18 Burst results for "Dr Jenny"

"dr jenny" Discussed on Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

10:15 min | 2 weeks ago

"dr jenny" Discussed on Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

"Kind selfless and caring idea and is that true, right? We're going to talk about our you a good enough parent, right? And we're going to even talk about like, why do parents become helicopter parents? And in fact, what do children actually need? What do they really need to have that essential social emotional learning so that they can regulate their own feelings, right? Essential essential stuff. Before we dive in, I just want to let you know that the mindful parenting teacher training is now enrolling for the fall. Do you want to bring mindful parenting course? Do you want to bring that to your community? Maybe you're a therapist. Maybe you're a teacher or doula or you're just like super passionate about parenting, then you might be perfect for the mindful parenting teacher training program. It's a 5 month intensive program. It can be done from anywhere around the world, and it gives you literally everything you need to bring mindful parenting to your community. So to learn more and apply to the program go to mindful parenting course dot com slash teach. That's mindful parenting course dot com slash teach. And now join me at the table as I talk to doctor Jenny Wu. So I love this story that you share. You did a TEDx talk and you shared a story about how you screamed at your husband for not cooing at the baby. I was wondering if you could share that story and kind of where your mind was at the moment. Sure. So I am a parent of three now, but back then as a new mama, right? Of one. And just being with your new baby, you witness every single little, you know, coups and changes. And so it was this period of time when our baby started cooing and making sounds. And I was just like, you know, yes, yes, talk to me. Uh huh. And then there goes my husband. He just didn't quite share this very same enthusiasm and sort of curiosity as I did. And I was just like, you know, birthday got a little PEEP. Being a person who worked in human development, I said, you know what? I'm going to give him more time. I'm going to do some role modeling. I'm going to just see, you know, if my husband is going to start going back at that breakthrough is going to come. And you know, I think 24 hours later. Exactly. For 24 hours. You don't know queen responses back at that reciprocation. And so I got mad. I think it was the combination of hormones and just kind of like, how could you not feel what I'm feeling in such expressive way that I am, you know? So I screamed at him. I was like, come back. So that was the context of screaming at my husband. How did he take it? You know, I think he was probably a little bit taken aback, but to be honest, I mean, being a new parent, you're probably screaming at a lot of different things, right? Get the milk ready. Wash the bottle. I need to pump. Well, baby's crying, you know? So he was a little taken aback, but I think in the midst of everything, it was another sort of thing that he needed to think about my husband, right? But I think it's really a growing process for the both of us, right? I think it's not only understanding this new life you created together, but it's also understanding each other and understanding yourself. Yeah, yeah. And so you were wanting to be and you shared in this, I could relate to this idea, you know, you wanted to be a good mom, obviously. You were very intense about going. You know, you wanted to do things right. Obviously now you're like, you know, you're a Harvard educator, you're one of those people who gets the good grades and does the things right, probably. I'm just going to make a guess here about that. And so with the cultural directive to be a good mom, your selfless, your caring, and you talked about this idea about the good mom and how you were kind of like having some friction with that. And I was wondering if you had just like, talk about that a little bit. The problems that you were coming across with that. Yeah, I think there's such an expectation both just right up front in your face, but also the underlining expectations for women these days. You know, what being a good mom means. And a lot of the times and means, you know, we use this word selfless, sacrifices, right? Those are the things that we cherish, right? Those are the selfless mom moments where, you know, you look anecdotally, you know, you see a post, you see somebody do, you know, that warms your heart, but what it's not being said, which rosny are the wrong way is really what does this woman need? What do you need and how can you fill up your what you need, right? Put that oxygen mask first in order to continuously sustain this type of energy to be there for your child for your family to be selfless in a way, right? So I think that that's why, you know, you mentioned my TEDx talk. I sort of played on that word, right? I said, it's not about being selfless. And it's not about being selfish, but it's about being self and ish being selfish, right? Reminding yourself of who you are, your values, and your needs in order to be a good mom. And the very whole sense for your child. And when I say, oh, you know, we also talk about the whole child approach, right? But what about the whole parent approach? Yeah, I mean, I love that. Did you find yourself getting not like in that first year? Did you find yourself not meeting your own needs? Or getting burnt out? And what did you do to self correct from that? Yeah. I definitely found that, but I don't think it quite surfaced as I'm getting burnt out. I need some support. I need to do some self care, but it was rather at the time, very initially. It was, what is wrong with you? Why can't you handle it, right? And it's a lot of moments of that Pinterest type of. This is how it looks. And then here I am. This is my picture of the Pinterest tale, right? Type of moments and you sort of, you feel very conflicted because I teach emotional intelligence the night study it, right? So emotions are essentially cues. Their data, they tell you what you need, right? And when there's a need that's not being fulfilled, it could manifest into resentment. And to self blame and to guilt, shame. And those are the things, but if we don't know what the motion is really telling us and we're sort of cognitively interpreting it in such way that saying, you know, you're not selfless enough or you're not tough enough, right? That is going completely the opposite way. So I think, you know, to answer the latter half of your question, what did I do to kind of correct that, right? Honestly, it's been a process, right? You don't just one day wake up and say, oh, here I am. I want to focus on myself, right? No, I think it's very much a process and it's one of those things where you continue to feel like the grass is greener on the other side. Why can't I do this? If I had this, it would have been better, but it's really understanding slowly what you need. And honestly, what has helped me is to start working in schools. To understand other parents, teachers and children, and what's happening in their context. And that is really the reality of things that normalizes for you. I'm like, oh, I had my aha moment going, well, everybody is struggling. Everybody is trying to do the best they can under the circumstances for their children. And guess what? Everybody's doing it differently, but that doesn't mean that they don't love their children any less, right? So that is the aha moment for me to my best, but also understand if you do the best for yourself, then it helps you do better for everyone. I love that that idea of what normalized things for you is this community piece, right? This not being an isolation piece, this piece of seeing other people and just kind of remembering that, you know, which is hard. It's harder even now. I mean, that's what the pandemic has made incredibly hard, right? Is the isolation. And so everything is mediated by the screens now. And so it's even harder than it was, but that piece of like, oh, I'm not alone, is huge. You know, even though this is this Pinterest north star is all I'm seeing, like the truth is I'm not alone and we're all struggling. Yeah, and you know, this reminds me of an article I actually just read a couple of days ago and it was right now during the pandemic, which I have so many were officially out of the pandemic, the COVID jail and our household, by the way. So much to say on that front, but it was a breath of fresh air when I read this article where a mom somewhere I forget what state she organized a little mini event where her neighborhood mom just come out to the track field and you just have a screen fest. And the night you can how you can screen all you want, but just kind of letting out those frustrations and energy. Can you imagine screaming at the top of your expressing your frustration finally, right? And then other.

Jenny Wu rosny Pinterest COVID
"dr jenny" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

02:54 min | Last month

"dr jenny" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"Like I said, <Speech_Female> it's joyful, but <Speech_Female> also horrifying <Speech_Female> at the same time. <Speech_Female> All right, <Speech_Female> Rachel, <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> how about you? What's your test <Speech_Female> of joy this week? <Speech_Female> Well, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> my test to <Speech_Male> joy this week <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> my husband is going <Speech_Female> away for a couple of <Speech_Male> days and I just <Speech_Female> need a <SpeakerChange> couple of <Speech_Female> days to breathe. <Speech_Female> I love <Speech_Female> it. <Speech_Female> Absence makes the heart <Speech_Female> grow fonder. <Speech_Female> Yes, <Speech_Female> that too, <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> he's been <Speech_Female> so, so busy <Speech_Female> that even though he has <Speech_Male> a research assistant <Speech_Male> to also helps him <Speech_Male> with scheduling. I've gotten <Speech_Male> roped in a lot, <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> I'm glad that he's <Speech_Male> going to be gone, and <Speech_Male> I can focus on a <Speech_Male> couple of things for <Speech_Female> me. I feel <Speech_Female> like I can get some <Speech_Male> things done before <Speech_Male> spring break, and then we can <Speech_Male> just enjoy <Speech_Male> some time with a <Speech_Male> family. So <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> my toaster joins <SpeakerChange> my husband <Speech_Female> leaving. And <Speech_Female> you Amanda, <Speech_Female> <Laughter> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I love <Speech_Female> it. That's <Speech_Female> love. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> That's love. <Speech_Female> So given <Speech_Female> our topic, I <Speech_Female> would really love <Speech_Female> to do my toes <Speech_Female> to joy to the <Speech_Female> yimbys. The <Speech_Female> yes in my backyard. <Speech_Female> Love it. <Speech_Female> And the interesting <Speech_Female> thing about housing <Speech_Female> policy <Speech_Female> is it's totally <Speech_Female> not aligned with <Speech_Female> political parties. <Speech_Female> And so the yimbys <Speech_Female> tend to be <Speech_Female> people from <Speech_Female> Republican and <Speech_Female> Democrat. And so <Speech_Female> you end up talking to a lot of people <Speech_Female> you don't usually talk <Speech_Female> to, which I think <Speech_Female> is really <Speech_Female> interesting. <Speech_Female> And I think <SpeakerChange> it makes <Speech_Female> sense though. Yeah, it <Speech_Female> does. It actually <Speech_Female> really makes sense that <Speech_Female> this is one area where <Speech_Female> you can talk to people <Speech_Female> and give them <Speech_Female> facts and give them information <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> really <Speech_Male> change minds. <Speech_Female> I believe this <Speech_Female> is an <Speech_Female> area that <SpeakerChange> there's a lot <Speech_Female> of potential for growth. <Speech_Female> I think so <Speech_Female> too. And <Speech_Female> I get it, <Speech_Female> change is hard, right? <Speech_Female> I get that for <Speech_Female> a community, <Speech_Female> you're worried because <Speech_Female> you want to keep that <Speech_Female> community <Speech_Female> so charming and <Speech_Female> lovely and you want to keep <Speech_Female> it the place you love. <Speech_Female> So I get that. <Speech_Female> What's over the <Speech_Female> people who are willing <Speech_Female> to kind of step out <Speech_Female> and be like, you know what? <Speech_Female> The way to keep it the <Speech_Female> way we love <Speech_Female> is to let it grow, <Speech_Female> right? So you think about <Speech_Female> your kids too, right? <Speech_Female> I love my kids, <Speech_Female> but we have to <Speech_Female> let them grow <Speech_Female> into the beautiful people <Speech_Female> that they are. We can't <Speech_Female> just keep them the same. <Speech_Female> And I think about the same <Speech_Female> is true with our communities. <Speech_Female> We have to <Speech_Female> let it grow and grow <Speech_Female> in a way that <Speech_Female> it needs to grow. <Speech_Female> Absolutely. <Speech_Female> So thanks so much <Speech_Female> everyone for joining us today <Speech_Female> and we'll see you <Speech_Female> again next week on <Speech_Female> another <SpeakerChange> episode of the suburban women <Music> problem. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> The suburban <Speech_Music_Female> women problem <Speech_Music_Female> was created by <Speech_Music_Female> red, wine, and <Speech_Music_Female> blue. Our executive <Speech_Music_Female> producer <Speech_Music_Female> is Beverly bat, <Speech_Music_Female> our producer and editor <Speech_Music_Female> is Amy thorsten, <Speech_Music_Female> our <Speech_Music_Female> video producer is Ashley <Speech_Music_Female> hufford, and our <Speech_Music_Female> production coordinator <Speech_Music_Female> is drew am studs. <Speech_Music_Female> If you <Speech_Music_Female> are ready to be part of the <Speech_Music_Female> suburban women problem, <Speech_Music_Female> head over <Speech_Music_Female> to red wine dot <Speech_Music_Female> blue. And sign up for <Speech_Music_Female> our newsletter <SpeakerChange> so <Music> you don't miss a thing.

Amanda Amy thorsten Ashley
"dr jenny" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

04:27 min | Last month

"dr jenny" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"Places where the public schools aren't doing particularly well. These are our future workers and our future citizens and we are essentially under investing in the workforce systematically. That's such an important point. And I think it's a big concern for any parent that we want to make sure that we're investing in our kids or our kids have a future, but we also want to make sure that the people are kids are going to grow up with their classmates and their neighbors and people are going to interact with, we want all kids to have that shot. Like to me, the American Dream is also about it's not just about a house in the suburbs. It's about giving our kids a shot, giving every kid a shot to be the best whoever it is that they want to be and housing is very much tied to that. And so in this country, we have a history of racism that is shaped a lot of American domestic policy and housing policy is no exception to that. So on our podcast, we actually heard from Cory Booker, who talks about how his family struggled to buy a house in a suburb in New Jersey. So can you tell us more about this intersection of housing policy and racial inequity in our country? Yeah, there are two ways that it's particularly obvious. One is that until pretty recently in our country's history, black people weren't allowed to buy homes, right? And that was just legal, right? So they weren't realtors could refuse to show them homes, banks could refuse to give them mortgages. That was completely legal until the 1968 fair housing act, and even since then, we haven't had kind of full force enforcement of it. It's not particularly well funded, and so there's still a lot of discrimination, particularly in applications for mortgages, especially for black families, and also for Latino families. That's especially problematic because owning your own home has been the primary way the U.S. has encouraged families to build wealth. So you buy a house, you pay down the mortgage over time, you build some equity. And if your parents are grandparents owned a home, then they've accumulated some wealth that they can pass on to you. We know, for instance, that when white families buy their first home as in their 20s or 30s, they're very likely to get a gift for the down payment from parents or grandparents to help them buy into this. Young black households are less likely to do that because their parents and grandparents didn't have the opportunity to build wealth. So they don't have it in the family, they can't pass it along. This compounds over generations. So we're now at the point where white households about 70% of them own their own homes, only about 40% of black households own their own homes. So a 30 percentage point difference in home ownership, the second way we really see enormous gaps in racial opportunity is that these zoning laws that require only single-family.

Cory Booker New Jersey U.S.
"dr jenny" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

04:33 min | Last month

"dr jenny" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"So the big backdrop for kind of how our housing systems are broken and what we need to fix sort of goes back to the Great Recession, we essentially stopped building houses after the Great Recession and didn't really pick back up in. So at the national level, we are ten years into a housing deficit, which shows how as not enough homes for people to live in. High prices and rents in most places where people want to live. So unless you bought a house, there are 30 years ago, there's a good chance that you can't move in because we're just not expanding housing at all. On the flip side, we also have patterns of housing development and city grows that are really damaging for climate change. So we're actually making things worse by where we build and don't build housing. We build homes in a lot of places at very high climate risk, which we taxpayers are already paying for. That will only get worse over time. So we have these sort of large systemic problems with housing systems, most of which are choices made by policy makers, and by individual kind of members of the community. I love that you mentioned, you know, housing prices because we hear a lot about how new college students, millennials, can't afford to buy a house, and we often hear this trope of like, well, if you just stop buying avocado toast once in a while, so I know you mentioned this in your book, then you could afford that house. But it's not true because housing prices have gotten so bad in a lot of areas. And when we think about inflation, we talk a lot about inflation right now. When you think about inflation, like housing and housing prices are in there and one very common economic approach to dealing with, if you have high prices, build more houses then. And that's how you deal with it. It's not just about millennials buying avocado toast all the time. It's not. And this is such an issue that splits along generational lines. So if you talk to lots of people under the age of 40, they're particularly in kind of the big expensive cities, they feel like they're never going to be able to buy a house or they're never going to be able to buy a house that's sort of the size and quality that they want in a neighborhood they want to live in because it's just so expensive relative to incomes, that wasn't the case, so I'm a late gen xer, right? And we were still able to, you know, if you wanted to come out of college and buy a house within, say, 5 years or so most people were able to do that. And for our parents and grandparents, even more so, but it's just become so much more expensive relative to income that it's really hard for people to access the places that they want to live. And some of this is really down to this decision making process where we have said it housing markets don't work like other kinds of things where if the demand increases and the price goes up, then GM just makes more cars, right? We don't allow housing to be built that way..

GM
"dr jenny" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

03:56 min | Last month

"dr jenny" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"So our guest today is a senior fellow at brookings metro and an expert in urban economics and housing policy. She's been interviewed by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post, and she's the author of the new book fixer upper. How to repair America's broken housing systems. Doctor Jenny schutz, thank you for joining me on the suburban women problem. Thanks for having me. First, let me say your book is such a good read and cover so much policy ground in a readable way and I love the title, so I am an HGTV fan and is it a play on the HGTV show fixer upper? That wasn't my intention, but it's turning out that way. Although, I've gotten some emails from people who say, oh, I read your book and I thought it was going to be about fixing up old houses and I'm really disappointed it's not. Oh no. Sorry about that. So I'm an economist and you're an economist and you and I talk on Twitter sometimes about economic policy. So I could get into the nitty Gritty details about this stuff for hours with you, but what should the average listener, the average suburban mom in America know about housing policy and how should they talk about it with their friends and neighbors? So housing policy, the whole sort of package of housing policies affects our day to today life and our quality of life in lots of ways, but often they're kind of hidden to us. So actually one way I was thinking about this is why my sister in law and brother in law live in a very typical suburban neighborhood outside D.C., Vienna, Virginia, which is sort of like very much 1990s suburb, and they chose to live there primarily because it has really great public schools, and they wanted to have a big house with a big yard, so my nieces are little at this point. And so there's some really good things about their neighborhood, but it's also, in many ways, not actually that kid friendly and not that people friendly. So you come out of the house and you're immediately on a giant curvy road that has no sidewalks and has no bike lanes and cars drive really fast. And so, you know, my nieces are never going to be able to walk to their friend's house or ride their bikes in the yard. It's far away from any kind of grocery store or coffee shop. You have to get in a car and drive 20 minutes to the.

brookings metro Jenny schutz The Wall Street Journal The Washington Post America The New York Times Twitter Vienna D.C. Virginia
"dr jenny" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

04:38 min | Last month

"dr jenny" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"And making sure that we're holding on to those and paying attention so that they don't disappear when you're not paying attention. Right. So Aaron, you are mom, you just mentioned how you moved and the whole moving to a place because of the schools or the culture or the community that definitely makes a 100% sense to me and probably to a lot of our listeners. So I'm a mom as well and my daughter lives with me and so she gets to basically get an insider view of being in politics and so how does that with your kids? Do they know what you do? Do they understand what being the council president means? And do you think they're like absorbing what it means to be a part of local government? Oh yes. I mean, so I was elected in 2017. So I think probably around the same time you were Jasmine, right? Yeah, I was at 18th, yeah. Yeah, so it's like this moment where all these young moms were coming into local office and it changed village hall. They weren't really used to having kids coming, but I had a two year old at the time three year old. And so she came with me in a meeting. She went to parks meetings, you know, we were talking at one point about what sort of railing should be on the bridge because we're getting a new bridge because our bridge is old. And you know, we're talking about how easily can kids climb this railing and I'm like, you know, she's right there. So they've grown up with it in sort of a special way in my opinion. They get to third grade social studies and they know who's on counsel. They know the players. I can only imagine what they're telling their teachers in the classroom. But you know, I think they understand that the work. I mean, they see firsthand that this work really does make impacts. We're trying to build a new playground in the center of the village. It's causing some minor kerfuffle here and there. And so, you know, but they've seen the playground and they understand that we're having this conversation about is this what we want. This is what we should do. And learning to sort of listen to all the voices and just try to sort of distill where the community really wants us to go. I don't think you can teach that without showing them. It's too hard to explain sometimes. I think it's so important that it's on such a small level because it's hard on a national level..

Aaron
"dr jenny" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

04:32 min | Last month

"dr jenny" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"A lot of systems that do not treat people fairly, that justice is not acting in a way that is blind. So to have that representation right now is especially important. And I think it's relevant to what we're talking about today too with our guests because if you think about books like the color of law, if you think about the civil rights movement, one way that people dealt with civil rights movement is to start enacting a bunch of zoning to keep certain people out of where they live. Right. And so zoning and these laws, which are on the face of them, colorblind, right? Isn't a zoning necessarily right now that says black people can't live here, although at one point there was. There was. I know there used to be. Yes. I know. But now even we think about even redlining, right? So redlining we've talked about isn't a thing anymore. So we fixed it, right? No. No. If you look at those maps, they are still highly related to a lot of the issues society has. And we see zoning making apartment buildings illegal, but it's also really important for the environment and for racial justice to have better housing policy. It's important for so much. On that note, let's ask someone who's actually on a city council here in Ohio about how she's navigating these issues on the local level. Aaron, welcome to the podcast. Hi, I'm excited to be here. So I wanted to have you on the podcast today because you're the council president in chagrin falls, Ohio, and I live in Hudson, Ohio, so it's about 15 miles away from you. And here in Hudson, we had a lot of pushback when we tried to put up some denser, more affordable housing, like apartment buildings or condos type stuff. And we still have a plot of land sitting empty, filling with goose poop right now, actually. So how did you manage to put up apartment buildings in chagrin falls? So chagrin is a little different than Hudson. I think in some ways, we're sort of stewards of a legacy that has always really embraced multiple uses sort of adjacent to each other on top of each other. So our histories that we were a mill town with this little river that runs through it and there were all these millworkers and large economic spectrum from the beginning. That makes it a little bit easier because we don't have the same nimby sort of situation that you have in other communities where they're coming from large lots. And now you're suddenly changing density. So you said real quick, you use the word nimby. Can you just explain what that means when you say nimby? So the whole not in my backyard mindset, right? Density housing is okay there. It's okay and Mayfield heights, but not here where I live. Yeah, we have a lot of that in Atlanta where there's a lot of whenever someone comes up with, oh, build portable housing here, and then people, you know, the nimby signs pop up or the nimby I will say hashtags pop up..

Ohio Hudson chagrin falls Aaron chagrin Mayfield heights Atlanta
"dr jenny" Discussed on Optimal Living Daily

Optimal Living Daily

02:14 min | 8 months ago

"dr jenny" Discussed on Optimal Living Daily

"Potential starts with giving your brain. The attention it deserves to work at his very best is time to start doing more of the one thing that will make the biggest difference to how well you think. Learn and remember move more as orange. Eric reminds us quote above all to not lose your desire to walk every day. I walked myself into state of wellbeing and walk away from every illness. I've walked myself into my best thoughts. And i know of no thought so burdens on that one cannot walk away from it but by sitting still and the more wants it still the closer one comes to feeling ill thus if one just keeps on walking everything will be all right. You just listened to the post idol. The best way to think more clearly by dr jenny. Baucus of dr jenny broadcast dot com. If they get a doctor. Jenny one habit that i personally have from this list that i thought was odd but i find more and more people have also is when talking on the phone. I can't be sitting. i find it's very distracting. So i get a lot of my steps in on days where i have long phone calls with my business partner. Lee more reason to get on that phone. It's easy way for me to get steps in. I don't even realize how many i got until i check later through my phone or smart watch. I got a smart watch as a gift. Recently and other than tracking steps. I actually do find the little reminders at sends to stand up actually really helpful. Somehow it knows. When i'm sitting and it'll tell me it's time to stand up and if i do. It congratulates me. And i feel good about doing. It is such a small symbol thing in a tiny feature in smart watches. But i really think it helps also record this podcast standing up. So that's not quite moving. But at least i'm not sitting even more. So maybe there's something like that in your life that you do every single day where you could think maybe i can stand instead of sit and you wouldn't really notice the difference your body would though and that's important so see we come up with have a great rest of your day and weekend on your feet and i'll see you tomorrow. As usual where optimal life awaits..

dr jenny Baucus Eric Jenny Lee
"dr jenny" Discussed on Optimal Living Daily

Optimal Living Daily

02:40 min | 9 months ago

"dr jenny" Discussed on Optimal Living Daily

"Why it pays to be more grateful man how to show it by dr jenny. Baucus of dr jenny. Baucus dot com. What are you grateful for. According to cicero gratitude is more than being the greatest virtue. He described it as the mother of all other remaining virtues gratitude. This isn't about remembering to write your christmas. Thank you letter to auntie mabel. Who sent you that hideous pair of socks or thinking. Your mother-in-law for the huge dish of soggy overcooked brussel sprouts. That just got put on your plate at a family get together. This is about real gratitude that is authentic and heartfelt why that matters is because showing gratitude has been shown to dramatically ramp up your level of mental wellbeing. It's been described as an essential component for employee engagement. It has a positive effect on your physical health and resilience. In fact there's so much going for gratitude is hard to find a reason why you wouldn't want to include more gratitude in your life. Gratitude boosts recovery as we move into the new living with kovic era of heard twenty twenty one described as the year of recovery recovery from all our adversity financial insecurity economic downturn and mental health challenges. While i believe it's going to take somewhat longer than one year. Gratitude is an important part of our wellbeing armory for recovery helping us to distinguish between what is important and what is not to stay focused on what is possible and to strengthen our patience humility and wisdom which has been wearing a little thin for patients recovering from heart attack or other cardiac illness. The more grateful patients were found to have better sleep less fatigue and lower levels of inflammation in their recovery face. Meaning they recovered well while in the grace study. Researchers found that the most grateful patients were more energized. Engaged proactive in their own. Healthcare and motivated to make the necessary long-term behavioral changes to stay well breast cancer accounts for twenty five percent of cancers experienced by women when my mom lost her best friend breast cancer while still in her forties. It took her a long time to recover from that loss as gp and in my own circle of friends of known many who have endured the trauma of being diagnosed with the disease and then undertaking the long road to recovery with chemotherapy and surgery but surviving. That is only half the story. What then remains the ongoing fear for currents and possible death this is where gratitude interventions have been found to produce a positive effect and improve psychological functioning better coping angrier perceive support gratitude is linked to wellbeing.

dr jenny Baucus Jenny amir apple google Eddie
Why It Pays to Be More Grateful and How to Show It by Dr Jenny Brockis

Optimal Living Daily

02:40 min | 9 months ago

Why It Pays to Be More Grateful and How to Show It by Dr Jenny Brockis

"Why it pays to be more grateful man how to show it by dr jenny. Baucus of dr jenny. Baucus dot com. What are you grateful for. According to cicero gratitude is more than being the greatest virtue. He described it as the mother of all other remaining virtues gratitude. This isn't about remembering to write your christmas. Thank you letter to auntie mabel. Who sent you that hideous pair of socks or thinking. Your mother-in-law for the huge dish of soggy overcooked brussel sprouts. That just got put on your plate at a family get together. This is about real gratitude that is authentic and heartfelt why that matters is because showing gratitude has been shown to dramatically ramp up your level of mental wellbeing. It's been described as an essential component for employee engagement. It has a positive effect on your physical health and resilience. In fact there's so much going for gratitude is hard to find a reason why you wouldn't want to include more gratitude in your life. Gratitude boosts recovery as we move into the new living with kovic era of heard twenty twenty one described as the year of recovery recovery from all our adversity financial insecurity economic downturn and mental health challenges. While i believe it's going to take somewhat longer than one year. Gratitude is an important part of our wellbeing armory for recovery helping us to distinguish between what is important and what is not to stay focused on what is possible and to strengthen our patience humility and wisdom which has been wearing a little thin for patients recovering from heart attack or other cardiac illness. The more grateful patients were found to have better sleep less fatigue and lower levels of inflammation in their recovery face. Meaning they recovered well while in the grace study. Researchers found that the most grateful patients were more energized. Engaged proactive in their own. Healthcare and motivated to make the necessary long-term behavioral changes to stay well breast cancer accounts for twenty five percent of cancers experienced by women when my mom lost her best friend breast cancer while still in her forties. It took her a long time to recover from that loss as gp and in my own circle of friends of known many who have endured the trauma of being diagnosed with the disease and then undertaking the long road to recovery with chemotherapy and surgery but surviving. That is only half the story. What then remains the ongoing fear for currents and possible death this is where gratitude interventions have been found to produce a positive effect and improve psychological functioning better coping angrier perceive support gratitude is linked to wellbeing.

Dr Jenny Baucus Auntie Mabel Kovic Cicero Cardiac Illness Breast Cancer Heart Attack Cancers
"dr jenny" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"dr jenny" Discussed on WTOP

"35 public schools in Montgomery County will begin opening doors to in person learning starting March 1st. The school board unanimously approved the process. Yesterday, the transition will begin with vocational students and those with special needs than larger groups of students will be phased back by grade level. Starting on March 15th some parents in Montgomery County or not happy with the schedule of sending kids back to in person classes, Becky Mayo says her kids will remain virtual, but she's concerned for teach. Is that are not vaccinated. There was a push to not wait until teachers of vaccinated when we have two weeks past the second dose, That's when we get the most immunity. Margaret Bauer, a third grade teacher, told wt O. P that she is not only concerned about teacher and student health but also the family members of students. I'm also really concerned for the Children that we teach who lived with oldest family members such as Grand parents. I'm concerned about them, possibly spreading it to members of their family, and even with schools being close Know that there have been cases of covert within and CPS facilities. Blucher w. T O P News. A lot of folks were happy when CBS announced that it would make 26,000 doses of covert 19 vaccine available every week in Virginia. But the launch of the company's sign up page has caused a lot of confusion. The plan called for CVS to begin accepting vaccination appointments Thursday for eligible individuals. Including those 65 older, But CBS opened the sign up page two days early to give public health departments the chance to enter names of eligible people who had pre registered Virginians eager for vaccine who were online noticed the sign up page launched early, and many people jumped on it quickly filling all of this week's appointment slots, not an ideal rollout. But at the end of the day, we are thankful that it's a way to pull down more vaccine into Virginia. Virginia State vaccine coordinator Dr Jenny Avalos says health to part Have been pre registered lists have been compiled with equity in mind, particularly on O w. T O P news. We have quite a few chances for snow in the forecast. That's next. It's 6 37. The best an Internet and entertainment is here, and it's all powered by Xfinity for one unbelievable value. Introducing breakthrough WiFi speed now faster than a gig. That's right, not just Internet speed, WiFi speed, and that's enough to handle every device in the house and then some..

Montgomery County Virginia CBS Becky Mayo CPS Margaret Bauer Virginia State Dr Jenny Avalos Xfinity coordinator
"dr jenny" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"dr jenny" Discussed on WTOP

"But at the end of the day, we are thankful that it's a way to pull down more vaccine into Virginia. Virginia State vaccine coordinator Dr Jenny Avalos says health to part Have been pre registered lists have been compiled with equity in mind, particularly on O w T O P News. Some Charles County public school students returning to in person learning late next month. School board voting to send their face to students back to school on March 22nd that includes special ed students, English language learners, career and technical education, students and Children of staff. This is a full month after the superintendent's recommendation, saying they should return on February 22nd that start date, though, follows the teacher vaccination schedule. March 22nd is 10 to 12. Days after most teachers will receive their second dose. It has now been close to 11 months now some students in Arlington heading back to the classroom's next month last week, Governor Ralph North emerge schools to offer in person Learning by March 15th and now Superintendent Francisco Durant has announced new plans for Arlington public schools. Students who have opted for hybrid learning will begin heading back in early March. Pre K through second grade are scheduled to head back on the 2nd 3rd through sixth grade students and ninth graders will head back the following week on March 9th and the rest will be in class by March. 16th students who opted for hybrid will attend class two days a week. Some will have a Tuesday Wednesday schedule and others a Thursday Friday schedule. The school system is expected to release more details in the coming weeks. Durant also announce that over half of Arlington teachers have received their fur Vaccine Look, look at the beauty of P news members of the Washington teacher's Union voting against authorizing a strike by the union is asking the mayor and chancellor to establish what is called a situation room where urgent issues can be identified and addressed within 24 hours. Union also says they want more to be done to prevent the spread of covert, 19 says last week is some in person learning resumed covert 19 exposures, forcing five classrooms to convert back to virtual classes. Beauty O P has reached out to the D. C public school system for comment, and we are looking at another snowy week that me NBC for his duck.

Superintendent Francisco Duran Arlington Union Dr Jenny Avalos D. C public school Virginia Virginia State superintendent Charles County coordinator Governor Ralph North NBC chancellor Washington
"dr jenny" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"dr jenny" Discussed on KCRW

"The Patriots. Had he accepted that award born NPR's sports correspondent Tom Goldman. Thanks so much for being with us. You're welcome, Scott. You're listening to weekend edition from NPR news. Now that health care workers and nursing home residents are getting the covert 19 vaccine states wrestle with who ought to be next. So, for example, essential workers. Who's considered essential who's merely important. People with underlying illnesses. If so, which ones? Well, you have to show proof. What kind Many states have decided to use what amounts to the honor system determine who should be next in line for the Corona virus vaccine. We're joined now by Dr Jenny Arnold Cheese, the CEO of the Washington State Pharmacy Association, and Also a member of the committee that divides the state eligibility system. Thanks so much for being with us, Dr Arnold Thank you very much, So you just trust everyone, to be honest. Well, any system can be gained and honestly being able to have the best and most equitable distribution of vaccine. This seemed like the best solution to the committee. Well, for example, I gather Monday in your area, People can go online to determine their eligibility. How's that gonna work? We've actually been in a bit of a test phase with the system since the beginning of the month, and we've been using it just with health care workers to self assess their risk. Of work and where they work and their access to patients and so far in the initial phases, it's worked really well, but do of do you make anybody will you make anybody Produce a driver's license with date of birth, any kind of health care card that certifies that they have a certain condition anything like that. The challenge with having people produced a license. Health care worker license, for instance, in our phase one, eh? Is that not every person who works in the health care setting has health care license the housekeeper's the support staff. The people who are interacting with co vid waste or cleaning up after it. They all have a significant risk, but yet aren't healthcare workers themselves. One of the things that we heard most consistently from the hospitals from the pharmacies is they didn't want to have to be the regulators. They didn't want to have to turn people away. They didn't want to have to be the ones to the side who is in and who was out. They wanted to be able to vaccinate people quickly and efficiently and not spend a lot of time haggling over individual people's value. What do you think ought to be done now? Given all the problems there are nationally with the rollout of the vaccine. What have we learned in the Past couple of weeks. And what should we do now? I think we've learned that we need more resource is than we even have now more access points and more hands on deck to be able to roll out vaccine distribution. I think that the impulse is that if things aren't going well, we need more reporting. We need more data, and I want to make sure that we don't get health care workers spending all of their time Writing up who they're giving back seen to and where that vaccine is going. I want their resource is to be put in vaccine clinics and getting staff out into the community. And I think those increased access points are going to be invaluable for increasing the rate of vaccine distribution. Doctor Jenny Arnold heads the Washington State Pharmacy Association. Thanks so much for being with us. Well, thank you so much. Stay safe. This is NPR news state close to KCRW Wherever you are..

NPR Washington State Pharmacy Asso Dr Jenny Arnold Cheese Patriots Doctor Jenny Arnold Dr Arnold Tom Goldman Scott CEO
"dr jenny" Discussed on Lured Up - A Pokémon GO Podcast

Lured Up - A Pokémon GO Podcast

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"dr jenny" Discussed on Lured Up - A Pokémon GO Podcast

"I don't like that like that doesn't yeah that doesn't jive doesn't feel it Mega are y will get the boost And they also teased two things a collection challenge which should be coming. This is a feature in today. View that Per the blog promises to make events more exciting to experience and the celebration which is happening on the twelfth through the seventeenth. So you know it is tuesday. The fifth sunday the tenth and cinna will be the twelfth through the seventeenth getting a lot of information a little earlier than we have in the past like before like the new cycles crap started really taken off with this game we normally get a week or two heads up before events so this feels good gives us plenty of time. But what do you. What do you think of this event in. You know we did the celebration like what if you know. Same shit right yes. I enjoy the fact that we're gonna get a break here. That's like a good highlighted. I'm glad that you like pointed that out that we will. And i've seen a bunch of evolutions to like. I don't know recently. I had a whole bunch of ambrose specifically like for sure at my house and what who's putting these stage two of lucians at my house. I like it keep it up. I don't i agree. I don't like janna sect being not shiny when it already has it's shiny it's kind of like oh hey cost to for peekapoos or whatever. The base forms like they're always going to be shiny or have the potential to be shiny like they made that announcement than oh. Hey here's a base warm. It's not. I don't think burn dr jenny. Sacked is considered a costume pokemon. Though it'll be it'll be interesting if the tag in the search screen for costume picks up on. Burn dr genesis. I can't. I can't wait till you fly baby. And they're like oh well the white flour and the orange flower and the pink flower. We'll we'll give you a ten week raid raid timeframe and between each one. I thank you think. Yeah i just. I just wish we had new pok mon mean. I know that they posted inside the snowball from it. Running down the hill. I.

cinna dr jenny ambrose janna
"dr jenny" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"dr jenny" Discussed on KGO 810

"Says roughly one in three Americans would not get a covert 19 vaccine if it was available at no cost. After passing nonpolitical FDA tests I can't understand out politics fits into our health. But for what it's worth 81% of Democrats say they'll get the shot. Where's his 47% of Republicans saying they won't frankly, I shake my head when I hear that. One of their reasoning is to believe only what Dr Jenny McCarthy says when she's not analyzing the science of the mass singer or just afraid of needles. I would urge them to reconsider. Do you really want to live with this new normal forever? Dr Anthony Fauci says of too few Americans get a covert 19 vaccine when it becomes available, it will not help reduce the spread south. He told The Wall Street Journal that even a third of Americans getting vaccinated against the Corona virus won't be enough. He says, quote. It's a combination of how effective a vaccine is and how many people use it. If you have a vaccine, this highly effective and not enough people get vaccinated. You're not going to realize the full importance effects of having a vaccine. By the way. Did you see CNN's Town Hall meeting with Joe Biden last night? Overall, I think you came off pretty well. Biden continue to cast doubt on Trump's claims that a Corona virus vaccine will be ready or close to it in time for the November election. Former vice president said. I don't trust the president on vaccines I trust doctor found CI. You found cheese is a vaccine is safe. I would take the vaccine. We should listen to the scientists, not the president. Of course, Trump's campaign and allies have alleged that by casting doubt on the president's vaccine claims, Biden is undermining trust in a potential back singing. Biden, meanwhile, says Trump is trying to claim a panacea is right around the corner in order to deflect criticism of his handling of the virus, enough to win a second term. We're looking at almost 200,000 Americans dead because of the corona virus. 65% of us say we would take the vaccine and 35% say we won't Let me ask you. Did you get the polio vaccine earlier in your life? A vast majority of us did, And despite a few cases turning up in the last few years, polio has essentially been eliminated. Well, covert 19 can be worse. They have now been more than 30 million cases of covert 19 recorded around the world. Nearly a million deaths have been reported globally. And did you know that wealthy countries have already bought up the expected vaccine. CNN reports that when the vaccine does arrive rich nations including the United States, Britain and Japan, I've already bought up. More than half of the expected supply has about 51% of available vaccines for about 13% of the world's market..

polio vaccine Joe Biden vice president Trump Dr Anthony Fauci Dr Jenny McCarthy FDA polio CNN The Wall Street Journal Town Hall United States Japan Britain
"dr jenny" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"dr jenny" Discussed on WTOP

"Temperatures are going to drop into the fifties tonight tomorrow we do have sunny skies in store for your Monday high temperatures Monday will be in the mid seventies so we're gradually warming here by Tuesday upper seventies mix of sun and clouds on Tuesday I think we'll see a bit more clouds around these parts Wednesday temperatures are going to be in the low nineties thanks for sending clouds and storm team four meteorologist Samara Theodore seventy five in south riding seventy three in south laurel and seventy one in Washington at five forty prince George's county public schools had a virtual graduation celebration with a special guest of coming home to the DMV Taraji P. Henson was the commencement speaker the academy award nominated actress graduated from Oxon hill high school in nineteen eighty eight she said she wishes it wasn't person but was excited to be a part of celebrating their journey the cost of I was stopped for the world but will not stop us from celebrating our the names of the eight thousand county graduates from thirty one traditional public charter and alternative high schools schools across the screen during the E. graduation which aired on ABC seven giving them some recognition and a chance to snag a screenshot of their names on TV Valerie bonk WTOP news as we continue to spend more time at home parents might be relying more on the TV or the tablet to keep kids occupied but experts say be careful about your use of technology hello planned Dr Jenny Radesky is a pediatrician and expert on children and the media at the university of Michigan's children's hospital don't let it just be this reactive haven't driven thing that you do throughout the day because then it's a lot harder to create boundaries around it and she says it's important to start a conversation we have to help his reflect upon their relationship with technology how it makes them feel how it scares the brain sometimes she spoke at a virtual roundtable hosted by two local democratic members.

Samara Theodore Washington George Taraji P. Henson Oxon hill high school ABC Dr Jenny Radesky Valerie bonk WTOP university of Michigan
"dr jenny" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"dr jenny" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"The Democrats are really hoping that the White House will focus on what they're calling individuals essentially real people working American families more from ABC's Rebecca Jarvis the industry that has felt the most direct impact at this point is the travel industry airlines are projected to lose a hundred and thirteen billion dollars this year in sales because of the corona virus and while a number of other companies have seen their stock prices get hit dramatically the Dow after losing over two thousand points yesterday they have been up as much as eight hundred today this is ABC news Great Britain is bracing for more coronavirus visually there's just a few hundred confirmed cases here Britain's deputy chief medical officer says that will change dramatically in the next few weeks we will see many senses fifteen fifty five converse as what we seeing in other countries Dr Jenny Harries says she expects treatment to take to pass along to the people particularly those with chronic underlying conditions getting tested and get treatment and we supported the piquant Henman time majority six banks can be managed safely and appropriately in that home setting timers ABC news London as if Paris hadn't been through enough with Notre dom now the water level of the Seine river is rising so fast the move could be forced to close again it's already been shut down off and on for the corona virus and history for James Taylor he's now the first artist with top ten albums in every decade from.

White House ABC Rebecca Jarvis Britain medical officer Dr Jenny Harries London Paris Seine river James Taylor deputy chief Henman
"dr jenny" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"dr jenny" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Slurry of calcium hydroxide to change it into a solid, and that slurry helps form tiny pellets of calcium carbonate, those pellets are than treated at high temperature with the pellets decomposing into a carbon dioxide stream and calcium oxide, and then that stream of pure CO. Two is clean up for move water. Impurities the key to the process has carbon engineers, Dr Jenny MacKay hill is about concentrating the CO two we can then put it underground as in sequestration or we can combine it with hydrogen or to form hydrocarbons or methanol. There's a number of things you can actually do with that. They're looking to make liquid fuel from carbon dioxide, which is pretty awesome. So why exactly are fossil fuel companies investing in the process? Well, carbon dioxide can use to flush out the last remaining deposits of oil in wells that are past their prime. So you can use it to get more out of the ground. It's estimated that using carbon dioxide can delivered extra deliver an extra thirty percents of crude from oilfields with the added benefit that the gas is then sequestered permanently in the ground. So at the same time that you are taking this out of the urn putting into the ground. You're also able to frac which by the way is one of the reasons that America has been reducing its carbon emissions for years because of the rise of fracking natural gas provides less carbon dioxide emission than other forms of carbon based fuels. Carbon Engineering's director capture technology has the unique capability to capture and provide large volumes of atmosphere with carbon dioxide Occidental. Petroleum's senior VP Richard Jackson in a statement carbon carbon engineering is also being invested in by PHP best known for coal mining Dr Fiona wild who's the head of sustainability and climate change at HP says the reality is that fossil fuels. We'll be around for several decades, whether an industrial processes and transportation, well, we need to do is invest in those low emission technologies that can significantly reduce the emissions from these processes. So in other words, we have to keep using the processes the work, but we can reduce emissions. Well, we're doing it. So our environmentalists happy about all of this the answer for many of them. No. It's a huge concern says support Berman international program director for stand dot earth. We need to be working together to figure out how we move away completely from fossil fuel. So in other words, it's all or nothing to fossil fuel completely don't bother trying to make it safer to use. She says that's our moral and economic challenge these technologies provide a false hope that we can continue to depend on fossil fuels and produce and burn them and technology, we'll fix it. We are way past that point others are concerned that the development of direct air capture devices may just encourage some people to think they don't have to personally reduce their carbon footprints. It's impossible to say says BBC if carbon Engineering's idea will emerge as the type of device that makes a major difference in the battle against climate change. Certainly the company believes its machines could become as communist water treatment plants right now, it's occurred enough money to build that commercial facility. They can draw down carbon for less than one hundred bucks a ton. There's a worry that large investments from the fossil fuel industry will be turned toward producing more oil as opposed to climate change. But is very true that new technologies that reduce the impact of carbon emissions. Why is that a bad thing? The answer is because the real goal for a lot of these folks has nothing to do with reducing carbon emissions. The real goal from any of these people is a global redistribution system to destroy phone channel Connie's in the name of reducing climate change. Well ignoring the actual leading producers of carbon emissions places like China and India. That's obvious from the way that this is being treated. I mean, if you had cancer, and I said, you know, what there's a brand new treatment. It's just exploratory. But it's shown some optimistic results. Would you be happy or upset if you're upset? I would suggest that maybe it has something to do with the fact that you are not actually anti cancer. So if you think this problem should be celebrating. If you're not celebrating. It makes me wonder why in just a second. I'm gonna tell you the story of a sad sad democratic rift over at the New.

Carbon Engineering Dr Jenny MacKay cancer senior VP HP Berman America director program director Connie Richard Jackson BBC India China