17 Burst results for "Dr John Medina"

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

03:04 min | 3 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"The inability to get extra sleep to be sedentary and the inability we didn't talk about sleep at all in others time for it but it unbelievable effect on the quality of life for virtually everything else who else so even though so that sounds pedestrian exercising and sleeping well is probably my third and final answer to your question beautiful dr john dina what fantastic interviews so much recovered so much knowledge here i think we're going to find people listening to this more than once in taking notes chris they can always get the transcript online but taking those has its own set of value for making learn things it's your does your right log on man longhand wanna do that can't read it but i heard you're saying sorry millennials exactly by the way my kids school requires that they learn how to write in longhand they focus on it because what it does to cross patterning in the brain and all that and there's said for that too what else if forces you to repeat it so you're setting up a recruiting repeat because you have to find motor structure that's why you learn it better that's something you can directly show it's your type if you happen on something you can't do that but if you have to do this micro litter you have to repeat it constantly and so the repetition schedules minimum on which is why it has to be law along that's what drives the learning that actually makes a lot of sense people can find your work in the brain rules books the most recent one was brain rules for aging well and you've got a couple of other ones there and at just from hearing this interview anyone who's thinking about like is there something i could do better there probably is and even studying for a very long time with an animators i which is fascinating awesome thank you for your time thank for being on the show dave you're a delight to talk to you for your time this podcast is inflammation pappas only statements and views expressed on this podcast not medical advice this podcast including dave aspirin the producers claimed responsibility for any possible adverse effects from the use of information contained here in opinions of.

dr john dina chris dave pappas aspirin
"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Know they're getting we're walking twenty kilometers day so this makes kind of sense you wanna get back to that the fifth thing to me is the most interesting one though this is the most magical because it has a it feels just like the movie cocoon have you ever seen the movie cocoon yes of course yeah okay so we're not gonna we're not gonna work with a donna meeting or ron howard we're gonna work with ellen langer ellen langer was the first woman to get tenure in the sector partment at harvard and she's alleged she's done a lot of really cool stuff she created have you ever heard of the counterclockwise experiment before finally was this i'm not oh let's get into it okay let's you could ask as she does a couple of different things based upon what she's going to do he's going to ask the question is there any power in the static exposure case so it turns out and their three reasons she went after what's called the counterclockwise experiment and need to briefly review those before i can talk about the wise so this takes a couple minutes already first of all when you she has noticed for a long time that there's a retrieval bias in elderly populations they can if you ask the question you gross domestic product over everything you remember you remember best both quantity of information and the temporal order in which they occurred best between everything that happened between the ages of fifteen and twenty nine that's what you remember when your life is over or when your life is seventy seventies eighties and if you've done more of your life than you're gonna have left okay so this retrieval bias so you remember things better number to win you start reminiscing particularly over the age of fifteen to twenty nine your social connected to scores go up just interesting there's very for this year monica wellbeing increases your risk suicide is going down you become less afraid of dying and here's the most interesting thing the more you expose yourself to your own astounded the greater tolerance you have for outsiders particularly with people that have perceived social differences and we think we even know the reason why here's the biggie when you become the style gic your dopaminergic system comes right online it's been declining for while when you're aging but but the i wanna call the highway to hell between the nucleus accumbens ventral mental area those those dopaminergic just comes online in all of dopamine is flooding through and on the basis of that she said what if i did this experiment what if i recreated a took a bunch of seventy year old and recreated the reminiscence bump i'm gonna have to rent out a monastery and i am going to turn it into nineteen fifty nine so they were not allowed so the court was coming she does it's going to be a pre post experiment so we're gonna measure cognitive ability and motor skills wide variety of things pre and then they're gonna take a bus to from cambridge in go west to this monastery it's not a monastery anymore you can rent it out but she prepped it to look like nineteen fiftynine all the closer television has president eisenhower's united states version of nineteen fifty nine on it you're going to have johnny unites of the baltimore colts there the minneapolis lakers not the los angeles link you're going to have news feeds and and and movies at night when you when when those people got into the monastery if they couldn't carry their suitcases up the stairs tough they had open the suitcases and bring the shirts up one of their concern omagh gonna be seventy eight years old for a solid week he exposes them to nineteen fifty nine ate the same foods same smells above and at the end found what i can only because magoo's bumps when i think about it is actually written about new york times couple of years ago and it's called counterclockwise experiment a what she showed us that hearing sensitivity began to improve and by the.

seventy eight years twenty kilometers seventy year
"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"When you are reading a book when i read william faulkner like i just finished reading light in august for the third time the light in august can put you into a world unlike any i have ever experienced in my life i am virtually transposed into so when you start to read you start to visualize the world that you're in and you start to see that the more you can visualize that virtually transpose yourself the better it is for the brain that's the cognitive secret soda and if you can do that with auditory books terrific if you need to have dead trees in front of you fine what it's not that's not the point the point is which you can't have dave is the image and i say this is a former professional animator yeah we'll have to generate the image you have to do the work you have to generate the image yourself even this format as a as a podcast that people are building pictures right now what you look like they could go to youtube and they can look at it but i stopped doing video on youtube because most people do five minute teasers or take out the very best bits but it takes a lot of work video and i think people get less from it i love the fact that there are still radio dramas out there because it forces you to virtually transpose i'm convinced it's one of the reasons why podcasts that have narrative read to them the one podcast that was i forget the name of it but you probably know it's it's was investigating a crime and it turns out the u woody about whether the guy did it or not i'm sure that the name will come to interact that one you when you read when you hear that you are virtually transposed into that entire relational thicket that they describe and it's just like reading a book that's the stuff that appears to keep your brain a buffered against the negative effects of alzheimer's and probably it camps down enough of the cortisol levels because you're not into it out into your own problems into somebody else's and that tends to lower people so that you're gonna change cardiovascular insults wow it makes there's a lot of z law his young nyerere inspire me i'm gonna have to write a fiction book now just to just to help people age less all right and you missed i will use your role model willful okay so that's the second thing the third thing you can do which i think is interesting in its own right is exposure to music but titular ends once again is in the period work at what as all the books that right the grunt factor flares his available and there's a lot of mythology about music for example the the relationship between music and mathematics mathematical competencies is is tenuous invest we don't really know we do know what music does to put your lung gemini and most importantly your executive function no kidding go right back to this when you get older your executive function tends to die off you know you start to things are breaking down and it's painful and you can't ignore those anymore so your impulse control is starting to descend to start centralize to your own problems that's maybe normal part of aging but if you if you play a musical instrument and this was done by people who had no knowledge of playing piano and have no knowledge of music theory and for four months they hit the carnegie mellon of carnegie hall or the take your pick of music that they had to learn they were gonna class and they were learning piano their executive function just soared their impulse control improve their cognitive control which is the heuristic of just to detail as well as the ability to attend to a particular stimulus all of those things improve so the third thing i suggest as you really because function impulse control that's a measure of stress management which is going to directly affect your heart which is directly how long you can live here yep learn to play an instrument you have never seen before is good for long jedi maybe better to say lifespan that's incredible fourth we talked about it so let's not belaboring but it's a robot exercise strength is good too but it's amazing how little you have to do to actually get a cognitive benefit elderly populations thirty minutes of moderate aerobic activity five times a week moderate being walking too fast to sing so it's like you.

william faulkner thirty minutes five minute four months
"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Sides but the rules those banks are inviolable at i can give you really good example where my son joshua this is josh noah groups story i had to go through all of these mixture okay josh is five noah is three i think at the time and they have great relationship but sometimes they could become they were they get into bill fights sometimes vilified with devolve rent so i heard this upstairs downstairs having bill fighting and it was getting pretty so i came down there almost immediately and i saw josh is getting out of control and so i i physically separated the two of them and josh bit my hand he got a major time out because i told him this rule and as a rule is in our household you are allowed to be angry quite frankly dave justice irving no you didn't deserve about he was not being nice to his into kid brother you are allowed to be angry you are not too expressive violently yes that's a rule in our household and that has never varied and that's what a florida parenting is interestingly enough you can add something that's also now called this is different research thread but it ends up being quite congruent something that's called inductive parenting whereby it's it's it's a parent's relationship to their own rules and here's that relationship their relationship is you have to explain yourself explain your rules for example and you can show this was done by measuring compliance rates if you if you just say don't touch the dog because the dog is there what's the compliance rate on a kid while sometimes it's a hundred percent but sometimes it's thirty right if you wanna double that you want to get it to sixty at have much more stable number just add a sentence after that don't touch the dog because the dog on i don't want your hand it to get her to get injured when you beginning splaine your rules that compliance rates go up and more importantly it gives around for negotiation because the other thing about a parenting dave is that even though the rules are set in titanium there regularly heated up and reformed the banks are regularly shifting because the kid grows they need the they required if it rose so if you have both extensive being very strong but keeping your eye out all the time that you may have to change it it's much easier to do if you are routinely explaining the rationale for rules and when that rationale no longer applies the rule can evaporate beautiful now let's fast forward we've talked about young adults talked about teenagers we've talked about kids babies prenatal what about those of us in the forty fifty sixty one hundred twenty kind of thing would we do for our brains yes there's a whole brain rules raging will of the list probably if the question is how to transit through the aging process well which would probably defied a future i would is going to be long jetty and the other one is going to be life expectancy because the research world or two very different yet so the amount of time you can spend on the planet where conditions ideal is the definition of on jevon that's what we think is the life expectancy sometimes go life span is the amount of time you can spend on the planet given the conditions are not ideal so that's gonna be one is you think about for seconds be primarily nature component and the other one is going to be a nurture component and the question is how stable are those what can you do to transit through whatever longevity you have we actually don't know the longevity number for humans now we're not sure how it is the we know that the find out i'm totally good with that well bro we'd like to already we've awarded nobel prize retailers that's as far as it's gotten well we'll get there i have a.

joshua josh noah hundred percent
"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Supper point with simon frazier and others because there's behavioral consequences to that that you can see the risk of pediatric anxiety depressive disorders is sky high from traumatized will and the ability to navigate your social environment and not feel stressed about it is pretty low you're going to be stressed a lot of your life in such fashion that you can when you get married you can actually have stressed marriage and that stressed marriage is going to do the same damn thing and put the cortisol back in the placenta so even though it's totally genetic there is an deleon and aaron's around it's simply that the cortisol gets passed from one generation to the next the pines of babies we are creating in south texas even as we speak they new york times uses the word horrific and i would call that a light active i agree and we saw this in world war two as well and you can see it echo down through the generations of seen it in my family i've seen is when people in europe and we know that this is what happens yet it still happens at there's been studies done in salvador remember during the civil war there was one of the interesting things about the german refugees now in in bavaria is that it's a perfect experimental paradigm because it actually has a stop date that you that you can no you have syria that was in a fairly stable social structure for period of time and then all of a sudden the barrel bombs start falling and they had to leave so the stress the ins inset of the stress can be known insect of the stress can be known immediately and if they survive you have trace record okay they went to turkey or they crossed the mediterranean renita les and then finally in in munich you can know every bit of those things you can do a fairly a robust set of behavioral work simply because the the environmental circumstances so well known is there something to be done there lot of people listening like oh this describes my family this is me this guy's my kids what is there to be done about this one as well just just a general thing so listen it's going god like i screwed up my kids or my parents screwed me up so that can turn on that guilt and shame wheel we just talked about but are there things that you can do as an adult either for yourself or for your kids so it doesn't keep happening absolutely there's a lot of hope here mostly because of the one of the great powers of the brain is the ability for it to rewire itself into adapted to actually at before reinvention so the in fact i usually say the brain is hardwired not to be hardwired if i were to give metaphor i would say it's not a classically trained cellist its charlie parker it can move it's still beautiful it's still extremely intelligent but man can't in adapting and i guess that would be the way to say and as a couple of ways you can show the patient so shall we go down one of these roads yes let's talk about that now we're gonna be talking no not valley stay with teenagers free young adults as well and then maybe in your twenties and you're starting to have kids there is a phenomenal statistic a statistical congruence that occurred number of years ago and i've had the great fortune have ringside seats at least one of this is the canonical work totally behavioral work she's a psychologist diana boun rhine who did her work in the mid sixties on what a good parent looks like and john gottmann who sensually did the same kind of work in the late nineties and they came up with the exact same findings and ice i remain my jobs still behavioral jobs still a dropping a little bit from what they came up with because they're such hope in what they came up with to our point here the diana bound and john where i able to show that all of parenting rises or falls on a single battlefield and like i say and has done her work at berkeley john did his work up in seattle but john's phd's in applied mathematics by the way so it's he's not as colleges and but he so he approaches it in a quantification grumpy bio engineers like actually really fire.

simon frazier
"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Right and when i was eighteen i would've said screw you dave i'm gonna go do it but understanding you like you're talking you're talking to john medina study this even more than i it's it's not a good idea and you'll have more power when you're older if you listen to that advice all right let's let's move up from the childhood development and the teenage actually i one more childhood question for you we're gonna move passing into the kind of young adult and then the aging brain hoops where i want to end up okay what is the role of early childhood trauma in what's going on in the brain well we're getting a master class in in the united states currently yes germany had it before with the syrian refugees certain relation were pregnant this'll be the great work of megan gunnery with megan's work at all she suppressing i've done a lot of work on trauma that's big part of it for years thing i do but you and arc wanna start looking up okay megan m g h a m and look particularly at her work she did with simon fraser she's at the university of minnesota humanos infringes work up side gracious work with this this'll be the stuff i know you've heard of that as the remaining orphans a work but she's don't actually much more than that and if we can start to get now into epa genetic land for a little bit would infer listening epa genetics signs of how the environment around you changes genetic expression in it's one of the reasons biohacking works as field exactly right the seminal finding here's the i can get emotional with this pretty quickly when settled for second because the data are so clear and the damage is so apparent we know in with stress systems in the brain you generally have one of two giant field offices to work with one of them is called the hba access i've eight steps for hypothalamus piece denser to terry hypothermic and the and the ace stands for adrenals the and the seminal hormone florida's cortisol there is another though stress response even give the people start they lead but they get stressed they lead with cortisol not everybody so some lead with the other big huge arm and that is the s a am sympathetic adrenal jewelry and it's big hormone is epinephrine except if you're in the uk which case you'll call it adrenaline right it's the still the same thing okay if cortisol is supposed to be high in the morning and low in the evening that's kind of its job it's job is to regulate the high and low but if you have a stressed womb the seminal finding is that court assault could leach into the placenta go into the developing brain probably the hypothetical so that stills that's where the the shadow still lies and you said in the womb this is pre natal trauma whatever to hear that that's standoff has been on the show talking this as well and like every like it matters like nice to pregnant women aren't keep going are better to say allow them the goldilocks stressed that they're supposed to have yeah a little bit of stress to spike it can develop normally what they're not supposed to do is be stone with barrel bombs more if the pregnant watch their eldest son be taken away from one for two years and never know if you're gonna get him back the kinds of stress catastrophic stress is beyond the goldilocks now you're switched over into epa genetic land because with sufficient concentration of cortisol skipping right into the placenta goes right into that baby's brain and rewires it stress responses such that when that baby is born that baby is now under a permanent state of alert and cortisol which is supposed to be high in the morning low in the evening is high in the morning it's high in the afternoon it's highly evening it's high all the time these kids are on permanent state of alert i was born that way i was born with a cord raptor my neck had the birth related trauma and i dealt with all that stuff it it is it is fixable but man it is a lot of work in the first thirty years my life i didn't know why was in that chronicler state because it feels normal so yeah i love what you're saying well megan gunners done a lot of the behavioral work to get to get the.

john medina thirty years two years
"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Was well known for while i think the first big name to publicly say i took my daffodil for eight years and it saved my meditation save my career i made me a better human being but i don't need it anymore because my brain just works like that all the time so that's extreme but there's a bunch of other cognitive enhancers like caffeine nicotine smart drugs nutrients what's what's your take on this well it's such a broad question that of nasty to specify all right i'm is there a role for nutro picks for either adults or even teenagers to make the brain worked better grow better live longer not necessarily doesn't evidence to suggest there are certain enhancements that occur in the shortterm we know very little about what happens twenty years later i was very true and given that the particular for teenagers the amount of developmental sequencing going on in the highways between prefrontal and are so delicate and for the most part so unknown and the little we do know suggest you can really screw it up psychotropic if you're not careful the the data are so limited that anything evidence based would not only be responsible it would be potentially hazardous and since in my career where it was like enter disorders my big thesis statement is do no harm i i got to say thank you for pointing that out i have been a religious about telling people because teenagers the longterm even young adults in your early twenties the long term consequences aren't there like don't go out there and start taking modafferi hill and all these other smarter because you're nineteen hundred school your brings not done cooking like let it finish before you start doing this and if you want to enhance your condo function do that at every age which is neutral big if you have a andro even slight decline you don't think as well you can do that you can eat really well you can aerobically decent you can meditate but don't like don't go hit the smart drugs it's not it's not for young adults it's for brains that are done and got but thank you for saying that in so many words because it's really important and that also i believe it goes even things like microdosing lsd or using i o osco and things like that those are not a young person's thing because your brain is still doing what it's supposed to do without them well usually use as the metaphor as best as best as when you when you smell it it is a trap door that will not spring for almost twenty five years but once it springs you're dead there's no cure for it there's no getting away from the lung damage that will happen it is very possible because the brain of so much more complicated than lunch structure that these very powerful drugs which were never built to be what the in the concentrations were giving them certainly and that's true with any any pharmaceutical comes out of natural plant the it was built to be within the plant itself and so you have to adjust fully but even that just for your actually ingesting entire ecosystem into your brain we know so little about it that dave it's just and there's some things we do get off your button go for a run is into say you're might o'connor it just is that focusing on that until the research is is a better developed i have no dog in this race i don't really care if it works as a scientist i long since quick carrying i believe i just would like to know what's out there but if i don't know what's out there because i only have one brain and most of them are not my nerves or not my topically activity more it's it does not behoove me given us how i have to make my living on my brain and most of the millennials will to dave they will actually have to there were since we so moved into an information economy you cannot afford to take a risk with it in a fashion that is responsible like i say if it worked terrific i wouldn't mind doing that at all i live in seattle you know we're going coffee go there might be some evidence for coffee and i just interviewed a a researcher from vanderbilt who wrote the first paper in nineteen eighty eight about using nicotine tobacco it just nicotine even alzheimer's and things like there's some evidence for those things but don't do that if you're eighteen it's just it's just not.

twenty five years twenty years eight years
"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"You should never read on any circumstances i agree with you there i'll take the lawsuit we didn't i didn't find the brand of it there but that's just an example for high carb sugary breakfast of any flavor whether it's a you know a pop tart or donut or fruit smoothie even where does come into this for for kids and teenagers here the literature is really sloppy i'll just be blunt not that i don't believe it in fact the only literature that i've seen and it had undergo statistical review about a year ago and it's the mediterranean diet talking about the but it had a root canal and a when they come back and they settle this down actually still had strong they have strong result but i use that as an example because i believe deeply in the importance of nutrition and fuel and whatnot it has received so little funding and confounding variables are so strong yet everybody's individual metabolic rate their their ability to grail directions and leptons those are all genetically controlled the guts got his big gigantic set a nerve down there that's constantly squawking various parts of the of the brain we know almost nothing about it on top of all that you've got a bunch of micro biota and bacteria viruses and even a few fungi they're sitting around throwing lots of different chemicals having to respond to the system and everybody's got a different micro bio because they actually eat different things than they didn't choose their parents wisely tell me that i can do good science in that house save you know we're just starting have you with other colleagues in seattle navene jane who's running volume you've added with him no not at all with it okay that that is one of the things gives me great hope for understanding what's going on because at least now we have a list of all the bacteria viruses fungi and phages going on in the got so maybe if you have the data you could start understanding behaviors but the links between those and the literally billions of potential pass between that and behavior i think is going to require a bit more compute power than we have now but we're going to get there in our lifetimes absolutely absolutely convinced you put you put your finger on the correct parts i think i love the approach of bio and other people that say okay i need a population census which is what they do and so what types of bacteria what types of normal floor are there what types of mag relates in so powerful that the ability to look at how that interacts with neurons is big old deal bacteria and usually bacteria walled off in the brain which where most people look at with the central nervous system but it's not like they're not trying to get in and there's lots of tasty fats stuff you can get but until we've got the population down and then start asking questions we're going to overlay that now with somebody's individual connectik profile because it's going to be different from one person to the next how how does this configuration this cluster of of normal flora interact with this genetic metabolic profile how does that create xyz none of those tables have been done yet they're in the process of being done but until they're done my best advice when i talked to people about this day as i say you know i'm fruits and vegetables kinda guy you're just gonna have to start doing that and if you're gonna have white meat you're gonna have meat make sure that it's chicken and if you're gonna have oil make sure there's a moment got us a pretty simple on the nutritional side white chicken versus grassfed beef or salmon well seven you might be able to make a strong argument depending on the collection of heavy metal isn't sockeye salmon for the low medals of course exactly right yeah stay away from tune in you're going to be happy i don't have anything i don't have to ask your question i don't have much to say in the period and until i do all i can do is give an opinion got it okay so it is necessarily research based but it's a there's definitely pros and cons for both of those i've certainly written all my opinions and all the resigning down on the nutritional front but i was i was like to talk to brain doctors and brain researchers about what do you do what what about cognitive enhancers i mean i i.

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"The same thing jerrell pollock chance jerry yeah we just built funded research in journals lab on water biochemistry yeah we read a sizable check there to help understand some what's going on for might okon drill works and i was guessing you must be colleagues because he's also bioengineering at the same school anyway my said hi i hope to win some the lad of book that he wrote a number of years ago beautiful okay so yeah he's the okay the but i'm saying this about the in fact it's called when i've now that had professional relationships with the number of organizations over the years they call it the m f the medina grump factor because because i work with psychiatric disorders dave i have to be a pretty good behaviors but i have to link that to a bunch of cells so i have to do some imaging but my base are the molecules i am a dna jock and so the ability to speak those three dialects brand science if you don't mind those up on a row you know it's not like i live in my standard ev with the behavior expect to isolate a little snippet of dna not gonna happen so the growth factor has to be fairly strong and a available and i'm gonna use the word mindfulness when immediately run to migrate factor because meditation and if you look through that literature it's actually some of it is excellent some of it is a sloppy so sloppy that it looks like it was done with an undergraduate without any view yeah and there's even booking there's a book you can get called mindfulness for docs okay what baseline can what psychometric has give dog that would make sense to there's another one binds his recap so again to stay away from except that shame on me shame on doctor medina because the work of john cabot zinn actually put some of the behavioral work in the mindfulness on solid reproducible footing and people like david creswell at carnegie mellon i'm not sure if you're familiar with dave's worker not he's a terrific imagers good good cognitive sinus put together a powerful story about how mindfulness if done in the eight week protocol prescribed originally by john cabot in and then refined over the years and randomized blinded trials with ends the larger than five ser getting you know you can get real results show something very powerful solid regular mindfulness training under those conditions boosts executive function and lowers depression rates in pediatric populations in adult populations and adults no kidding so the second if the first thing has become a really fit the second thing in my new high school if the gym is the center i'm gonna have some mindfulness routes we're gonna have some places where you can go it will actively be practice it's the first thing that kid is gonna get because the transition from home to school is extraordinarily traumatic for most students they often had especially with teenagers they're a fight with her with their parents in the don't have good mental time travel so of course they didn't prepare for tomorrow's test and with the backpack together so they come out of fair often fairly hostile environment even though even if it's loving and after go to a school where guess what they're going to confront a bunch of other immature people with no mental time travel who are risk averse probably emotionally not particularly competence towards them we'll start that day by god with mindfulness in the david creswell john cabin configuration and have them be tested for it because that has been shown to aid in executive function get him into the gym and then they can do their precalculus that would be a complete change of of what happens in schools and that there's the long answer that question heavier reduced suffering teenagers what about the role of maybe not having raisin bran for breakfast.

eight week
"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Reasons why wrote the brain rule series dave most of the stuff just sits it's gorgeous work it was wellfunded it's time you publish it sits on a shelf and gathers dust that are so and it gets filled the why have a passionate about it is in it gets filled very easily with mythologies people are really interested so you know you only use ten percent of your brain yeah right the default ristic states forty percent there's no such thing as a left brain personality and a right brain personality any both his fears to make fricken personality is frankly what is it we don't we don't really know but in the peer review to say what also you can do with teenagers and we certainly get the aging in a minute but the what you can also say with teenagers is this the peer review shows that you can aid an abet executive function and notice how i said that i didn't say i said aid and abet it so that it can more comfortably develop if you're a robot fit if you are not aerobically fit executive function scores go down this is the work of rebound meister engine tag ni folks that have done what's called the self control scale and they've done a bunch of good solid psychometric tests at strong reliability scores good internal and external validity you can actually measure people's executive function aerobically fit teenagers are have much higher executive function scores than a robotically unfit teenager so in fact i advocate in the book attack of the teenage brain that we should redesign schools and at the center of the school should be jim and you have an aerobic workout all the time in fact jim the there would be a school uniform in this model it would jim calls because it because it's so powerfully aids abets executive function that actually reduces the psychopathology rates both anxiety and depressive disorders it's a specially good for affective disorders works somewhat for the thought this orders that that probably requires something of more strenuous effort but in terms of the things that in the united states right now we are dealing with a crisis of suicide cdc's you may be familiar came out and showed since nineteen ninety nine thirty percent increase in the rates of suicide the an executive function with impulse control you have strong empel's control that just doesn't happen yata be fit all right i think i just came up with the way to save all the teenagers you tell them they can only charge their cell phone if they generate the electricity on a treadmill or a bike right without problem very good what i put i put a delimited in that cell phones took a lot longer course maybe some resistors line sorry i didn't tell you about that so you're twenty one okay teenage audience with apologies the adults are inspiring not actually on your behalf but not in your local this is the second thing you can do though that is that we also did in our in our household but also now anchored in the peer review and that is something i had to hopefully a nice guy but i'm pretty grumpy scientist as you set in your introduction most of my life has been spent as an analytical research consultant i literally hired a paratroop into a project and try to that's my job was my job sort of retired started to brain research institutes in my time where i did virtuous anything and i'm in the department of bioengineering at the university of washington medical school and there i do.

dave nineteen ninety nine thirty pe forty percent ten percent
"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

03:39 min | 3 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"To that like why did i do all that stuff back then and it like you said this because you don't understand the consequence of action you don't have wisdom what do we do as a society to help our teenagers maybe suffer less well we have a twenty one year old in eighteen year old so i've just come on out of the star wars four ending where the x is leaving the death star and there are several things that really helped us out out so i will personally and then i'll answer it in the period walls that make sense will to what really helped my my kids dave is that i told them what was going to happen to them when they were age eleven twelve it was performed as a strategy i said to them in fact i showed him jay's gay gade stuff i said this is what you're gonna look like and these are the behaviors that we know you are likely to experience one of the great warnings that i gave them and i would urge anybody in even you dave for people that have a close to teenagers do you know what the average age of onset of any mental health disorder that exists in north america's united as you're probably is from around thirteen i remember right fourteen point one close it real close fourteen years of age and that's true the second world you can divide the behaviors into what a call thought disorders like schizophrenia nia probably borderline personality and the affect of disorders like anxiety depression and even some mixes and matches like schizophrenia active disorder which is as aspects of both it doesn't matter what high want to categorize it age set for all of them is fourteen years of age we actually think that most mental health issues that we deal with our disruptions in the normal adolescent developmental program in the brain it's because it's an extremely vulnerable time the hormones are beginning to surge in darwinian priorities of projecting janes or beginning to happen you have lots of things so what i did with my kids to the personal side i told them this is what's coming if you begin to feel if you have suicidal i i would i would love to know that in advance if you have a we can have feelings of exile i would like to know if you're just embarrassed by me and you will be because i'm a big presence will embarrass you that i guarantee isn't that like our right as fathers and mothers to embarrass our kids for fun i thought that was part of being a period well i just don't want them to feel guilty about it when they do feel that very okay that the feelings are normal so you can get rid of guilt and shame which are destructive okay well exactly and the guilt actually makes loop anxiety so you feel guilty anxious you can actually feel guilty go back so can snap that or at least address it so that they have the tools and this is the first time i showed my kids jay's got these beautiful fourtest life is so i was able to show them some really really fine grain imaging they started getting into it so we would have an ongoing conversation about what was going on as their little lives developed so from a personal point of view just four arming them with what's going to happen and it's okay then it happens that there's an evolutionary reason for it that is so powerful it actually saved the species yes i don't have to feel guilty when you slam the door he's just have to know why do it that is really powerful advice i think a lot of people listening by their bunch of teenagers simple perfidious i've talked to the lunch at airports and on the street so if you're listening to this and you know something about your brain you didn't do and for parents i think as profound advice but it's not really what they taught me in seventh grade has this entered the school system at all no most in my one of the.

fourteen years twenty one year eighteen year
"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Fully mature till age twenty five so you are passionate before you are wise for the development grain and j even thinks he knows the reason why have you ever i'm going to go off at a model here but he won't make a discussion big care for now tell me this to me is really interesting because he brings in history and so i as an added former adamant i keep saying okay how would i draw those the habsburg line we're gonna look at spanish habsburg line of particularly charles the second in point of an incestuous series multi generational having sex with with relatives but we could also look at at most more recent queen victoria and prince albert you know they were first cousins and at was a problem because they had sex and they had sex lots of babies that had lots of deleterious mutations in fact the more sanguine sex which is you know that's what that's called with blood bloods or you are having sexual relationships within the within your people group the more likely than we are to occur so what jake did dave is that he said okay let's stretch that back to the seren getty if we are in our hunter gatherer stripes on the side of the google crater walking around in groups of forty or fifty per probably robin dunbar would say no more than one hundred fifty but say forty to fifty is probably more like it what's going to happen when you have babies and those babies grow up and they hip uber di because now there randy now they wanna have sex but if they have sex in that people group in two generations they'll be infertile that's charles the second his his mouth was his tongue was too big for his values drilling all the time each huge mental health issues probably screening he was infertile and he was it was a train wreck he was the last the hamburg lined by the way it actually his his deficit led to the wars of spanish succession because it was stuff so it's got a big it's a big deal and j knows it's a big deal and he says well so what are the hunter gatherers gonna do given they are close together well he says this if you did the following if you made the teenager when they're growing up have certain suite of behaviors such that they feel all the passion that you would normally feel that at twelve or thirteen are completely pissed off at your mother and dad and your family grew in such fashion that there's no way in hell you're going to have sex with them lilla lull even have just the whole idea being embarrassed if you create a behavioral firewall yet at the same time stunk their mental time travel ability and now to the point so that they cannot understand the consequences of their own action very well by god they will leave the forty or fifty group and they will strike out on their own and that's a hazardous thing to do in the seren getty in google crater given the weakness of our of the home sapient body structure well if you have problems with mental time travel you're gonna give her okay this makes so much sense you can't stand your uncle you can't stand your dad you wanna have sex your y'all k you can also show the risk risktaking behavior also increases in the teenage brain j things as direct result of the neurological developmental sequences such that you leave go find another people group and have your sex in your babies there and this mix up the gene line never have charles the second until you have crecy so when i use it say the book actually is that the next time your teenage daughter runs up the door and slams reservoir stairs and slams the door in your face old parrot get down on your knees and thank her that behavior saved the species that completely makes sense and so much of what we do now in cities billion people is driven based on these small caveman things even our sleeping patterns are tied back to that which is which is irritating can we hack that i mean i do nephew with my kids help them integrate their kids their brains better there in a waldorf school they played two hours outdoors every day but man my daughter's eleven and see the little beginnings of teenage brain in there and i love it 'cause they're fantastic and you know because we were all teenagers.

two hours
"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"The consequences of their actions they don't understand the future impact of present behavior so they don't understand the long term consequences of shortterm interaction does that tie into the fact that you're prefrontal cortex isn't really fully developed you're about twenty four is at the prefrontal cortex as causing this mental time travel or is this a different brain structure well it's better to say it's not a frontal cortex actually has a fair amount of mature structure in it but it's bility to communicate with the deeper parts of the brain that's where the maturity is so and that takes a while in fact you can show this is the work of j gate james work at all his university of california san diego what was his last name g e d i have not seen as work he's also niamh age a ridiculously good imager and a powerful advocate for understanding the development of the teen brain his put a lot of the team brain on the map and here's what he was able to show he was able to show that the deep interior structures of the brain i'm going to use the word amid deloitte complex what i really mean by that if we just stay with the amid for your listeners who don't know about the interior brandstatter if they could envision a scorpion in the middle of the brain okay and if you can think of the scorpion and the two clause of the scorpion k that's the amid daloa one you've got to one each side the legs that connect the claw to the body of the scorpion those the hypocrite by the hippocampus was to them one on each side and they connect the middle to the center structure which has lots of different names of the biggie is probably the knicks the mingla those claws it's a great metaphor for this because the amid is involved in things you feel passionate about or that could hurt you or that you love or that you hate it's the center of your emotions and not just the ability to generate the emotion but your ability to generate a memory of the emotion those memories that's why it's closely tied to a campus which is involved in memory formation well that structure david develops i that's gets on it gets are line around twelve or thirteen in it'll step once you once it's there it'll stay there your frontal cortex to get to the heart of your question the ability to the of the forehead brain the places where you are more mature in a more adult to communicate to those structures is not.

san diego knicks university of california deloitte david
"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

03:00 min | 3 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"With the prefrontal cortex is going to be talking to the interior of the brain amid deloitte complex what we often call the reptilian britain the ability to set up a reciprocal electrical relationship between those two is the neuro sludge ical substrate for the following behaviors a cognitive control executive function is built for cognitive control what i mean by that is if you have a whole disparate set of variables and you see that right the commonality you can make a gist detail heuristic really quickly out of them and you begin to organize it better also your ability to shift from one thing to another and then come back to it that's all related to cognitive control people who have add adhd do not have much cognitive control in that area it's often catastrophic for them to be interrupted from a task then move to another one and then come back they usually can't come back very well so the first pillar of executive function is that but the second pillar is related to it although it doesn't seem that way it's emotional regulation it's it's ended up people who have poor executive funk in this in this category really are hard to be around dave they're moody they don't have affective control they don't have a lot of things that you can work with the most importantly they don't have impulse control and because they don't have impulse control the not a great relationship with the deep interior structures of the brain of a cab anger management issues or they get addicted very quickly or they can't focus on something enough to get going people with strong executive function are often really good at math people with poor executive function are often really poor at math a good example for the impulse control side if you get a math problem in you don't understand it if you have poor impulse control you will fraud out because i don't understand this i hate this stuff i'm going to go away but if you've got good impulse control you'll say i don't care if it's uncomfortable by god i'm drilling down on this till i get it because regardless of how i feel about it there's certain goals he'd been maybe and see and that's why with emotional regulation and cognitive control actually were canned in hand in a single gadget we call executive function mental time travel is a part of that tell me more about this mental time travel it's the ability to plan and into we call is also called virtual transposition it's the ability to plan something in advance and understand the consequences of that planning before you do anything that's why virtual so you're not is actually not happening it transposition you're transposing yourself into given set of circumstances good mental time travel people are really good at plot prediction which means they usually hate most hollywood movies they know they've seen this story before they know how this journey ends they've got great mental time travel team i just finished a book on the teenage rent and hallmark of the developed undeveloped teenage brain is that they suck at mental time travel they don't understand.

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Who's having the most influence online in health and fitness and i was amazed and grateful to find that i was number sixteen on the list this year so thanks guys doing the work of quantifying who's reaching a lot of people and making a difference i appreciate it today's guest is a really interesting guy he's a seattle based developmental molecular biologist whose looked at isolating characterising genes involved in human brain development and the genetics of psychiatric disorders but that's probably not white you've heard about him you might have read his in your times bestseller called brain rules where he talks about how brains really work and how to redesign our workplaces and schools to match he came out then with brain rules for baby which tells parents like me in early childhood doctors educators about brain science c can have happy smart and moral kids and his last book is brain rules for wage brain rules for aging well which talk radio david exactly for waging well and we're talking to a guy who's just a phenomenal human being who also is mostly a private research consultant who's worked in biotech and pharmaceutical industries and mental health and not necessarily the normal academic background that you might expect from someone with this level of knowledge and his name is none other than john medina john welcome to the show thank you david thank you for having me on now i just have to ask you your weird how did you get to be a person who studies these fields and you're in a broad field your genetics cell biology mental health like what drives your.

seattle research consultant john medina david
"dr john medina" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"John i have really enjoyed getting to talk with you again and i hope we won't go another nine years before we talking that i tell you what will come out with like a brand in the spring what you that sounds like the plan already legiter you have yourself a great day it is absolute bill like talking to you and your voice to give you two it's always fund it off with dr john medina because his enthusiasm is contagious his new book brain rules for ageing well is written in a very down to earth style but it's full of useful information if you enjoy dr medina's enthusiasm you might also enjoyed the audio version of this book i should point out that although this book is aimed at older readers the principles are valid whatever your age i do want to mention a few key ideas this for me first we talked about the fact that the human brain is wired to be social engaging with others face to face is cognitively demanding and helps keep your executive functions at their best conversely loneliness is bad not only for your overall health but also for your brain this means resisting this temptation to stay home and looking for opportunities to engage with the world and with other people dr medina also told us that practicing gratitude helps increase the dopamine in our brains and the evidence is mounting debt mindfulness meditation actually improves cognition in the book he talks about the ways are memory changes as we age but we focused on things that we can do that help.

John dr john medina dopamine executive dr medina nine years
"dr john medina" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"dr john medina" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"That's some great news is now possible to get your pentium subscription via pay pow or your credit card the premiums subscription allows you to access all episodes of brain science including about six years of content recorded before two thousand thirteen and all episode transcripts way to access premium an three content is through the three rain science mobile app which is available for i o s android and windows phone you'll find it in your favorite apps store to learn more about premium go to brain cents pike yes dot com look into brain science the podcast for everyone has a brain this episode one hundred thirty eight and i'm your host started ginger campbell my guest today is dr john medina he first appeared on the brain size podcast back in episode thirty seven which originally aired in two thousand eight today we are talking about his latest book brain rules for ageing well ten principles for stain vital happy and sharp even though this episode is less technical than some recent podcasts i will come back after the interview to review key ideas and to make a few announcements as always you can get complete show notes and episode transcripts at brain science podcast dot com and you can send me feedback at brain size plot against itchy male dot com welcome back to brain science do realize that it's been nine years since we last talker maybe i wouldn't brain rules first ky what yeah yeah i'm looking forward to talking about your new book.

windows pentium android dr john medina nine years six years