard beneath luxuries. Light our intelligence in Asia means a condition of something less than fullest expression of life and intelligence the body and allows people to reclaim their within so they can stand out and make a difference instead of just conformance fit in and live in the shadows of others. They can allow stand on the shoulders of giants actors. Like the Jacob's ladder metal movie. The car fresher shot guides principle for potential in the universe of people. And we're gifted that way in the sense that we had the a yearning to follow our intuition and inspiration to be that Mavericks Pasadena less amazing I think right now in the profession and Exhaustible but but when you first started practice but in the profession and this is the thing is we're kind of politics leadership any candidate got this kind of fight between whitelist radic or ms cake radic and then the evidence based chiropractors. I know for us like you can't putting expectation on others. We don't have control over that. There's going to be pros and cons to everything was your take on this union. Yang because the chiropractors who believe and do what you just talked about basing like they feel like they have to get all the other actors who are more team based to come along so well I've been involved in you know for forever and this is not just our profession. It has this even the medical profession. Their SYS- division going.

Peru Calgary dougherty Martini Iraq Beijing Texas giants Cosco Suan Tunis Colby Paul C Bragg Texas carpet college Canada metro Pasadena Phd Peden
"dr john" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

06:11 min | 5 months ago

"dr john" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"Many is a Ren disley difficult situation loss of job future uncertainty health issues and they go on and on and on into the future. So we're all in one sense in this together but not everybody is experiencing the same way. I'm locked down as an elderly person. I'm not suffering from covet. Nineteen they smelt of the moment and I have to bear in mind all the time that some of the people reading my book may be reading in a hospital bed and my heart goes out to them as it also goes out to the courageous medics and nurses folks. That are treating these people and you know. Here's another thing that's important. Why do we have hospitals and hospices whether they're actually if you trace the back starkly a Christian legacy in the ancient world during one of the early plagues? The emperor was amazed that Christians didn't just care for their own people. They took risks with their knives on. They cared for Non Christian people and that is a wonderful legacy and we shouldn't be ashamed of mentioning that provided we do in the same breath as we recognize the wonderful work. That's being done with. People of all faiths are numb. It's just amazing. Higher that sense of humanity and solidarity is coming. My hope would be preserved long after this is over. I do too. I mean it has been one of the great stories the technological innovation into the very personal care and and and Dr Lennox. I really believe that this is one of those ways that Christians can continue to run into the plague. I mean the good news is there are hospitals today. So we're not dealing with it in the same way that the plague was dealt with so a lot of Christians are thinking what can I do and the moment I read through your book whereas Got Corona Virus World? I thought this is a way that Christians conserve because they can get this book and they can send it to their friends into their family into their skeptical neighbors. They can actually make this available as a way to share their faith and I just saw a study. Dr Lennox love to hear your comment on this. That that early indications are people are more open right now to talking about spiritual things you know at anytime that this sort of thing has been recorded. I think it was a Barna studied. Would you be surprised to find that? That's true not a toll because it is the fact that during times of great national stress and Calamity World War. Two for example for many of the churches were packed with people now. They're empty because we have to keep social distancing but I suspect that they understand spiritual things is growing. I've done a number of interviews in the past couple of weeks like this one and the number of hits just seems to soar up day by day so it shows that people are open are looking for answers and I hope that will long continue my guest today on the breakpoint podcast. It's been Dr John Lennox. Who has done? I think Christians and the larger culture a tremendous favor and providing this book in Record Time. Land speed record whereas God and a corona virus world and in and in this book. Let me just quote. What he writes. A Christian is not so much a person who has solved the problem of pain suffering in the corona virus but one who has come to love and trust God who has himself suffered. It's a tremendous book. That says what we can say about this sort of thing. It doesn't say what we can't say and acknowledges that but it's a tremendous resource spoke to strengthen your faith as well as to share your faith with others come to breakpoint Dot Org. That's breakpoint dot. Org and we'll tell you how to pick up a copy of this book and Dr Lennox. Could you also just tell folks where they can find you on the Internet yes? I've got my own website and I'm always delighted to be talking to people at the United States because I got so many wonderful friends and over the past decade given the many lectures debates dialogues interviews in your premier universities and colleges and you can find many of those. I'm very task dot. Org I have my own website. John Lennox Stopped O. R. J. AND THE TWAIN THE TURF. You can watch some of the debates and so on and The tone of how Dr Lennox Debates Some of the grumpiest atheists that we've had in our lifetime has with a terrific loving response which are also find in this book again the title whereas gone in Corona Virus World special thanks to Dr Lennox and the Good Book Company for making this available so quickly Dr Lennox. It's great to hear your voice and great to see your face here via zoom and just really grateful that God strengthened and empowered you to make this book available and thanks for joining us on the break point podcast..

"dr john" Discussed on Made For This with Jennie Allen

Made For This with Jennie Allen

03:03 min | 6 months ago

"dr john" Discussed on Made For This with Jennie Allen

"Would navigate. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> do you <Speech_Male> hear me hear <Speech_Male> what I'm trying to say <Speech_Male> here. I'm <Speech_Male> trying to say <Speech_Male> in you asking <Speech_Male> the right question. <Speech_Male> Yeah you <Speech_Male> ask this for your <Speech_Male> audience and <Speech_Male> what we want <Speech_Male> them to do <Speech_Male> is to become <Speech_Male> engaged <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and they gotta being <Speech_Male> gauged <Speech_Music_Male> around <Speech_Male> the felt need <Speech_Male> of a prison <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> they engage <Speech_Male> you. Otherwise <Speech_Male> it's Super <Speech_Male> Fisher is <Speech_Male> make believe <Silence> is toy <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but if you <Silence> get to know people <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> now you can relate <Speech_Male> to that paying <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> if you're a Christian <Speech_Male> own your job <Speech_Male> and if you <Speech_Male> have shown some <Speech_Male> concern <Speech_Male> and if you've been praying <Speech_Male> followed through <Speech_Male> people you'll fan <Speech_Male> and when <Speech_Male> they get <Speech_Male> in trouble <Speech_Male> they'll you to pray <Speech_Male> fall its <Speech_Music_Male> star. <Speech_Music_Male> Were the <Speech_Male> people <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> and start <Speech_Male> letting US <Speech_Male> touch on <Silence> each other. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> why do the work <Speech_Male> around touching <Speech_Male> people <Speech_Male> and that's why people <Speech_Male> get on our knees <Speech_Male> lack. The hormone <Speech_Male> had been <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> sued for Seventeen <Speech_Male> Years <Speech_Male> With Ping. <Speech_Male> She puts <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> in Jesus has passionate <Silence> went out of me <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> or <Speech_Male> is she <Speech_Female> cool touch me <Speech_Female> yes <Speech_Male> you <Silence> so. I think <Speech_Music_Male> people <Speech_Male> are looking. <Speech_Male> I think we will <Speech_Male> find some methods. <Speech_Male> Don't <Speech_Male> go around looking <Speech_Male> for method. <Speech_Male> Go around <Speech_Male> looking for <SpeakerChange> people <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> could. 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It was <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> such an honor to have <Music> you here. <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> God I just thank <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you so much <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for this great man. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I thank <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you for how you preserved <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> his mind <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in his heart through <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> such <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> injustice <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to still be a person <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of reconciliation. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I thank you for <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> his wife in their marriage <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of sixty eight <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> plus years. 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"dr john" Discussed on Made For This with Jennie Allen

Made For This with Jennie Allen

05:33 min | 6 months ago

"dr john" Discussed on Made For This with Jennie Allen

"Is anger and many kids. Don't have to connor religious background that we have. Now they are looking on that cell phone and they Inflammation Fhimah judges and from Your Talk Phil. That's got our family that in my community. Eighty percent of the tower is being raised without a father in. Oh Lord have mercy. That's the percents that these kids are more subjective dipoto prison and if kids that are the highest go to prison is one who has a family in prison. Olarte WE NEED HELP. We need each other. Dr Perkins Talk. About when everything changed for you and when you wanted to fight for justice and you knew this was going to be part of your life. Well when I got out of the service I got merica. Viewer may two year in one and came out we started I found. I love the little cheering song. Did prompt me. Jesus when my three year old son went to good news love and came home saying Jesus loved the children. All the children of the were Reyat Browning yellow black and white. They all oppression in his eye. That was in California. I don't think we could've song that song in Mississippi because at that time a national guard and troop which trying to get some little black kid in Little Rock Arkansas into the school when my son came home saying no song being taught by white women and Black Women together in our neighborhood. I said if there's a guy who not I was hearing descended long ago Anton into the war. The death of me. I WanNa know that saying. That's all you got to say because God is calling a all. We HAVE TO LISTEN. And so your connection to salvation and justice were simultaneous. It was gonNA turn as running. No the motivation suggests says is God loves us so much he each other just as well as people from our Social Jessa Cullinan Desta and all that affects of it. That's the way it enters our society in terms of touching us but zest. This is long gone so loved. The He created his humanity. He loves US humanity. It's unlike the parish and I belong to them alive and I give unto them early and they never Perry. This way of US cut not jeff's had become injustice within our society justice is knowing this Levin and redeeming God who came in the person of Jesus Christ and neither is their salvation. You talking about to be say to be secured and go to heaven when you got salvation. You'll secure you secure you entertain and no one could pull you OUGHTA follows. I feel that way but I feel santona rally. I feel seeing as colored me all the time and I think the more you love God to more conscious Chan he would come and so I feel him more and more. I'm finishing my series of books. It I'M GONNA call my manifesto and this has to do with the virtual in pain and suffering. I think that is joy and Laddis. We're GONNA use the premise in writing it. Quite James said. Count it all joy when you fall into suffering and paying and we bought into religion disable the guy to be healthy wealthy and why we ought to be debt as much as we can be that but it's not only given that we should believe on Jesus but we should love him so Mike Live. We Love our children. Were to suffer for the eight engages Anymore suspect in in to the pain of our society of our children and the pain of each other come unto me take my yoke upon you learn of me I am. I'm long. Oh Lord to thank God in loan it out in you. You'RE AT A. We got a wonderful Levin.

US Levin Jessa Cullinan Desta Reyat Browning Anton Dr Perkins Little Rock Arkansas Chan Mike Live Mississippi California Perry Laddis James jeff
"dr john" Discussed on PD Stories

PD Stories

02:00 min | 7 months ago

"dr john" Discussed on PD Stories

"Between you and that officer sharing the street. That's where the rubber meets the road shop there. I would have been an advocate and they probably would have yelled at me a lot but I think it would be important. Just bring this sport No one ever did absolutely John. You've written several books about the statistics of mental health and police officers. What made you want to publish and pursue this work I or portent for scientists to my mom like all. The cases are very scientifically based and that that really written in lay terms. And the reason I did that is to encourage researchers to develop this whole idea about the health and quest for more you know to get more. Research galling give an impetus to be where it's your research and in doing so lighten the field and and maybe they things better for officers out there will. Your work is definitely saving the lives of police officers and helping their families as well. So Professor John Volonte thank you so much for being on this show on PD stories. Thank you for your service as New York State trooper for three years in. May you continue with your work? Continue to make life better law enforcement officers across the country and around the world. Thank you for joining us. Today on. Pd stories if you enjoyed today's show. Please subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. So you never miss an episode and like us on FACEBOOK DOT COM slash p. Stories for more information you can also catch me on a unease live. Pd every Friday and Saturday night at nine PM. Eastern PB stories was created and executive produced by sue. Phone WITH PRODUCER. Julie mcgruder our editors Steve delegator special. Thanks to McKay me Linh Keesa Cassidy Linda and the teams at eighty networks. And podcast one for making this show possible until next time. I'm Tom Moore's junior..

officer Linh Keesa Cassidy Linda Professor John Volonte FACEBOOK Tom Moore Julie mcgruder Steve delegator New York executive PRODUCER
"dr john" Discussed on Anxiety Slayer

Anxiety Slayer

01:54 min | 7 months ago

"dr john" Discussed on Anxiety Slayer

"Experiences <Speech_Male> just messaging <Speech_Male> signature program <Speech_Male> done at <Speech_Male> sixty four countries <Speech_Male> one thousand nine hundred times. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I've yet to see <Speech_Male> anybody that can't <Speech_Male> dissolve their anxiety. <Speech_Female> One <Speech_Female> Thousand and Ninety <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Times <Speech_Male> one thousand nine <Speech_Male> hundred <Speech_Male> sixty four countries <Speech_Male> in forty two <Speech_Male> hundred forty three times <Speech_Male> a year for <SpeakerChange> the last thirty <Speech_Male> one years. <Speech_Female> I gotTa tell <Speech_Male> you like <Speech_Female> when we were talking about <Speech_Female> before we started. <Speech_Female> The interview is this. Where <Speech_Female> does this man get <Speech_Female> his energy? The now <Speech_Female> having <Speech_Female> listened <SpeakerChange> to you and learning <Speech_Female> a little bit more this <Speech_Female> is you are <Speech_Female> just you <Speech_Female> are on. <Speech_Female> You are turned on <Speech_Female> by what it <Speech_Female> is. You're learning teaching <Speech_Female> growing doing <Speech_Female> travelling. And <Speech_Male> that's <SpeakerChange> what you're <Speech_Male> doing. Well <Speech_Male> when you what your <Speech_Male> infinite energies <Speech_Male> infant once you recognize <Speech_Male> a source and there's no <Speech_Male> lack <Speech_Male> of energy in human <Speech_Male> beings except when <Speech_Male> they drain themselves <Speech_Male> by doing low-priority <Speech_Male> stuff right <Speech_Male> now if you if <Speech_Male> you know vitality <Speech_Male> life as <Speech_Male> a proportion of the vividness <Speech_Male> of your vision and <Speech_Male> the thing clouds the vision <Speech_Male> is all the inject <Speech_Male> values of others. <Speech_Male> Make you uncertain about <Speech_Male> your direction in life. <Speech_Male> We're not here <Speech_Male> to compare <SpeakerChange> ourselves to <Speech_Male> others. We'RE HERE TO COMPARE DAILY <Speech_Male> ACCESS. Our <Speech_Male> own highest values. <Speech_Male> Do that amazing <Speech_Male> things start to happen <Speech_Male> that way? We don't live in the <Speech_Male> shadows. Anyone <SpeakerChange> we stand <Silence> on the shoulders of giants <Speech_Female> right <Silence> <Advertisement> on. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> Oh deep <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> bow to you. Dr <Speech_Female> John <Speech_Female> De Martini. <Speech_Female> I am so grateful. <Speech_Female> We got to have this <Silence> conversation today. <Silence> <Speech_Male> Well thank <Speech_Male> you for having <SpeakerChange> me on your show <Speech_Music_Female>

"dr john" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

13:26 min | 1 year ago

"dr john" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Producer better known to his fans as Dr John died yesterday of a heart attack. He was seventy seven his best known songs include right place, wrong time and such a night. Is that just? We got view. On. How? Do you. Oh. Some bad of Lee. From that. As it is that. Curfews on. That. Mackowiak grew up in New Orleans came of age when the city was one of the country's rock and roll capitals in his teens..

Dr John Producer New Orleans Lee Mackowiak
"dr john" Discussed on True Crime Brewery

True Crime Brewery

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"dr john" Discussed on True Crime Brewery

"Of the blue on september twenty seventh two thousand seven kevin was called into the office by supervisor where he was handcuffed and read his miranda rights he was escorted out to a state police vehicle transferred to the indiana county jail fingerprinted photographed in the cell i had to wait for his preliminary hearing take place which would be within six weeks attorney general tom corbett held a press conference attended by law enforcement agencies in the area of indiana county in the local news media to announce the arrested trooper foley for the murder of dr john yelich and this seemingly came out of the blue and that's pretty rare for state trooper to be arrested for murder right that's crazy yeah so they had an eight hour hearing and in during this hearing it was founded there was enough evidence for the state of pennsylvania to hold trooper foley for the homicide of dr yellow nick the date for commonwealth for kevin james foley scheduled for july fifteenth two thousand eight and bail was not offering through the classification of the cases homicide so fully remained in the indiana jail until his trial this was just a few blocks away from where michelle in the children lived by the beginning of february two thousand eight kevin fully wanted out of jail and the bail issue came up again his attorney requested a bail hearing his mother gail brother james and his aunt showed up in court but only to hear judge martin tonight bail michelle was seen visiting him from time to time bringing their doctors son to see him in the spring of two thousand eight the defense requested a continuance admitting they needed more time together investigative evidence foley's hearing was moved to remember ninth two thousand eight after more defense motions to postpone the trial didn't actually began until march ninth two thousand nine and it lasted until march eighteenth let's talk a little bit about that the prosecutors opening statements focused on five points to explain why kevin was countable for the murder of dr john yelich first of all the dna under dr yo annex fingers match kevin foley second his outbursts of anger towards victim third video film footage plays foley's as uv passing two sheet stores located along the drive from the delmonte ice hockey rink where he'd been at practice the night of the murder into the morning of the thirteenth of april through blair's ville and route to susan drive in indiana for the knife that was the weapon of choice was used by the assailant although they didn't have the actual weapon did they know but just that it was a knife in that he was always playing with a knife i think fifth bloody shoeprint made by a six jail creed shoe which was worn by fully for years that brand and model and model now he ended with stating to the jury that kevin foley had the motive opportunity and ability to do the crime well foley's defense attorney really liked the phrase jumping to conclusion by the prosecution us that many times he said that kevin foley was innocent why because there was no trace of john yellen explode found in kevin felice suv the sheets video used to verify his suv racing through the streets of blair's ville was inconclusive due to the poor quality of the film his far as the dna found in tested he said that that was on reliable and to me of course that's the most damning evidence there is yeah yeah think we'll talk about that some more basically kevin foley was targeted by a supervisor because they didn't get along they said he also pointed out to the jury that there were at least three other persons of interest that the prosecution should have investigated but failed to and these individuals they said had financial ties to dr yellen ick early on the morning of thursday round two am according to the defence a neighbor across the street from yellen ix house heard a man's voice yelling out i will never loan you any money again any left the jury again with these three words jumping to conclusions so let's go over some of these witnesses okay so the first one will talk about is dr cyril wecht who was the.

kevin eight hour six weeks
"dr john" Discussed on True Crime Brewery

True Crime Brewery

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"dr john" Discussed on True Crime Brewery

"The life of john yellen iq a young friendly prominent dentist who was murdered in pennsylvania back in two thousand six was intertwined with the lives of his soon to be ex wife michelle and her live in boyfriend pennsylvania state trooper kevin foley all three of these people had specific personalities in beliefs which can be easily traced to their childhoods and their family relationships in our discussion of the murder of dr john yellen ick we will see how these three lives came together through seemingly random circumstances and culminated in a brutal homicide no one wins in murder we know that the violent loss of one life devastates many lives to comply lately understand this murder case will go back to where the story began john was brought up by a mother to give generously into ask for little in return even after he became financially successful he remained a kind humble man some would say that his marriage to michelle was a mistake from the start at the quiet end today we'll take a look at john's childhood michelle's beginnings and the background of her boyfriend kevin fully in the troopers target join us for the story of a ruthless murder with a psychological examination of the victim and his killer or killers and dick as always has brought us a local veer to go along with the story fun pennsylvania beer code sunday morning stout which doesn't mean yelling drink at sunday mornings but could be an appropriate time okay it's brewed by wire bacher brewing company in eastern pennsylvania before people jump on me it isn't a period stout so this guy is pitchblack no head it's got a nice roasted mall character some coffee in bourbon and the taste is very similar espresso bourbon little sweet chocolate thrown in there a hint of nila very nice now it's a twelve and a half percent oklahoma by volume so it's a beer to be sipped absolutely we won't chug it okay well in july let's open it up we'll head on down okay.

pennsylvania michelle kevin foley murder oklahoma dr john yellen dick