19 Episode results for "Dr Jeff"

Ep 87: Finding the Good in the Bad --COVID19 with Dr, Jeff Gardere

The Culture Soup Podcast

30:05 min | 7 months ago

Ep 87: Finding the Good in the Bad --COVID19 with Dr, Jeff Gardere

"Hey y'all this is culture soup where Texas culture and business collide. It's a podcast at spoons up. Everything hot from social media. I'm your host El Michelle Smith and each episode. We bring you some of the most notable and not yet notable thought leaders in Tech Business and culture. You was twenty twenty in fact. It was just about a month ago about the time that I joined tick. Tock you know the social media platform that's pretty much the happiest place. On the Internet. People dance people lip sync people. Make you laugh. People make you smile. Sometimes people show other emotions but generally. That's what it is. It's a little bit Rachid. It's a little bit fun. It can be very informative well after joining. Take top learning the culture even submitting. Some tick tock of my own. There was a certain. Take top that jumped out at me just last week. It was video of people in Italy on their balconies in their apartments. Singing a Riana Song. You know blink. Better get my money. You know. That's all right anyway. They were singing all in unison. All in English despite the fact that probably not all been spoke English but it wasn't so much the song they were seeing although it was quite a proud moment to see black culture this dominating the world especially during a crisis and talking about Covert Nineteen Aka Corona virus. These people I read were all sequestered in their homes. Self quarantined because the country is lot down because virus is taken hole in spreads so quickly and so many have lost. Their lives is interesting to see how people adapt during a crisis and no doubt all of us have felt the impact of Corona virus around the globe. Even around the corner. And it's change. You know I talk about change happening. Two ways it's either thrust upon us or we take the reins we initiated. This was changed. That happened to us that was thrust upon the entire world and it's sad because people are losing their lives. People are dying. People are getting sick but on the other hand. There's a lot of good coming from corona virus it really is all a matter of mindset as an executive in business coach in life coach and make it my business to make sure that people own their happy because no one else does and it's the only way we can be resilient through tough times. I talked to Dr Hernandez Babari last week and we talked about globalism impact on the spread of this pandemic. This week I have another friend. You've heard him here before. Dr Jeff Gardir America's psychologist. He's GonNa talk to us about how to keep our mind right during unprecedented times. A fear and uncertainty without further ado. I want to reintroduce to you my friend. America's psychologists Dr Jeff Gardir. Hey everybody I'm so excited to have America psychologist me my dear friend for more than it does here. Beer from New York City. Says I'm doing well just really glad to be with you in these extraordinary times That we are experiencing our entire applecart bid toppled over. I am so sorry that we have to go through this. Kovic nineteen pandemic. I am so sorry for all the people who are ill or may die from this route but I do hope that we don't let this tragedy be something that has not changed us a fundamentally in how we must march on into the future in a much stronger way than than the way that we're going into this we've got to come out of this rabbit hole even stronger even better as a society as individuals in our relationships. Absolutely Jeff in you know what it's important to keep perspective because so many of us like you and I. We have first world problems when it comes to this. Right Allie have to do is keep to ourselves. Wash your hands right right other. People don't have it that way whether you're more elderly if you have underlying conditions if you're poor and may have access to things rocking from home that's right our access to even hand sanitizer writing if you're living on the street and then you're exposed to other illnesses. That may put you at risk for the corona virus. Right so you know. Many of us are trying to keep it light light hearted. But it's good to keep in mind that even as we try to get a chuckle here in the air. This is a serious thing. Look there are a lot of people who are now hunkered down who have self isolating self quarantined and just as you said Michelle. Have all of the creature comforts but and they're learning how to interact with their families again had to be with one another day coming in and spending time with one another for example all my children are coming on except for the one in South Korea. Yet I leave it there right. Your she's there and she's doing absolutely five South Korea's done so much better than we have here amock with their testing and salt but I think the bottom line is even though we want people to do better even though we want them to try to be comfortable even though we want them to be safe. Never lose sight of the people who on the front lines just as you said? The immuno compromised the elderly the people in poverty the people living on the streets. It's not just the virus that may decimate them but what we're seeing as to. What's going on now with this recession that we're in knowing freefalling falling economy. It's crazy but you know what that note what you say. We have a culture moment yet. Let's do the most obvious. Hashtag trending there at least two of them. One is corona virus the other is cove in nineteen. Jeff how do we keep our minds? This is heavy. It is happy and so there was an old country. Song Mrs Way before your time since. I'm so much older than you. It's called I beg your pardon I never promised you a rose garden right. There's gotTa be a Little Rain Sometimes. So we've been very privileged in the United States. Most of us not have to deal with Ongoing wars with ongoing on You know Starvation with other diseases and so on their societies in countries that deal with that every day. And how we have to step into the reality of twenty twenty that no one is immune from that if we take care of everyone else who has less than us than it's going to touch all of us as that's how we keep our sanity that it's only been a matter of time that we've been able to escape the realities of the ups and downs of what can happen as far as our environment or as wars as far as famine and as far as disease and was still blessed that we're able to talk about it in the Rocking about it now. Absolutely absolutely you know it's interesting. You raised that because last week I had another done ruin a PhD doctor of Media and Communications. And he was talking about the impact of globalization. And how that really does impact this pandemic in that. Your point exactly. We're all connected in theory. Is that whatever happens in another country will ultimately have some kind of impact. That's in your own that's right and that's right answer. Look outside of yourselves Ourselves and this whole idea what what is political system been under this leadership it has been tribalism and tribalism at working and so I'm seeing communities that have never talked before sides. That never talked before people who've never talked before because of race or religion. Whatever the case may be they are now talking to another. They are now communicating with one another and we even see for the first time. The logjam has been broken in Washington. Where the the Republicans and the Democrats are actually cooperating on it. Absolutely you know what my folks in the faith based industry would say is like a guy hit reset and we're having to do exactly what you say we are realizing we're all in this together. I think one of my favorite things on social media which is one of those things is keeping US connected despite. All of this is watching on TIC TAC on instagram. Where the people of Italy or out there singing the Riyan attune. They're all quarantine in their apartments. But they're all singing together and guess what we're hearing a mayor. This year's this is what we call the human spirit and this is why we're still on the planet as this particular species because we continue to habituate and we We adjust and we conquer and we keep moving forward. And so. That's what when this story is written on this Coq au Vin nineteen pandemic The warning that we've been given from the Creator that we have to come together. It's like a movie now. I know you don't remember this one. And they did. A remake was called the day the Earth stood. Still where you know. This robot came from another planet stood right in the center of Washington and all of these faction all these warring factions. Had to come together in order to deal with the situation and it was really about was that robot was sent to tell people. Hey you all better get it together or you all going to perish and that this. Hoven nineteen is about. We better get it together. We better get out. Wigs on tight. We bet minds right. Yes we will not sure bye. I just got word out of my graduation requirements for my certification as an executive in personal coach pitch. But it's a good lead up to say that I've been in contact with a lot of people over the last several days as Cova even more crucial offering free services to one of the things that I have been doing for. Small businesses in also leaders in the workplace is a share with them strategies on how to shift their mindsets to think on the positive. Because you know my. Coaching is based in positive. Psychology of course don't have the same credentials that she was a psychologist. We are very different. But what kind of swimming in the same lane. Absolutely varied in diversified versu- fide. Approach in the different specialties. In order to get to where we are going. That's what was saying about covert nineteen. We can't have same getting in everything we do. We have to bring all the voices together in order to get the solution so you know. Of course I'm so very proud of you in everything that you've accomplished including this latest accomplishment but I can tell you audience this ain't just for you if the next naps the next the next the next and that's what it really is all about living and learning. You know the first ten of heavy is there to say about that. Well I did. That's what will learnings from Kobe. Nineteen to be grateful for the things that we do have to be grateful for our resources. Yeah we may go into a supermarket and the shells may be empty on a couple of items but guess what you're in the supermarket. The supermarket is open. I remember in you know at some points in Russia and some other countries where people would go into supermarkets. And there'd be maybe five six seven eight irons so the fact is that we are resilient Here in the United States who are resilient in the world. We've got to help one. Another people been able to stock up and even those haven't been able to stock up. We're going to find a way to help them. So we must be grateful for families. We must be grateful to our friends. We must be grateful for the simple fact that we are now finally coming together. No matter what the divider in cheese has done even he has the now bring us together because he knows hate and division. Ain't the way isn't that trip. He's act bring people together to conquer covert nineteen yet his. Hey his hand was forced orange and you just hands happened wars. Why God right? Yes absolutely absolutely is a beautiful thing so I understand that. We are all responsible for our extra happiness. So what do we do as individuals to get too happy during the time that is full of uncertainty? Well I think we must never forget in these times the importance of learning to love the importance of learning how to keep love and the importance of the human connection not just loving partners but also loving all of those around us and giving that helping hand. And here's here's the thing people who are south isolating self quarantining who may have to stay in shelter. We're doing all of this for the greater good when this just for our own health or that of our grandparents or those around us source sick would doing it for the salon viable of society and for woman and man behind shop. Eat things doing things. Not just for us but unselfishly for all of society. That's what that's why we're going hard at this thing the way that we are absolutely you know. I keep referring to the latest star wars movie. I don't know if you've seen it but towards the end there there's a great word where it says. The trick of the evil side is to trickle into thinking that we're alone that will isolated. And how can we end up in that mindset by feeding all the negative energy even the the news and information that we see? How can that put us in a place where well it all depends on the mindset that we have I can absolutely tell you that there are some people who live on Cable News. For example able news is their friend yet. But they're resilient enough that they can look at that many many hours a day and be educated by it no matter what they're getting it from Rhyan. Msnbc Fox News whatever the case may be but there are other people who can only take so much and proposed people. I say look you know if you if you if that news brings you down. If you feel that you're getting negativities from it and you're not getting enlightenment than turn it off as Teddy pendergraph said when he said turn off the lights each asset turned it off got took me over and over and over again so I thanks a lot. So what are they wanting to know from? You know. It's really interesting and I brought this up with a couple of folks one of them being Album Manager Janelle farewells. Yes she's the best and she loves proud of you but we're also proud of your incredible success but no no. It's it's it's it's it's real and you know had guess I do just not to. Their face are that being said but the important thing is you know in what I learned. It's just you know for a long time. Under the trump administration. Everything has been politics in TV. So a lot of people like you and I you as a motivator As a life coach myself as a psychologist a lot of people. I know they didn't call on US anymore. They didn't want to know what we thought. Even though I always knew all of it was psychological anyway because we're dealing with nothing but the insanity of the politics and what it was turning people into so now all of a sudden the veil has been lifted on our leaders the emperor's with no clothes on now being seen you know tribalism is now falling apart Power of virus and now people are going back to what's going on in our minds so now all of a sudden the phone never stops. Ringing and people want knowledge they want enlightenment. They WanNa know how things happen and so I really do hope that we have the right answers for them. Not The answers that they want to hear not the answers that we wanna give but staying in the reality of the true answer. -solutely well you know what the other thing I want to talk about. I called my therapist probably a couple weeks ago in a you know. I do check in every once in a while you know. Mental health is important for everybody right now so just when I did cove in nineteen was making its move on the United States and she did something that I'd never expect you to do but I'm so glad she did it because she her office is way up North Almost Oklahoma from my home in Home Office. And I'm going to send you a link because I have a hip certified or approved platform that we need to use this a lot like zone which blew my mind because of course zoom is in my arsenal. I You sky the time. I have some other state of the art things that allow me to do everything just like this just like talking to you and Bradley. We're seeing practicing medical professionals and counselors and therapists also using these platforms. Are you using it? More and more I I've always been using it and Some of the ones that now on not hip compliant are actually in. You have to check. With the American Psychological Association American Psychiatric Association But are actually now getting a waiver with regard to hypocr compliance because people need to talk and so everything is pretty much been thrown out the window. But I think it really is important for us. Understand that we've gotTA check in with people folks have pre existing mental health conditions. Really need to stay in therapy. They stay on their medications because even though we may think. Wow this is fascinating. What's going on the stress you can cut it with? It's it's real and you know those of us who are practicing gratitude and we're being resilient and doing all of that every once in a while you get this like Whoa. What in the world is going on? This is well. Let me tell you what's going on. Let me let me tell you how crazy right down my wife. Who's a starfish you know? What a starfish is like okay? That's a person when they sleep in the bed. I want you to touch them. They spread out like skaarfish touch them. You wake them up the APP sleep issues and so on okay. Homegirl has been spooning with me. Every night are bless her and you know. Hey Don't you know I'm a starfish now. I know you spoke to her right back. Yes I like. Ooh You draw closer to your loved ones. I have been keeping my little girl. So close to me at Lenny more by the way. She's so tall but she's still got a little abyan or you know in fact that's my purchase. Pumpkin and I need her to know that she's during all this craziness going into the world because it is very hard to shield this information from your kids especially when their schools are shutting down. Well so what's so interesting? Is that all of a sudden With the school shutting down. I think it's important that we keep as much as possible. A routine for our kids make sure they still wake up at the same time that they would have gone to school and we should do the same thing for those of us. Who are yes get dress. It's not just about you. Know WALKING AROUND AND PAJAMAS. That's GonNa make you lazy. You can wear loose clothing but get grass. Make sure you take a shower in the morning. Don't believe end of the day if you worked out earlier. Make sure you work out at home. Bust out those hundred sit ups and push ups. I'm hitting Peleton by the way when we're all done you would please the buttering set you up. And that's why the screaming achieve and more But you know this is. We've gotTA maintain the routine. We'VE GOTTA maintain a self discipline now that the kids are home and make sure that they do their homework. And I have kids now. Who FOR THE LONGEST? Time didn't want to be anywhere around me. Let me show you something. Hey y'all all of a sudden he parks itself next to me. He hasn't done that in ten years. These are these are very unprecedented times. Yes absolutely and I know we haven't seen this in my lifetime. I don't think my parents are seen in either. We have not but this is what's going to bring out true character and this as Winston Churchill said this has got to be our finest hour with regard to caring for one another doctor Jeff garp year. It has been amazing as always. Thank you so much. Come onto the show and I can't wait to talk to you agents. Are we gonna see you around on television in the next few days? Where can we see? You know who knows? I don't really care you know what's important to me. People like you giving information and helping all of us. It's not been about me. It's never been about me. It really is about people like you. The new generation just grabbing that dawn and running within so so proud of you. Keep doing what you're doing and I'll be going to the retirement home soon. I'm still going to be so we don't know held one hundred and five. Who knows I'm close to it? Don't get me where they can find. Okay they can go to a doctor. Jeff Gardir DOT COM D. R. J. E. F. G. A. R. D. E. R. DOT COM. I don't even know my twitter at Dhaka. Jeff Yard dear as a whole bunch of stuff out there but if you go into Google put my name in then you'll find the infamous Jeff Garcia and all the platform. It's really funny when people call me and say Ooh I found you on social media or value on TV. And I'll say really and you still want their with talk. I'm surprised you not running the other way. Everybody Palm who is about a lot of humor. I appreciate. You radiate you Michelle. We'll talk to hold the family guy. God bless America. Awesome Conversation with Dr Jeff Garcia Dear. America's politics now together all sorts of content for my community in light of a corona virus. When you do is go to my website L. Michelle Smith Dot Com and you will see an icon of me the scroll down and standing near Tampa and and it says yourself cope in nineteen look for that. Click on him okay. There's an article there. It has links to all sorts of resources. Not just for professionals. It's for anybody it's life it's business and it is career in leadership. Coaching all in one place. And you'RE GONNA see links to not just this podcast because I'll make sure this is linked to but you're gonNA find last week's podcast. You'll find a special message for me. I wouldn't live last Friday for instagram community. He will also find seven questions to keep moving your business forward for small business owners and also for entrepreneurs and you will also find that. I'm doing for Re coaching on Friday. There are a few more slots left if you want to join in. Click on this package. I'm telling you in there is also a place for you to book your appointment. Thirty minutes one on one with me by phone and we will get you moving forward and unstuck in this time of uncertainty and fear that we're calling dynamic. I hope all well stay. Well check on your neighbors check on your family and let's pull together because you know what at the end of the day all to find us. Online at the culture seems dot com on instagram and twitter at the culture soup and on facebook at the Culture Soup. Podcast until next week. The coaches you park. As the reduction of no communication the culture sue PODCAST is a registered trademark of no silos communications. L L C.

United States America El Michelle Smith Michelle Jeff Italy executive South Korea Texas Dr Jeff Gardir America Washington New York City Mrs Way instagram Dr Jeff Gardir Dr Jeff Garcia Earth Dr Hernandez Babari
Ep. 32:  Dr. Jeff & the Apocalypse

Room 77 | Podcast

40:26 min | 5 months ago

Ep. 32: Dr. Jeff & the Apocalypse

"This pockets contains explicit content language and sexual situations. It is intended for adults. Eighteen years of age and older these thoughts and opinions expressed are not those of any specific employer group or individuals that up with the rat race. We decided to sell everything and move to Cancun Mexico. Now we do it. We'd Love Work Party and play at desire resorts after sixteen years in the lifestyle. We thought we saw all. You are so wrong so wrong. Oh my God so wrong. Now we WANNA share the fund that we get to have every day so come to room seventy seven. Let's play aright. Lauren. You're both here present missing a lot of people. We are missing a lot of people. How are you? How are you and then good? How're you doing fantastic? You look amazing. Why because I'm outlets. Yes I'm skin. Looks Amazing you have a nice little glow going to you. You're radiating positively. That's how I get through my day. Is You smiling? And laughing. And making life worth living You're so sweet. I also want a divorce. Life is strange it is it is a little bit strange right now but we do want to thank the outpouring of love that we received from all of the people who went over to Patriot and bought our dollar episode and more just saved our lives in a way. I don't think people really understand what it's like you know. We came out here not out here but we came down here well depending on where you live. Maybe we came up here. I don't know I don't know where you live but Yeah we came to Mexico on a whim and a prayer. We've been started doing this thing. And the support of everybody's made it possible. WanNa thank every person or that one person who listens? It's been remarkable. We know that a lot of people are suffering up there and we wanted to say by your support. You've helped us to not suffer through this. It really means a lot to aside. Just the emails of people saying like can we mail used to. What do you guys need rethinking of you and that really means a lot to us? It really does. I think we would have been in severe panic mode. If we didn't have the support over there patriotic for me. Absolutely my favorite part of the day is hearing the answer to this question. What Day is it has become the favorite part of my day. God Yes the quarantine is starting to get to me in sort of a psychological level. I guess it's starting to change my mood a little bit. I am the barometer of the world. I know this up. Something's bugging me. It's it's probably bugging somebody else out. There I represent the every man mostly the every woman but yeah. I'm starting to feel a little blah. I feel like I'm bringing you die tired of me. No I'm not tired of you. I you tired of going to the store for me. No look at it as like a little adventure. I don't know what I'm doing there. I just hold onto my list like it's my last line of defense treasure map. I mean you could use a little bit. Better penmanship. Such chicken scratch like some beautiful mind. Shit I know to you. It makes the outsider. It's like one step above a note to call nine one one. I've Been Kidnapped and stuck it up against the car window while it was driving. That's what it looks like but I enjoy it. I don't mind going to the store I mean I like getting out more when there isn't people around you jam it's Gm So it's it's a little bit better for me but yesterday had a very long conversation with the lady about breadcrumbs in Spanish. So we've talked a long time. How to say breadcrumbs in Spanish? And what is the answer? I forget Mega Migas Day pan but Migas Day pan is not really correct. It's not what they they use. That's out says it in a translator but I had to text be an ask be. I'm like hey how do you say that? Because they don't know what the fuck I'm talking about the one they go by is panned. Modibo Yeah Ground Brad Modibo. Before I even looked on the translator is walked up and I said do you have Povo Day pan which is what does that mean. Dust dust of bread. That's bread that's not far off was the loosest translation. I could come up with my head because I don't know crumbs. Yeah and I don't know ground so I I asked for bread dust and she looks at me like someone would look at you when you ask them for breakfast. Did you wipe your nose? Like he had a coke problem because I had a mask on arts so then she finally got what I was talking about. And then we took a trip together over to the Deli section as. You asked me how much I wanted and then I didn't have the energy to explain your. I don't really understand the metric system. I don't know how much breadcrumbs way nor do I know how to make that equivalent. And how about Kilo Kilo Housing Graham? Yeah give me a kilo. I don't know how much that is but I know it looks like in a cocaine photo. That's what I need. He knew rapid chess. But while I was in the store going through my chaotic breadcrumbs Scavenger Hunt. I'm out there even with a few people there. I am aggressively looking for hot. People have sex with. I mean it's just like hey it's getting desperate right like I'll just take them and throw them in a van. Take them away. You raping lead Bass I am. I Am Shush. I just need to take your temperature. I and fill out this form about where you've traveled in the last couple of weeks and I need some information about your family friends for you. Take off your clothes and then and then I'm going to rape you just. It's just getting desperate. I'm a little sexually frustrated in the in the lifestyle world because I don't have anybody to fuck around with play with look at touch. Rub Up against flirt with other than you again. I love you to death but you don't count when somebody does finally come to desire and we are there. I'm just take them first. Couple even hints at the fact that they would come home with us. I'm just GonNa be like let's go. What are your names? All I forget I'll ask you on the way home. I don't care I just need to have some sort of orgy right now. Yeah I was getting horned up by watching the final scene of sausage party. Oh my God. Having the end orgy scene in that particular Seth Rogan Film. I was like Oh God. I need a fucking orgy. I need to have dirty disgusting sex with my wife. That's what I need to do now. We don't usually go into terrible detail about our or even really sex with with others mainly because I don't want to gross people out mean that's the honest truth. Like what do they care like? I'll shut up just how it works but I'm not going to do that today today. I'm going to go into absolute detail for a reason at gay before we went upstairs. That's where we have the sex I see a time anywhere in this particular day. We did it on the upstairs And I had right before hurt my back so I had warned you I was like. Hey we're GONNA fuck you like. Yeah listen are my back really hurts okay so if you have any fantasy of having sex with a barely mobile eight year old man. That's going to help out my performance. Just set your by right there. I was sort of trying to get into a position that felt good for my back. Only being in one of two percent lion flat on my back yeah or or sort of on my knees right tells you could starfish night. Be Okay with I. Anyone do that. What I did was is. I just started treating you like an absolute pick. I took you down and it's just sort of turned into this right. Yeah I started feeding you my caucus shoved my cock in your mouth and I was taking your head. I was grabbing your hair and I was just fucking your face and then I started just dirty talk. It was like little fucking whore fucking whore I love and he did not so then salivate. I know and you're getting more and more turn on at the more and more turned on. You're getting elevating your dirty elevating dirty talked now just like pending you down. I'm shopping my copy your mouth that I'm making you salivate and your eyes are watering. And I'm telling you that you are a worthless piece of Shit and you need to learn. You need to learn how to suck cock and then you started making sounds. I told you to shut the fuck up. Shut up if I want to hear something out of you. I will tell you two fucking speak and then you started talking. I was like shut up at at one point. I slapped your face and then I paused and I was like. I can't remember if she doesn't like to be slashed. In and then I was waiting too long so I slapped in the face. I was like I'm going to stop slapping her in the face. I kind of remember this. She doesn't like that now. I do like it. Oh so there's I was like you or a pig. You're nothing you are fucking worthless. You are a whole that I am here. Fuck your just a halt me. I don't WanNa hear you speak out anything about you. I paid a man to come into this room to use. You like fucking hole you filthy dirty or I love you very much and you're getting turned off. I like I think he's finally face right like going to do. I'm going to walk outside of the room and I'm GonNa Comeback in here. I want you to sit on the edge of the bed yet. Like you are trapped here and you have to have sex with any stranger who walks through the door so you sat on the bed like a good little person and there were you sort of put your head down and you put your hands down and I walked out the door and I thought about making your way at a little bit but I gotta be honest. I was way to Hornets. I walk out the door and come back in and I grab your hair and I pulled back and I say are you Lauren. And you just nod yes and then. I throw you down and I lift your legs up and then I just start hammering away you I just start fucking the shit out of you. I'M A I'm getting so super turn on getting turned on talking about not just treating you like an animal and then I was like all GonNa come. You had already come because I had already. You've already had an orgasm before this right so I have to last forever. Which FOR ME IS THIRTY. Seven seconds so. I can kind of come faster because you're at a cave so I'm like I'm GonNa go there and I fucking stick my mouth my cock in your mouth. I am going to make you swallow every drop of compact crawler and I start coming and chicken out and I just come on your chest. Yeah because I was like I can't do it and then like Jim. Jeffries said one of his his routines I am. I'm so sorry are you okay are you? Okay yeah okay. That's out. Okay okay. I'm so sorry love you fit you just violated like well you Kevin. You cut masturbating. You're so turned on. You just sat there and you're like hey can you help me with your fingers. I WANNA come one more time and I'm like let back curt killing me. I'll try okay now. I have a a lot of fantasies that go a little bit deeper than this. And we're going to get even more graphic but we're gonNA put it on the Patriot side of it is a fantasy that I feel weird about a little bit but it also turns me on. But we're GONNA put that over there the dive into it a little bit worse. You'll hear more of that head on over the Patriot dot com forward slash room. Seventy seven year breath dollar. I on this long. I'm listeners for some call. Time listener caller. Thank you all right. Where are you calling? Hey we're coming from sunny southern California first time caller time listener first time. Doing any of its in your family. Who Does the show breadcrumbs there and Sydney? What we'll do you find the good question. I'M GONNA ask this question. Who Does the food shopping in your family? Which I'll do you find breadcrumbs. It seems like it would make sense. Who in your little family? There does the food shopping. Oh Good God. That's me are what I'll do you find breadcrumbs the bread. I'll do you like to call your lady in bed. You like to call her. Names like crazy redhead so fine crutches something like that quickly. I'm like which is fine. Do you like to slap her around a little bit. And then she strong when you were having sex to be called the pig or a lot. I know you like to. Do you ever like to be treated like trust and called a slut? Good God yes. All of these cotton slap during sex in the face out bare minimum years. When you were having sex you ever like to be called a four. Pick come slot. I'll never have you ever been slapped in the face. I'm getting slapped. This is a question that usually goes for the couples. But she's not here but I'm GONNA ask Anyway. Do you swallow plus all right. So we're going to start off with Dr Jeff. A lot of people were like. Hey there's anybody who want to hear from during this time it's Dr Jeff and Dr Karen. Where are they so we were? We were trying to bring them up like guys. We need you guys. We have a fucking family year. We can't just pull everything out of the closet and start talking about sex and balls and tits and our kids are gonNA walk in and this is going to end horribly but I do want to preface this. We did. We did talk to them with and that's coming up next. This is really important. This is true after we talk to them. They donated five hundred dollars to our Patriot on and they are the sweetest people. We WanNa thank them so much. It just doesn't go unfilled cry. Don't it means so much. Dorks they are. I loved them and so much. So and the other thing is a lot of people always ask is Dr Jeff's votes disguise. The answer is yes. It is disguised because he has to keep his privacy which we respect at acknowledge and is especially important. Now that we don't give away his identity being that he is on the White House Kuroda by risk task force. I'm not saying Dr. Foul Daca is Dr Jack. I'm not saying that right now. Of course you're not saying no. I'm not saying that Dr Jeff and Dr Foul are the same person or that you have written. Dr Felt like a wild stallion before. I'm not saying no absolutely privacy is super important at this time there is Dr Jeff. That is what people have been asking. Where are they emails and messages and social media? It's all here and you know what I tell them. Doctors is. This is an easy time for you and I you know what I mean. We have a lot of questions that are coming in all the time. He got conference calls. Richard I have a fever Richard. What are the symptoms? Richard sent me nudes. There are so many things just coming in all at once and everybody wants answered. Everyone wants a piece Richard Doctors. Are you feeling that over there as well so I just kind of catch up with each other a little bit? We do need to connect but we also need context prioritizing. We just WanNa talk to you about some things. And then Dr Jeff Dr Karen. Which by the way not their real names so then after that will turn the recording off and then we will catch up and talk about your family what it's like in Russia. This time of year did normal stuff that we talk about. Is that okay with you finally decide? How Answer Questions Busienss too busy right now because I had a doctor Dr. Listen I'm going to ask you a question and I want to specific answer. How many lives have you saved today? Dr Karen I don't really want to talk about the pandemic and everything because who knows what's going to happen. This is the question I had in my head I was like are. We actually prepared for a real apocalypse. I got scared because I personally. I'd be dead inside of an hour. If there was a real apocalypse I told Lauren. This this is a true story. We would die alone first of all you would die because I would run away from the danger right. So then you'd be by yourself that you would alone just that yeah so. I said I was like really if something really does happen. We're not gun people and we don't live in the United States. We die we die. We've been shootout. It'd be the wild wild west especially in the United States in fact if there is an apocalypse. I don't think I want to be in the United States because I think people would just walk out the doors and start shooting each other. You'd be dead in crossfire from your neighbors before the Zombie Apocalypse. Even got to you. It's always been off. It starts with a fever every movie. It's just got different rules but it did start. Be Thinking about who I would want on my team if we were in a clan and I thought I want Dr Jeff and Dr Karen on Martine Absolutely. Do you feel like we would add something to your team. Because I have a few questions that I need to ask before I make it official. Oh yes you guys would be the best team ever. What bring in the table you guys can. We know you could can tell jokes. That's perfect. I'm really Oregon night. Lauren is organized. And I like to clean so we have a clean tent. I can be the gatherer. That's good doctor. Do you hunt okay. But if you had to like H we if we had to kill someone and eat them as a doctor. Would you know what parts are good part as a human? You could slow rose. Yes your choice needs. I suppose you could write obviously be in charge of butcher. What you're right because he's candy. That's your job so I think we all have actually. I'm the only one offer anything telling jokes but seriously let's say if it did start off on the day that sort of started here. All we had in. Our cupboard was Cheetos in Gatorade. How long could a human live on Cheetos and water? Well influence supply of cheater. No no no no. Let's say a bag of cheetos. Are we talking eight ounce or sixteen ounce COSCO? Let's do costco-sized? How long can humans live off that bag of cheetos but us when sharing our Cheetah? We didn't meet up yet. You're jumping way ahead in the movie. We haven't met up together yet. We haven't gotten desperate enough to go outside yet. She does it. Water spot all right back cheat. Us RELAXED WATER. The cheetos to go a time really like cheeto per day. Rationally cheaters out per day. I don't know if I could do that because they're so good he can't he won. You know what I mean and then you get that dust on your fingers you can we. Can we bump that up to two or three a day and these offi puffy not crunchy kind although I do prefer those but I find three stages of cheeto eating which is oh my God. These are so good. Wow this tasting weird and then Oh my God I need to throw out. You always get to part three just too late all right so we got cheetos before we make it out. Does gatorade help us if I have? Some water are going to worry about dollars and my bringing the Gatorade or am I bringing the water or whichever you can have. The most of. It doesn't really matter. It doesn't even have the gatorade going to bring gatorade. Okay do you have a flavor preference? Richards is great. Gorge is the best one the red ones. I don't like the red ones either then. No Red and we're not bringing the reds like a bad movie. If that's all we had I would pour it out on the floor. Yeah reporting them our in them out. Have you been working on your your body? I sell a camera for a little bit before this and Damn Actually Karen AC- working out. He always works out saying you have exercise equipment in your home. Yeah we do. We have a full gym so jealous low. We can bring it to the camp bring way if you would help us. Carry the fifty pounders. This is why we're going to survive. We're smart like this. We will bring weights and carry them everywhere so that we will be yup so that we have time to work out. I just think that as a clan walking through the apocalypse we WANNA be shredded. You know what I mean. We should look out right. Yes poses a good question for ladies. What kind of shoe are you packing like a wedge kind of thing or is this? Is this an easy pump? Did I get that right? I'm just I'm thinking of primary sneaker but then I like to air the shoe let the feet air open toe. Yeah definitely a Wedge Heel I think yeah the wilderness the wedges redoing apocalyptic the night look like Oh my God. That's the nights would be so like you guys got to look hot because that's part of our thing. Your hair can be a little bit. Messed up but in sort of a stylish way yeah like that. Beach Wilderness. Look like must abun with dreadlocks. Exactly the doctor and I are going to put dirt on our face strategically and spots that make us more handsome but take a shower every night and brush your teeth weird bamboo. And then we put the dirt right back. Hawk hookup little like running water using like a milk container. I don't think we have to rough it. That much I have a feeling waffle houses will still be open because they don't close in our world some waffle houses and and Walmart or to well. We have an RV we take the RV okay. This is getting because I think we're GonNa Mad Max the fuck out of that campy all right. It's getting too campy art. That's pull back out burns. Still have the treadmill chess or wait at. We're still carrying weights. Let me ask you this. Let's just say that we're in in the thick of it and one of us. I'm not going to say which one we're doctors. One of us wants a little plastic surgery. Now you brought your doctor tools with you. I brought my down until doc. Is there a way to give me a lift in? The field are eight and again if you want to hear more about our plan during the apocalypse go to either rooms heavy dot com and hippopotamus on link or Google patron dot com forward slash group seventy seven. You can hear how we are planning to take over the world and how we will and pillage other plans for. World dominance and homoerotic surgeries. All of. It will be waiting for you over them. Cheetos over there are too many cheetos Jake's typically when I'm eating Cheetos I'm pretty high so that limits me from throwing up so You can probably finish backhaus like Walmart hoax of cheese. Focus on the word booze. A five gallon bucket of Jesus could stop. Bsing finished a half of one of those barrels of cheese. Goofs Evening Nassar. During an apocalypse the proper shoe at tire would be optimistic. Oh the Sparkley Solta ones yeah and also if the yields are really really long and sharp so can just kick something still good choice Gucci loafers D-. I want everyone to know spot can. Maybe it's science LETO. Six inches glitter Black Ryan. Sounds who the fuck cares at that point. What's your favorite flavor gathering? I don't know it's blue. Yes that is the correct answer. What is your flavor of Gatorade and like the glue out? There's a purple one. That's pretty good too. Yes Reverend Prefer. Pedialyte in the middle of our debauchery. Gatorade in pitch aren't in a pinch. What is your favorite flavor of the gatorade? Great Grape grape. Yes I like the frost. No coloring agrees that the red SOx. Yes what is your favorite flavors. Frost Frost Ones Arctic Frost. That's the white flavored one. I like yellow. And we're trying to get gatorade just making reds now to get everybody on board with. That would need to strongly worded letter next conversation. You're going to hear an extra extra boys being ex playmaker from our M. Yeah so that was living here but if you want to hear the rest of that conversation go on over to patriarchy. She gives you an update of her life after desire. Now it's not secret anymore. She was living here with us in little by the way. If you WANNA look at be. She is over on instagram. At 'em underscore the R. N. A. L. D. or on twitter at Marissa underscore E. R. N. A. L. Check her out. Make sure she knows that we sent you and she will give you news videos videos. Yeah probably I don't know if that last part is true. I haven't talked to her about it all right so the other thing that I wanted to bring up is. Lauren is in some sort of crisis so she started this only ask. Are you aware what only fans is? Yes art so only fast for anybody. He doesn't know is like you tune in you tune in. I don't know you subscribe right. Yeah it doesn't matter. It's a way that we're making ends meet. And she's decided I'll get to get on Kamerun diddle myself so last night she was like I wanna make video of us doing stuff I was like are asking for it. I'm like what's on your shot list. So she says Waga. I'd need a shot of you. Fuck me in this position this position in this position. I'm Sharon I'm supposed to be working tonight. But our August shower. We'll get these positions done. And then she throws this at me she says I want to do it in front of the giant window while the neighbors are what ladies like word dollars so I'm like sorry. Walk downstairs completely naked and I talked about in another episode. You can see into our window. Lauren's like lighting. It's like we're setting up a window in Amsterdam to like the light district to bring clients and she setting the lights up. I'm sweating nervous. Right started my eyes are locked on the street. Because I'm like oh. Please don't walk by. Please don't walk by police. Don't anybody walked by. I was trying to make dim so people couldn't see in and she's trying to make it bright so people can see what she's actually shooting. It didn't end well. I think I got so nervous that I just came on your leg and then I ran out of the way he did. Try to fill out a back and you came on my leg. I didn't even know that I just ran away. I just ran because I was like. I can't do this man if you ever wanted to know what. It looked like. When a person with mental disabilities has sex for the first time. That's what I look like. This is my life now along with Lauren. Selling Panties I sell today. Laura is selling her patties right now. How do you feel about that? Be Up here. How much would you pay for Lawrence Panties? I would say eighty eighty dollars depending on what she did in them. Yeah I just sold them for bargain and if it has some lobue come return more expensive now that that can make a baby that can be scraped off yeah then their DNA for life. Yeah no what have they been asking for that. You've been running in. You know I put up a couple of examples on the loss EPA like what. What are the examples? It was working out Sweating ones that. I slept in which are kind of like you know it just takes it takes that when you wake up in the morning you have a different smell right vaginas bed breath and then masturbated and then you came up with the ones but everyone wants masturbated one nobody wants no one wants sweaty one for ones that you crap them not graphing and any of a and then came up with once. The EP didn't which I think is actually a better one than Crapton were both. Why can now no one wants? Thatt's number one number two Combo. What did you do you masturbated masturbated in a and? Then 'cause I was making like a video last night so they're the ones like. I pulled aside when I finished. I put him back on. Just sorta wiped it and then I just made a clip at the end. Maybe someone would want to buy these so I just made a little video clip that the ends like four second and then he was messaging me as like. I sent him the little four four second video clip like I want those and that's what I staying a little package deal like. You're going to get a little clip. And if you want the masturbation video then you can also that's like an additional item. You can add to cart and then I'll ship you the pennies done. It's like a cool deal right and then you can smell the panties. Watch the video jack off. Whatever I don't know I thought it'd be cool package. You put them in a little plastic baggie. Like you're in the right off. You gotTa take them off is all that is like that's good that's good. It's it's intense and I put them in a bag in Egypt. It up a put it on the bed for the morning. I was like I don't know what to do with it. I haven't sold these. But what else can we sell on you? What if you start lactating? Wait if I do like wax strips this whole conversation make surfaced Chris. Do I do know that the panties are deal because there's all this vending machines and stuff that's high got the idea. There has to be a pan for sale on site somewhere. Well there's a few of them are they are. Yeah what do they look like? How many people are on their selling pennies? Aol Dot a couple of them. And you know for me to pay someone to twenty percent commission. I'd rather just direct deal with my people cut out the middleman dealing with panties. Ernie Pan is anyway. You don't need an agent well and that's what I was thinking like. I'M GONNA make it more special and I'm GONNA make a tiny little video that goes with it. I'm GonNa make like a something that shows at the end row. It's that you know exactly what you're getting you know. It was on my body and embrace whatever kinks people have. I WANNA make it as not dirty as possible if that is your fucking embrace it. I'M GONNA make a little video so you can have fun with it and just be study as you want I. There's nothing wrong with that. They tell you what they're gonNa do with your panties now. I haven't gotten that far but someone was like. Tell me what you did to make those panels and I'm like oh I can't get into this on tax but I could show you can show you the video. That's a good tool. I mean ninety dollars keeps going up because she didn't know about the video inflation. Can we sell your panties? Yeah sure that could be the Combo Patty to fry like it. You can't all right so let's start selling stuff or doing it. Got A room seventy talk and there's going to be some sort of back link portal to the dirty stuff so patties and maybe we get into. I don't know if there's a thing with bras or anything like that and also some old electrical equipment that they need to get rid of steel. Does this stuff you can't you can't go to. Canada. I'm sorry I feel like that. You should just make it official. I wish we weren't going through a time right now. And then we could just be on full-time. Yeah we money to pay her outbid excellence because my grand scheme is like to have be here then. B.'s life would just be about the. What's clean I don't WanNA TALK ABOUT RECORD? That is about all we have after this. I may take you upstairs and slap you around a little bit. Sure I was thinking. Maybe I'll up my fantasy a little put a little price tag on. You do a little haggling. We could do. Maybe change the Google lights to maybe a red and work on that Amsterdam feel. Maybe I also have another fantasy that we're GONNA get need cooperation from other people. It involves an auction for for that one and Inox near it. You want to hear the dollar version of all of this over to patriotic or go over to route seventy seven life dot com and hit the Patriots link over there. We're going to have to split. The shout outs to accommodate their so many of them that I don't think we will be able to read all of them on on one episode but we want to thank. Everybody will get to you. We promised that is a problem for us to have but so much so that before. This influx of patriots came in. I had been very worried about just the whole Kobe. Thing and flying now we can just like private so we thank you for that Patriots. It's going to be safe for us. And ultimately you the best fading Katri on Money Lauren. Who are these people that we are GonNa Thank? We have Mark Roscoe David and Casey Mark Booty Call Jason. Liz and Mark Jeff and Karen L. A. couple Keith Elisa Corbett Ra sexy J. Vanna R&B babies dusting Barrett SNP to win. Eleven are W. Oath three to five sell twenty twenty M and toby the couple. Pov Heather be indeed Lauren and been Blink Space Jeff de Matt and Lisa Tyson Susan Lawrence Shirt. Tom Rosebud Jack's Adam Bell mout Lobos Larry and Debbie Ashley D Brown Zoe Hillary Tanya Cannon Sasha P P Wallace Ted tied law adding Kate Katie A. Rod Ducks Lawrence John Von Clyde Tony Dad. My Golden Retriever Chris. Shell Elliott Sousa. Listen Jimmy Leo Costs Haas Ronnie Franchesca. Fransesco aren't as sixty nine. Corey Dr Jeff and Dr Karen and Mister Kenny. All right you didn't hear your name. You will hear it in the future when we get to it. Just don't want to spend ten minutes reading names. This was not even really including the people who just to listen so we want to thank you all so much. But in the meantime Lauren. What are you addicted to this month? I am addicted to the opera soundtrack and cannot get enough of it while I'm jogging. Random thing I know it really is and I hit your music by accidents one. Yeah and I know that. That's what you work out to clear CARLA COP like a I. I jog at night and like I reason it just takes me out of. I don't know I transport I'm weird. I don't try try and pretend I'm normal. That would make me crawl over to a Bush and at any workout done. I'd I have been addicted to the curse of Oak Island which is a show on the history channel. This is what it is. Basically a bunch of people. They've been digging a hole for seven years and have essentially found fucking nothing at all but I've watched almost every episode of that seven years digging a hole unbelievably at one time. They found metal one time. Like we've found would missing are so addicted to those honey. Honey found a piece of wood so what Cha speaking of addiction to what tell them about the media addiction so when you book five nights or more with us you get a Free Bikini from Bikini Addiction Dot Com and we will send that code to you and your welcome email or you can go to you. Bikini ADDICTION DOT COM CHECK OUT US. Room seventy seven and the Promo Code and you will get ten percent off your entire purchase. Really hot stuff. Go check it out go by bikinis. We can look at you in them when we see you next time and again really quick. If you're thinking about going to desire temptation we're taking crews mixture to go to our website. Rooms have had life dot Com and Click on Lawrence box. It helps us live. Pay Our rent and do everything we do. We appreciate if you go over there. And just you want to go around and look at her box. Searcher box could also go to only bands. Check out our box in there. We've got a lot of videos of guys that have set in of them just jerking off that. You've really appreciated not up on my website but you get them. You're like honey look at this guy jerking so high. I love hearing that for my out of fears. Okay Sir or Madam. Thank you so much for listening to Stay safe and hopefully we will soon is about dozen paroles for more information photos or contact does good room seventy seven. Podcast DOT COM. Thanks for stopping by room. Seventy seven we had a blast. Get your clothes and get out.

Lauren Dr Jeff Gatorade Patriots Richard Doctors Dr Karen Google United States Cancun Mexico official Dr Jeff Dr Karen Amsterdam Mexico Seth Rogan Tom Rosebud Jack California cocaine Dr Karen I rape
COVID-19 Special: Understanding and Supercharging your Immune System with Dr. Jeff Bland

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

48:31 min | 7 months ago

COVID-19 Special: Understanding and Supercharging your Immune System with Dr. Jeff Bland

"Hi One group. Rodier hosted the brokering podcast today. We have a special Kovic Nineteen episode for you understanding and supercharging your immune system and we have the best person here to walk us through this education in this material. Dr Jeff Bland. The father. The father of the Functional Medicine Movement. You know Dr Jeff. Bland has been a pioneer in the space for over thirty five years. He's been a mentor to so many out there including myself and my business partner Dr Mark Hyman and why we called on him for this episode is that he has this incredible ability to present complex scientific concepts in a manner. That's both personable presentable and accessible. And that's exactly what he's going to do on this podcast today. Dr Bland earned dual degrees in biology and chemistry from the University of California Irvine and he completed his PhD in organic chemistry at the University of Oregon. He's a fellow of both American College of nutrition where he is certified as a nutritional specialist and the Association for Clinical Biochemistry. Dr Blaine is a former professor of biochemistry at the University of puget sound in Washington and he served as the director of nutritional research at the Linus Pauling Institute of Science and medicine in the early nineteen eighties. He worked directly with two TIME HERE. That right two time. Nobel laureate Dr Linus Pauling who? He considers his lifelong mentor. And we're going to be talking about Dr Linus Pauling in his interviews day. Dr Plane has authored five books. Nutritional medicine for the healthcare professionals in our field of functional medicine and Beyond and over six books on nutrition and health for the general public including his last book the disease delusion conquering the causes of chronic illness for healthier longer and happier life. Get by the way. He's also the principle author of over a hundred and twenty hundred twenty peer reviewed research papers on nutritional biochemistry and medicine. And why? I'm so excited to have Dr Bland here today is because if you look at the way cove nineteen is being presented. The narrative is often that this single agent single virus is the primary cause on its own for the symptoms. That people are going through today. Now there's no denying how terrible the virus is but Dr Bland has written an article recently that you can find in medium called reflections on the Cova nineteen pandemic in there. He lays out an incredibly strong argument based on history and the research. That's available to us that these viruses often do not work alone that there's other insults to Armenian system that end up allowing the virus to hijack our body and invade and take over ourselves and if we don't understand what those other insults are then it's going to be very hard to protect ourselves from this virus so that's what we're talking about today now before we jump into today's interview. I you cannot start a podcast and cove nineteen today without just saying we feel for everyone. That's out there in a pre interview chat. Dr Bland and I were just sharing how heavy our hearts are for. Everyone affected directly or indirectly through. What's happening now? Everybody that's gotten sick. All the individuals that have passed away. The healthcare workers the central workers. That are out there. Everybody that's lost their job because the economy we have to acknowledge this and just have a collective sigh for humanity and the weight. That's on everybody's shoulders now. That being said our hope is that this interview in the material that Dr Bland presents can be a little bit of a glimmer of hope a little bit of a glimmer of regaining control in our life in realizing that we do have something that we can do when it comes to protecting our bodies the bodies in the health of our loved ones now to kick us off. What I asked Dr Blended do is answer. Such a fundamental question that it often gets overlooked. Which is what is our immune system. So we're GONNA kick off the interview by Dr Bland answering that and like a lot of interviews. That are happening today. This interview was done on Zoom so bear with the Audio. The material is fantastic. GonNa pass it over to Dr Bland. Who's going to explain? What is exactly our immune system trying to make this quick eating all of our derive from Boehner which may be for a lot of people kind of something. They didn't know our bone marrow. Has Skin cells these waiting to turn in so that are the origin of all the sales for go round and are blind and our tissues that are being used so these are called weightless L. system the bone marrow also doesn't too so it gets involved with a whole array of very important functions when those cells come out of the bone marrow and interim either life in our body at the rest of the body they are converted into various specialized members of Argon. System based on the Barney. That person has happened so the person has environment fashion. Those cells to become part of immune system they're going to be shunted into becoming a certain type of blood cells that will find viruses bacterial infection. There will be a different way to their. If we're for me if they're if our body supposed to chemicals or as a food allergy. They'll they'll come into a different shape and different so our immune system is being pattern in real time by the environment in which we find ourselves. Wicked includes Howie. How we think always late in how we move. All of those things are going to be sending a message to our immune system how it should form it so when I tell people that every ten seconds we form one million white blood twenty million red blood cells in thirty million platelet sells every ten seconds. You think about my words we're constantly regenerating are in what we WANNA do. In these times stresses regenerator immune system. That's optimally able to do. Its job to take on the battle of the offender in this case the virus and we don't want a tired of them. We don't want worn out immune system. We don't want an insufficient clinkers down into it. We want to regenerate with these fresh cells warriors who are given the opportunity to to defend us and the way we do that is to create our immune system with respect because those cells that dinner formed. We'll go to the places in the body where they're needed as know about fifty percent them. We'll go to our gut in they sit in the Gut Associated Immune system which is the the greatest reservoir of new cells is around our industrial and that industrial. Howie is is going to have something to do with our immune system response so if we eat a bunch of junk and we eat a bunch of racket foods. Our immune system gets on alarm officers. Personality comes less capable of kind of addressing the problems at hand might earn section so we are much more in charge of power immune system works. Then we really most people growing understand and you know this is why so much of a functional medicine and doctors practicing talk about health and disease starting in the guts you know in really paying attention to the gut health which redone many episodes of the podcast for so let's make one more connection just to solidify it so now that we know what the immune system is and where it comes from and we owe that certain people who are immuno compromised our immune suppressing negations. Would it? Help us understand connection Egion because Ernie's hearing that okay elderly population or individuals that are that age of sixty seventy eighty are more likely potentially to be at risk depending on the situation? So what happens in the aging process that our immune system is an impact? You're really asking good questions. Like that's very a question. The question is at the forefront right now of Research right at the cutting edge of what research scientists in the area are really discovering and focusing on and dancing that question. I WANNA throw a lot of terms this account. The scientific addresses this issue. It's called Immuno. Theon typing I think Phoenix is a word in medicine. Biology that defines how a person or organization looks acid fields so our gina tied our genes that determine what we might be Venus. I is what actually happened. We look and feel and so when you talk about the new. No TYPING GETS TO UNDERSTAND FUNCTION. How the immune system looks acts of field right it now. This term is currently recently intern in researching medicine. Because it's only within the last couple of decades actually give maybe less than that. We developed the tools to allow us to actually understand each parts deleting system in much more much more specificity so we just don't talk about the effects of white blood cells we start looking at subpopulations. The white blood cells to having unique personalities. And you need now. Why this long story because this has advanced what is turning recognized? His that our immune system will sell that make it off can undergo damage over time. That accumulates and it has a resonance Memory back on the effectiveness of conscience. Those I mean they collect call. Clinkers are injury and it gets progressively increasing over time. They don't get cleansed in replaced by Height vigilant young warriors at the same rate. That you're building up. These personality bargains have been what's called inflammation inflammation we as we age our immune symphony comes more alarm more injured and more producing inflammation. And this is what happens on people as they grow. Senile is that basically immune system starts a not working as well to defend them and be injuring them. Because it's their producing inflammation inflammation not turns out that that processing intimating is not correlated with our number birthdays. It's not directly related to our here. Some people who have huber days to have pretty bad inflammation. There are white cells already collecting a lot of these injuries. And the debris that results in the Inflammation THAT COMES FROM. It is already readiness. Nobody and then there are other people have lots of birthdays. But if you look at their blood cells carefully their immune cell. They're not collecting injury and they are not producing so there is a relationship aging your birthday. But it's really the biological aging than it is chronological surgeon. And so what we're starting to recognize is the regulation of how these cells get injured and collect. Those damages over. Time is allowed under Arkansas on how we are actually treating ourselves because if the rate of production of our yard exceed the rate of the accumulation of our goal damaged cells. Were still vigilant. We a good immune. Arman hip hopper damaged cells accumulate faster than our young cells. Can come and replace them now. We have the shift that balance into an immune system. That's actually doing us harm. It's not completely working to our benefit. And that's why they eighteen individuals have increasing respite. Also people with other diseases Diabetes Heart Disease Arc. Light is the things that we're learning about now. High Blood Pressure because Nassir predictions jenner associated with an immune system. That's collecting a lot of these injuries. Don't they become co Morbid problems when a person gets infected with a virus like his nineteen? Because it doesn't have the reserve that it needs to fight that because it's already in a injured state is almost like God. There's a castle and it's all it's defenses. Walls and MOATS are all been compromised so now it can more easily be taken over and I and I think this is such an important thing because right now the mainstream idea that's pretty well accepted by most people who are talking about the virus even at the highest levels is that a single agent and the exposure to a single agent. In this case code nine team it could viruses retroviruses ever out there that just simply exposure to that would lead to end an infection or what we're talking about here there what you're describing. Dr Bland is that okay. There might be this external agent out there. But then that agent to be able to take over commandeer the castle city it has to really go against defense and if those defences are strong through things off by the second then it just can't be taken over that same way. I think that's a great wins and I think it's a really good analogy the the nature of it. It's interesting if we all think about one of the back. Schoolkids right in vehicle include season and weakening in our classroom and coal a really bad flu season and the teacher was when tell the student appearance like the cautious. This is a bad season. And maybe Accord the class would be out. There would be sick at home and then we think it's horrible. Of course good kids that are out art. But we don't think about. Why did three quarters of the class with sitting in the same classroom? They were exposed Why are they still here? Not One of those other factors that give rise to our resistance to these things which aren't some of it you say well that's is the lack of the draw while there is some luck of the draw but some of that luck rock and improved in terms of its outcomes like I play Blackjack well they can improve their success of winning by doing the game and knowing the game in this case is knowing how free your immune system to defend against things that are out of your control. You're going to be expensive like you know your article that you had written people can find show notes on the topic of a single agent. I questioned statement. Infectious diseases are caused by civil agent by reason stem from the study of history. The study of history and global viral pandemics and their pathogenesis and demographics. While there's no doubt that specific organisms are seen as infectious factors associated AMEX? I believe you street tells us that these viruses do not work alone. So what are these viruses working with? What's helping them take over our cells in our by and compromise us as Thank you that's a really great segue so unlike despite a quick study that somehow has lost in this discussion. I haven't anybody's talking about that. I think is actually your major. What she asked so back in. Nineteen Ninety reinvited at our Institute for Functional Medicine Annual Conference Day investigator from Harvard. Medical School must go public health. Who Kissed written actually overseen a study in Africa with HIV AIDS of women in Wichita published? In what is considered one of the talknet internal medicine and this study was evaluating whether if women took a simple multi vitamin mineral supplement every day. What influence the infectivity of HIV virus in Africa? And it's a pretty interesting question and you might Well Gee Whiz and you probably would never do that because the viruses. So strong lowly multivitamin down but what they did find was a Kissed Place Significant Reduction in infectivity in those women who did get infected. Their course disease was much more bladder and they were more responsive to immune therapy for the disease in every outcome they improved when they were taking a simple multiple multivitamin minimum. Now one could say well. That's an Afghan. People are malnourished there so you diets in favor of positive outcome because of the nature of the people's nutritional status. That's partly true but what it also tells us is that our immune system is directly in communication with what we're reading in the vitamins and minerals and protein and hundred essential fatty acids it all these phytochemicals and all those things are playing roles in even against a very vicious virus. Hiv couldn't prove function. So I think that's a really should be relooked at as an interesting Example of how much control he might harm so interesting and I want to talk about a couple of things on viruses forty continued. You know there was a article in two thousand seventeen and it was published in the New York Times and talking about how a lot of viruses. Dna is baked into our humidity. In fact they were quoting inside of their DNA contains a hundred thousand pieces of viral. Dna so how can you? How does Dr Jeff Plan? Look like the function and role of viruses in the history of human evolution. You're really asking the good ones. This is like a story lab question answer for me so it's wonderful so that's absolutely true. The over the history of evolution of human species we we incorporated this needs viral genetic information into our own gina originally initially when this was being discussed by Jan. It was thought of as what was called jump. The debris that was accumulating energy normal or trying that was not necessarily doing anything good or did anything bad it was just kind of taking space so to speak so they call Joe Montana as looking to the twentieth century however the Agent Gentleman's And we have these new tools with much love decision at really. What's going on in our genome? We know that. The amount of our genome the percentage of DNA in our genome. It's ourselves that is involved with making us meaning coating for our body cone of the human body represents less than five percent of the DNA energy. No and pro so they would say well. You mean there's ninety five percent junk and only five percent good stuff well but twenty. Five years ago I started saying. My doctors said he cautious. What you call junk because I think as we learn more over time we're gonNA find out that stuff is not junk. It has functions that we don't understand it's not coning necessarily for enzymes that are used but may not function that we will learn later so we shouldn't start using the term. John Until we really understand what that leads and I think I've been proven right that over the last We now call this the dark man or genome and it actually in cones all sorts of very important information. That's not making directly the proteins and enzymes in their body word but it actually makes up a regulatory system that regulates how our genes are expressed its shop bus. It's the executive center. So this stuff that we call junkie has been re purposed in our body to be Kinda shop bosses to control and regulate the expression of genes as families. When I try to tell people is that if you look at the number genes in the human genome the coker body. It's something around twenty thousand if you look at the number of genes that code for the function in the Great. Thanks some Piano Greg. They have about thirty five thousand genes if you look at the genes that code for the function of it's about fifty thousand genes so he would say a whole. Does that mean? The Rice is more sophisticated than human rights dance twice as many genes and the answer is no. It's not more sophisticated because it's not just a number you have. It's how they're regulated in their expression that determines the difference between one animal and other plant now and the regulatory control of the genes in our bodies which is all controlled out of this dark matter that used to be called junkie a much more sophisticated than any other planner. And that's what makes us different and a lot of that were rallies the stuff that we incorporated over time in history that didn't necessarily make us may different proteins but it allowed us to regulate how we make proteins in a unique way that become very human so my thought is not all happened that we thought was is extraordinarily important to make what we are. And there's no doubt that viruses are can be very dangerous of course we all know as you mentioned HIV and in this case covert team. But they're also could be a larger element wishes that we don't fully understand how the evolution of the human species as culpable with viruses. Over time to make up some of this what was stars jumped eight but is now understood to be dark matter. That is sort of orchestrating and helping our DNA FUNCTION. Exactly also throw into the impact the microbiome to all these bacterial. Dna's their present in our intestinal microbiome. That influences the radiation of our human DNA. So it's a combination of some of the viral exposure had were you know. Hundreds of millions of years coupled with bacterial communities live of us and all express their messages. Into what makes us human sewing often? You pretty your your some of your experts. Say we're actually less human. Dna than we are bacterial Vienna and at some extent our learning union this viral. Dna that we we continue to have resonance bystander. That lives it's actually. Having an effect on our function it could be positive in regulating our response Barton. So let's talk about regulating our response to Meiring. Because now that we know with viruses are and now that we know that our immune system plays an important role in how impacted wore a things happening. Charlie that either may gets more available to be hijacked or not so. We talked about pilot walkable. I've heard individuals talk about know. Stay away from processed foods and sugars. But how those things how that staying away from. Processed foods like on a biomechanical. Besides we all know John. Food is not green. It's devoid of nutrients that's how that specifically in that case making our immune system will less strong to fight off viruses. Yes thank you so again I want. I want to emphasize it. What I'm giving. You is opinion of land. This does not necessarily mean everybody in the field of Science. Nutrition or medicine would necessarily agree with me. So I'm going to give you my opinion from being involved in this field for four years as how I see it and as I see what we have learned is a principle that ties really to ecology ecology study the rainforest. What ecologist with till you is the stability the rainforest is really determined by its diversity of its plants and animals it is such a diverse ecosystem that it has the ability to resist things that might otherwise in a simplified system causing to go to extinction and if you contrast say a Cornfield Mile. In which has a monoculture of one kind of clamp that you can dry miles and miles and miles and see the same plan versus a rainforest. The plant species is very unstable in its environment. So what is it needs? It needs a bunch of fertilizer and herbicides and biocides to protect it because it doesn't have the protection of the system if you go to the rainforest it doesn't eat for writer. Herbicides Bio side. It does describe myself because of its diversity so the concept in ecology is diversity means diversity now why am I going in because if we apply that to nutrition what was the nature of our guy what we're time first of all it was not how the process we know that we didn't have a lot of industrialization of our food supply we ate with grasping thumb and handle? Malcolm what we could find seasonal Leeann. We didn't have our rifles. We weren't the greatest thing in shooting game. We have traveled a very complex doubt skill to break down the game so what we learned over time as a human speech he was the heat. What was available in the natural environment? That was all involved with this web of complexity right so there was a utilizing analogy web light in which you had complexity lead to stability and the police we were reflection of the complexity of that system now we moved to a new system of food processing and agribusiness and all the things that are simplifying the system for production reasons producing Brains all sorts of products particularly corn. And now we get a simplified system and then we eat that simplified system and we get the lack of the diversity of protection yet in a complex ecosystem. Follow my analogy absolutely and so. It's it's a brighter issue just mucking at individual nutrients. Wanted Tonight saying well. We didn't get enough vitamin D two or visit selenium was low. Yeah that may be true but if you put it into. A system of how body evolved to respond to its environment. We were part of the system rather than separate from the system. That's how our body maintains its stability and its resilience against the opening. We experience unexpected. Streit's that's for us to be a virus or that stress could be a motor traffic injury or that stress could be a blow up with our children. I mean all these things are unexpected. Ask for us to mobilize reserves which caller resilience which basically is our immune system by the way societies have immune systems and the planet commune system. And when they're all working together in concert deputies the resilience when you're on a sink that leads to rhys. That's a great analogy. I think that something. That's so key during these times because I I don't really watch the news. I listen to lie slow news which is obviously a good recommendation for a lot of during these news. Concrete so much anxiety action second but I've seen some images here in going into the grocery store myself. Gatien during his process where all classes through the health food stores is also ships highly processed different things and even that whole foods and produce. Isle is is kind of a little empty uniting. That's partly because people offer eight you know could could be more easily contaminated by worker or the transportation of time but just telling the Times where our body so we. We don't have to begin to fully understand the way the symphony of how all these things together to keep our immune system tout so. Do you remember the Woody Allen Movie? Where when he woke up all the FOOD WITH PROCESS PACKAGE. The no one who beat the nationals. Duffin what's Oh no no? We don't eat that s not say we only this highly processed Highly industrialized so. I think now I heard the term cogan fifteen. Have you heard miss? You know in college the Freshman. Fifteen and now. It's the Kobe fifteen because people are using comfort foods and snack foods and high against I can only guess that he foods to kind of be the Boulter of their spirits and so we're having this nutrition shed their tyner. We really need to feeding our diversity to create an immune stream. What what do you mean no when it comes to the use of supplementation and what is they can help our body with. When it comes to being or Zillion to being taken over from yeah I think so I think the first thing which we always want to say as good nutrition starts with the right so. Let's make sure that we don't think that we can just be attended to the quality of our just a bunch of supplements and that'll do the trick in wall. We have to eat correctly. That's word starts eating correctly mean making decisions on behalf of our candy choice for me out to make the right choice right. So those are the things that we talked about with regard. Michael Foale don't eat too much. What you we diverse and mostly plants a good set of rules to start but then beyond that we say. What have we learned about? Specific families nutrients that are known to have important roles in rejuvenation of our immune system and although there is certain nutrients that we would always immediately jumped to. I think person I think people would think would be vitamin C because of its long-standing Linus Pauling connection with colds and flu. That certainly is an important Vitamin Nutrient in terms of of UN Protection. Defense but I won't even put more importantly above vitamin C. If I was to rank these the family of flournoy dhs better found in all sorts of plans boots. These are called bioflavonoids. His spiriting Bruton where Septem- Ludi all dials man. I mean there's literally hundreds of these different types of flournoy even polyphenols in green tea like if Gallo Catechin Yala Greasy G. See All these are members of of the families of nutrients that all have affects on helping to reduce the incest. Now you say he's in different germ. I didn't say support teens system. What happens if you supported immune system? That's already gamage at which you really WanNa do. No you probably want to rejuvenate the news of them. You're not wanting to really support your wanting to rejuvenate the youthful function of your immune system. So these are near that are Nolan in plant food to have the ability to engage would call the property. Which is the renewal of immune system through getting rid of the old and making room for the new so that is talent really think about families of nutrients. It was really useful to put on our list of important during times of immune renewal and that would be your flournoy families. They come in all sorts of every every natural land gas laboratories in some more than others and different numbers famines. But they're all so that would start. There'd and my colleague laundry for years he had a minute talks not heating colors of the rainbow. That's right and you get those through those kinds of foods. That's right then beyond that we get into specific nutrients like the mineral zinc. We know and now there's very interesting information surrounding zaentz role in the boat. General Museum a defense but also maybe even specifically its effect on viral advances precipitate cases. So very important. We THINK ABOUT SELENIUM INSULIN. Into relationship with a very important protective substance in our body for violent events call glued violent that we know that selenium is a mineral in our diet. Plays a big role in supporting news brought today's Zimbabwe with violent function in the body. And then we talk about Vitamins like vitamin B. Two which has a very important role to play in the support in activity of Glutathione and the defensive parts of our he he says some so then of course people will say well. What about Vitamin D? That's topical in the News Right now. Yes I think. Vitamin D does de has an important Whatever call curve linear but does that mean it means that low levels that has an adverse effect on arms at too high levels. It has an adverse effect on immune system in mid range. That has been official so we shouldn't be saying the more the better. We have the saying the right amount for your need for optimizing function. What would that probably somewhere between a thousand two thousand international units Obama the three days somewhere in that range maybe for a person under immune Stress maybe a good amount to consider there may be need for those certain cases better but I think the general public I would say in that range. Then you say what about? The name doesn't vitamin workers inconvenient mcgeown in supporting immune system. Yes it does but vitamin eight also has it. Koerbel in Europe that is well vitamin A efficiency absolutely compromises immune defense and we know that in children who are vitamin A deprived and they have much higher rate with measles and other viruses. So you need to have adequate vitamin name. But also we all know too much by today as Conan that study that I was talking about AIDS in Africa actually leads to immune reduction of the offense defense so again. What's the right amount of probably somewhere under weighs like fifteen hundred international? Today would be a good between a thousand fifteen hundred just as a kind of a baseline so these are kind of some of the things that we're learning from. Taking the information has been developed in the past related to the moon function. And Its relationship in attrition now applying it in this immune defence application for Kobe in other viral proteins. You mentioned at the beginning when you were talking about by. Seeing that was light is falling and all of our listeners. Know that is and also impact that this individual ads on your legs a little bit. About how the work of. This incredible version really changed the game. When it came to health lines polling was the only person in history to run win two Nobel prizes in two separate independent in the independent Nobel prizes one was in chemistry and one was in peace and he and his wife Helen. Who was his advocate? Partnered in -OPAYS efforts and was herself a neuroscientist. Change the world for the betterment of all time and I can say that having the privilege of working on for two years as institute on Sabbatical for my university professorship in nineteen eighty one to nineteen eighty three dollar alto athletes volumes to decide the news and and my boss was was falling and the effects that he had on the world our ear reversible in good not only getting help us understand stuff about vitamin C. And he was actually when you look back. The person who really made dietary supplement to the journal because his book vitamin C the common cold and flu so over ten copies and made by NC. Something everybody thinks about they get a cold but beyond that he was really the other The founder of the concept of molecular medicine and molecular medicine gave rise to functional medicine. And I feel very privileged to have been the ambassador to take what I learned from him in the development of Molecular Medicine and translated into functional medicine model which is really built around. Light his concepts of you're there to diagnose disease you're too late in the game you gotta go upstream understand the root cause and the effects that has on the body. Not just what you call out when you get. That was his mom. When you think about the larger beyond like physical health and what's happening in the body if we have going upstream during his current state of the world that we're in right now singley about going upstream Russia's and if you were an alien you're Zuri humanity and you're like okay. Help humanity on their health and wellness. What do you think are some of the upstream factors for the state of anxiety and fear and chaos? That many people are finding themselves in right. Now that's a very interesting open. Invitation for all sorts of philosophizing. So let me let me make it simple. Because I could wax long and boring on that topic United Seventy four years old. And I've been in this field for four years for my children are three sons growing up now and they have their own grandchildren. And I try to get everything in the in the concept of perspective. But what seventy four years of living as what I've learned from those experiences have also traveled six million miles in my life. Go around the world have been extraordinarily people in so many countries that have been printed me with really great ideas and different perspectives about life and let the living on this planet. And so to if I was to summarize all this high into kind of a soundbite yet stat this issue that we're going to right now with Kobe. Nineteen with all tragedy producing has some positive outcome because a positive outcome is that there are many many people now whose lives were so complicated and so to spread because of the complication all different. All the information on all the things that have all the time urgency all the worried about. How am I going to make a living and get to cars? Have a nice house. Have Kids in school? Have a good job. All these things are now being reduced down to us. Being in our houses our homes and our burdens living with whoever our martyred most important people we think in the world either because they're cohabitating with us or they're virtually connected to the new technologies only recently income available obviously interest Lincoln incident with Colin. Nineteen isn't a good that we have on the Internet and that we have remote shopping and that we have team in off the Internet thing of what this would be in the absence of that communication system right now with everybody and stay at home so thin flow is now an opportunity and I can see now. My children and grandchildren to deduce immediately by horse beating selectivity Simplicity our lives are reduced to very simple concepts one value propositions of living. How much did we really give up? We didn't have all this technology. And all this buzz. All this other stuff going on are trying to progress world. Are there certain things. We're learning about our value system that when we get out of this wave Cova nineteen which we will ever return to normal. It will not be the normal we came from. It will be a new normal that not my generation of a bunch of Geezers But the new normal of individuals who are seeking a different way of seeing the World Relationship Bennett. It brings the value proposition of living at a different level so that suicide and drug overdose. Death aren't the major cause of young people leaving this planet in our country and re you know our relationship to the true value system produces a sense of purpose for living. If that's an outcome from this in any way shape or form then the price we will pay it will be worth. That's mightily. Those are beautiful. Final thoughts I into close on Dr Bland and I WanNa thank you for the fundamental understandings. That you always were buzzwords immune system. We hear that viruses genius. But sometimes we don't make a connection to the most simplistic things which is why already things where he made up on when we understand the basics pillars. It's a lot easier for us to understand the headlines in context and under what you'd actually do to maintain their health and actually protect ourselves volley and I swear acknowledge you because I wouldn't be here practitioner. I'm on the business side of things like to interview yourself but My audience worked my business part time in a everybody else. That's out. There are in the field of medicine. They win. Year wasn't for you and I just want to thank you because I think it's time where where this perfect storm which unfortunate Scott yearly people. Aren't we've never had more access to technology that under before? And there's never been more distributional unhealthy healthy foods out there. We saw a lot of work to do to give educational but also people have never been sicker than ever before and so that perfect storm is creating a place where wellness mainstream. And it's because we are able to do that because the foundation you another prime years. Like a lions Paulie has worked so thank you and I acknowledge you for all the worth you thank you. I WANNA turn that back to you. I think that I'm very involved in about the future. I see people like you. That are coming up to the other and take to the next level of race of living. It's a race of life the ratio of evolution of human existence and that we need ambassadors. Who Really. I can't tell him. Enjoy this this has been a just a a really fun. Walked down all sorts of lanes. Thanks for your Guided tour. It's been incredible and then thank you so much. You can find the link to Dr Blance article in Charles and for anybody. Who's a practitioner? Who's interesting Your Organization has actually virtual conferences happening. I think he's seven summer. Yeah thank you actually The ritual conference is coming in sixteenth from ten am to twelve thirty. Pm Pacific Standard Time. Those of you that would like to look into it so you can go directly to our website which Ya. Www dot p. l. him institute DOT. Org and we will send you to sign up. It's obviously free like anybody that would be interested in participating in snap our exercise. What did we learn from nineteen and where we going for your beautiful? Invite Lincoln actor. Brian thank you so much for being here. Mike thanking you grow on.

the Times Dr Jeff Bland Dr Linus Pauling Dr Bland Linus Pauling Institute of Sci Dr Mark Hyman American College of nutrition Functional Medicine Movement flu Dr Jeff Dr Plane Cova Africa John
Ep: #ThrowbackThursday Privilege, Still as American as Apple Pie with Dr. Jeff Gardere

The Culture Soup Podcast

39:12 min | 3 months ago

Ep: #ThrowbackThursday Privilege, Still as American as Apple Pie with Dr. Jeff Gardere

"Today is July. Ninth is the Thursday and is another throwback? Thursday listen. It's so interesting to see how much has changed and just a year's time. But how many things have stayed the same about this time last year to fourth to be exact, Iran a special episode with Dr Jeff Gardir America psychologist Dr Jeff I go a long way back, but there was one topic that I wanted him to specifically address, and that is the topic of privilege. It looks like it's in the vernacular once again so without further ado Dr Jeff Garcia and privilege. It's as American as Apple Pie. Hey y'all this is culture soup where tech culture and business collide. It's a podcast that spoons everything hot from social media. I'm your host El Michelle Smith and each episode we bring you some of the most notable and not yet notable. Intact Business and culture. The year was two thousand three. It was a rough year for me. I had experienced divorce. And it was a rough one. So, bad then it landed me in the hospital. I recovered from that. But I was in the midst of starting at my agency. And a half to turn over the reigns to consultants. Mind you consultants that I trusted. But I a lot of unanswered questions. During that time. I was working with sister two sister magazine. You Know Jamie Foster Brown? Right. The entertainment magazine that had QNA's with celebrities. and Parents Jamie new everybody's mother. And I turned Jamie like she was my media, mom. and. I explained to her how I was feeling. And she told me you know Dr Jeff. Dr Jeff Gardir. Anti Time Dr Jeff had a column that routinely ran insisted. Assist your magazine where readers would write in and ask him questions anything to do around mental health emotional wellness in Self-worth. You see Dr Jeff is a psychologist. So Jamie connected me with Dr. Jeff and we spoke on the phone. For the first time. And I never will forget the advice and counsel the Dr Jeff gave me. Not only was it enlightening? It was empowering, and I have to say it was one of those moments that was turned he from me because the confidence that was restored. The. Outlook Positive Outlook that he gave me in provided for me was important. And thanks to Dr Jeff. A strong family and friend. Support. My tribe, and of course, my faith in God out was able to. Get up. And Kit, my agency, combing in within at least a year and a half I would build it to a seven figure business. I'm wanting you to meet Dr Jeff. You've probably seen him. On CNN Headline News. Or the real housewives of Atlanta. Couples Court. And some other places. But Dr Jefferson I. We go back a long ways. Two Thousand and three guys that's about sixteen years. Dr Jeff is a friend. And throughout the time between then, and now he has provided his services, ask spokesperson an influence her for myriad of brands that I worked with as a part of my agency and beyond. Ladies and gentlemen without further ADO. I want you to meet Dr Jeff Gardir America's psychologist. I challenged Dr Jeff to conversation around a topic that very important to us here in the united, states and beyond. It is the fourth of July. Independence, day. But I also wanted to talk about a topic. That sometimes tears US apart. In, that is the topic of privilege. This isn't a conversation for the faint of Heart. But if you're ready to move to understanding. Jesse take a listen? Okay everybody. We Have Jeff Guard here. He is A. Psychologist you providence on Headline News and you've also seen them on the real by Atlanta housewives of Atlanta of couples. and. Love and Hip Hop New York and the reels channel and Paternity Court and couples cord. I've been working in and I'll soon be driving coober in your neighborhood. You. Hooper with you Dr Death would be a food I. mean honestly you guys, you probably know that this is the guy that knows the insights and the great inside scoop on the why people do what they do so Dr. Jeff is a forensic psychologist. You want to tell everybody what that means. Forensic psychologist, basically that I am able to work with people in criminal feels. Working with people who have backgrounds. With regard to the justice system, and so on basically crime, and that sort of thing. Yeah, yeah, you know that's deep. Deep and you have a practice right. I do I have a practice in New York, but now my practice is global things to skype facetime and other. Platforms and it's really amazing. Even get people now. Michelle. Should I say L. Michelle? Yes, you can Michelle. You know me for years well, but your. Shell. You even get folks now. Who may be no more than ten miles away, but they'd rather skype or facetime in for their therapy session because of the convenience. You Know Coaching Clients Yeah, Zoom. We use zoom. Yeah, you know either around the corner or Of the globe so amazing, it's awesome. I love technology when you say we have a culture. You're ready that I'm ready to SIP. Off The thumb, so you know I've always come in the threads and I'm always amazed at how different trending topics keep people talking, and sometimes, when whether it's politics or sports, or even the weather, sometimes people can fear into the topic of race, and they often so much of that conversation. Is stemming from the idea of privilege, and you know, we hear the term white privilege of La in America, but as Americans we have privileged layers to privilege. Don't exactly you have a white privilege? You have white male privilege of milk privilege ADB. White female privilege in some other of course cultures. Though, we don't see it as much as we should have different types of female privilege but I mean we're talking about privilege two things come to mind, and that is either Male privilege or American privilege just talk how? Americans are not aware that they have a certain type of culture where they take for granted all of the rights and all of the privileges. That many people just don't have. Right right, you know it's so layer color ISM. Sometimes people based on the skit skin color, even within segments like. If you're African American. If YOU'RE ASIAN INDIAN! If you're Latino you have see where the lighter your skin is, you might have privilege that may be your darker skin, you know. People might, not, have. Read. Isn't it fascinating that? As human beings, we tend you. subconsciously when we're looking at people as far as a different skin colors, there may be a preference for the darker skin because we associated with being more, and it may not be the truth, but more impervious to the effects of the sun, but when it comes to actual rights when it comes to actual behavior when it comes to actual privilege, then we see the lighter the skin color in many many many different cultures, not for American culture, not just Caribbean culture, but in many different cultures that seems to make a difference I know that was a scandal. With. I believe with India where people from India were complaining that he wait a minute. You're just you know when it comes to these beauty contestants beauty. You know you're pushing forward lighter skin. Indian people versus the darker skin ones we see that in some of the Asian nations where those who look more Caucasian. promoted. More than those who look more Asian. It's really. We have a lot to a lot to consider a lot to talk about a lot to examine with all of us. As as global beings. As to how we meet the change, our perceptions and our belief systems because we do marginalize so many others don't realize how we do that. Because a lot of it is and unconscious, racism, unconscious sexism, and so on those some of it is just right out there and and hateful, but sometimes you'll find the unconscious institutional types of prejudices that more harmful, because people don't even realize what they're doing. So unconscious biases, one of the things that I spent a lot of time thinking about especially in my past. Job where I was working one of the fourteen tens in diversity and inclusion, but you know what it's just interesting because. I think privilege is probably as American as Apple. Pie and you know what it's July fourth. So why not? Let's talk about it and we've got America's psychologists. Trait, but it's interesting when you travel as an American. Sometimes you come into situations where unconsciously have stepped on someone else's culture without realizing it, so let's talk about what privilege actually is I tend to think of it as something that centers you in your world in. has everybody else around you have? They. Send to you in the world. I think that's great explanation because you become I. Think you know in another way the center. Not even aware that you have a lot of given a lot of permission a lot of support. That, you may not have necessarily earned, but you're in the right package as far as you know your your your sex, your gender, behavior, sexuality and so on. That people you know when you're in that, you don't even realize. All of the advantage is that you have and the disadvantages that puts other people. Well and I like the way you put that because as much as you may have put yourself at the center. Others have put you there too right. So that's the thing it's not about people who have privilege are bad people. It is really an institutional cultural phenomenon that you know in many ways gives you a lot of advantages, but also disadvantages in that. You're almost like walking blindly. In the world, thinking, you know having a certain perception of yourself, but other people have a very different perception a lot of exceptions. But some of the other perceptions and negative, because people are prejudiced towards you with your having. This sort of advantage and you're not even aware of it, and that's why we see many times. When it comes to you know privilege white males. You have white males who complain and say I've never been prejudiced. I've never done anything wrong. I I love all people, and yes, absolutely I totally get it. But? You also have to own and acknowledge that there are certain things that you are given certain things. They do own certain things that you were born into that people don't have, and therefore you have to be able to acknowledge that to yourself and to them. If you want to be totally, you know in truly enlightened. As to your place in the world. It's interesting to me. How part of the institutionalized? Nature of privilege works, because have you found because I've seen it? People who are not necessarily in the privilege population. Buy into the privileged so for instance. In twenty seventeen that del into the idea of the corporate structure, and how white males are centered in structure as the power core brave. Bud that women and women of color are on the fringes, because even by definition by race by gender. They're outsiders right so in the case of black women they're double outsiders, but what I found. Is that other black women other people of Color other women even? Because they're so used to that power structure in White Maleness, being the center that they look at one another, and don't expect as much out of even their own system I, agree with that. And I think that is really the destructive part of privilege that it begins to affect other people. It is so much part of the system so much part of the institution that people don't understand. What it is that they're doing when they begin to exclude one another or get into a competition with one another in order to become part of that sort of centrist. Place with the N. The institution to. Them privilege that even when they do earn it. as we saw with President Barack Obama still wasn't accorded. The privilege that any person should be accorded as being president of the United States. So we have to be aware that it's not just about making ourselves better for outside of the circle, but also understanding that we have to begin to interact in a way, which is therapeutic with one another, but also with the person who is in that centrist position, because they will never view you a treat you the way that you deserve to be treated if they're stuck subconsciously with this idea of privilege and don't quite understand why you will never have the same privilege that they do. Right, so let's flip it year. Aren't there them? Good mindset traits that we can take from those who are privileged. And bear with me for a while. Is that those of us who may not be centered in that privilege? We take on a mindset that since we are not since people do not value us that. Maybe we take on the devaluation if you will. Is there some merit to taking on a mindset that centers you? Even if you are not centered bomb in it, it came across as very complex and unique. And difficult question, but as you put it to me. I begin to think about the importance of. Black love. Power and not way to denigrate anyone else, but believing in oneself looking to love oneself, and that's something is African Americans. Caribbean Americans other underrepresented minorities. Come right down to people who want to change other cultures. A, want to change. The shape of their is to look more Western. No more Caucasian, not having that self love, so that's one thing that we can say with people are privilege. They. Practice soft love you. Love and they learn to love themselves and hold a certain standard because that's what they were born into what they're used to. That's how people treat them. And once we outside of that center. Begin to love we are. Then I think this is something that is very positive that perhaps having the privilege of being an African American or an Asian American and seeing that as a privilege so. If I, were wearing a hat like you are right now. I would say hats off to you. L. Michelle, because that is probably one of the most provocative questions that I've been. Asked in a very long time that. I'm going to ask you some more provocative questions because I'm writing a book and I Kinda let that slip a couple episodes ago and my premises somewhere around changing the mindset, and how much we can learn from from privileged groups right? As underprivileged groups, depending on what culture you might be speaking of right, so I am reminded of a scenario, assist something that happened to me once when I was working at this big company and a group of black women who are very very polished. Have all the degrees I say find people find cars find closed. Just impeccable corporate ladies right were sitting there at a conference, and we came out of this very provocative panel. We're talking about you know people of Color and underrepresented groups being you know. Dealing with micro aggressions and unconscious bias. And I made a statement. I don't even remember what the statement was, but the part of the conversation that jumped out at me was there was a white man that approached this. Guy, in the world one of my favorites, who said something like Michelle, you said X. Y. and Z., and then you said you'd never would say it out, say it. Oh and he said Yeah. Why wouldn't you say it and I said well. You know what they do to somebody like me less than that out in this environment and it struck me when he responded. He said I would say it and I'll tell you why I'd say it. What could they do to me but take my job? I just go find another one, and then it hit me. This is not the way even the three black women fine. Fine clothes fine ours fine degrees. All of this find people even thought we were thinking. Oh if I say that I fear that someone will take my job and instead of saying I'll just go get another one or I'll just go start my own thing. We're sitting there thinking. Oh, my Gosh! Where does put us we? Are you know we're bound by our mindset? So could we borrow that mindset from our white brought there, so you know it's. You're absolutely right that this is something that we can. Begin to work our way towards feeling freer and. Being more. Self, self-assured and having better self esteem to say you know what you can take this job and shove it if you don't like what I'm saying, as long as I'm speaking truth to power. I think we have to look at a bigger stage and that is. You. Know and I knew you'd like to go right into the popular culture. Let's talk about what happened to Monique. Let's talk about the conversation. She had with Steve Harvey on on his show, which which is gone now. You know and he basically said to her. You know you know. Don't forget you know when people of Color. We can't do it the way that you know the man doesn't. And, we've got a different way. We have families to feed you know one of the things that was left out from that conversation, but maybe I think he. He wanted to put it in, or he said it in a different way. Is that what do with treated in a different sort of standard? What eight not get someone else? Fire? Who is non black may get US fired. If we're black and Oh, you have to put that. That factor into the equation, so yes, Monique is right as you are that. Yes, it's important that we stand up frost selves, and that we believe in ourselves and no risk, no reward go for it demand all treatment, but I can also see what Steve Harvey was trying to say that yes, stand up for yourself, but we gotta do maybe a little bit of a different way because we don't have the privilege. Even someone like Steve Harvey had to give up his show for somebody else coming in because of the politics that make on with a particular CEO or corporate group that he was work. Right, but you know what you're absolutely right that same catalysts store study share that what we feel when it comes to microaggressions when it comes to unconscious bias when it comes to racism, outright in his real, and that's what I loved about that study, and the women in the workplace setting, leaning and a McKinsey right, but the thing that Mr Harvey has that made. You and I don't have. A little bit more privileged talking about this. He's got the money and he's got the clout to go this summer. To do I was going to the other thing that he has that. We don't have those really large. Yes! Because? A COUPLE OF TIMES Actually a very nice man. He's the people I've ever met him yet. One of my good friends Jalen Bledsoe is quite responsible for his brand, so he was on the show measure like episode three, but yeah, you're right when I'm driving at is is if there is an opportunity to feel a little bit more secure in ourselves in what we have and what people cannot take. Can we therefore standing our power and grasp on some of that mindset? That may be the you know culture that center. For instance. I. Know But let me tell you. THOUGHT SIR! You're absolutely absolutely absolutely right. And there is a privilege that I know that you practice that I. Know that I practice that. I know many people perhaps who we know. Weather's patients as as clients as. Practitioners as you and I, and that is the privilege of intellectualism. You know so when I look at this whole idea of privilege when I look at white male privilege. When I look at any kind of privilege, Brian I'm automatically think of myself as a black male. Above all of that act. Or as psychologists, I look at that privilege as being a psychological phenomenon and for. To study. It I'm removed from it. I analyze it and therefore or I'm able to move the way that I want to and to Nath align that privilege that someone else may have to slow my roll. One of my mentors is truly bourgeois. `hand. She has written the book in fact what. I. Wrote this book frank here. And it's equality courageous conversations about men. Women and racist spark of diversity and inclusion conversation. Okay breakthrough. But trudy had theory around creating your own equality. And I talked to her as a part of this book. That has not come out yet. And she she talks about how you can create. What essentially is some privilege, right? When it comes to how you attack your relationships. How you attack you know your authenticity how you attack. You know even approach in in in face head on microaggressions in a very gracious way, but because you have. Some what's the word? I'm looking for confidence. And your skills, your network, which may come to some privileged people very easily. They don't have to think about it. We have to think about it if you have some confidence. In those things you can move in ways where run to the risk or run to the trouble like people who may be aren't so sure about you know what they have. In other words, this podcast lines up every friend. I have had time. And then some. And when it showcases how beautiful these folks are at creating at the epicenter of Tech Culture Business, but it also shows the power what it also shows as. We ain't hating. Because someone is born into privilege, for example, such as a white male. Listen good for you, but for you. You are who you are. We respect to you are. Onto let you dominate us a to accept you as an equal so main have tallahassee may not have as privilege which may be the color of our skin, or you know certain Genitalia what have you. We will seize on what it is that we do have. Tried, we asked me. You know the struggle which may be dealing with adversity every day in order stronger and I think that's what we need to go society. That we need to learn to respect one another, and not. It should not be about. Oh, you going billionaire. Therefore, you're a bad person on the white male. Therefore you have all these. No, it's about okay. How do we come to table in different ways? We all created equal. But we are all different. Yes, and it's our differences that make strong A. Nation Right which is why don't get me started I'm not all for you. Know Boorda walls, and all that kind of stuff. Going on is you. Have you know and I'm not going to name any names, but everyone knows what I'm talking about. Your. If, WE WANNA. Make America great again. That means making it better than it ever wants beaked was. It. We always had division. And privilege also feeds into that division. Really odd job as Americans and those coming from different countries. Who one day we'll be Americans is. How do we bring everyone to the table? So we can be a strong as possible as a nation as a people to then be able to be benefactors to others around the globe, the globe is in many ways warming. There are me dramatic issues environmentally, and the ecosystem is damaged, so we're we are all going back to come together in order to save the planet and Save our people, our species, the animal species insects, all of that the whole ecosystem. We are going to have to come together. At this point, our conversation takes a turn for the unexpected. We're going to talk a little bit about black. In where you can find it. And wh- conduct has to do with it. Thanks to the experience. Sister scholar gone through CECELIA Joyce. Recent travels to African. I wanted to. Bring up this little story. My sister just got back from she she. Bra and. took. Some other conveyances into a small town in Ghana, and when she noticed there, there were people that were in a village. There were people near there were dirt poor. But they walked with their head up high, and she I began to notice that she was the outsider. African American. She started to notice that things about her. That didn't quite add up to veer blunt privilege if you will. The fact that there were no varying skin colors you know as people from the US, we are reminded of our slave history, even just looking at the marrying skin colors right, because so many of our you know. Women were raped in slavery and that's let's keep it real. We all have this various skin colors right some very for love, but that was very very rare. Sally hemmings was raped. Okay right, but when you go to Africa, you see that people are this dark chocolate amine monolithic, and that's the norm, so the mini you walk into that you're an outsider. Right and nobody is making fun because someone carrying something on their head. That's their answer. Of what you say that you know, they walk with pride, no matter what their socio economic factors. That's why when you go to Ghana and someone says, and you walk in behind someone and you want to go somewhere, and they say walk this way, but want that way, and what just like they walk with a hand held high, because amongst the people who are in more than just privilege, it really is about a birthright, a birthright of being right a froude individual a proud community of race yeah. Totally it's you know. She came back with this new. Perspective even If you saw Black Panther you understood kill monger. You may not have understood him very well, but he really did not feel yet a birthright and either act. On it's fascinating I. Thought Marvel did a great job in portraying him as a villain, but as a villain very interesting cycle dynamics. But that the soul we could look at an empathize as to who he became what he became why he became that way, but it was also really. For more of a a symbolism four Africa, African Americans you know is the. Between those particular to particular groups and what? He can America slave free, and all of those things, so that was, and but that's why you saw so many people. African Americans Africans primarily, but all races all religions come out for that movie and were able to understand what it means Wauconda forever. Totally I mean black. Panther was centered Kanda absolutely. They had their own privilege hat names. which was to a lot of people viewing it like? I've never seen this well unless you read. Marvel comics like I did grow up. The most scientific society. Base planet and a bay aided by brain NEOM. They. They had to hidden and actually played into the stereotype up, and in fear at poor African nation, all of that was just a mirage to protect their technology and protect their people because they had the challenge, they had the fear that they would be exploited as many other people of color had been deep deep deep. Stop the. Janet van reflects all of the many issues of our humanity. You know what? Time is almost up. This has been great and all of these conversations you've had I really wanted to get Louis Gates on that gates. But this was such a great out. And if another person on the street says Hey, Dr Gates I'm I'm GonNa have to knock somebody. After Game Some of them think I look like. I said, listen of all is much more canceled, and secondly he's ten time slaughter. Bird. He's about a hundred times. Back. Let me. Be The privilege of being Dr, J.. Jeff, you're my friend, the. Friend. You know what Dr Jet. This has been a main thing, and if you don't mind now, only in fact, you back at some point, but I also want to interview my book. You, Everybody Dr Death Gardir America. Thank colleges. Thanks so much for coming. God bless America. Let's America before. Standing thank you so much! Dr Jeff. Everybody we have. Even more. Coming Up, if we can tampon. I want to introduce the psalm reintroduce others. Riley! Is. The coaches park as does every deduction known size communication. PODCAST is a registered trademark of NO SILOS COMMUNICATIONS L L C.

Dr. Jeff America L. Michelle Jeff Guard Dr Jeff Gardir Steve Harvey Dr Jeff Garcia Jamie Foster Brown Dr Jeff Gardir America Apple El Michelle Smith Dr Jeff I United States Weather Africa Monique Dr Jeff New York Atlanta
Interview Interlude Playlist, Part 10: Dr. Jeff Hoffman

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

58:53 min | 7 months ago

Interview Interlude Playlist, Part 10: Dr. Jeff Hoffman

"No one likes to feel stuck. Especially by your cloud, but the IBM cloud is the most open and secure public cloud for business. It can manage all your apps and data anywhere. SMART loves problems. IBM. Let's put smart to work visit IBM DOT com slash flexible. Working remotely can be a challenge especially for teams that are new to it. How do you deal with your work? Environment being the same as home while staying productive at a time when teams must come together more than ever to solve big. His trello is here to help Trello. Part of Atlassian collaborative sweet has been powering remote teams globally for almost a decade. Trello keeps everyone on the same page. Helping teams communicate focus and connect. Trello for free and learn more at trello dot com that's T. R. E., L., L., O., DOT com. Welcome stuff to blame mind from how stuff works DOT com. Hey, what stuff to blow your mind? My name is Robert. Land and I'm Joe McCormack in today we've got a very special episode creole out there. We are doing a partnership with national, Geographic Yeah, so they've got a new show coming out called strange rock, and it is produced by Darren aaronow Sqi of many movie fame, and all about it's all about the science of planet Earth in the sort of intricate interconnected processes both geological and biological the keep the earth stable. Sanctuary for life as we know it, and in that sense, it has a kind of. Ecological Alexander von Humboldt kind of vibe that I. Really Like I. Like it when you can see the large-scale and small-scale interconnectedness of all things to to make the world how it is. Yes, in speaking of saying, this is a visual spectacle. Yeah, it's got a lot of really beautiful photography and it's hosted by Will Smith I. Don't know if he ever says welcome to Earth and it kind of hope so and it. It tells stories through the experiences of a large cast of real life, astronauts who are the only humans ever to venture beyond the shield that protects us from the universe at large, and so because of our partnership with National Geographic for this episode we got an opportunity to talk to one of the astronauts on the show Dr Jeff Hoffman who flew five space shuttle missions, including a Hubble Space Telescope repair, mission and this. This is a great interview. We're just delighted to share it with everybody doctor. Hoffman is very knowledgeable from multiple vantage points about the thing that we're going to be focusing on today, which is the radiation risk from space and how Earth protects us, and he's knowledgeable in a couple of different domains because he's done high energy astrophysics knows all about the radiation environment of our solar system and the universe at large but he. He also has direct experience of what it's like to be an astronaut out in space to sorta go beyond our protective barriers, and that kind of perspective is of hard to come by because I would say one thing. It's really easy to lose sight of in your day to day life when you're reading about. Politics are playing with your dog or making some dinner is that your body is made of molecules and in? In order for molecules in your body to do what they do. They have to remain what they are. And most of the time. The internal chemistry of our bodies is pretty stable right, but we have to recognize that the chemical stability of our bodies is an enormous and unique privilege provided to us by virtue of the fact that we live on planet earth yet and this into a truth that we touch on quite a. A bit on the show and that is that Earth is just the right planet. Yeah, for life as we know it kind of unsurprising of course being creatures that evolved on planet Earth that planet earth is just the right planet for us, but despite realizing the kind of anthropic obviousness of that fact, it is still a kind of strange and comforting feeling. Well, wait a minute. Is it comforting or is it discomforting the? The fact that most of the universe is going to be so hostile to us so unbelievably hostile so incredibly violent that it's just impossible to even consider, and I'm not even talking about the vaporizing heat of stars of the cold airless void of deep space, I'm talking about the fact that the universe is an acid bath of killer radiation, including ionizing radiation, which often takes the form of these high energy charged particles that. That blasts through animal bodies, damaging changing the molecules within them as they go along, and even changing the DNA of our cells, altering the blueprints for cell replication and bringing about tissue, damage, sterility cancer, and so that body integrity and chemical stability. We so take for granted to keep living is only possible because of the planet we inhabit which shields us from being blasted by the sun nearby, and by the galaxy at large. Yeah it's interesting to think about this that we we are creatures of the shallows. Yeah, so life as we know, it essentially thrives in a tide pool, protected from the full onslaught of wind and wave. If you've ever been to. To a number of beach environments, you've seen those areas right where? We're the waves are crashing, but the, but there's this pool this this area of calm water that is protected from all of that, and that's where a lot of can thrive. That otherwise would not be able to bear the hostilities beyond the rocks. And it actually reminds me of this quote by John Steinbeck and he's not directly talking about what we're talking about here. But the comparison is is just beautiful. He he wrote the knowledge that all things are one thing, and then one thing is all things, plankton, a shimmering phosphorescent on the sea, and the spinning planets and an expanding universe all bound together by the elastic string of time it is advisable to look from the tide pool to the stars, and then back to the tide pool again. Our Earth is protected not from wind and ways, but from the full blast of solar and cosmic radiation, instead of rocky sea walls, protected by a robust atmosphere, and most importantly the magnetosphere, the interesting other side to the fact that we've got this kind of connected consciousness that we're aware of like there is no real division between the Earth and the heavens. They're just different places. The only real division is distance, and so all the universe is connected does have a common origin and the Big Bang, but at the same time that connectedness. We use the word connected in such a happy way. It's nice to be connected to things, but you could also think about that is extreme vulnerability like you are right next door to everything in the universe that would crush in annihilate you and what we've got standing in the way of those those crushing annihilating forces beyond our power to control is essentially. Essentially a big magnetic field and a thin layer of gas around the rocky surface of the planet, and so basically we have going on here. Is Your earth solid inner core in liquid outer core? They play a crucial role in protecting life as we know it. From deadliest deadly radiation differences in temperature and composition in the two core regions drive a. A powerful Dynamo, emitting Earth Project, protective, electromagnetic field, and remember. This is one of the key factors we have to consider in proposed interplanetary space travel and establishing stations on other worlds, the only planets in our solar system with some form of magnetosphere in place are mercury. Earth Jupiter Saturn, Uranus and Neptune right so then, of course you've also on the surface of the Earth got the atmosphere to count on, because that means that there's more stuff that radiation has to get through to get to you, and so the atmosphere will block some kinds of incoming radiation, but the other big protector is the magnetosphere that keeps these particles directed away from the earth. Some of course still get through right and also. Serves to protect the atmosphere as well. Yes, because if you don't have magnets, fear, your atmosphere over time can be stripped away, which is one of the things that they think probably happened to Mars long ago. Right, so it's protective barrier against the elements. It's our battlements, and the only humans to have walked these battlements. Our astronauts such as Dr Jeff Hoffman now. Most astronauts never even go beyond the shield that protects us right. We know that astronauts in space are exposed to extra levels of radiation, and that's one reason you want to limit your time and space you'll. You'll like. You can't live in the ISS forever they WanNa bring you back eventually. Because the more time you spend up there, the more you're exposed to this dangerous radiation that could harm you in the long run, but even up in the ISS. You're still you're still benefiting from a large part of the Earth's protective shield right? Yes, it gets a lot worse if you want to go to the moon or Mars or colonize another planet. Yeah, because then you're going beyond Earth's protection so I guess we want to go now to our conversation with Dr Jeff Hoffman. To talk about the radiation risks posed by the universe, and what astronauts have done in can do to protect themselves, but I I guess we should give you just a little bit of background on Doctor Hoffman Yeah, so his original research interests were in high energy astrophysics, specifically cosmic gamma, radiation and x Ray, astronomy, and his doctoral work at Harvard entail balloon-borne born low energy. Energy Gamma Ray telescopes and design, and then the testing of the technology for making seventy, two, nineteen, seventy, five during post, doctoral work at Leicester University worked on several x Ray, astronomy rocket payloads an, and then he worked in the Center for Space Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology From Nineteen, seventy five to nineteen, seventy, eight, as project scientists in charge of the orbiting. O. One eight four hard X, Ray and Gamma Ray experiment, which launched in August, nine, hundred, seventy seven, but in in seventy eight, he was selected to become an astronaut, and he went on a total of five different shuttle flights so in eighty-five. You went up on. Discovery Nineteen Ninety on Columbia Ninety two one Atlantis. On Endeavor in then in nineteen, ninety, six on Columbia, all told one thousand, two hundred and eleven hours in space, twenty one point five million miles. That's a Lotta Miles. Yeah, FREQUENT FLYER! Yeah, so he he is a not only pedigree scientists pedigree astronaut five shuttle flights. That's impressive. That's five more. The vast majority of human beings all right. We're GONNA take a quick break. When we come back, we will be heading straight into our interview with Dr. Jeff Hoffman No one likes to feel stuck, boxed in or held back especially by your cloud. It's a problem, but the IBM cloud is different. It's the most open insecure public cloud for business. It can manage all your. Your apps and data anywhere across all your clouds, so it can help take on anything from re booking flights on the fly to restocking shelves on demand without getting in your way. SMART LOVES PROBLEMS IBM. Let's put smart to work. Visit IBM DOT com slash flexible to learn more. It's a trying time the challenges all of our basic assumptions, however one thing that brings. Brings us all together is our common humanity now more than ever, teams must come together and work together to solve big challenges and Trello is here to help Trello part of Atlassian collaborative, sweet as an APP with an easy to understand visual format plus tons of features that make working with your team, functional and just plain fun teens of all shapes and sizes and. and companies like Google fender and even Costco. All Use Trello to collaborate and get work done with Trello. You can work with your team wherever you are whether it's at home or in an office. No matter what device you're using, computer, tablet or phone, Trello sinks across all of them, so you can stay up to date on all the things your team cares about. Keep your workflow, going from wherever you are with, Trello try Trello for free and learn more at Trello. Dot, com, that's T. R. E. L.. O. Dot COM TRELLO DOT COM. Dr Off men welcome to the show. We're really glad to have you well nice to be here. Looking forward to it. I was wondering if you could start off by telling us a little bit about your research from before you became an astronaut. What what made you interested in high energy astrophysics and What were your pursuits in that field? Well I grew up with an interest in space I I lived in or near New York City. My Dad used to take me to the planetarium to see the new show every month I saw the birth of the space age you know. I was alive when Sputnik was first launched when you're good garden and John Glenn Flu and and so I was also interested in human spaceflight, although it was a tarrant to me that all the early astronauts were military test pilots, and that was not a career for me, but space in general I was fascinated with and went on to become a an astronomer. I got A. Doctorate in astrophysics at at Harvard, and I was attracted by What we call energy astrophysics was a totally new field at the time the discovery of x-rays from celestial objects and gamma rays It was a new branch of astronomy up. Just like radio astronomy opened up back, in the nineteen thirties and Tat Struck me as being An area, where we were almost bound to make new discoveries, because we had never looked at at this type of radiation before, so my professional career as an astronomer, consistent designing x Ray telescopes, and then putting them into space I with I was using high altitude balloons when I did my PhD thesis, and then I spent three and a half years at Leicester University in England. And we had both sounding rocket experiments where we put our telescopes up above the atmosphere you to go by the atmosphere, because x rays and gamma rays are absorbed in the atmosphere, which is good thing for us here on the ground, but it makes life difficult for astronomers, because you have to go above the atmosphere to to see this radiation, and and that was kind of cool as well because I was always interested in space and rockets and so. I was combining the technological interest with what I thought was very exciting scientific field, and then I came back to mit, and we, we had actually all on x Ray satellite, and the most exciting research that I was doing discovered. These things called x Ray bursts you look at an x ray object giving out relatively low level of radiation fairly constantly you know, and all of a sudden you know ban it increases by hundreds and hundreds of times, and then gradually fades away over the course of anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes and we, we discovered lots of these and This was a completely new phenomenon, and that was probably the most exciting thing that I did scientifically was. finally figure out what was what was causing these. It was actually. neutron stars Orbiting around regular stars and The gravitation of the new star, with such that it would suck hydrogen off the regular star in the hydrogen would accumulate in a layer on the surface of the neutron star, and then eventually the whole thing would. Detonate and in a huge thermonuclear explosion, so what we were looking at were hydrogen bombs ten miles in diameter You know pretty spectacular stuff, so that was really exciting and I was all set for A. you know career as an astronomer and But that was now in the mid to late seventies when NASA was getting ready to fly, what was then the brand new space shuttle? And Neat thing about the state shuttle from my point of view was that it had a crew of seven, but they only needed to pilots the pilots. We're still going to be military test by. Let's, but it really opened things up for engineers, scientists and medical doctors, and when NASA put out a call for for astronauts for the space shuttle and indicated that yes, they really did want scientists and engineers and doctors I thought well. I'll apply and I was lucky enough to get selected the first time around so. That basically was the of my career in astronomy. Research I. Had A You know I'd say it was quite successful in and had I not been selected I. Hope I would have had a good career as a research astrophysicist, but Getting selected by NASA, astronaut certainly changed my life. Of before we ask you about a little bit of your spaceflight. Experience I just wondered, does research into high energy astrophysics like if you're looking at neutron stars and bursts of x rays and gamma rays and stuff in the universe. Does that change the way you feel about the sky when you look at it and most people look up and see twinkling stars and. It feels kind of Nice and cool and calm, do you do you envision the universe emotionally has one full of radiation, danger and high energy. Oh absolutely i. mean you know when you look up? Just simple? Look up at the stars. Everything looks pretty constant and unvarying, and when you realize that there's things exploding and off all over the place that tremendous areas of high gravitation, high magnetic fields charged particles Yeah, the universe is a pretty violent place, and You don't see it with your naked eye, but modern astronomy has has opened this up to us. doctor. Can you tell us about some of your your spaceflight experience? So what was the Hubble Service mission like well? Let me let me start a little bit further back with first spaceflight because That of course for any astronaut is is an exciting moment. When you get the call from management, and they say Oh, you've been you've got an assignment to your first spaceflight. We were supposed to take up to satellites and put them into orbit and other pop them out of the Cargo Bay of the shuttle. which was what the shuttle was doing in the early days. And then come home. It was going to be a short, relatively short mission four days or so and As it turned out the second of the two satellites that we popped out of the shuttle didn't turn on You know had nothing to do with us. All we were supposed to do as was get it out of the shuttle into orbit, but when when we reported that it did not seem to have activated NASA went into a big study mode, and they figured out the there was only one single point failure that we could possibly do something about. There's little switch on the outside of the satellite that maybe had gotten stuck. And, so they scheduled for the first time in NASA history, an unplanned spacewalk where my partner and I went out, see I had been trained to use space suits, but we weren't planning to do a space walk on my first flight. but they sent us out to fix it. And so that was a totally unexpected incredible experience. You know getting to go out and do a spacewalk which? you know all astronauts would like to go out? It's the most intimate experience that you can have being in space is actually putting on a spacesuit and going out of the airlock and. Kind of you. Face to face with the rest of the universe it's it's an incredible experience, and and we did a good job, and and so I got identified as as somebody who is good at spacewalking, and I worked on a lot of advanced spacesuit, development and various things, and then when it came time to. Select a crew to go up and try to repair the Hubble Telescope, and of course nowadays people who weren't alive at the time when Hubble was put in orbit, don't don't really appreciate what a disaster! It was for NASA I. Mean This. Billion and a half dollar telescope, which had been launched with great expectations about how it was going to revolutionize, view the universe, and then to find out that it couldn't focus properly I mean how could NASA make a huge mistake like that was what everybody was was asking, and it was absolutely critical I mean. As, I say people don't remember what disaster it was, but NASA Hubble where the joke of late night comedians Hubbell was denounced in the halls of the US Congress as a technology Turkey. NASA was trying to get Congress to approve funding for. The International Space Station at the time, and as you can imagine as it wasn't very popular with Congress, so. basically they were told you know. Go do something about Hubble and then come back and talk to us about the space station. In any case, NASA wanted to do everything possible to reduce the risk of failure in this rescue mission and one of the things that they. Decided, was that only people who had previously done? Spacewalks would be eligible to do the spacewalks for the Hubble, rescue. And because of this unplanned spacewalk that I did way back on my first flight and I had two subsequent, since then so Hubble, for me was my fourth flight, and I had my spacewalkers union cards so I I was fortunate enough to be on the crew, and that was certainly of all the things I did as an astronaut. The one with the most lasting impact was obviously rescuing Hubble and turning it from. Basically Nasr's worst disaster scientifically to its most successful and productive scientific mission ever so it was a, and, and of course as a former astronomer as well as being an astronaut, being able to put my two hands on the Hubble telescope up in orbit was. I mean it was the thrill of a lifetime, and we fixed it. Integrate thing you did well I I know that many of my asks former astronomy colleagues after the mission they would come. I can't tell you how many people would come up to me and say oh. Jeff, thank you so much. Because you know my my professional career was depending on this and all I could say was well. It was a pleasure. Thank you. It was pleasure. It really was. So you mentioned that when you were out on spacewalks in va that you had this kind of intimate experience with the universe, it was like putting you face to face with the Outer Universe, and I wonder about something so there was a Sifi. Couple years ago where a character's born and lives her whole life in simulated environments inside generation starship, and she finally at one point comes back to Earth late in life, and she's outside and discussing the idea of getting sunburned, and she's so familiar with the concept of earth, and the sun that she calls this horrifying, and she calls this getting burned by radiation from a star. Is there a moment in? Space you know outside vehicle activity. Were you begin to think of the Sun, not as the sun, but as a star and other kinds of alien nation effects. No absolutely I mean this is something when I give public talks I. I often show a picture of the sun in space, and then I asked the audience. There's something very strange about this picture. Can you figure out? Out What it is and most people don't quite get it, but what you're seeing. Is the son in black sky and think about it. You've never seen the sun in the black sky. Because every time the weather is clear you go out, and of course our atmosphere scatters the blue light preferentially, and so this guy is blue and so every human being throughout human history. Until the space age has only seen the sun in a blue sky. We see the stars in a black sky, because there's not enough light really from the stars to be scattered, and and make this guy, look blue. But not the sun, but in space you really see the sun as a star in a black sky course. It's bigger and brighter than any other stars, because it's close to us, but yeah you really do appreciate the sun as a star, and that that that was something I didn't have to go out and just looking out the window the shuttle you you get that appreciation, but it's a totally different perspective as are so many other things that you see. I mean that's one of the things about the. Off the surface of the earth is that you look with a totally new perspective. just like most people don't remember the first time ever in an aeroplane, but if you, if you pay attention and look out the window, you also get a totally new perspective on the on the Earth, although most people don't bother to look out the window these days, but from space we spent a lot of time looking at the windows and I never got tired of it. It was a completely. different perspective not only on the earth, but on on the heavens. It was great flying during the nighttime. You know we'd start. We'd enter darkness in the Northern Hemisphere, and you could look up and see all the familiar northern constellations. Cygnus the Swan, which is the northern cross, and then fifteen minutes later you'd be in the Southern Hemisphere and see Alpha Centauri and the southern cross, and that's something else that you never do when you're on. The surface of the earth is to see the northern and southern. Skies at the you know within a half hour of one another. Would you describe this as it as being Kennedy? The overview effect well the over via fact Maybe some of the listeners don't aren't familiar with that, but it was. Coined by Frank White. He's an author who thought a lot about I. Guess he had this kind of inspiration during an air airplane flight when he was looking at the ground, and and feeling a little bit removed from the Earth but he started thinking about what what must it be like for the astronauts? So he came down to Houston and I was one of the first astronauts that he interviewed. And you know the idea is that it really does change your perception of planet Earth to to look at it, and and actually see the earth as a planet. to see from an airplane, you can look out the window and see entire cities spread out below you from an orbiting spacecraft. You can see the entire countries continents. Really the earth is very beautiful, and so you do get this relationship that develops between you and the planet at the same time. You can see examples of environmental degradation caused by humanity which is. Now visible from cosmic perspective, and that's pretty scary. You know the deforestation of the Amazon the silting up of harbors and rivers and and Just all sorts of things and you realize that You you definitely get a feeling of the the finite -ness of planet earth, and and this sense of what it is to be removed from the earth, and how that changes your feelings for planet earth is what Frank called the overview effect, and many astronauts have have reported this now. Actually a a movie that you can find on on Youtube video. That the. About the overview effect made by A. Sin Cinematographer in the UK. interviews with a lot of different astronauts. Myself included so yeah, it's It's a totally different perspective you got when your hundreds of miles above the surface of the earth so going back to the idea of of radiation risk beyond the surface of the earth, the missions you flew in the eighties and nineties. What did you in the other crew? Members understand about radiation risk in space, and a what what kind of measures were in place to protect you other than just limiting the duration of missions. Shuttle flies like International Space Station in what we call low-earth orbit, so we are. Basically below the van Allen radiation belts where inside the earth's magnetic fields, which shields us from most cosmic radiation so. it's it's a much more benign environment than when you actually left the earth to head out to the moon, and you're outside the Earth's magnetic shield, and then you're exposed to direct impact of galactic cosmic rays and and charged particles coming from the sun. you. ultra-violet light of course is not deflected by the magnetic field and we have to have. Protection against ultraviolet light, otherwise it would destroy our our is which is why the space helmet spacesuit helmets have those those gold visors which protect you and there's ultraviolet protection on all the windows, the space shuttle and the international station windows. So You know electromagnetic radiation, cosmic the the ultraviolet rays, we have to protect ourselves against, and then of course there's the infrared radiation from the sun the heat. when you're in the Direct Sunlight temperatures of things exposed to direct sunlight in space can go up above the boiling point of water, and so when you're out in your space suit, you need good. Cooling and we do that by sublimating ice and Matt Cools off which we then circulate in in a liquid cooling garment with lots of to was where where you can run the cold water, right over your body and and take away heat. and you can adjust ad because when you go into the dark side. It gets very very cold and they are. You don't want this extra cooling, so from the electromagnetic point of view has gotta protect ourselves against Ultraviolet Radiation, and we've got to have good thermal control for heat. For the charged particle radiation as I say, we're in a relatively benign place when we did our helplessness in Hubbell was put as high up as the shuttle could go about four hundred miles six hundred kilometers. And we were kind of scraping the bottom of the van. Alen intervene Allen Radiation Belt So. It was calculated that we were GONNA get about ten times the normal exposure first shuttle flight, which which still was nothing to to be concerned about from a cancer point of view, but. but they had us where radiation monitors, the whole time, and and particularly when we went outside, and they tried to schedule the spacewalk so that we would not be outside when we went through. What is known as the South Atlantic? Anomaly which is A. Part of the orbit, where the radiation is is much higher than than the rest of it. That's about all you can do. Obviously if there were ever a huge solar eruption we always have the option of coming home and and Getting underneath the atmosphere for the extra protection, but we never had to do that. What about extended future missions? How did the risk change? And what sort of solutions are being developed to protect future astronauts? -Ation risk is recognized as being one of the most serious if you're going to be. The Earth's magnetic field for a long time. Either on the surface of the moon, or on an extended trip to Mars. On the surface of the moon. Actually getting to the moon is is not such a big deal because you can get there in three days, so your exposure time is limited, but if you're gonNA, spend any significant amount of time on the surface of the Moon obviously the the moon blocks about half of the galactic cosmic rays, but but you're still exposed to all the rest of them. And it may be that you know we'll. They're talking about possibly having underground habitats in lava tubes which we know exist on the moon you. You'RE GONNA have to do something to shield yourself from the radiation, because being exposed to it for a long time is going to be dangerous. That's something that's very difficult to do. If you're on a trip to Mars, because you can't carry that much mass with you to protect yourself and so. NASA is interested in other ways. There are some re. I think very interesting research going on about pharmacological protection against radiation. If there was some way that we could enhance the body's ability to repair DNA. That would. Make the impact of radiation much less serious. We know that there's bacterias which can withstand hundreds of times, the amount of radiation that human can, and they've developed the ability to repair. Much more significant damage to DNA than we're able to do. There may be genetic clues about how to protect against radiation, so the point being that we've got to look for other ways besides just shielding, and of course developing a better more powerful propulsion systems so that we could get the Mars quicker would be a big help as well not just from radiation point of view, but logistically you've gotta carry everything you need. you can't get. Get resupplied once. You're on your way to Mars, so all the food, the medical equipment the spare parts everything, the quicker you get there the better so there's a lot of ways that that we're looking at. That will make long duration spaceflight outside the Earth's magnetic field safer, but most of these things are still works in progress right now. We don't have those solutions available. Now and in correct me if I'm wrong, but once you get to Mars on a Mars mission on the surface. You're not a whole lot better off than you are in space, right as as far as radiation. Bars just like when you're on the surface of the Moon Mars is blocking half of the radiation just by its mass, and then Mars does have a bit of an atmosphere which gives you a little bit of protection, but you're right. There's still the radiation environment on the surface of the law. A Mars is More severe than being low-earth orbit and so radiation protection on the surface of Mars will continue to be an issue. Will be on the moon. you'll have to have certain amount of protection and your habitats. But again the other the other thing you know there's two aspects of the dangers of radiation. One of them is that in the long term it will lead to an increased incidence of cancers like leukemia well one of the things that we're realizing. Is that ability for early detection and treatment and cancer is continually improving, and so maybe you know twenty thirty years from now. That's just not going to be as much of a problem. The other potential problem from radiation are cute impacts there there've been some experiments that have shown a potential loss of cognitive capability for rats when they're exposed to radiation. you certainly would not like to get to Mars and find out that your I q is decreased by twenty points they are potential effects of acute effects of radiation on the circulatory system on the nervous system, and that's an area of very active research. Now it's relatively new traditionally. We were just concerned with the long term impact of radiation that is ultimately causing cancer. Unless of course you had a huge solar flare. You know if you get enough radiation. All at one time you're gonNA, die or have serious illnesses and you know we? We would like not to be in space when they have a huge solar flare. Statistically. Those don't happen very often and so far. We've been lucky. So we've discussed the ambient radiation risks in space, obviously within our solar system. You you've got solar radiation to worry about and got charged particles from the from the galaxy, the universe to worry about, but also apart from these ambient radiation risk. Does it make sense to also for space ferrers to worry about anomalous radiation risks I know for example like x Ray Bursts and gamma-ray bursts are extremely rare in the universe or they so. So rare that that we just don't have to think about that or will the future of space exploration needs really think about it I mean if if if a huge black hole merger like was observed with the gravitational radiation, billions of light years away. If something like that happened right near us in the galaxy, it would be bad news, but there's absolutely nothing we can do about it, and so it's just not something that. That we even bother to think about. What about solar anomalies, you mentioned like a solar event so. I mean solar flares are recognized I mean for a big solar flare in nineteen, seventy, two in August, which just happened to occur between Apollo, sixteen and Apollo seventeen had it occurred when. We're on the lunar surface. There's been a lot of discussion of weather with would have been fatal, or whether it would have just been very bad for them, but it would have been very serious effect, but that solar flare nineteen seventy two was not nearly the strongest solar flare. That's ever existed. I mean, there was the Carrington event back in the mid nineteenth century, which was so powerful, of course that was, we didn't have satellites. We didn't have electronics going, but they did have telegraph lines, and that solar flare collapse the earth's magnetic field to the extent that. Moving magnetic field induced voltages in the telegraph lines which caused fires in telegraph offices I mean if if a flare like that hit us today. It would cost. Lights funding did a estimate of that I mean it would be like a trillion dollars worth of damage. All of our satellites would be destroyed electronic systems all over the world electrical power grids. We'd go down. And there's nothing we can do about it. Except that statistically something like that happens maybe once every five hundred years or so so far we've been lucky. And, not too much more, you can say about it. we are people are? Still doing research to try to be able to predict solar flares so far without. Many positive results, but I just read recently. Some new research is indicating that you know. Maybe they've made a breakthrough. being able to predict solar flares in advance would be a big help so that at least you can get ready for it, and if you had astronauts on the moon. At least they could try to get inside their shielding, but other than that It's statistics and so far we've been lucky. I Dr. Hoffman in other interviews you have stated that shrimp cocktail your favorite food in space. Can you explain for our listeners why you select? You know when when when you take away. Gravity, there is a an upward migration of fluid from your lower body to your upper body, and so you get a lot of extra fluid in your head. It's a little bit like having sinus congestion and it. It decreases your sense of smell so that you. The food becomes very bland They provide extra tabasco sauce that we can sort of spice up our food. The Nice thing about the shrimp cocktail dehydrated so the shrimp themselves. you know nothing to write home about you? You put a little bit of water on them, and they don't have that much taste, but they pack it in a really really hot horseradish sauce so. I found if I would eat a shrimp cocktail. Before dinner every night that horseradish would kind of open up my nasal passages, so that I could smell and taste the rest of the food a little bit more, so that's why it was my favorite food, not because it intrinsically taste good I mean as a shrimp cocktail. It was you know I. If they served it to you in a restaurant, you'd send it back, but it really opened up the nasal passages so that I can enjoy the rest of my meal well. I guess it's those little pleasures that make life worth living. Well thank you so much. It's been such a privilege to talk to you Dr Hoffman. We really appreciate you sharing your time. And I hope it's giving maybe a new perspective to some of the listeners who haven't heard some of this stuff so thanks for your interest and It's It's been fun. Yeah, thank you so much, thank you. You have a great day, sir. Well, thanks once more Dr, Jeff Hoffman and National Geographic for an enabling us to have this wonderful chat. We're going to take a quick break and we come back Joe and I will discuss the interview a little bit before we close out the episode. Working remotely can be a challenge especially for teams that are new to it. How do you deal with your work? Environment being the same as home while staying connected and productive, and then there's your newest co worker the. The cat, well, your friends at Trello have been powering remote teams globally for almost a decade at a time when teams must come together more than ever to solve big challenges Trello here to help Trello part of Atlassian collaborative, sweet as an APP with an easy to understand visual format plus tons of features that make working with your team, functional and just plain fun. 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These are strategies that have worked for me for people I admire, and that comes from listeners like you. We'll tackle everything from to do lists to Home Office design to strategic career decisions. Listen over that First Cup of coffee. And I promise you'll learn something useful. My goal is to help you succeed in the modern workplace where ideas matter more than ever, but shoes might be optional. Listen to the. New Corner Office, starting April first on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. All Right? We're back so Robert Dr Hoffman mentioned a few things in that interview that I thought were really interesting. We might WANNA. Follow up and talk about a little bit one of the things he mentioned when we were talking about solar anomalies was the idea of the Carrington event or the solar storm of eighteen, fifty nine, and this just stuck in my mind because this is one. One of the most fascinating and I think maybe lesser known craziest astronomical events in history. Yeah, indeed it may have been the largest solar energetic particle event in the past several hundred years. So why don't we call it the Carrington event? Well? It's a name for Amateur Astronomer Richard Carrington who observed quote to patches of intensely bright and white light erupting from a cluster of dark sunspots. They vanished within five minutes then within a matter of hours, the effects of this event were felt on earth, so one of those affects look like well as Doctor Hoffman. Alluded to telegraph communication around the world. Begin to fail. Sparks were flying from Telegraph Machines, Telegraph. Operators were in some cases shocked. In also colorful auroras in the sky were causing. The birds chirp at night. Yeah So the solar flare in question, had the power of an estimated ten billion atomic bombs and ice core samples reveal that the Carrington event was twice as big as any other solar storm within the last five hundred years. This is the kind of thing where it really hit today. The estimates are just in trillions of dollars worth of damage. It would just. Just be a massive blow, and Dr. Hoffman alluded into this as well the idea that it would, it would impact our satellites in fact, technology on a scale that simply did not exist in eighteen fifty nine, but of course it would also greatly affect any exposed astronauts or space ferrers that you know we're columnist or wherever outside of the protection of the. The Er Shield. It didn't even fully protect us from this event. Yeah, yeah, you know. I actually interviewed him physicist Dr See, Alex young several years ago about solar storms, and he pointed out that that our modern electrical grid in particular is just highly vulnerable to this sort of thing. He told me the power grids that we have in the US and. and. Actually all over the world are interconnected in very fragile. If the current large enough, it can short out the largest of the transformers, which can knock out the power grid over the scale of a country of a continent or even across the whole globe, a scary yeah, and it for just a minor example of the sort of thing Canada's. Quebec power grid experienced a similar shock in nineteen, eighty, nine from particularly powerful son storm in this caused the grid to go down for over nine hours, resulting in revenue losses estimated in the hundreds of millions of dollars, and that was just the small potatoes compared to something like the Carrington. Event, yeah with our earthbound minds, it's impossible for us to grasp the real power and magnitude of solar events like if you've never seen one of those pictures of the earth superimposed to scale against a solar prominence. It's amazing solar prominence or these events where this monstrous loop of plasma erupts out of the photo sphere, which is the apparent surface of the sun, and then it curves through the sun's Corona guided by solar magnetic fields, and this is not even really the core of the Sun. itself is just an event. It's like whether it's it's an event on the surface of the sun, but this event itself is tens of times. Times bigger than the entire planet earth and you see one of these pictures when you look at it. The vulnerability in tiny of human scale projects becomes absurdly apparent. The comparison that comes to my mind is if you've ever been out in nature as I know you like to venture out nature on hikes, and so forth you ever observe a bird's nest for a wasp nest, some sort of animal structure and ask. Yourself, that's horrible place to put that. Don't you know tiny birds that eventually the wind is GonNa Don't you know when it rains? That's that's just not a very protected, plus don't you know that that's my front porch and I'm probably. GonNa. Knock you down eventually just because you're inconvenient to me. And then when you think about everything that that is life on earth, and then everything that humans have built, and you think of the vulnerability. That is intrinsic in all of that We're really no different from from any O. Wasp, the decides to build its nest on the bottom of a porch swing on a geologic cosmic timescales, projects are so hilariously shortsighted but then again that that's just how we're built. Right I mean it's very difficult for us to seriously focus on a project that we think will take place over. Over say one hundred thousand years or even a million years. Yeah, totally we we are sighted is a species. That's what we've evolved to be now. On the subject of Longtime Scales and and the cosmic scale of events I asked Dr Hoffman about whether. Spacefaring species should really worry about things like Gamma Ray bursts or x ray bursts, which I think is kind of a weird question because. On one hand it's something that would pose a very serious threat, but these things are also incredibly rare in the universe, and they're incredibly rare in the galaxy, so it's hard to factor into one's idea about something like space exploration. How much you should worry about something that is almost never going to happen anywhere near you. Yeah, but if it did, it would be catastrophic, we come into it kind of. Of reminds one of lead of course, the the seafaring explorers of old, and to say well. If you go out in that boat, you might very well drown. You might run into a hurricane. ETC, and the hurricanes are pretty common. Yeah, those are pretty common like. If it was, you'd have to say. Oh, I mean we may very well drown. We may very well. Di Di on some distant island. But in the chances here are are are less, but it's ultimately the same scenario like it's of course it's safer to not go out and explore is certainly in the short term, but are the type species that is going to do that of course then again if there were a nearby gamma ray burst as unlikely as that is, that would be bad even if we were on earth. Yeah, yeah, so these in particularly gamma-ray bursts emitted by powerful Supernova that are dubbed Hyper. Nova and you can think of these is. Like the energy shrapnel from titanic exploding star. And even though they are rare, the radiation killing zone for an exploding hyper stars been estimated to be around six thousand light years across compared to normal stars. Thirty Light Year Kills Zone, and even smaller gamma-ray doses can have a serious neurological impact on an individual Oh. Yeah, you don't gamma rays. No matter what. Yeah, there was a cold. Spring Harbor Laboratory study on mice that found the gamma radiation targeted a particular type of stem cell in the hippocampus, the an area of the brain. You know believed to be important for learning and. And move control and normal doses of space radiation also pose serious risk in a separate experiment, the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory dosed mice with radiation equal to the amount. An astronaut might receive on a three year voyage to Mars and scientists discovered significant damage to hippocampus stem cells responsible for repopulating the brain with new cells, so without proper radiation, shielding lengthy space exploration might be recipe for the kind of in the cognitive and emotional breakdown that Doctor Hoffman alluded to the idea that you would have your astronauts arrive at their destination. With reduced cognitive abilities, and this is exactly the time when presumably all the hard work is right in front of them. They're going to have to Land on the planet and Planetary Explorers but have to do so with a reduced with reduced brain power. Yeah, it's a daunting problem. Now. Of course in all of this discussion, we don't want to give the impression of discouraging space, exploration or anything like no, no, no just because of all these risks but In talking about them, it's just that we have to recognize how hard this project is. And how dangerous it is, and how much investment of research and technology it's GONNA. Take to make this something that humans can safely and reasonably do. Yeah, we did an episode. Last year we talked about proposed ways of genetically altering A. Astronauts, the future, so they might be less susceptible to damage radiation so there are there multiple fronts on which? Science current science and future science. May Be able to to tweak all this in our favor, but it is still as you said a dangerous universe and in. A very fragile species that has evolved a thrive. Within a very slim portion of our own. Atmosphere within a slim portion of our own terrestrial environment, even a large portion of the earth will kill Ya. It's true. If you were to teleport up to the top of Mount Everest you would not be able to breathe, or if you were to suddenly appear at the the bottom of the ocean, and find yourself surrounded by what three thousand atmospheres worth of pressure. Yeah, the North or South Pole? Yes, or in the middle of a desert bright. There's just a lot of bad places to be, but I don't mean to trash the earth of course I mean. This takes us back to the idea of the overview effect that we mentioned a little bit with the Hoffman that. Having a cosmic perspective on the earth, realizing the alternate kind of emptiness and violence and hostility of the universe at large and the incredible uniqueness and privilege of this one little rock floating in space. It really should give us a perspective of thankfulness and transcendence something that makes the petty human squabbles kind of fade away into non importance, indeed all right today you have it. hope everyone enjoyed our chat with Dr Hoffman. We certainly enjoyed chatting with him. Absolutely, it was a pleasure and he He gave me a lot of stuff to think about. About this is the first time we've had an actual space traveler on the show, and it did not disappoint. Maybe won't be the last time. Yeah, who knows now if there's anything in our discussion with Dr Hoffman that really left out at you and you would like to hear a whole episode of stuff to blow your mind on. Let us know about that. Because because he covered a lot of ground in the interview. Totally don't be shy to get in touch with us and let us know what you would like to pick up on from that conversation in the future right and you can do that. Arab at are various social media accounts. We're on facebook twitter instagram Allen. Check out stuff to blow your mind dot com. That's the mothership. That's where you'll find links out to our social media accounts that is. is where you'll find links to our social media accounts as well as all the podcast episodes, some blog post it, cetera and hey, checkout one strange rough. It's a really beautiful. Show it definitely like hd home viewing experience big thanks as always to are excellent audio producers, Alex Williams and Tari Harrison and if you want to get in touch with us directly by email, you can do so as always at blow. The mind at how stuff works. Dot Com. For more on this bathrooms of other topics visit how stuff works dot com. took. Week. The epic fiction podcast. Tuman Bay returns. We met before. Oh yes, general, you have no choice. The test to be done. What you've done. Listen on the iheartradio, APP, apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Guys it's bobby bones host the bobby bones show, and I'm pretty much always sleepy because I wake up with three o'clock in the morning a couple hours later. I get all my friends together. We get into a room and we do a radio show. Our allies. We tell our stories. We try to find as much good in the world. Possibly can, and we looked through the news of the day that you'll care about also your favorite country artists are always stopping by to hang out and share their lives and music to. Wake up with a bunch of my friends. I ninety eight point seven W M, Z Q in Washington DC or wherever the rotates you on the iheartradio APP.

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247: Vaccine Injuries, Autism, and Homeoprophylaxis With Dr. Jeff Knight

The Wellness Mama Podcast

48:57 min | 1 year ago

247: Vaccine Injuries, Autism, and Homeoprophylaxis With Dr. Jeff Knight

"The. Bobby podcast. This episode is powered by a ritual may make vitamins specifically designed just for women ritual vitamins contain night, essential nutrients that most women just don't get enough, including vitamin B, twelve as medical ballum form, only and not this medical Gasset, d three K Ketu, vitamin E omega three fatty acids. Moron. Curated iron, and a proprietary form of magnesium virtual supplies all of these informs that are easily absorbed and utilized in their capitals are vegan gluten free allergen free and ninety hope they have it both the prenatal and regular women's multivitamin both designed specifically for women and synergetic for women's poor moans. Did you know, for instance, that forty percents of women cannot properly use full of acid due to Mt. Jeff, our Jeanne rich. Contains a natural form of folate and center just nutrients, so the entire multi is more effective, especially important prepregnancy during pregnancy because during pregnancy especially full late is vital. According to OBGYN, Jason Robert most women don't find out they're pregnant until about four to seven weeks pregnant, which is passed the first week days in the first one days. The baby's organs are rapidly forming and the neural tube, which becomes the central nervous system and the vertebral column his almost completely formed an closed by the end of twenty eight days. In other words, you need those nutrients in your body before you get pregnant the essential nutri fully helps promote healthy development of the neural tube. And this is why many doctors recommend taking a quality prenatal for several months before trying to get pregnant ritual makes this easy with both in prenatal and a regular women's multi-vitamin, and you can learn more about both by going to wellness MoMA dot com forward slash. Go forward slash ritual. So again, wellness, mama dot com forward slash go. Forward slash RIT. You out this podcast is powered by steady. MD the innovative new way that I found and now connect with my primary care doctor using concierge medicine. The idea of concierge medicine used to be something reserved for celebrities or the altering and it didn't seem acceptable to the rest of us. The concept is great though, having a doctor who you know, and trust in him knows your medical history always available when you need him or her. I loved the idea for years, but I was so excited when I finally found a -able and personalized option that made this available to everyone. And it's what I know us about this. We can do almost everything virtually these days, and now we can talk to our Dr this way to digital aspect makes it affordable. It's only one hundred sixty nine dollars a month for a family plan. Or two parents and all kids in the family. This means that you can call and chat or video chat with your doctor anytime, there's an issue in your family. Someone is sick has an action, etc. The system also allows the doctors to take fewer patients, so they have more time and attention for each patient. So essentially, it feels like the modern equivalent of a country medicine, doctor who comes to your house when you have a medical need accept it makes the best use of technology because we get instant access to our doctor the text Email or even video checked you can find out more about how works or take their free quiz to get matched with a doctor who fits your needs. And personality by going to study MD dot com forward slash wellness, mama. So that's S T A D Y M D dot com forward slash wellness. Hello and welcome. To the wellness, mama podcast. I'm Katie from wellness, mama dot com. And I'm here today with Dr Jeff Knight who is a chiropractor physician with an emphasis in helping people tap into their natural ability to heal. He uses a multi therapeutic approach that includes functional medicine functional neurology muscle activation, brain and cellular detox chiropractic and functional movement. He has a strong passion for serving autistic kids, vaccine damage children, and and helping couples who are challenged with infertility in were to deep on a couple of those topics today because I get a lot of questions from you guys about that. And Dr Knight has some specific area of expertise here. So Dr Jeff welcome and thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. I'm excited to be with you guys today and excited for our conversation. And like, I said, I think you're obviously, I'm guessing seeing more and more children with these issues in this part of your specialty, and I'm gonna ask you today. Some of the regular questions, I get from readers, and I note. I'm just going to call out the elephant in the room before we jump in. I know that vaccines are controversial topic. So for those of you who are listening, please note that we are definitely not going to be discussing whether or not you should or should not give axioms we're going to bring up questions to consider. We're certainly not going to be judging any parents for any decisions one way or the other. But we're going to take a deep dive into related questions that I get a lot like vaccine injuries potential turn it is and other questions. So to start off Dr Knight. Can you talk about what you're seeing most commonly in your practice, and why this is become such a focus for you. So yes, some of the things that I do see often in my practice specifically with autistic kids is the they do come in and always bring up the questions of where the history is in how this all came about. And and yeah, I would never say that vaccine is the number one cause of lie child has been become autistic. However, it definitely can be a trigger. Just like so many other things that can be a trigger for other health issues as well. And so so the the reason why this has become such a passion of mine in. Why it something that I'm so interested in long story short is in my early time of school had a chance to go to a seminar in and I learned through the seminar that there was a doctor that was able to help reverse some of the symptoms of autism. And that was something that really struck me in end grew up thinking that once you're autistic that means this is just something you gotta live with the rest of your life. And so it was more of like kind of the idea that I realized that you don't just have to cope, but that there is hope for healing and Freeman some improvement. If not for some kids, you can see a complete transformation, and I grew up with two stepsisters that have autism kids. So I gotta see firsthand of the challenges that it put on the family. Especially mom and dad, and siblings and one of them. He was pretty high functioning. But the other one was definitely severely autistic, and you know, very difficult with verbal in all that. So when I saw the challenges that they face in when I realized that there was actually some hope for a family like like, my stepsister, I thought, Wow, I've got I've got to do something more about his in enemy, quite honest. It was I guess you could say it was definitely a gentle nudge from from God's saying. Hey, Jeff, you gotta do this. Because there's so many people that need this help in in really that they can find value from from tapping into that audience natural ability to hill, but there's definitely certain things that can interfere what that ideal function. And so, yeah, we see a lot of things that can contribute to the autism such as yet there are some vaccine damages in the reason why that can be such a sensitive thing for these kids if they're come. Into this world or any predisposed for some sensitivities, for example. I know on some of your other podcasts, we've talked you've talked about a generational talks ity, and that's a real thing. And what that means just as refresher. For those of you that are listening is there can be talk since that can be passed from from mom, baby. But it also can be past for generations. So there's a biologist name Michael Skinner who did some studies in realize that you know, what great grandma had in her body could potentially be in me right now just through the generational. Toxicity. And so oftentimes we'll see mercury or lead that can be passed for mom to baby as well as some other things. And then there's other studies that have shown that in the court of newborn babies blood that there's actually several toxins they're already in. So you know, when you throw in the vaccine if there's a very highly sensitive child. And maybe they are already somewhat compromised due to it could even be the process of delivery. 'cause I mean, as, you know, Katie being a mother six my wife's a mother of six delivery is not anything. That's just a walk in the park when you're delivering these babies, but that's a stressful thing for both mom and the baby. And so this baby as they're coming through that birth canal. That's a lot of stress on the cranium. So in also the neck, and that can definitely stress the nervous system to some degree. So right there there can be some susceptibility just be just the way of how traumatic that birth may have been end. Of course, I know another topic that you discussed before is is c sections in how unfortunately these babies aren't gonna get the maximum amount of that good bacteria from their mother going through the birth canal. So these are all kind of like the perfect storm, that's creating this potential eruption for for autism in. Then you top it off with say. Vaccine in. That's where I've had some parents that have come in in bay said. Yes, soon as my child was vaccinated. Here's what happened and they'll go into details about some things. So, but then again, I think we all know hundreds of not thousands of people that have been vaccinated, and they haven't had any direct acute injuries as a result of it. So the question is in I kind of compared to a car accident. I mean, I know people that have been in car accidents where one person walked away on the the other person died in the same car in you kinda think how did that happen. You know, like how did one person, you know, quote, unquote, e so lucky or fortunate verses that one person that that they lost their life. And and sometimes vaccines can be that kind of like a car accident where some people walk away. And it's like, well, luckily, there was no major trauma from the things that are in the vaccine specifically, which are you know, there's mercury there's aluminum there's they even use. You know, some other ingredients that they can't be harmful. Of course, what the intend to try to create immunity for that child. So the intention behind it. You know, it's there's a good intention behind doing vaccines. But again, it's just like is your child more susceptible. And and you know, is there potentially, you know, some kind of history that maybe even mom or dad had for example. If a parent grew up in maybe they had some some different like health challenges, whether it was auto immune or maybe they grew up, and maybe they had some even sensory processing disorders, or maybe maybe they were even somewhat mildly autistic, or or who knows, but you know, right there that's going to even create a greater chance for some of these kids potentially from also, you know, becoming that way in. So my approach is really like like you explained in my bible therapeutic approach because it's not like a a one-size-fits-all type of. The thing you really have to go out this in a multifaceted way and really get specific on understanding that individuals needs because everyone is so different. So hopefully that helps a little bit definitely. And I think you're so right about the bio individuality, and that's the one commonality. I see in all the research. I'm reading right now in everything seems to be indicating that the future of health is very personalized and very very much buried, and that's something I've said several times recently is I think that there's so much. We can learn from different approaches because we are also different at the end of the day. It's each individual working with practitioners who understand their medical history of fine. What specifically works for them. And I love the way you the vaccine topic as well. Because like I said, certainly we are a judgment free zone here in anybody. No matter what decisions they've made on that. Completely welcome in this community. And I would never judge apparent parenting. It's incredibly incredibly personal decision. But that said, I think we also do need to make sure where at least asking the questions because it is a big decision. And I know for me, and I love your feedback on these men a couple of the questions that I definitely asked an researched when I was considering this decision for my own kids. The first was we know by their nature that vaccines have to create an immune response that like you explain to. That's what that's how they work. And so one thing I asked was if it's doing that is it could there be any negative effects of that immune response? And if so does that grow exponentially, the more vaccines we add because that's something that's been brought up quite a bit. Is that increasing number of vaccines that have I know since I was a child there's four times as many that are recommended now than when I was that age. And so, you know, does the first vaccine still like is the seventieth vaccine is important as that first one if they are that affective and James Maskell who founded new healthy had a great explanation of this recently of just a way to think about this for parents. He said you have to think of it in terms of somewhat two opposing philosophies, and then way that so one being in science linear cause and effect in another economics. We know there's diminishing marginal returns. So the first example, he gave was antibiotics, which of course, when they first emerged. They were very valuable. They changed the trajectory of human lifespan, you know, had a death sentence just because you had a simple wound and mortality rates dropped. This went on for decades until curious thing happened, and we started seeing a marginal return once we use antibiotics millions of times. And now we see superbugs and these bugs are mutating. Now, we're seeing the kind of rebound effect of that. And you know, see this other places in society as well. But I think that is something we could also look at could there be this effect with the number of vaccine that are happening. So even affections are could be argued to be proven to reduce certain diseases. Could they also be fuelling chronic disease or? Could the seventieth vaccine at as much as the first or diminishing returns there? So I'd love to hear like what are some of the questions you thought about when making this decision for your own children, just as far as the philosophy and the questions you asked. Sure, you know, it's amazing you touch on the antibiotic things I was going to assure share that to because. Yeah. As they were such incredible blessing for people that had exposure to these illnesses. I mean, it was incredible. But yeah, what has happened is. You know, people are becoming more and more resistant to antibiotics I mean, how many people, you know, with penicillin and all these other antibodies it just doesn't work for him anymore. And because of the superbugs has the as intelligent as our bodies are, you know, those critters those little creatures bacteria, the viruses all that stuff there superintendent to in their whole desire is to survive as well. And so so with the whole concept of backseat, you know, the. Question. Yeah. Is this gonna be technically be the same type of result? Now. That's a great question. I don't have the perfect answer for it. But from the research in the study that I have done is that I know in the early, you know, like, I think it was back in the sixties. I can't remember the name of the doctor off the top my head. But they they were saying that, you know, once you get back seen or receive a vaccine if you get one than typically, it should be good for life. I know there's a big topic on herd immunity to and and the white people should be on all the kids should be vaccinated to help support say that immune compromise child. And so the argument there, though is truthfully, you know, herd immunity is effective. Ninety five percent of the population have been vaccinated or alise our immune to that specific, infection or illness. But what they're what the what we're realizing is that that means that every adult would also need to be vaccinated within the last five or ten years of all those different series. So how many adults do you know that are regularly getting their vaccine? So right there on fortunately just for from that argument, if you are looking at the herd, immunity that means day these kids are walking by people that have not been I guess, you could say, quote unquote, protected from vaccine for who knows how long so that gives me hope to realize like, wow, you know, our bodies definitely can do incredible things on its own end. When we allow our body to have that natural in Nate immune response. It's not just gonna give us immunity for the current time. But the majority of the time you're seeing immunity for a lifetime versus where if you got introduced to vaccine. In early on. Guess what? That means. You do have to go back and get reinculcated every five to ten years for the rest of your life, basically or else, you are going to be more prone in what they are finding too is that you know, we're seeing different things like measles in. We're seeing different things like some of those illnesses like protes-, but we're also noticing that a lot of those outbreaks are in individuals that have been vaccinated as well. And so that question of is that sim death back seen really gonna add the value compared to maybe those first few and and that's a tough question to really answer. 'cause I would say the likelihood of that is it's probably not gonna make as much of a difference mile. My biggest concern, of course, always is looking at the risk versus benefit. And where you know. I know I've got several friends in colleagues that you know, are older than I am that grew up in the. They they did get some of those childhood illnesses. And it was just like, well, that's just how it was where for me. It was the chicken pox, and we had chicken pox parties. Right. And we would go, and and if you knew that so and so had the chicken pox, while mom would say, all right. Let's go play with them. So you can get this quick and be done with it now at a young age. And then the beautiful thing is now I have immunity for the rest of my life with that. So it's it's definitely one of those topics that I think is really interesting in the studies in the information that I've received as I've looked at this more depth has led me to looking at. Okay. What are some other safe effective ways to still provide immunity because the thing I'm most concerned with with the vaccines are honestly, the the materials that are in there that can be neuro toxic. And that can also affect neurologically the child both acute end ten down the road. And that's the other. Why would say the seventieth vaccine would not be beneficial more for this straight fact of the bioaccumulation of toxins in how they can reside in the brain in deep into the tissues, which can affect neurological connections immune connections, as well as hormone connections. I mean when we see a large large increase amount of childhood, asthma, childhood, allergies. And then also as were seeing to there's more and more people that are auto immune because when we're forcing immunity into someone that's not natural form than were basically, basically pushing a button and telling the body to be on, hyper drive immune response, which then, you know, can trip it to where it's like now somewhat, you know, over stimulated in a sense to where it's now super-sensitive in it. You know, you start to see some of these other challenges. So so an end to be quite honest with every. Anyone that's listening? So that people can know where I'm coming from. So, yeah, we do have six kids, and guess what through my research and education. You know, we've only not vaccinated one of those six kids. So the first five all receive some forms of vaccines. And why because that's what I was taught at what I knew to be the right thing. And so, of course, my wife, and I that's what we chose to do. But as I started learning, educating myself, more and more these were the concerns I had in of course, as I started having more and more patients come in with their child, and I would ask where they started seeing some these negative facts in they mentioned through vaccinations, and I'm like, okay, there's gotta be a better way. And again, you know, it's it's like we're all doing the best. We can as parents, right? And our number one goal desires to try to raise her children to be healthy happy and be able to live a fulfilling life. And so anyone that shoes? It's vaccine I would say bless you because you're trying to do the best thing for your family in any. Anyone that chooses not to? I would say bless you. 'cause you're also from your understanding you're trying to do the best thing for your family as well. So I don't necessarily think anyone's wrong or right? It's just really coming to know what's right for you and your family and being comfortable in confident with that decision. And so for me that concept of knowledge is power is what gave me that power in confidence to say, hey, you know, what there's a there's some other options that can be really effective and safe, and that's kind of the path that I've gone down. So, but which you know, leads into if you wanna start chat about this, Katie is a home you'll prophylaxis chimp in there now because I get a lot of questions about this. Both is safe. Is it affective? Does it do the same thing? How to do it? So I would love if you could give us an expert primer on what that is. And how you used it. If you have. Yes. So so again, the homeo- prophylaxis, it's basically, this is a way to a hell. Help individuals acquire natural immunity using a homeopathic approach. It's nothing new. This has been around since seventeen ninety nine just to give you a little history. A doctor hahnemann from Germany who was the father of homeo- homeopathy. He I used it with scarlet fever, and what they found is as they would administer a remedy prior to these kids potentially getting the illness. It had an incredible success rate where the amount of scarlet fever was definitely declined significantly in that community and in in that area of the country where they live so the state of Germany or the country of Germany really started to embrace this in started to utilize more and more frequently but from there the home homeopathy in the homeopathy LAX's became something really effective tool to use. It can be used on on several different illnesses. So there's a a childhood program that that I use for families in our office, which is focused more on addresses, some of the same stuff that you see on vaccine schedules such as polio protests, you know, the mom's needles and all those other childhood illnesses as well. And and the it's very easy to administer. It's a natural approach to introducing immunity. And so it's using these little pellets, we call them, no, so DHS, and they are have been prepared and diluted substances, you know, for the purpose of educating the immune system in gentle non-toxic way. So they're completely natural. They don't contain any foreign cells, or antibiotics preservatives, or at advocates or any chemicals of any kind. And really the goal of HP is just to orally introduce safe. You know homeopathic versions of some of those diseases. I mentioned to. Actually stimulate the immune system because what they do with the home office eighty. It's basically taking the energetic form of that illness, and they do what's called the take the mother tincture is what you could call it where you can get that onus from like sputum or discharge or other things like that. And then they mix it into this tincture end a success it, which means they shake it so many times. And then they, you know, go through this process that over time it's in it's diluted over time. It's basically all that's left is the energetic form of that illness in so you're introducing, you know, this ability for the body to respond, positively to that immune, you know, energetic, immune response in the body starts to create real immunity for it. So it educates the immune system. So there's no there's definitely no side effects to it in. This has been really need for us. To us 'cause there's not just the the series for the kids to to utilize, but there's also even different forms such as like a flu version so people that want to have protection against the flu in MRs were in the thick of cold and flu season and our family. This is something we've used at for all of our family in his, you know, what's amazing is our kids have been incredibly healthy in spite of even playing interacting with lots of kids that have gotten the flu in been sick for days, if not, you know, weaker to in our kids come home in, you know, thank heavens. They're still healthy and happy doing well. And so it's really again like I said the idea is to educate immune system, and it reduces the susceptibility. So it's not it's not a vaccine, and it's not necessarily simply just a replacement for a vaccine, but it's more of a strategy that can help strengthen the immune system. So it's it's been really. Need in our our youngest daughter. We've been using it with her. And so we do this where there's different series in you pick maybe pick one one of those childhood illnesses a month, and they're the pellets are so small you can even put him in a baby's mouth in it'll just dissolve in. So that's the natural way of how we get onus. Anyways is through the Nukus membranes. So it's coming through the arm. Ouch. Into the into our cells that way versus being injected directly into the bloodstream, you know, in the idea there, of course, is just give the body strength. The ability to be more prone to fight off any exposure to that illness. Now is it one hundred percent affective accords? There's no notice thing as one hundred percent affective nece on on any, you know, homeopathic or or vaccine, but there was a doctor out of Australia named Isaac golden and heated fifteen years study. Back. I think it was from like eighty five to ninety can't remember off Tom ahead, but he did a fifteen year studying and by following on these kids, they found that it was really successful that it did reduce the amount of illness exposure and also assisted in more long term health benefits fascinating. I'm sure from a lot of parents really to know that there are alternatives than have been studied especially for that long. This episode is powered by a ritual. They make vitamins specifically designed just for women ritual vitamins contain night, essential nutrients that most women just don't get enough of including vitamin B, twelve as medical ballum, inform folate and not this medical acid d three K to vitamin E omega three fatty acids boron. Curated iron, and a proprietary form of magnesium ritual supplies, all of these informs that are easily absorbed and utilized and their capitals are vegan gluten free allergen free and non GMO they have it both a prenatal and a regular women's multivitamin both designed specifically for women and synergistic for women's hormones. Did you know, for instance, that forty percent of women cannot properly use full of asset due to? Mt. Jeff are variation ritual contains a. Form of full late and center just dig nutrients, so the entire multi is more effective this a specially important prepregnancy or during pregnancy because during pregnancy especially full late is vital. According to g I n Jason Robert most women don't find out they're pregnant until about four to seven weeks pregnant, which is past the first twenty eight days in the first one eight days, the baby's organs a rapidly forming and the neural tube, which becomes the central nervous system. And the vertebral column is almost completely formed and closed by the end of twenty eight days. In other words, you need those nutrients in your body before you get pregnant the essential nutrient full late helps promote healthy development of the neural tube. And this is why many doctors recommend taking a quality prenatal for several months before trying to get pregnant ritual makes this easy with both a prenatal and a regular women's multi-vitamin, and you can learn more about both by going to wellness, mama dot com forward slash go. Forward slash ritual. So again, wellness, mama dot com forward slash go. Forward slash our. I t you out this podcast is powered by steady. MD the innovative new way that I found and now connect with my primary care doctor using concierge medicine. The idea of concierge medicine used to be something reserved for celebrities or the ultra rich, and it didn't seem excessive to the rest of us. The concept is great though, having a doctor who you know interests. And who knows your medical history always available when you need him her. I loved the idea for years, but I was so excited when I finally found an affordable and personalized option that made this available to everyone. And it's what I now use and love about this. We can do almost everything virtually these days. And now, we can talk to our Dr this way to does it'll aspect makes it affordable. It's only one hundred sixty nine dollars a month for a family plan for two parents. And all kids in the family. This means that you can call and chat or video chat with your doctor anytime, there's an issue in your family. Someone is sick has an ear, infection, etc. The system also allows the doctors to take fewer patients, so they have more time and attention for each patient. So essentially feel like the modern equivalent of a country medicine, doctor who comes to your house when you have a medical need, except it makes the best use of technology because we get instant access to our doctor via text Email or even video chat. You can find out more about how it works or take their free quiz to get matched with a doctor who fits your needs. And personality by going to steady m d dot com or read slash wellness moments. That's S T A D Y M D dot com forward slash wellness. I know that you do like boxing injuries are well-documented thing. Regardless of whatever perspective parents may have on vaccines. There's a lot of data that vaccine injuries are well documented, and I know that you were part of a series with Dr Patrick tempo about healing from vaccine injuries. So I love if you could walk us through a little bit of the approach there. When a parent comes in with a child who has an injury to see you. What do you look at? And how do you start at therapeutic approach with them? Also, a great question. So I definitely look at three specific things primarily in the easiest one that anyone can apply would be relating to the gut health and to diet and digestion because we know that govern connection is a powerful connection and even the bacteria in our gut can influence, our brain and our nervous system to certain degrees. So definitely the first thing is looking at changing or modifying or. Doing some things that are a little different in a lot of families. Actually, honestly, there's so many incredible parents out there that common they've applied. A lot of these principles already in 'em, basically as far as the diet and digestion of big part of it is definitely reducing the sugars removing in the process sugars and really trying to get into more of Akito genyk type of diet where you're doing high fat moderate protein in low carb in the low carbs are going to be focused more on good vegetables. You know, lots of good green leafy veggies. So, you know, some fruits here, and there are okay. But the idea is just to keep the coast in the sugar levels, low indefinitely remove any process stuff now for some people that might be really hard to implement right away. Because, you know, unfortunately, the way we've, you know, live in this country. We have so much convenience in there's so much, you know, ease of gathering Gadet getting some kind of a quick quick mail here quick meal there. In end, those aren't necessarily always the most beneficial. But if you can even just start with say, if you still your kids still are like in love with their MAC and cheese or in love with you know, some of those other Staples that a lot of families have if you can even go to nor Ganic and a non GMO version that'll be far better than just, you know, buying the other stuff off the shelf. So that would be a one one great way to start is really, you know, increase good fats because our brain loves good fat in our brain needs that good fat for both, you know, the nervous system, but also for hormone function, and you know, there's so many other great benefits even deeper at the cellular level. So increasing good fats removing the sugars in processed foods, really focusing on eating close to possible. What comes from mother nature, so just whole foods, and then reducing carbs to certain degrees. So the Kito says can be a healing. A healing mode for that brain. And in fact, he genyk diets were first discovered to be so beneficial back in the early nineteen hundreds with children that had epilepsy. Seizures and where it was a powerful tool in resource for even helping their brains in helping calm things down. So with autistic kids, these are kids that have a chronic inflammation of the brain. And so our goal is to also, reduce inflammation and helping crease their body's ability to heal on function better. So definitely start with diet and with with just of health the other thing that I do is a lot of with chiropractic. So specifically, there's some specific adjustments that I really focus on one in particular area of the spine that I really find that can be a powerful impactful is the upper part of the neck, so the upper cervical spine and where even the the head where it sits on top of the neck. It's called Oxford and the top vertebrae call. The atlas and so that area right there doing specific adjustments that can free and release some of the tension there, which can also positively affect one of the really important nerves in our body called the Vegas nerve or cranial nerve number ten in cranial nerve ten or the Vegas nerve. It has a huge role with balancing that whole fight or flight mechanism in in in our bodies. And so a lot of these kids are in a fight or flight mode. And so if we can help stimulate that Vegas nerve, which does the opposing where calms things down helps people be more restful in it helps kids be able to be more present and be able to digest their food better at cetera. I mean that can be a really powerful tool. But so yeah, jesting of the of the of the spine can be really powerful because then we just enhance the nervous system in the brain's ability to communicate to the body. Some other techniques uses one call. Neurological immigration system, and that's more like a functional Raji technique where really were through contacting different points on the body. We can neurologically stimulate different responses to help the brain even communicate more clearly with Oregon's glands to increase its ability to work against kind of infections and things like that. And that's been pretty powerful as well. But I would say all those things have helped me get incredible results. But then I knew there was always something missing. And that's where I started working with Dr Pompa and learning how to detox the brain. Because again, heavy metals have an affinity for the brain specifically mercury aluminum. So if anyone has ever had any kind of silver filling or if a mother was pregnant with silver fillings than that can even pass some some of the mercury from child to baby. And then of course, any of the vaccines or flu shots that can. Mercury aluminum are the age of events that are used there, and that can settle into the brain in in caused some of the irritation on the nervous system. So doing strategic approach to how to remove those toxins, and and really go through that process is really powerful. I mean, there's some other beneficial things that can be done that can really help as well in. It's again, it's all focusing on stimulating that brain in a positive way trying to recreate good patterns whether it's functional movement to I mean crawling as silly and simple as it might sound. You know, just getting your kids to crawl more often can be really powerful for grading some different networks of connection from the brain to the body. And then that can also help stimulate other good good connections with how the body's functioning in working the weights post too. So those are a few things that I use that have been really powerful ineffective at allowing us to help some of these kids. You know, make this path in this process to helping them heal in helping them again, like I said before not just cope, but you know, give them hope to where it's like, hey, you know, they can actually they're communicating better. They're forming more sentences. You know, they're I contact is improving. I see some of these kids where they're, you know, now actually interacting with their siblings and playing with them more. And I mean, just the there's a ton of really needs things as parents are sharing with me as we're going through this process. And I would definitely emphasize it as a process for sure. So 'cause I wish it was a quick fix. But it does take some time out. It's really neat to see those changes. That must be so rewarding. And another question we've mentioned that, you know, vaccines by their nature they work to create in the moon response. And you've talked about the generational taxes city in how if there's underlying factors that this can trigger some things. So I've got a lot of questions from parents. And you mentioned that you even chose to backseat several of your children, if parents are choosing the vaccinate are there things they can do proactively before. And after to help keep inflammation low and to help hopefully avoid problems. Have you worked with parents on that at all? There's definitely some things that can be done. I mean, think of all the the individuals that work in hospital system. They're required to get flu shots and be up to date on their vaccines. And so it's not just kids, but even even adults there's definitely specific things that you can do to prep your body in a sense. So that when if you do choose to do that there's ways to minimize the negative effects in? So there's some some really good. Products that that I use in some of them that are a staple as far as the detoxing goes one is called sido detox. The other one is called bind. And so us utilizing even those in doing some heavy dosage before you get a vaccine is going to be really powerful and beneficial. And then after the vaccine is received, you know, doing that as well. And so using some of those drops in some of those supplements those capsules that can help really catch in gear at grab those those those toxins that are being injected into the body and make sure that you're getting him out as quick as possible, and that can be helpful. Also, another like, you know old trick is wherever the vaccine it is going to be done. You can put some ice over that area and numbing that area. Where the vaccine is gonna go into can actually help reduce the the body's ability to spread that those toxins as. As quickly so you can do ice. And then shortly thereafter, another remedy is putting some bent night clay over that area net can help even pull some those toxins out of there. So there's a few little little things there that can be done in the I can definitely help coach some families. If if that's a choice, they do make. But they do want to make sure that they, you know, for them they find that the vaccine is going to be important for them. Here's some tools in resources to help them to to minimize potential negative effects of it. So and that would be again, go at those adults that that are needing to be vaccinated working in the hospital system if they want to keep their job, right? Otherwise, I know if they don't do that. Unfortunately, they're asked to leave. I think there is that commonality you mentioned several times of inflammation. And so all these seem like good things at all of us can implement irregardless vaccines, just to keep inflammation low. And I'm curious. Do you feel like other things? Go back to inflammation as well. It seems like I'm seeing so much in the research right now of that being very much a common trigger, and I'm curious if you're seeing that as well. And if you have any additional advice for all of us in just keeping inflammation low so a common trigger for what? Specifically, I just for chronic disease in general, I'm seeing that connection across auto immune disease. Like we've mentioned a little bit certainly in kids with any kind of struggles. Like, the ones we've mentioned, but it seems like that's a connection in everything from joint pain to potentially in kind of across the board. Yeah. Definitely inflammation. I mean, it's it's crazy. The things that can create that inflammation will definitely make us more susceptible more vulnerable to being exposed to some of these other things that can take place in. So. Inflammation from you can come in so many forms. Definitely there's inflammation response from from stress. There's inflammation response from you know, the foods and beverages. We put into our body. And then there's inflammation, of course from different traumatic events. And so our body interprets all those different stressors similarly in. So if there is like this, chronic inflammation, going on then you know, it's it becomes like a perfect storm. I guess you could save for for really facilitating more and more negative things from happening because the body in a sense it's filling like, whoa, I've got this fire that is continuously burning. I can't put it out. And so if it's always trying to minimize some of those negative effects of inflammation, will unfortunately that does leave us exposed or vulnerable to you know, other things that can happen in the body. And so the more we can incorporate in adopt. You know, good healthy habits of. Finding ways to minimize inflammation. And one tool that I know that's been discussed on your podcast before his fasting utilizing both intermittent fasting doing extended fast can be powerful as far as really toeing the body in giving it a break allowing it to speak be quiet and minimize some of that that stress that comes from from the inflammation. So fasten is an incredible tool, of course, choosing low inflammatory foods that are are not gonna stimulate in increase that you're tation. But I guess that gives it gives me the piece in the hope that, hey, this is something that we can influence more than we realize, and it's something that necessarily we don't have to fill like, well, this is just my reality. But but there's so much. I mean, I've seen I've seen people reverse their diabetes. I've seen people, you know, take a hypothyroid issue and completely change. That I've seen other audio mute conditions that people where they've been able to make that choice in really do some great things to reduce reduce those those stressors in that inflammation. So it's it's definitely a big deal. I mean, it's been something that I know has been more on the forefront lately in our member even a time magazine back I think in two thousand four it said inflammation, you know, the root of all disease, and it is definitely one of those connections that will trigger in and makes several of our illnesses in things worse. So yeah, I totally agree with you there. Katie. You have definitely touched on some of the really hot topic questions that I get a lot and shown a lot of light on those today where can people find you? If they want to keep learning more from you or STAN touch. Sure. Yeah. So probably one of the easiest ways is our website. It's WWW dot true north Cairo dot com and our office is called true north practic in wellness center. We're just north of Salt Lake City in Utah. And our office phone number's eight zero one four four seven one six four seven. But then I also do have a Facebook page. Just Dr Jeff night put in different information out there on on different things. And I've got a YouTube channel to that has different testimonials in other ways that people can connect kinda see the families that we've helped and what that looks. Like, but yeah, it's a love what I do. There's not a day where I don't look forward to you know, going to work. I love it. It's just so great. And you know, so passionate about serving these individuals in helping helping people be able to find greater peace of mind, hope and freedom for them in their own families. It's just been been a blast. I think it's soon for Neka one last time what you said earlier that every parent is in this doing the best. They absolutely can for their children in that something we all share. And so even though things like vaccines can be such controversial topics. I think it's important to have the discussions into have them in a kind respectful way in realize that at the end of the day. We are all doing the best for our families with every with the information, we have in the individual cases that we have. And I love their people like you who are working with people in their very specific cases to find out. What those answers are for them. So thank you so much for your work, and for your time here today, pulling all of those that you mentioned in the show notes. People can find you and Stanton which grew will execute. He appreciate the opportunity and honored to be with you today. And thank you to all of you for listening as always cheering your most valuable asset of your time with us. We don't take that lightly. And we're so grateful you're here, and I hope that you will join me again on the next episode of the wellness, mama podcast. If you're enjoying these interviews would you please take two minutes to leave a rating or review on I tunes for me. Doing this helps more people to find the podcast, which means even more moms and families can benefit from the information. I really appreciate your time. And thanks as always for listening.

Inflammation Dr Jeff Dr Jeff Knight Katie Mt Jason Robert flu Bobby DHS measles boxing hypothyroid
Becoming a Leadership Superstar: Guest  Dr. Jeff Standridge

James Miller | Lifeology

26:39 min | 8 months ago

Becoming a Leadership Superstar: Guest Dr. Jeff Standridge

"Welcome to life. Algae I James Miller your host and a licensed psychotherapist. I'm looking forward to spending this time view as we learned some pretty amazing life lessons. Let's get started. Thank you so much for taking time out of your busy schedule to listen to the show when you're done listening. I hope you take a minute and write a quick review on whichever radio podcast platform. You've heard this show. Your insights will help others to be inspired and encouraged. I have a great show for you today. I hope you create your own proof to show your success. Also be interviewing Dr Jeff. Stanage who helps organizations and their leaders disrupt the status quo and generate sustained results in the areas of organizational effectiveness in leadership. Jeff reviews his best selling book. The top performers field guide catalysts for leaders superstars and all who aspire to be. This book will give you specific tools and techniques to help you be a top performer in your industry for more information about Dr Standards. Please visit Jeff. Standridge DOT COM. You may also purchase his book in any digital bookstore or the previous guest products in both stores at other James Miller lite follow dot com or life allergy dot TV. Thank you so much for listening till I apologize. I would love to connect with you be sure to follow me on all social media platforms under the name. James Miller life algae except for twitter. Which is James M life algae? I'm also very active on instagram. In Crete mini videos with quick tips and tools. That you can immediately implement. Be Sure to say hello and follow me there. If you're anything like me you'll love to read life. Algae AUDIBLE DOT COM. Have partnered to offer you. An incredible opportunity audible is offering you one free book download with a Free Thirty Day trial. This is perfect for those of you. Who Love to read but often. Don't have time to enjoy your favorite pastime. Go to James Miller. Follow DOT com forward slash audible to start your free trial. They have over a hundred and eighty thousand books from all genres. So I'm pretty confident. Your favorite authors books will be there go to James Miller followed dot com forward slash audible and start listening to your favorite book today. Once go to James Miller life algae dot com slash audible to get started today creating proof of your success. There's nothing worse than having a goal by not having anything to show for it. I used to be an adjunct professor and I taught a lot of different psychology courses on one particular course that I love to teach was treatment planning in that treatment. Planning I taught my students how to create an effective treatment plan so each patient would know and be able to prove to themselves that they were making progress in treatment. One of the main things. You really want to focus on anything you do. Is You want to create metrics or in other words. Tanta ways that you can prove to yourself that you are making changes. One of the most difficult things is when we try and create a metric of success for something we can't see we're not sure actually accomplish it. Research states that on average it takes about sixty six times for someone to engage in a habit before it sticks when you're trying to make a goal. It's often good to break that goal down into quarters for example if you have a year goal breaking down into a quarter which is three months and in those three months that's when you continually do something and a stated earlier after sixty six times it becomes a habit so much else for you today. Is this any time? You want to try something new. If you can't put your finger on it and say yes. This is the proof to show that. I'm accomplishing my goals. Then you have to think what are the activities or what are the behaviors? I can do that after a certain period of time. I know I will accomplish my goal. So as you develop own self development goals your own business goals or financial goals. Whatever those may be you want to say. I have to show proof to myself that I am accomplishing goals. Because a more proof you show yourself the more you buy into continually growing developing and that allows for you to ascend to the next level of yourself development and the more you do this the more excited you are because you are accomplishing your goals. Just because you've had a goal in the past and weren't able to accomplish it doesn't mean that today you can't restart that goal because the more proof you have two more successful you'll be. I have a fantastic interview. Dr Jeff Standridge. He is an expert in. How did you become the superstar that you are? He gives you practical tools and techniques in his book the top performers field guide catalysts for leaders superstars. All who aspire to be. This book will give you the road map. You need to be successful person that I know you can't be cessation for this phenomenal interview. I wanted to take just a quick moment to thank you. All who continually support and listen to James Miller Life Allergy. I am so blessed and honored by your continuous supports. However I want to make sure that you don't miss anything exciting. That's happening over here. So good. Or James Miller lifelock dot com or DOT TV and sign up for the Free. Weekly recap each week. I will send you an email. Which has all the latest radio episodes youtube episodes magazine articles and self help products specifically for you once again go to James Miller lifelock dot com or a life allergy DOT TV and sign up for the free weekly recap. Mike yesterday is actor. Jeff Standards who helps organizations and their leaders disrupt the status quo and generate sustained results in the areas of innovation strategy profit growth organizational effectiveness and leadership. Jeff is here today to discuss his best selling book. The top performers field guide catalyst for leaders superstars and all who aspire to be. This book will give you specific tools and techniques to help you be a top performer in your industry. Welcome to my show. Jeff thank you so much. It's a pleasure to be here. Yes I really looking forward to this. I I was reading your backstory. And you've been to five different continents working in consulting that is that's phenomenal. That's amazing you know. If you would've told me that when I was a young child growing up in a small town in South Arkansas that I would circumnavigate the world many times. I would have thought you were crazy. Isn't that amazing? When we reflect on where we were very hard today is quite fascinating insurance. Did you know that you become a leadership expert? I had no idea I had no idea. I knew I wanted to go to college. I'm a first generation. College Student Families Completed College and grew up in a farm town graduated high school with twenty eight. People in fact rammed a four year degree into five and a half years. I I go around and no I did not not understand that I was going to become a leadership expert and then your your daughter's followed suit. Were both wet neonatal. Icu nurses that is fantastic. Yeah for Nina Lights nurses and worked in the same unit where my wife and I met Tony Nine years ago. So that's that's really cool. I always love to hear family legacies. And how you know how one generation starts something in the next generation will continue to help grow and develop. That's really cool education. I'd say changed my family tree. It didn't change ally but it literally changed our family tree and You know Our kids are are very successful. And I I consider that one of the greatest accomplishments is is having daughters who have grown into strong young women That's wonderful and I believe one of them. As soon be sending a lot will also be a physician to well. Actually I have a son in law. That's that's going to be a physician. Oh Gotcha okay per mary. Oh good okay well. Congratulations now. Let's turn into your book because I was really excited about that. So the book top performers field guide catalysts for leaders superstars all who aspire to be now. That topic itself is a huge mouthful. But I think encapsulates so many individuals who are listening right now so we want to focus on entrepreneurs people who are our the business world but also just people in general who want to be top superstars. So why don't yes? Why don't we jump right into the book What would you say? Is the premise of this book. Well I spent a number of years both academically and Organically as a leader within organizations on five continents studying the concept of leadership. What is it that differentiates those people? Who are what? I would call that cream of the crop at the top one percent of performer. The ones who really stand out as superstars from those who are in the masses the average which is most everyone and Spent a number of your studying. That academically had a couple of organizations wanted me to replicate that research within their companies to figure out what constituted high performance within their companies After a couple of consulting engagements I walked away from a A professorship six months from from a tenure review to join the corporate world where I got the opportunity to continue studying leadership on five cont On the premises that that top performance and leadership I kinda put those in the sector. There's leadership where you have responsibility for leading people then there's leadership where you have responsibility for leading yourself results. And what have you and people ask me? Well what did you find your study? And and when? I really boil it down. Top performance and leadership really revolves around the degree to which an individual can ballots to. Thanks and that's result and relationships. Oh interesting if I focused on results at the expense of relationships and I keep a set of kind of legal scales on On my bookshelf. In talking right exactly if I think about that if I if I wait over to the result side if you got resulting relationships on each side of the Scales and if I err on the side of result to the extent that I that I'm wildly on results I'll be successful very very quickly until I alienate everyone around me responsible for helping maintain those results if I air to the other side and focus on relationships at the expense of results. People will love me. They lose respect for me. Because I can't do what I say when I say I'm going to so it's almost like the expansion of what successful looks like. So it's not just one metric that's being used. It's okay which makes a lot of sense so one thing that I really teaches well. Is that balance of how to how to encapsulate pretty much. Everything in one's life to be able to live that to create that metric of success whether that is quality of life whether that's what have you but it is something that if we're not mindful of that we can easily slip into one side or the other. No you're right when you reflect on the five continents from where you work all the places you've been. Is there a difference between cultural? What what it means to be a cultural superstar like in one culture. There is what I would consider minor nuances and some of them not so minor nuances but the interesting thing is when I talk about this concept of results. In relationships it has really translated into virtually every work environment that I've ever been in some environments are a little more focused on the relationship aspect some environments are a little more focused on the results aspect but by and large. I would say the vast majority of the people with whom I've worked over the course of the last twenty five years they get this balanced and they get this conversation around results relationships in the tightrope that we walk Two balances low when it comes to entrepreneurs surveyed say. They don't really have much of much of a team or just starting out. How would they be able to balance between the relationships and results when it comes to their own mom-and-pop shop well the customers they think about the relationships that they have to build to actually Get customers in their store and to keep them coming back and to have them generating word of mouth partners and vendors if they have that supply them with the With the things they need Those those are a couple of ways that they focus on the relationship on the results. Side obviously There there are very few results but they are very critical result in a new. Start a business that that must be delivered and in many of those are around generating new customers generate new revenues and and making sure that those revenues are being managed profitably. How would you help them? Really kind of just slow down and say okay. We really have to focus on both things at the same time because there's I know for me when I first started life. Algae I was like Oh my gosh. There's so much to do just me and it was really overwhelming so thankfully I was able to be successful the way you're saying this as far as the relationships results but it was very overwhelming. What are some practical ways that they can just generate and use right? This second say okay. This is how you could balance those things out. Well one of the things. I like to call like ask organizations and individuals to do is just to step back and say where am I going where am I going and over. What timeframe do I want to get? There is a twelve month. Is it a twenty four month or is it a thirty six month and if it's if it's more than twelve frank let's say it's twenty four month timeframe. I want to be here and be very very definitive and clear about what here actually is. Where are you going? How are you going to know that you've got their win? You get twenty four months out you WANNA be able to look back and say yes or no. I did or I didn't preferably I I DID RIGHT. And so get very very pedantic and specific about where you're going and then you back up from there and say okay if it's twenty four months then what. I have to do in the next twelve months. To get halfway there in verse mcnew at your reverse engineered and then you say okay in twelve months. What I'm going to have to do in the next six months the next three months the next six weeks the next six days and reverse engineered into here the things that I need to do on a regular basis in order to to get where I'm going you know I have found that success is really two things it's it's number one defining what it is and then it's committing to it which means figuring out what you have to pay to get there and start paying. I really liked with you saying that. Because when people start a business or perhaps even therein are an organization of some sort. They may not really know to what end. Where does that look like so they often may have the end result in mind of you know to be incredibly successful which is wonderful but I really like how you break it down to a year? Let's get twenty four months three years however you want to do that but when you are really specific with quantifiable metrics it really creates that roadmap because sometimes if we think so far out and we have creative steps to get there or perhaps the evolutionary steps of what that may look like. Then you're right. We won't really know how. How am I going to get ten years now? If I haven't really looked at what are the steps? I have to write the second. You know. It's interesting I have. I have taught in adult settings College settings actually teach a couple of courses at the university now I've taught at the junior high and high school levels albeit very short periods of time. But I figured out that is not my calling But what I have found is that the subject of goal setting action planning and progress monitoring is probably the most under top subject in any setting. It's it's it's almost completely ignored. And as a result we have a number of people in our in our world today. Who just don't know how to take control of their lives and all their one performance are what had. Yeah without that without those quantifiable metrics. Once again like you said they're just meandering around their their life. How they're going to get there. A swap versus river cuts through canyons. Just kind of spreads out exactly. Yeah I like that. I was looking through the table of contents of your book and my listeners. This is not just some fluff book. He has he has fifty fifty two chapters and I was like. Oh my goodness that is a lot of what I love it. Because they're so practical the techniques that you have in there so I definitely want my listeners. A purchase this book because it is going to give you the methodology. And the step-by-step ways. Which Youtube to be a superstar when you wrote this book what what happened in the world around you that you said okay? I need to write this book. The world needs to read this well. Well it's interesting. I actually started with a different book before this one and it was called the innovators God and the targeted toward Entrepreneurs innovators and organizational changes in its written in much the same format a format. The book Even though it has fifty two chapters each chapter has the same format. A- A TITLE. That's meant to kind of. Pique your interest in a quote that unpack that a little bit a very short reading about two pages followed by some questions for reflection and consideration and perhaps even some action steps and so it it's It's a very digestible book. And that's the reason I have. It is fifty two chapters as one could take a chapter a week and then do the actions at the end at Cetera. No I wrote the after. I wrote the innovator spill guide and it was very successful in a variety of settings from public schools to colleges and universities to nonprofits and businesses. I really went back to my life's work of studying top performance about which I had never really written a line And and so while the innovators field guide was very targeted. I wanted to step back a little bit. And and take the same approach and provide some content that would distill out. Those key taught performance qualities that I can put into digestible format for people to read and adopt and take action on. Well that's perfect. I'm really. I'm really glad you did that with some of my listeners. Who Listening now. Let's say they're working in organizations and they've really trying to grow and develop and become a top performer but perhaps leadership or perhaps just a culture of the organization doesn't really want for change or doesn't really want for sometimes even the superstars. What what advice would you give them to help them to break through that glass ceiling you know used to have people come to be and say and I worked in a billion dollar organization that had multiple levels of leadership? We call them all leaders. And when you had the title leader in your name you were actually a formally recognized officer of the organization with hiring environment compensation responsibilities and so people come to me and say you know. Jeff. I'd like to sit down and just visit with you a little bit. Maybe some maybe some mentoring and yeah. That'd be great. Come come sit down. Let's talk and they come in and say you know I really want to be a leader in the organization and I would say well then go be one. No no no no no. I want to be a leader like you in the organization and I said then go be worth go. Be a leader in the organization and do that consistently and I'm using the the lower case l Leader in an organization and do that consistently and over time An opportunity will arise to provide you with the upper case L. Role of leadership. And so you know really looking at where. Where is it that you want to affect change within the organization and sit down with your with your leader or you're the person to whom you report and have that conversation in gained some type of mutual consensus around how you're going to pursue that change what it is? What's the end result going to Try to produce you know. One of the things about entrepreneurs is eight thirty six percent of all entrepreneurial endeavors fail because the the entrepreneur creates a product or service. That no one wants Jessica Point Severi. Yes they they create a product or service. That doesn't that. Doesn't that not enough? People will buy at the price required to be a prophet one. One concern will in organizations. We do that all the time. Someone gets a great idea. And they run headlong in trying to implement that idea only to find that it fails because they couldn't really articulate the problem that they were trying to solve or the or the problem didn't affect enough people to be worth the effort that goes back to if you don't know if the goals that you have if you haven't really fleshed out with that looks like a where you're wanting to go then yeah it's not going to be successful. Yeah so so. What we just talked about is is taking an individual who you know. We talked about the reverse engineering approach. The same thing happens in an organization is figure out. What's the business problem? You're trying to solve the the the opportunity that you're trying to seize get agreement with your leader of of that that is one that's worth chasing and then reverse engineer. What has to happen to actually get there. it's funny. We were talking about this. Yesterday I was consulting with with a of mine and he had just started this new job and he but he has this desire to be entrepreneur so we started this new position. He's like but I also WanNa do as a side hustle. Why don't get focus on what you're doing at this full time position? I said why. Don't you take the entrepreneur aspect and do exactly what you just said. I said as you become invested in this company look at some of the pitfalls or ways. In which you can. I'm augment someone else's dream a dream of someone else's business always started as an entrepreneurial endeavor and then you create a way in which you can then kind of piggyback off that or look at ways in which to improve and enhance it and from there you then would create this job detail and without job detail then would allow you to make more money for yourself and to be able to arise higher in the organization. So I'm so glad I'm talking to an expert like you hearing that. Perhaps my console console was wise so that is good so when when it comes to some of the pitfalls of just say leader leadership in general so let's say I'm a leader of an organization and here I am I've I've kind of hit that glass ceiling myself and I've kind of lost some of my drive in lost someone we motivation and all of a sudden. I was once a top performer. And now I'm not that trickle down effect does affect the culture. What advice would you give for leaders? Who maybe have that moment of self reflection as wait a minute. I have lost. Perhaps my Mojo fuel you know I found out that I would lose my Mojo occasionally earlier in my career and it was probably in my mid forties early forties that I really started to ask. What's my calling when what what am I uniquely. Gifted to do some people call it their personal mission their purpose in life. I like to refer to it as a calling and I believe is some people their vocation is they're calling. My wife was a nurse practitioner. My daughters are nurses. Mahathir law was a pastor counselors people in the helping professions. They get the privilege of getting up every day and going to work and earning their living while fulfilling her calling bin there. Other people whose vocation hopefully supports. They're calling and I put myself in that category I was working for a large. It company selling data to to marketers. Better try trying to better target their consumers and I was pretty convinced that that wasn't my calling But but but what was an in so at when I start to receive feedback from folks and they would tell me what I was good at and where I had helped him with this or help them with that. I came to this understanding. That my own unique gifting. If you will was to create new insights that lead people better ways of living and working. And that's what I was doing with the five hundred plus people I had in my organization on five continents. I was solving problems for them. I was making work easier for them. I was helping them balance their lives with their work. I was helping them achieve their objectives. And it's why I wrote this book and it's why I speak on leadership. And what have you? And so when I figured out the intersection between my vocation and my calling. It was a complete and total game changer for me. Wow so I would encourage those those entrepreneurs those leaders organizational Folks who feel like that. They've lost their Mojo to snap back and really begin to contemplate what what is my calling. And where does that intersect with? While work is my calling my job or his. Does my job support my colleague that really very profound so a lot of this has to do with just people sometimes just forgot to perspective or forgot the foundation. For why do they do. That's exactly right and sometimes you just have to step back and and understand you know what what where that connection is. I can't imagine how I worked for you know I guess I was forty two at the time so how I worked for almost twenty five years not really understanding this connection between what. I'm really gifted in uniquely qualified to be doing what I'm called to do. And and how it intersects with the -cation well I think it kind of goes back to what you were saying before as well as if a person starting out and if they don't really have a clear cut with quantifiable metrics of where they want to be. Let's say a year or three years or twenty four months. Whatever it may be I think sometimes when people are in established leader they forget that they haven't arrived at the end of their career to have two know. Click new iteration of that. I think research states I think about five iterations or five transformations for each person in life and so with that they have those metamorphosis or change of of I think it is roughly five times and so I think many people do forget that when they are at the top of their career top of their of the maybe the executive branch now from forget that. There's still so much more they can do and fast because I know sometimes I do that. Can cause us if you like. We don't what's getting you're losing your Mojo in somewhere well and I stepped away from our corporate career To To do my own consulting coaching business and when I did that it enabled me to fulfil that calling discovered in years previous. It enabled me to do that. Even almost It almost transformed my ability to do that are exponentially increased my ability to fulfill that calling. And and you know being able to reinvent yourself in the physical world to earn a living so that you can fulfil your calling in the grander scheme of things. That's really I think what it's all about. And that's why I think those transformations occurring people. Yeah that is so. That's so inspiring. I really hope my listeners are picking up on obviously your energy but also just the aspects of where you are today. Does it mean to you have to be tomorrow? Changes change is a way to just simply have a conversation with someone our conversation with yourself understanding where you want to go and then creating reverse engineering the steps. You need to take to be able to accomplish that goal. That's right Dr Jeff Standards. It has been absolute pleasure having my show. Thank you so much for wisdom. If my listeners would like to find out more information about you to work with you and purchase your books and the book we talked about today. A top performers field guide CATALYSTS FOR LEADERS SUPERSTARS ALL. Who ASPIRE TO BE. Where are they find this information online? Best Place to find me that Jeff Standridge DOT COM J. E. F. F. stand on a ridge standards dot com perfect. Why also note that if they're not able to find your book one more time to top performers field guide catalysts for leaders superstars all who aspire to simply go to the previous guests products in both source at other. James Miller life algae dot com or life Ozzy Dot TV. Dr Jeff Standards. Thank you once again for your wisdom. I appreciate all your work. It's been my pleasure and thank you so much. I also want to thank you my listeners for tuning in today please subscribe to this Radio. Show ever portal. You join me today. Also please go to my website. Were you may sign up for the free weekly Recap Watch. My youtube episodes. Read the articles I've written specifically for you. Purchase my previous guests self-help products. If you'd like to work with me. Be a guest on advertise on this show visit. James Miller follow dot com. Be Sure to follow me and also media platforms under the name James Miller lite policy except for twitter. Which is James M folly once again? Thank you so much for your support and I'll talk to you soon.

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184: Mindset of Champions with Dr. Jeff Spencer

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

17:54 min | 4 months ago

184: Mindset of Champions with Dr. Jeff Spencer

"Hi this is Jim Quick and I have a quick update for you on proud to announce my very first book limitless upgrade. Your brain learned anything faster in unlock. Your exceptional life Miss Book is not only based on the latest neuro science in his field tested for over twenty years of working with some of the most amazing minds on our planet. Just go to limitless book Dot Com and enjoy this book. Welcome the quick brain. bite-size brain hacks busy people who wanNA learn faster and achieve more I'm your coach Jim Quick? Three. Lissa Magin if we could access one hundred percent about brains capacity. I wasn't high wasn't wired. Just clear I knew what I needed to do and how to do it. I know come. Show. Now I'm going to invite you to one of my coaches. Dear friend. His name is Dr. Jeff Spencer. Jeff. Could you please join us, please? Are you doing my friend. Just anytime you get a chance to talk to you. It just makes a better day for me. So thanks a million Jim. I appreciate you taking the time out of your busy schedule to be here with us. Jeff is an author. He is in Olympia N-. He is corner man for Olympia ends up going on for for decades creeping up on five. And he's also been. He's an incredible mindset coach for me and the first hem. We're GONNA. Talk about his mindset and no better person than yourself you've you've worked with everyone from a tiger woods to you to to these gold, medalists and I wanNA talk about the champions mindset right now and I. Mean Right. Now of people are facing some some challenges right Henderson you have you have a blueprint for this and over the next twenty minutes just wanted to deconstruct. The distinctions you have about people's mindset and so Let's Let's let's US began. Where where do we start great well? Thank Jim I think the first place has started a mindset as you wiser mindset necessary. And the reason why? The right mindset is critical is because it gives us courage. and. How we define courage, at least in this context is the ability to take action despite our fear based survival impulses. and. There's never a moment in history that this could be more applicable to because there's a lot of fear running rampant. And for us to be able to constructively move forward towards are bigger future, and in limit the downside of this we have to have a mindset that keeps us in the game, making really solid decisions that we can count on that show leadership to others and moving through this out the other side, and that's why mindsets so critical everybody listen up for this next one. Because this is probably repeal, take them selves out of the game the most. I was called into work with an Olympic athlete and this guy was favorite to win the gold medal. And he was. A member of the host nation's Olympic team. And just imagine having the hopes of a nation on your shoulders. And he was starting to mentally meltdown with two and a half weeks ago before the Olympic final. So I got a call. From the staff. Saying. We have an athlete here. Who has the best coach? He has the best doctor, yes, the best equipment. He's got the best of everything, but he's starting to mentally meltdown. We don't know what to do. So. Can you help? and. I said Yeah of course you know I'm in Olympia. I'd love to help a fellow Olympian out. I talk with them and he told me what the situation was. And I said to him well. Here's the deal. Is that you and your team all think that the put in the necessary to win the gold medal. You have to be perfect. You have to make a contingency for everything that could happen. To make sure that that single thing doesn't happen. That would prevent you from winning a gold medal. And I said that's Kinda trick and it's a deadly trout that you're now caught in. Because your fear, based human nature and your survival instincts are controlling your conversation. That's the why you're living in Terre every moment right now because you feel trapped. And should feel that way because you're not gonNA. Win a gold medal like that. I said. You may think it's about perfection. But it's really not about perfection. It's about the one or two things that have to go right. And as long as you guys think it's about the next detail in. You're spending all your time looking for the detail. Your brain is GonNa. Make up a detailed. It doesn't exist. That you're gonNA. Put All your confidence. You can't win like that. It's not possible. So I said there are two things you need to do. Instant gold medal. said the first thing is. Don't change your warm up. Don't deviate from what's traditionally worked in the past. Because your body knows what to do is start changing this. Your body gets scared runs in the cave and doesn't come out and play, but it wants to please. You're really wants you to win that gold medal it. What's do that for you? I said the second thing that you do. Is that. You Masur your first. You get your first four steps to the run-up correct. So. Your foot hits the Board to get the lift. To win the gold medal. Two things in your win. In why this is significant for us right now is because there's a lot of reason to be scared in this situation because of what we're hearing. But I can tell you what the champions do. They know that it's not about covering all the bases and being perfect. Doing the one or two things have to go right each moment. In that's what they dedicate themselves to. And as they dedicate themselves to that in what happens, is that the overarching umbrella fear? Subsides into the background, and they start to feel mastery over self. There to getting confidence in that people that are observing them or learning lesson on how they can get through this, so just be mindful is that? When you demonstrate these champions displays of action when we're going against our human nature tendency. To Cave to our fear, you're serving a living breathing. Example of what's possible others. At this time of humanity, in my opinion, there's never been a greater urgency to have people that are beacons of hope, courage and sanity that have shown us a way forward to maintain our dignity. To get ourselves to the other side of this. In so you did those two things. He did those two things. For the next two weeks in what I did, tell him I said. Who Your friends? He said well. It's this and this. I said those are your friends for the next two weeks. Don't get around to your friends. Don't get around your family. Don't get anybody. It's nervous about you because they're going to start to obsess about the details don't matter. It's one or two things consistently as long as you keep your eye on that gold medal, and so he did that for two weeks. Everybody thought he was crazy and then what happened? WanNa go medal. Should we be surprised by that? No. because. We took a lesson from the champion. Stu in the outcome was predictable, but just remember how hard that was. It took. Every ounce occurs. He had. To go against the grain of what is fear based instincts were telling him. You know what that tariff feels like right? Well despite that he did what had to go right to win. It's exactly the same thing for us in what we're facing right now. You talk about three PS often right in terms of is not the before perform their best, but it also takes planning preparation to be able to perform your best as a mindset. One hundred percent actually the champions Golden Rule is you do the homework in the test is easy. It's. How you prepare really dictates your performance and. You know if you ask somebody whether it's said artist, or whether it's business person making a decision how they did it. They say well. I, don't really know. It just happened while it happened because they train themselves through a vigorous approach to being prepared for it to be able to come up with the right answer and the right time to hit it out of the part. This is an important conversation to have right now because I feel like a lot of people over the past few months. They didn't anticipate nobody anticipated. What's going on right now? And they're uncertain about tomorrow's future might have lost. A must have lost a job. They might have lost family member they they're in an area. Would that they would? It would label crisis, and they have added pressure to be able to perform for themselves, and also the people that count on them, and and I sometimes the overwhelming for people. It can really challenge our our mindset even if If we know what to do. The methods and were motivated are of the mindset is that you know that confusion or or doubt or that? Fear that people like you mean you're an Olympian right for those just joining us Dr Jeff Spencer Olympia an author. He's a quarter man for some the most amazing performers including gold medalists, and you know when you're under that stress. You're preparing all the time to perform for a matter of minutes. Where where the whole world is watching you literally? It's all about preparation. It's like when you're prepared. You have evidence that you're ready to perform at the level you need to when it really counts. That's the evidence that you need. And when you show up and you have to execute, you just have to trust your preparation. You can't think you way to have the skill that you need when you have to be applying it, so it all goes back. To preparation in when you know you prepared than your anxiety drops when you're anxiety dropped should have more confidence. Time slows down. You can get into flow easier. PRESTO instant gold medal. Whatever that is for you whatever this your spiring to. That's your gold medal. That's how you do it. Yeah and it's Switz- funny when when people are also when they're when they're challenged, and there's change that's going on in the world. Be Able to hold that constantly in your mind, even when there's lots of distractions. in in the world also also well. Well and to your point there Jim. Is that remember our human mindset, our human nature always catastrophes and goes to the worst scenario because that's survival. And, that's where our default is. It has to be overridden. By the application of the champions action so as long as we. Don't look at the US as being that which is telling us to do what we know isn't going to work as it didn't work. In the past, we do the courageous act of. That which has to go right to supersede fear, based survival instinct in it's a tug of war and I. Just WanNa. Make sure please don't mistake. That part that's telling you that you can't do it as you. That's your impostor. The champion side of you is the one that's telling you you can in how we do that is by doing those things that have to go right consistently to move forward. As long as we're focused on that that keeps us other side of us. That leads to failure it bay. It's basically been neutered. We talk about in our book. limitless of those are your focal points. You know those those those cheese fundamentals, and sometimes people they want. They want the next thing the next thing the next thing, but also focusing on the fundamentals that may be fears trigger. Saying that you have to prepare inactivity potentially useful if it's it prompts you per year more. There's a road from Jim. I think it's Jim Rohn that said what you practice and private rewarded for. which you practice Simba, pair for. Your rewarded for big time. Has My, my friend, so how can and I challenge everybody right now to go deeper with Dr Answer, here How can people can connect with with you? I encourage everyone sees marine shot of this and are. I've had the pleasure of interviewing Dr Spencer Our podcast. Get searched both our names on Google, and that episode will will come out. Intellectually Align Champions reprint, which is amazing. It is the most detailed blueprint I've ever seen for personal success, so maybe people can take a screen shot of this tags both posted and. I words, please. Thanks Jim, a couple of things here I actually wrote a PDF. That I'd like everybody to consider getting. It's called. How not the boy just before you win? kind of explains the three traps. We need to avoid to make sure that we convert an opportunity that takes us to a higher better that we crush when it shows up. And then Y you're waiting for that PDF to come. There is also a video that will show you. The champions blueprint in the goal achievement roadmap. The Gym was leading to alluding to. The LINK FOR THAT IS WWW DR JEFF SPENCER DOT com forward slash number one www d. r., J. E. F. F. SP NC art dot com forward slash the number one. Yet Jim, I'd like to finish up by saying. This is as I said earlier. There is only one of every one of us in all of creation. In their seven billion people on this planet, like right now, which uniquely qualifies us to do some extraordinary things in life. And I believe that it's kind of a moral imperative that. We are on our talents by developing them to their fullest, and we achieve at the highest level possible to amass a massive legacy. Not to showcase us for that sake, but to show other people, it's possible because what we really need. Desperately in this world like right now as examples of people that have gone against the grain of mediocrity and have chosen to create a life with the sanction in why this is important, also as kind of were accountable for our time, and our talents in at the end of. Of, the day whatever that legacy is, it's GonNa live on in the human archive in the Internet space for eternity, and it's going to say what we did with their talents in what I want for everybody. I WANNA. Make sure that this is a contribution to humanity that shows people what's possible and if there's every time in human history we need to do this. It's now. Thank you for the privilege. Thank you very much gonNA hand. Let's thank that. Sink Jeff joining us today for sharing Don't get the PDF also as well. Jeff look forward to thank you for the amazing work that you do you or your gold, your platinum you know for so many of us and well. Thanks Jim back at you and I've learned so much from the book. It's been an. Indispensable part of my library. My daughter absolutely loves you for doing this. Thanks again be well everybody. Thank you. Want to double your brain speed and memory power. If you like to learn rapidly and get ahead faster I'd like to give you my brand new quick brain accelerator program. You will discover exactly what I teach my clients to learn read and remember anything in half the time. There is no charge as my gift to you for being one of our subscribers. That's K. W. High, K., brain, dot, com, or simply text the word podcast, two, nine, one, six, eight to two, seventy, two forty. And we'll send you a directly. Nine, one, six, eighty two. Growing up struggling with learning challenges from childhood brain injury. It's been my life's mission help. You have your very best brain, so you could win more every single day now one more quick rain here four ways to fast track to result in lock in which you just learned into your long term memory remember fast F., A. S., T. ESPN's for facebook here, not alone on this journey. I invite you to join our free private online groups dairy. Dairy connect with me. Your fellow brain lovers links to resources, and even submit your questions for me to answer in future episodes. GO QUICK BRAIN DOT COM. That's K. W. I a brain dot, com, the a stands for apply hacked on what you learned today we're knowledge is not power its potential power. It only becomes power. Use it and so us. What you just the s stands for subscribe. Don't miss the next episode in other free brain. And finally the t stands for teach you. WanNa, learn faster now accused lock. It'd right away by teaching it to someone else. When you teach something you get to learn twice. Here's a simple way to do that. Leave a review to. Leave a review with your biggest takeaway from this. You could also post share this podcast on your social media helps us spread our mission building, better brighter brains, and of course tag us to our team could properly thank you hashtag. Quick Brain K. W.. I'd cave brain. Mine is at Jim Wick W.. I came on Instagram facebook and twitter. So what does fast and for facebook apply? Subscribe teach I'll see you in our next episode of quick brain until then remember you are faster and smarter than you.

gold medal Jim JEFF SPENCER DOT Jim Quick Olympia US Dr. Jeff Spencer Jim I Lissa Magin facebook Jim Rohn Dr Jeff Spencer Olympia gold medal. Olympic Jim Wick WanNa Henderson Google ESPN Instagram
PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES w/ Sean Tracy & Dr. Jeff Silverman

Bad Science

37:20 min | 11 months ago

PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES w/ Sean Tracy & Dr. Jeff Silverman

"Welcome to the travel portion of bad science. I'm here talking with Eric. Jacquards of Success Express and you just came back from a big tour where you probably took planes trains and automobiles if I did. So what's your favor. Very of those transportation's well. I gotta go train because it's like a Blaine and it's a lot like an automobile but it's right in the middle of a medium kind of guy. I never never thought about that. Do you like the food on the trains now. Does it take longer than a plane. It does take longer than the plane. Do you get sick on. Trains always get really sick on a plane and really really sick sick automobile. Who Cares planes trains and automobiles is all about Thanksgiving thanksgiving? I love Thanksgiving and love. Steve Martin and I also loved John Candy and John Hughes who directed that film. Yes yes you're right about all of that and do you love the Turkey at Thanksgiving gravy and stuffing no. My family didn't do that. We did a live duck we would just chase it chase it around the house and then someone would bludgeon it. The the rolling pin and then whoever caught at aided wow weird family or from. We're from Florida. Oh I hope you have a very good Thanksgiving having happy Thanksgiving to all of our listeners. Out there happy Thanksgiving to you eat and you look great. You look really really good thank you. You also look awesome. Well you look cool and I thank you for being being on the program today. Absolutely thank you for having me. Great Happy Thanksgiving to you and I love you catch did get in. Yeah we have to fight fire. Everybody welcome to bed science. I'm even Edinburgh Berg and today we are talking about nineteen eighty seven's planes trains and automobiles. Because it's Thanksgiving everybody's favorite holiday. I don't know if that's true. I'm just assuming that that's true because you get together with to your family. Everybody gives thinks they eat food. Obviously the history of it is not for everyone but let me get to my guests. They're going to help me through this episode. I we have have from San Francisco. I'm down here in southern California but from nor cal. We have the director of the data science and analytics at Samba TV. It's Jeffrey Jeffrey Silverman. Hi Everybody Jeffrey. I should call you doctor Jeffrey. Silverman right I mean you earned that that that is correct Dr Jeff. It sounds pretty fancy. So Yeah Dr Jeff is here with us and can you just tell everybody in case they don't know what is Samba. TV because it sounds very spicy and like there's a lot of dancing involved perhaps You you know. There's definitely dancing involved after hours SAMBA. TV is a TV analytics and technology. Startup here up in San Francisco. So that's where I've been for the past few two years trying to figure out WHO's watching TV commercials work if you WANNA advertise for a new. TV Show where should you put your commercials. How many people watch game of thrones all that kind of stuff? WHOA okay great? Well this is a show in its own right so maybe by the end you can tell me if it's worth doing at all or if anybody cares that would be great now for my other guest as I wanted somebody from my family. It's a Thanksgiving episode. But then I was remembering coups in my family and I was like so I got the closest thing to a family member. It's my bestest friend. Songwriter Guitarist and music. Producer Shiny moves. The goose is loose tracy. How's it going show that I'm doing good how you doing? I'm doing great always when you're around. I'm in the best of moods. I'm all smiles to wow. I'll see you guys next time. It's been an absolute pleasure being here. No no we're back. We're back So Sean your a musician. You've traveled a lot a little bit. You travel a little bit not as much as others to me. You've traveled a lot. I guess maybe by comparison. You've you've flown to around the world to play shows a little bit. There's a little bit. I'm being honest. All right all right. Maybe compared to like huge tour touring musician. Some of our buddies. The it is a little bit right. Yeah and I wanted to bring up because this movie is obviously all about like a disaster of a trip Everything that could possibly go wrong does go wrong for Neil played by Steve Martin but I wanted to quickly go over a few of Shawn's mishaps because I love bringing Sean bring him back to these dark times. So Sean you at one point tried to go play a show in London and then London told you know thanks. Yeah they said go home. Find Your own. Oh my home Almost literally I was riding on the coattails of a trip to play this Gig and I had never been outside the country before those going to be my first time and And we went to music school. Where a lot of the kids there are from other countries and you hear about how when they come here? They're not allowed to play shows without the proper visa Blah and So I should've known I should've had an idea of what would happen. But I wasn't thinking so the they said we're gonNA play the show tonight. Just tell me when W when it is. Tell me me giving my ticket and I'll show up So we get I get on the plane. Fly All the way to London and I get there and I'm dealing with a lot of anxiety the at the time and I can't sleep on planes so I'm on loosely anxious being outside the country by myself for the first time because I feel alone yeah little shiny moose out on his own out in the world and and And this is my first time going through customs so they start asking me questions and they come to the question of Sube who bought your ticket and I'm like I don't know I thaddeus being on the wrong end on right before I left the states the booking agent who I hadn't hadn't talked to relate to me just when we get to customs. Don't tell me there to play. They show I'm like okay. That makes me incredibly uncomfortable soup. I can see why you're anxious but I'll get there. I'll worry about it when I get there. Okay and then They asked me a couple of other questions Russians like I for money I had euros and that was weird weird. Isn't that what they use. I not in England but right right exactly so the British pound. Oh okay so it was like he's like did you bring anything for money. I'm like I have these euro isn't he's like why do you have euros. Yeah and I'm like I don't know why at least you're probably not a spy stopping. God God one way to the airport smart enough not to anyways anyway long story short. This I- This guy was not having any of it so they detained me for ten hours. Ten hours what were you doing. I was laying on a chair. Listening to other people interviewed slash interrogated in the rooms around me and stuff. But do do they tell you. You're being detained or they're like wait here. No they definitely said like you're GONNA be here for a little bit And and then they just locked in a room. WHOA and They came to interview to me and like I was I was I was going to lie until an into my grave like ice. I flew all the way there. I'm just there to play a show. Yeah like so they get me in a road near one rule is is. You can't say that you're there to play. Show right. He told you this is the only thing. You gotTa Know Azure anxious anymore by the time the interview me because I was sitting by myself for hours and hours without a clock. They took all my stuff away so they put me in a room and they're asking me questions. Eventually they asked about the show with so and so at clubs so and so tomorrow night and he literally turns the computer has the Flyer for the show. The exact show that you're about to play and then there was this moment of okay. You got a bit and and I told them everything. And I'm like the booking agent. You just told me to do this and I was like it was too late for me as anything and so okay and he gave me this really sweet document that I still. I haven't framed yet but it just like makes me look like a bad ass like this person came into our country and lied to us and I got a year from the president. They said there were the number of flights back to Boston. which is right? flew out of that night so they flew me to New York and said find your only home. Wow so I got into JFK at like ten at night ten pm and it just so happens that that my little brother who was going to school outside of the city at that point had spring break the next day. Okay so I got myself on a train in March so it was actually really cool that myself when a train out to white plains him and his drunk roommate picking up and it was a wild and I slept in his dorm room for drinking and driving I do. I don't know I mean you said they're driving and you said I mean okay. Something dorm room floor went home. The next day I was home safe. Wow Pretty incredible story store. I was bringing it up in an attempt to embarrass you really but it makes you a bad ass like at school aggressive. Yeah Jeffrey were you ever kicked out of a country or blacklisted. Or something I I was not. I have not been blacklisted. I've not been kicked out of the country Yeah some run INS with local law enforcement a couple of countries but nothing nothing to permanent. I believe what about like just disaster when you're traveling like something that was delayed yet asleep at an airport something like that. Yeah one sticks in my mind it was just such a long day in should have not been in college. You know hanging out late trying to get a flight home just for spring. Break a quiet spring break at home. I thought this'll be simple. I was in Houston at the time I got to the airport late in two thousand and two thousand three so they were still figuring out arbitrary new rules to institute at the airports get they are just as the doors are closing. Can't get on the flight. Okay next flight. You know six hours later get into Denver. I was heading to La Stuck in the Denver airport then then for like ten hours and then eventually get to L. A. and see my folks should have easily been a five hour trip. No problem did take up. Most of you know twenty four hours hours and it was just one stupid mistake that dominated the entire damn thing man. Yeah that sounds miserable. I've had a couple situations similar where I had to sleep in airport or just nap for four or five hours waiting for another flight and getting back to the film it really showcases that like no other. I mean some movies. There's something that that goes wrong. There's a delay but they talk about it on the phone but I feel like this movie. You really felt terrible for Steve Martin and everything that he was going through it was visceral. There were so many it was relentless it was just non stop. This is the most inconvenient unfortunate film of all time really There's underwear in his face and it just seems really really terrible but I wanted to mention a few quick just fun facts. While it was like reading about the movie today that John Hughes wrote the first draft of the screenplay in three days and that his average writing time for his screenplay in those days was about three to five days with like twenty rewrites so the guy is a machine and I just felt like. That's really inspiring for anybody. That's doing anything. You're writing something recording something. If you're an investment banker you can probably do a lot more than you're doing for sharing. Yeah that's an impressive output. Yeah Yeah so piggybacking on that. I just wanted your impression of the film. When did you first see it? Let's go Dr Jeff. I I saw this probably when I was pretty young. I mean when it came amount I was four but I'm sure I saw it in the late eighties early. Nineties have a pretty early memories of of Steve Martin and John Candy Movies. My Dad's a huge each fan. You know definitely had me watch all of those films curse words and all and so I definitely remember. Yeah seeing it as a kid. You know enough to where I was aware of like long car. Ride sucked sucked in the airport. Socks and like I definitely enjoyed it but you know watching it more recently as an adult and having done a lot more travel a various types of travel oh and internationally and nationally and bad weather and all that you definitely appreciate it more and you know. At least. My trip wasn't that bad I think is a good way to think about Oga and Shawnee Johny Moose. I saw last night first time first time. How surprised I hadn't seen it before? I Love Steve Martin. I was younger. I used to watch parenthood on the loop so many favorite movies the only on starting at time and I just I was just the time like I don't know yeah I feel I I feel like this connection to Steve Martin. I've always felt a connection to him. I read his biography a long time ago and Orange Standing reminds me of my dad. I think that might be a part of it. Because he's very warm not in this movie but or at least not till the end Yeah I just I was just ten the whole time I mean for del Griffith was just getting on my booking nerve. Not But then at the end she come around on on Dell I mean I have a problem I have a problem with how they they did the whole thing like five minutes ago. Okay let's talk. Let's get into it. You know what is your problem with Hughes's masterpiece as we go with one hundred one hundred and twenty minutes in hundred twenty five minutes and we got like less than ten minutes on the clock And then all of a sudden it's like Oh yeah my wife's been dead for eight years and You know I got no home. I mean he was busted though. You know that's not the heat that he's a pride. Visa prideful man. It's not trying to tell people about that. And then they feel bad for him. It's weird you can't just go around saying you're homeless. That's tough. He's in a moment of vulnerability salesman. What's he doing with his money? That's true you're right a great salesman. I don't know I mean some people travel. I get that you know. Maybe maybe he just put on the juice you know of being a great salesman because he wanted a friend he wanted Steve Martin to join him as a brother. Yeah well it would sad to me that that would be only incentive to to make the sale. It is sad sad story. I agree yeah. I started crying at the end of the movie. Now now this is not a typical. I mean you know. I cry pretty often when music comes in and especially with this with this guy with Dell I really felt bad and I just felt You know like coming home to see your family. They show shots of Turkey and everybody's so happy to see their dad it It got to me so I have a problem with what you said John. That's okay and we're going to talk about that off Mike. You know what. Let's actually this'll be the second of three that I've I'll teasing out here opportunities to try to embarrass Shaun. The second one is that a passport fell out of your pocket at some point. Yeah I was going from New York to Montreal and I was with the band and we got through the gate and we all kind of standing around and I dropped my passport and I think I remember driving my passport but I do not remember picking it up and that's because they did not figure it out someone else in the band picked it up for you. Remember dropping it I remember I swear. Well my brain's me and it was in your pocket. It was my pocket than if I think it was in my hand and fell out of my hand and then the Bass Bass player picked it up. Okay in his who very cool guy. Cool guy very cool guy I mean plays Bass already cool great bass player but big up your passport right. So he picks up my passport thinking it was who says right and I know all of this like way after the fact because a lot of crap went down right after that so They say they're going to start boarding the plane. Everyone's like Oh make sure you get passports. I can't find mine and we all start panicking because like we're we have a show that night damn so I start looking. Everyone's checking their stuff. Everyone pan themselves down in idiot. I'm like feeling an idiot and like what happened. It just fell into the void. If you play guitar like you drop a guitar pick you never see it again. It was like that but like times a million and so I went back to security. I got like pre check or whatever for some reason I don't know why but so I went to back to pre check in like eventually just had them. I was with them looking at the cameras so we went back to like me going through and I had the password in my hand on camera going through the gate. Whoa so it was clear that I dropped dropped? Something happened crazy whether someone picked it up nefarious Louis and ran with. It didn't didn't know so the ban goes on without me and they're like behind and and there'd be like don't worry about it you know it'll be okay. Just trying get to see like they were pretty much saying like just. Don't worry about tonight. We'll get you to the next show. Yeah and and And then they fly to Montreal. And I'm like still just looking. I like become friends with all the TSA workers and stuff for all the people at the gate. You know. Because I'm like they feel so bad for me and I'm like you're detained in all the all the empathy you know because it feels good and people care about you. Sure so long story short. You're like Dell in this story. I'm just putting that a little bit a little bit. I like to think I'm not too annoying. I mean you were very annoying for the entire band and whoever's managing this tour you've missed your misplace passport passport convenience. Here's what happened so they get to Montreal and I get a call from the manager the to our manager and he says The Bass player has your passport port. And I'm like Oh wow okay. At least we know where it is. Yeah but he can't find his. WHOA so now? It's like he can't get into that country where's his. That's what that's what the reality was for about twenty minutes and they called back and said No. He found his too. So here's tore. Managers flies back online. Did you have yeah dude tour manager flies back to JFK grabs me. Well we grab the next flight to Montreal. I get to the venue with an hour an hour before a set time. Wow Ah play the show and it was a great show and so another attempt failed for me because you made the show and brought down and everybody loved it. Yeah that's not a bitch. Okay I have no of you know this because I know you've gone deep into planes trains and automobiles. But I have how long it would take to get from New York to Chicago by train by bus by car and by plane. You already know this information. I'm curious what number you have. What's here okay? So you do have some I have. I have some numbers. You have some numbers Sean. Definitely not so SEAN IS GONNA guess. Then let's do that okay. So Sean Sean Moose Goose's loose tracy. What is your guests? How long long would it take to get from New York to Chicago by train by train? Yes God you WanNa take another one I. I'll let you say the plane one I okay. I feel most confident about that. Shot Him with accuses. Lewis Tracy. How long do you think it would take to get from New York to Chicago by plane Hour and a half. What are you have Dr Jeff? I think it's a little bit longer than that. He's corrected is two hours. That's the information I have according to the Internet though who knows me crazy pilot to get you there and show any time there's Williams away. There's there's away when you're actually the planes. I read go slower now than they used to. Do you know what I'm talking about Jeff. I don't know about that. I haven't heard that specifically but I wouldn't be surprised. There's a lot of studies that have been done on cars and planes and You know aerodynamics of fuel consumption and efficiency stuff so oh you know messing with the highway speed limits messing with you know how fast planes fly and even the little the winglets the little tips that ends of Wings on planes that point upward upward are all to reduce drag and increase efficiency of. How much fuel is used so even though you know it might take a bit longer? It's probably more fuel efficient. So there's all kinds of optimizations optimizations going on constantly for that kind of stuff crazy okay. Oddly enough also my hamsters name has winglets. That's awesome that's true. What about why car honeymoons that go straight to New York to Chicago? Car York the big apple to the windy city. What are we nine hours? Dr Jeff. It's longer than that as well. You want to buy much twelve hours. It's thirteen hours. All right yeah but again. Maybe not if you're driving if I'm I'm driving now I drive real slow. Okay well it depends on the car. I would drive fast if I had like a car. Trusted on the civic. Let's keep it ended speed limit bus taking a bus. How long is that GonNa take you fifteen hours? That's a good guess Dr. Jeff Yeah I think around there right. It's sixteen and a half okay. You're getting closer as we go confident and get more comfortable pretty good okay. The last one is your dreaded train guests although I know you're a huge fan the band What's your favorite train song? Also let's get that out of the way Would it be meet Virginia Dan in uh-huh the job What the one about the kids? The one about the kids. What is about kids done in oh that one is that train that is trained about kids calling all angels. Yeah fantastic tested. So Sean loves calling all angels. And how long do you think it takes to get New York to Chicago by train. I'm going to say twenty hours worse. Okay I don't know Dr Jeff. That's a good guess. I found multiple routes I. I don't know which but as far as the train I gotta go with drops of Jupiter because ah after physicist by training so yeah and the drugs. Jupiter do get frequently in people's hair. Is that correct right. Problem scientifically accurate. That's great so wait. What's the different routes the twenty two hours? Yeah I found I found routes around. Yeah Twenty Two twenty four hours depending on which stations you want to go to and if you get do you have layovers and things like that but yeah it's it's slow that's for sure and also who should train have a song called New York to Chicago because if you think about it that's funny. I like New York to Chicago by train. Nothing I don't know if I you can't pick up on that one really so if you were in the band train you wouldn't. You wouldn't be tempted by that. It's just it's the fact that it's a reference to planes trains mobiles urged. Just no just because it's the city to one song. Sounds like a sentence that's cool New York to Chicago by train nothing. I'm just trying to think love ones. Well since you haven't I think that means that it's pretty good all right. We're GONNA take a quick break and we'll be right back. The break is over here we go. Let's talk about the third time you embarrassed. You left your laptop underground underground lot. Day is now bad Arianna guerande though. That doesn't really work out. You left Shawn is listen studio your laptop hop on the floor in Hollywood. Is that correct the sidewalk. I was outside okay. I don't know how much better that makes it Yeah you were there you were there. That's right so we were. We were by my car. We're on gower. We're on our mill. Hollywood next to the paramount Astro Burger right next to the Astro Burger. which we were not eating at? We're going somewhere else and you for some reason. Put your laptop up top on the floor and then we left. We were not as very true. Okay so what the hell happened. I don't know man. I just like get too comfortable the stuff down but what happened next. We got to where we were going. You're like I don't have my laptop now. What do we do I just embrace. I just accepted apted. I just accepted it was gone. Had My heart external hard drive in the bag with it. which had all the music I had ever done and had been working on? That was the only copy of it so it was just like clean slate. Your whole thing. I told myself clean slate. It's happened before in college because I lost a guitar. I remember that and as soon as I two weeks later I realized I lost guitar and left it at a Gig and my first thought was. It's gone yeah gone accepted very quickly. I will say that. I don't like that. I was shown on his very good. Good practice Anyway so we're on. I was on a couch wherever we were and I just laid down gone. It's gone and then what I think you kinda like. Let's go check and I was just like someone took that I mean pretty cool of me to find a solution already instead of lay on the couch and I'd say it's gone and we went and there was do we go. I don't remember it either. We went and it was gone or I accept it. It was gone and you didn't and you can take back yourself compliment lament. I absolutely will take it back. All that I remember is that you contacted me shortly afterwards. Saying that it's back right because I was staying right across the street and paramount and Eventually maybe later that day or maybe the next day might even the next week. It was the next day next day I just call him out and just told them because I figured that was the least I can do. Yeah and it was the least and a and I tell them what it looks like and what was it. And they're like yeah. We got it and I was like it was like Christmas. Time's a million. Wow how was the best feeling in the whole world so we drove into paramount and saw Bruce Almighty Wall And it was just a wonderful moment. That is a wonderful treating all my belongings celebration. I want to talk about this this. Houdini line that we spoke about very briefly. Jeff So Dell in the movie gets punched in the stomach By Dean by Neil sorry and he says like watch it because that's how Houdini died and so I wanted to look that up it. It seemed like you looked it up. Also and so I'm GonNa give you what I got because I found it astounding and you tell me if it's in the in the medical field I think they call it cock-up ah Poop you can let me know it is or if it's not so I see on Wikipedia here. It says that it is speculated that his death was caused by McGill University city student. Jocelyn Gordon Whitehead who repeatedly struck him in the abdomen. She asked him if he believed in miracles of the Bible and whether or not it was true that punches in the stomach did not hurt him and then delivered some quote very hammer like blows below the belt. Houdini was at the time reclining on a couch having broken his ankle so while performing several days earlier and then he was unable to sleep. He remained in constant pain for the next two days. He did not seek medical help and by the time he did see a doctor he had had a fever of one hundred and two and acute appendicitis and was advised to immediately have surgery. He ignores the advice he decides to go perform he performs at the Garrick theatre where he passes out because of his fever. I would presume which was now one hundred and four. This was in Detroit in October. Twenty Second Nineteen Twenty six and then they revive him. He finishes the the show but is hospitalized and dies a few days later so parts of that I really believe to be true. Okay parts of it. I don't know the the second half of the story. I think definitely hangs together. The fact that he went in had appendicitis and a fever and ignored doctor's advice and then eventually eventually went in the hospital and died effectively appendicitis which was pretty bad at the time nowadays. You know we can treat that pretty easily. The first half of that story is a lot fuzzier from the stuff that I've read definitely one of Houdini things. was you know. He had for various allusions. He had very strong ABS. You had a strong core four and so one of his you know gig was he could take lots of punches in the stomach And so you know that was the thing he did have to tighten up and prepare. You can just like surprise. Him with it Apparently and so yeah many there's various flavors of the story but yeah something about somebody either. Punching him repeatedly or unexpectedly you know whether it was a rival magician or somebody hired or amateur boxer or who it was. I actually haven't heard the version that involves involves quoting the Bible. That's a new one but who knows and so definitely there's a chance that that was unexpected. He was slightly injured by the interesting medical. Part of this comes in. There's been a lot of studies in the last few decades that actually blunt trauma can't lead to appendicitis or there's no evidence evidence that blunt trauma like a punch will lead to appendicitis and so the fact that there's no sign no obvious. Scientific connection between those two is I think like the part that kills part of this story and so what's interesting though and actually might have led to his death indirectly from the punching. Is You know if he gets punched. He was surprised or it was was a boxer whoever and he's slightly injured. Because you know that seems reasonable enough he had some kind of you know potentially slight injury from the punching. He felt some abdominal pain. And then as the days go on presumably as he has appendicitis growing or developing inside of him that have pain potentially was attributed by Houdini and others to that punch or series of punches so instead of thinking oh I have you know some weird abdominal pain. I should see a doctor or maybe it's is a serious thing. It's probably you know him and his buddies thinking. Yeah I got punched in wasn't prepared. That's kind of annoying. It's sticking around so you know definitely there's some level of you know self delusion of that's where it came from and if you hadn't been surprised punched or something like that you might have gone to a doctor earlier might have heated doctor's advice that you know this is not just. Oh I wasn't. Don't prepare for that punch. This is a serious internal issue. Okay so then. The moral of the story is that if you're reclining on a couch and somebody's talking about punching you a bunch of times times in the lower regions that you should pass. Probably that seems wise Sean. Yeah I don't WanNa do that. I don't WanNa be on either side of that. You don't WanNa Punch somebody somebody in the nuts guilt. What if it's somebody terrible that you hate depends on who okay? So maybe if that happens we will upload the video guys so. Don't worry you won't miss a second of Johnny Mussa's boxing match with somebody's testicles. Now how much of this movie do you think could have been avoided with cell phones the whole movie. That's an interesting one. I mean you know the one of the first issues is. They're trapped in Wichita Kansas. I believe and you know. They can't book a hotel room locally you know. People are waiting in line for the couple of payphones so if everybody had a cellphone everybody had you know hotels dot com or trip advisor. Maybe they could booker room pretty quick so yeah that might have helped. The taxi thing was a whole mess. Oh yeah getting. A car was a whole mess. Yeah the number of steps that they had to you know throw money at random. Random people are calling random favors that you could do on your cell phone. You know anywhere in the country pretty much. That definitely would would speed up some of these issues. I'm guessing so there's probably a lot less S.. People missing out on Thanksgiving nowadays. That's like a nice positive point right share I think the you know the the flip side of that is perhaps social media is leading us to you are more awkward Thanksgiving's than we used to have. Yeah that's true. There's little to talk about that safe anymore. I guess this movie is one of those things although not really safe if to watch with the entire family because of that one scene you mentioned where These saying that the bomb a bunch of times. Yup My favorite scene in the entire movie. That just came out of nowhere. It was. I think St Martin's favorite scene are like one of two that convinced him to do the movie and it really just blindside you the movie is completely like PG maybe maybe pg thirteen but then there's like what it's like thirty times says the F. Word in that same eight eighteen f bombs in one minute a lot of F. bombs in a minute the math on that every three seconds every list too so yeah sounds like that yet. Chaos okay so I also wanted to just name because it's Thanksgiving the smell of Pumpkin and gravy is in the air. What are your favorite Thanksgiving foods Thanksgiving Desserts Algal? I me crazy sweet potato casserole sweet potato casserole colleague marshmallow and stuff and they're kind of like a yams esque situation. Yeah yeah the rams and sweet potatoes are relatively interchangeable or not. I don't know I I feel like yams is sweet potato marshmallow and something else Jeff. You got got the math on that. I don't like sweet potato or Yam so I just scraped the modules off the top when my mom makes it to be honest. Say yet when you don't like something a sort of food you gotTA S. A.. Yet at the end. 'cause you never know I didn't like Broccoli. Spinach now eat that stuff raw. That's not with no just out of the back to great philosophy. I love that. I don't like it yet. That's what I was telling Eric Eric. So what else is in this casserole. Wait remember sweet potato is very. It's like a desert. It tastes like a dessert. Right right like I. I'm really hard to believe that anyone can take a bite of that and be like this is just like a tasty sweet dissolve. I I don't think jeff is going to like it very much. Jeff what what are you into if not yams. I like a good Pumpkin Pie and I make a decent mulled wine. So that's always fun to throw on the stove these. What mulled wine? So you heat up some wine wine and brandy and throw in cinnamon and cloves and oranges and it just warm tasty and gets you tipsy. And it's lovely. WHOA that sounds great? I want that recipe. All right. I'll send it to you no problem okay good. That sounds really nice. Yeah I'M A PI guide to. I Love Pie. I feel like pies. Just better than cake in general universal I'm putting that out there pies better than cakes that are cheesecake. Excuse me cheesecake is better than Pie. So wait a minute for you. It goes cake Pie cheesecake the thought of Yeah cheesecakes definitely at the top. I don't know about pine cake onto that. Okay Dude Los cheesecake by I mean I like chocolate so like a good chocolate cream cream pie. I think he beats a chocolate cake. Getting getting specific to my chocoholics. Yeah I don't know what it is exactly but I'm I'm more of a pie guy. I got to say okay. I think we're we're nearing the end. Here we do a plug section at the end Shiny Moose. Something you want to tell. The people preach to the people Yeah I've been producing editing. This podcast called Success Express Success Express. Tell me about a it's hosted by you. What and our Buddy Eric? But I host this show John. Hey how could I host a different show or you lying. You gotta give yourself some more credit. Yeah you're right now I do host that show with Eric are very good friends that we've known for we're a little bit of a brotherhood. The three of us. Would you say yeah definitely last ten years or so. Yeah and Sean does a great job of producing the show and interacting with us. And it's a silly funny show. Yeah Eh Improv and music and it's a really good time. Yeah well I thank you for doing that. Show with us. Of course it's always a pleasure and thank you for being on this show no problem And thank you for watching that movie that you've never seen before. I hope you loved it and want to thank me for that. Yeah Okay startling new you Dr Jeff. Where can people find yourself? Are you doing any more of the draft house exposes. Yeah about once a month friend and I at the Alamo Draft House theaters in San Francisco. Show a movie and then talk about the science behind it so we did planes trains and automobiles last November a week from tonight. We'll be doing close encounters of the third kind one of my favorite sci fi movies of all time. Yeah and yeah you can. You can follow us. The event is big screen science. You can follow him at the Alamo Draft House website where in their mailing list and you know tickets on sale each month for our shows big screen science. That's right. That is very cool. I and I got a geek out for a second because I just went to the draft house here in La. For the first time I had never been to a draft house before and it was the best after five minutes of being in there. I told my girlfriend. We're not going any other theaters anymore. Other theaters are done that that is a typical reaction. Yeah the Alamo Draft House started in Austin Texas and has spread had a lot of cities in the US and yeah. I'm super excited. We have one in SF. I gotta get down to the one in L. A. at some point but yet that's that's the standard reaction is. There's just no reason. Go to other theaters now. Yeah it's just absolutely the gold standard. They bringing you food and cocktails. It's it's the ultimate experience. So I'm sure that your big-screen extreme signs is a ton of fun so I hope people see it and I hope I get to see it someday soon. Yeah Great Okay thank you sir. Thank you Dr Jeff Thank you Shining Moose and I'll see you guys next time When we do some other Thanksgiving movie close encounters? I guess what other what other Thanksgiving movies are there. Chicken run. Am I just saying that because there's a chicken minute trailer one. What does that mean Grind House? Oh I don't call thanksgiving. Maybe that one. How many Thanksgiving movies are they're feeling we're lacking in that? Not at Greenwich Penny. Yeah not many okay. So then let's start making those because I feel like there's an open market here. Does that make sense. Yeah for all you exacts. Yeah all you exects ex- listening we have tons of by the time you hear this. We have a list of Thanksgiving movie ideas. Blockbuster Ideas Superhero thanksgiving movies. Perfect okay so great so see you guys guys next time and then you guys stay on the line and we'll just we'll just brainstorm Thanksgiving movies for a couple of hours. Just kidding me. It's just GONNA be meted. I hear you all right. Thanks bye everybody. That scientists hosted and produced by Ethan Edinburgh are associate producers. Emily Feld our editor. Is Lucas Bolinger ohlinger. And the executive pecan Pie deserve is Brett. Kushner follows on Instagram at bad science show. That's that's bad science show or feel free to send us an email bad signs at secret dot com. That's bad signs at secret DOT COM. Let us know what you think about the show any movies we should do in the future. I appreciate your emails and of course leave us on. I Tunes Review that let other people hear about the show. Elsie you all next week bye.

Dr Jeff Sean Sean Moose Goose Steve Martin New York Dr. Jeff Yeah John Hughes Dell Jeffrey Jeffrey Silverman San Francisco Turkey appendicitis Eric Eric Chicago John Candy Montreal California Houdini Jeff L. A.
Front Lines of COVID-19 with Dr Jeff Gusky

Unstructured Interviews

50:36 min | 5 months ago

Front Lines of COVID-19 with Dr Jeff Gusky

"Today's episode is also a video interview. So look it up on youtube dot com slash. Eric Hunley if you WanNa see that and my life streams joined by Professor James Fallon. He is a gentleman who discovered that he was a psychopath when he studied his own brain scan and next week the livestream will feature not one not two not three but four body language experts Chase Hughes Mark Bodin Scott Rouse and Greg Hartley. They're all part of the behavior panel and they'll all be on at once to answer any and all body language questions you might have now today. This is Dr Jeff Guskey. He is a front line. Er Doc who's dealing with covid nineteen and quite seriously. This episode May Save lives and with that present. Dr Jeff Guskey is Eric and this is unstructured or we have dynamic informal conversations with some amazing people today were joined by an actual er doctor so we can stop speculating for about ten minutes about what's going on in the world and maybe get some real information. This is Dr Jeff Guskey. He is a board certified doctor. National Geographic photographer saw so an explorer. And the Gentlemen Obviously Never Sleep or sleeps at all. How are you doing today? Doctors Guskey so glad to be with you. I hope you're safe and your audience is safe. I think everybody is Kinda hoping to be too. And truthfully I speaking for myself. I'm uncertain everything is really really uncertain in the world right now. What's going on my day job? Which haven't had to go into except to go pick up a couple of things here and there. Now they have three cases that have just popped up. So we're all a little jittery with this whole coronavirus Byron one to bring you on to talk about what is going on and you had a really strong message I heard with. It's the weather stupid. So let's start. It's the weather stupid. It's the weather stupid. So here's here's the meaning of that. You remember James Carville. The it's the economy stupid and everyone knew what he was talking about. And this is where this is during Bill Clinton's time yeah or the. Where's the beat which is another election so this is the this? This is kind of the mantra of hope during the Kobe. Era Because it goes right to the core of what the problem is that no one's looking at right now and if we do we're going to be much safer Levy start by saying that we have to always cling to sober realistic expectation. Started out the shutdown with with one singular mission which was that we avoid catastrophic death and collapse of the healthcare system. And we've achieved in. Everyone should really feel good about the sacrifices and the team working the and they unselfishness that they have all done to To get to this point but the initial goal has crept into fear and uncertainty and this this constant haranguing of all of us with asking us to do things that are not very scientific that are kind of winging it that are that are challenging whether we can trust our of the goal posts being moved. I guess it'd be the question. I think I think what's happened is that it's all become politicized because I hate to say it. But there is a cottage industry in in provoking ragent. Fear many of the large media companies Their business plan is basically keeping people in constant a constant state of post traumatic stress breaking news breaking news breaking news breaking news on. It's constantly keeping people on the edge of of fear uncertainty anger rage. Everything's become very politicized and politics needs to stay out of medicine in the Er there's never any writer left black or white gay or straight rich or poor educated or uneducated religious or non-religious. It's just human. You can walk into any. Er It's the same way and and people are a real there there's no PC and PC is dangerous. Pc and political manipulation were covert is very dangerous We need to insist upon clarity in terms of science behind the things were being asked to do and that's not happening right now billing presses right now I say that right precipices expressive this precipice. Thank you and do we open to. We not open. So I put out to Mike Group for the unstructured podcasts on facebook and I said Hey can I get some questions from everybody and they delivered so far. Start off with masks Damascus. Bents actually do anything with Vince. They're slowly masset like events in the site. Oh okay let's go back to where the masks started it would. Initially the surgeon general said don't wear masks for the general public that they don't work and he he I think he was factual now. There are reasons to wear masks. And I'll get into that but but let's go through the issue with mask as I see. These are all my personal opinions. It's what I believe. It's not political. I'm just trying to to help. People understand the science behind masks so we start out with surgical masks. Where do they come from? They come from surgeons in the operating room. Where you're you're trying to protect a patient who is lying on the operating table with open wound from getting infected when a surgeon like cough. And let's say that surgeon has bronchitis or were strep throat or something jer infectious that could get into the wound and cause a surgical infection so the surgical masks work reasonably well protecting the others from an individual. Who Sick but they don't protect you from others. The air comes right in the idea that that a surgical mask is going to protect you from anybody is a myth the facial coverings look so many people. I mean frame this at a positive light because you have to look at the the way that people have responded to this request that came all the sudden out of the clear blue and people have been so unselfish and noble in in trying to help others and socially responsible. We cannot say enough good about that but from a science standpoint in my view the the virus is so small it goes right through surgical masks and face cloths and all of these very creative ways. That people were covering their faces. Now Okay so so now. Let's go to the end. Ninety five the end ninety five mask is supposed to protect you from others. It does kind of what is end ninety five mean. It means that that masks win. It's worn properly. And when it is in in good shape you can't reuse them over and over and over you can read some song but it has to be in working condition. It will filter out ninety five percent of particles above three hundred nanometers. Forgive me for being picking up. Please go ahead. I'm a nerd. So three hundred nanometers above. Yes what's is the viruses. It's it's sixty two hundred forty nanometer. It's smaller than the particle size. The lower limit of the particles that the and Bible filter out now there is a circumstance where the mass help in that that some of the particles especially when someone coughs that's covid will be encapsulated in a micro droplet and those are larger than the three hundred meter limit and they will likely be filter out. But if it's a a just a viral particles floating in in the indoor drier. Air. You're ninety five is is not even going to protect you completely requires an n one hundred which is almost impossible to get right now so in my view the masks are important for healthcare providers or people in nursing homes or people people who are in indoor spaces where there may be cove exposure. Another application where you might consider an ninety five is if you're getting on an airplane although airplane air though there's some problems with it. There are a lot of good things about airplane. Air as well that that people are not talking about and that I think make us much safer in in in that air because of the turnover and the hippo filters so you have to look at mask social distancing and then the most important thing that no one's talking about that the risk of covert is very very different indoors versus outdoors and the irony of it. All is that we live ninety percent of the time indoors and now one hundred percent of the time indoors For many of us. Because we've been asked to shelter in place and guess where the danger it's indoor the hotspot the best hope that we have and and it's important in dealing with the emotions of of this covert marathon. That were is that we prevent society from having catastrophic viral outbreaks that lead to massive loss of life and collapse of the healthcare system in other words that we flatten the curve. If we do that that's the best we can hope for. We cannot get rid of the virus until a vaccine or the virus burns out in so when we hear the news with these outbreaks. That are going to be happening. They get used to it. Any of US can get Kobe. And and the good news is that most of us will do just fine. It's about ten. Fifteen percent were the The bad things happen. Think about this for years. We've lived with flu. And No one other to do social distancing to the handwashing the not shaking hands. And so all that we're doing now is having a strong impact on lowering the transmission rate with Kobe but somber are still going to get it. So let's talk about. Let's let's talk about the weather. So why is it the weather stupid? Let's start with relative humidity so if you get a chart of Wuhan relative humidity it looks like Florida. It's about seventy five to eighty percent twelve months a year. Here's the big surprise. Is that when you look at this other metric of humidity? Which is not relative humidity. It's it's a little bit related but mostly not. It's not something you as you're at home. It's not something reported on the Weather Service but they can report it. My mission is to get them to report. It's another geeky metric and if you WANNA learn about it very quickly go to. Google and type in humidity helps fight flu. And there's a brilliant sixty seconds science podcasts. From Scientific American from two thousand and nine. This data has been around for a long time. That says we've been looking at the wrong metric to understand indoor airborne spread of viral disease. And so it's this other geeky metric so when you look at Wuhan for that metric. Oh my God it was. The indoor air in Wuhan was bone dry when a small viral outbreak exploded into a massive viral catastrophe. And then you look at New York and you look at Detroit and you look at even New Orleans. It's the last place people would think that a viral problem related to dangerously dry. Indoor air would would lead to a viral bomb but tragically when you look at the two peak days of Mardi Gras this year. There was some weather pattern. It may have been a cold front or something that came in and it changed the normally humid weather into dangerously dry indoor air and that's why the bomb went off in New Orleans. You've also mentioned meat packing plants. I believe that they have very dry. Error because of the air conditioning xactly. Because and and so if you look at the common thread behind every single outbreak I believe it's it's that you have high population density indoors plus virus plus dangerously dry indoor air. Okay now let's talk about why. The weather affects the indoor. So when you this metric which is a measure of the amount of water in the air it has been. It's not relative humidity. It's something else. And so that metric actually correlates very well with indoor air because buildings breed even high rises that are field off. That seem almost medically sealed. They are connected to the outdoors and so when the outdoor humidity amount of water in the air drops low it affects the indoor air. And then when you couple that with wintertime where you have the heat on and it really drives it out. Washington state where the first outbreak occurred. You look at win. The in that nursing home win the viral bomb went off and go back about twelve or fourteen days there. They Weather System. That came through a made the ordinarily very humid air dry. I think it was actually even in the middle of the night. You can have what I call red days or or even read hours until the part of going back to the the mindset of what we're dealing with heart of watch on lives are turned. Upside down is because we were fighting a war against an enemy that we cannot see and we have to make invisible danger visible right now. It's critical and that's why I'm pushing hard for one of the big weather services and I've really tried to reach Byron Allen at the weather channel. I haven't heard back also accuweather also. Ibm which owns the weather. Underground any one of those sources could overnight prove that dangerously dry. Indoor air was a product or a component of every single viral bomb. That went off. And when I'm talking about with Barack Obama's you have a small outbreak that in indoors. That suddenly is it becomes a massive barrel. Catastrophe and so the worst places are nursing homes. Because in those places you have people who are very old with coq with prem- orbiting I'm sorry pre morbid conditions with co morbidity and and so they're extremely vulnerable they physiology of aging makes us more vulnerable to Kobe. And then when you add the CO morbidity it makes those people extremely vulnerable and so that's why you have nursing homes and long hair long term care facilities prisons and meat packing plants as the places. Were we see most of the of the terrible catastrophes happening that makes sense and I think somebody had released that an extremely high percentage of the deaths in New York all had co morbidity of some kind. Bi Tension Diabetes Obesity. They had something going talk about New York so New York is an absolute tragedy in that you know. The officials were almost arrogantly saying. Don't worry about it. We've got everything under control go. You know do live your normal life. All the while. Their city was being seeded with people coming from the hot spots in Europe and it was tragic. Would it New York look like when you look at the the dangerously dry indoor air it was probably by my estimate perhaps twice as dangerous as Wuhan that dry that's one secondly you have high population density in high rises? And there's some question in my mind that in in some of the spaces that you may have central heating. They have passed the virus from one level to the next the next and then third you have inner city poverty and and the the the tragedies amongst minorities in particular African Americans have been attributed to the the the well-known health disparities in inner city. Poor whether it's high blood pressure obesity or a chronic heart disease or smoking. Or you know. It's a whole panoply of of conditions. But there's something new and I'm going to share it with your audience and it is not in the news yet and I think we actually released a press release on Sunday. I just happened to stumble on this on Friday. We're looking at a physician's update on Cova and it's very hard to understand. It's it's very technical but in a nutshell it was the first time that there was data showing that the that tragic disparities of of death and bad outcomes with African Americans with blacks is not just from inner city poverty. It turns out that there is a genetic vulnerability that also is tied to this news about children. That is starting to come out. Who are experiencing death for multi organ failure and yesterday. There was a a headline that went all over the world. Fast related to men having a vulnerability related to an enzyme and all three of these situations or link there it turns out that the virus attacks what's called an NGO attention to receptor and that it puts that that receptor out of business. Basically in that receptor is very important because it keeps other receptors from going haywire when we think of cancer what is cancer it's were cells go haywire will there's another form of Haywire involving The immune system and chemicals that are produced in the body that attack our Oregon's and they're called super oxidises and they attack the blood set the blood vessels and they produce intense vascular thrombosis in blood. Clots all over the place and and it. It is a nightmare scenario. And and this is the re I'm really upset. I've had a great deal and I still have a great deal of respect for the medical doctors that are working tirelessly to help us through this crisis. But I feel now that it's become politicized and why is it that an Er doc who is on the? Who's afraid unlike a basic scientist? I'm not in a research lab but but I could put this together and why in the hell have not the doctors that are leading this. Put this together long ago. Because had we known about the link with dangerously dry indoor air to Wuhan Hotspot Sense. I believe we I believe we could have avoided the shutdown of America and save tens of thousands of lives and now that we have this story emerging about children that are that are dying from multiple organ failure and the vulnerability that explains why african-american death rates are significantly higher. They ghost it's actually Similar pathway to the problem of high blood pressure that is operatives genetic vulnerability in African Americans and so we need to go into overdrive. Just like we did with ventilators in. Pp Six weeks ago on a word time footing to get indoor air. What I call green to get indoor air safe because we're only five months away from flu season and when that happens it's we're going to be lulled because now and then we're going to. We're going to have a CMIH RESPITE. And it's because of the weather because as you go from spring to summer you have more green days than read and and it makes the indoor air relatively safer but but that's going to flip back into danger in in the fall and there are inner city poor. There are people in nursing homes. There are meat packing plants prisons. You know there are so many places. They're all the businesses that that have closed that could reopen if people feel safe by knowing the danger of dry. Indoor Air has been mitigated. And it's so easy to do so let me use Florida as an example. So we've heard about the fantastic success of the Florida governor in Florida. Health officials and all the courageous were radiance. Who did such a great job? They were proactive. In testing people going into nursing homes and in being very very careful about limiting the most or access to the most vulnerable patients and the projections about a nightmare scenario apocalypse in Florida because of all the elderly turned out to be just the opposite and they had the lowest death rates among elderly. Have you heard about that? I have not but that's about to hear good to hear. Yeah it's an amazing success story but I believe that a lot of it and not to discredit the governor or the courageous people in Florida at all but because they did great. But it's also the weather because Florida has ambient weather outdoors that makes the indoor air naturally more safe against Cova even with air conditioning. It's safer and I believe that a significant reason why Cova deaths have been less in Florida is because the indoor air is safer in a natural way. So how is it that we can create safety everywhere we can? I come up with. A parrot called humidity saves lives which is a simple plan to keep us safe. And it it. I begins with making invisible danger visible second. It's making that invisible dangerous safe by adding water to the air. We breathe indoors until indoor humidity is fifty to sixty percent round the clock until the crisis pat relatives. That's what we can measure. That's where that's a starting point. But but the the part one of the humidity saves lives is actually a new vital sign of viral safety. Which I want to see on every weather report every day around the clock around the world. And it's where they report this Kiki metric that can actually forecast ahead of time read air or dangerously dry indoor air in time for us to do something about allergy index or UV index index heat index allergy index. It gives people advanced warning viral danger indoors in time to make their home safe. And so what a difference that will be for all of us in terms of elevating our morale in our sense of pope in our sense of identifying the The enemy that we're fighting just by having the viral safety index on the weather report because the there are three things that happen when when the air is in that fifty to sixty percent range one involves person to person spread. So it's so simple and it's not new science there's an abundance of science. It's been out for years. The physics of Of Dry Indoor air enables viral particles to travel all the way across the room linger for hours in Moist Air. It's almost like social distancing on steroids. It's like a firewall that prevents the virus from going very far. Because there's friction. And there's there's a resistance to blow when you have moist. It's an invisible protective barrier against Kobe when you have moist water in the air that's in the rain to fifty to sixty percent relative humidity indoors. I want to clarify though before we go to deepen because I still WANNA know. Don't you still need to social distance even if you have the protective barrier? That doesn't mean he should be leaning on each other in the bar necessarily right okay. Well okay this is. This is where science you know. We've been spending all of this time. Fighting over. Testing mass test is is actually in my view dangerous and same with with all the promises about about tracing and treatment testing brace treatment. It's like a mantra that keep hearing on television by politicians who who are getting they're politicizing healthcare in in my view in a dangerous way. So let's go back to your various question. We don't know the answer. I know that first of all I know for sure that viral outbreaks outdoors. I in fact. I have not heard a single outbreak becoming a bomb outdoors because outdoor air is much different than indoor air dilutes. Sunlight that that makes the viruses non-viable very quickly and the physics of air outside or just totally different. So whoever came up with this six foot number I feel like they pulled it out of their hat. I don't know if there's really good science that I you know. In which people being arrested we have fights breaking out. We have so much tension over this six foot number now indoors in dangerously dry indoor air six foot mate may not be enough. If it's dry if the air is green it may be plenty. I don't know we need rapidly to look at the science of humidity that is in the fifty to sixty percent range or in terms of this metric it should be above ten grams per meter cube. That's the amount of water in the air to the I mean. Ideally tend to thirteen fourteen in that range. But you that we shouldn't treat even if the air let's say does magically get to that level. Everybody pays attention to does it. We still publish it practice a little bit of hygiene just in case. Oh definitely hand washing and and until this crisis is past. Probably not a good idea to shake hands in terms of the distancing. You know this. There's utter paranoia and fear now because we've all been indoctrinated with the idea that there's something magic about six feet. Here's why I believe. Mass testing is dangerous in the backdrop is that we've all been cooped up. You know we want to feel safe. And we want to feel a degree of certainty about about our lives about the future about you know the places that we are working and shopping living. We've been told that mass testing is going to make us safe that for example returning to work. You know the everybody needs tested. I don't get it I just personally. Don't get it because You can. All attest means is that you're negative. At the time the test was done. Could you be infected an hour later? Yes could you be infected the next day yes? So when people have all of this pent-up desire to have their lives back to feel certainty and safety and they get a a normal test. They're going to think okay now. I've got the good housekeeping seal of approval to go hug grandma and it's human nature that you know three or four days after the test you're going to say oh you're going to rationalize. I'm fine and you're going to be affectionate towards you know a person that you love who is at risk and that is going to potentially give. Cova to somebody that you love and it's because of the. The misunderstanding about mass testing now targeted testing is extremely important. I have a view that every person going into a nursing home whether it's healthcare workers or visitors or plumbers or whoever should be tested every time they go in at least every day I heard about New York saying twice a week. I don't get that. I think it should be every day that people go into a nursing home. They should be tested. I think that frontline healthcare workers need to be frequently tested bus drivers anybody working in enclosed spaces where you're around a lot of people where you could be exposed and then you could turn the a symptomatic expose others. You need to be tested frequently if you'RE A on a navy ship or if you're in a meat packing plant though situations you need to be tested but but that those situations are very specific scenarios where people were in indoor air at risk. Those are not the ordinary work situation. We have to reset our expectations around. What's real we have to go back to where we shut down the country to avoid catastrophic death in class of the healthcare system in realize that that is the best that we can do. We're not going to eradicate the virus. Well down to move four because I have a lot of questions that I wanna hit and some of these I think are very important. Actionable steps are questions that people have and you can. Hopefully answer are all right. Let's start off with. How much of a risk is getting packages slash food? Things like that delivered and is it risky. Is it not risky? And then what do people do about it? Should they how she decamped decontaminate it? Okay so I don't know the exact answer and you know there was a New York Times article. That I felt was was really irresponsible that was talking about viruses lasting seventy two hours on cardboard or something like that. You know the the first of all. Let's get clear about the difference between viruses and bacteria viruses do not live they bacteria or living organisms. They metabolize they they oxygenated a excrete waste products viruses are just a piece of RN. A with a coat they don't live. So what you need to know or the question you need to ask is how long will viral particle be infective in sunlight quickly Nature in moist air. They quickly or relatively quickly nature. They they don't last very long in moist air. You know we go out to a GROCERY STORE. We touch something we come into our homes. And now we're worried about contaminating the sacred space that we live in. And that's that is eerie unnerving that that the very place where you you feel safe. You're now worried about this hidden enemy attacking you so that you can't see and it's driving people nuts. I think people should just do good handwashing common sense. You know when you come home. Wash your hands and by the way you don't need to have pure L. or antibacterial soap. Even though that's what I used to be honest but like it's it's not these are bacteria they don't live plane. Soap and water is what you need so I want to say something. That's GONNA sound really like I'm lying. A Toll Cova. I did not know how to wash my hands. So this person said we'll wait a minute. That sounds that sounds unbelievable because you have done surgery well surgery we have a brush you know we we have routine that we go through okay. You're not washing. Your hands with surgeons brush neither am I and so because of covid. A in a medical podcast. I learned there seven steps and it's brilliant. So here's the first step. You go like this flat surface water palms of your hand. Then you go like this between your fingers. We're fingers and actually I do one over as well. Okay okay like that. That's step to two then. The third step is this from behind case. One other Palm to back of the hand. Yeah that's three okay. Third step is our four step is also two parts. It's your fingertips you go like this and then you go I out. You're turning a doorknob into your palm. Yeah exactly and that's your fingertips fifth. Steppers your knuckles okay. Rubbing Nasr on your palm. Yeah six step is your thumbs. Can you go all the way down like that up and down the yeah all the way to the base and then the seven step is your wrist? Go like that okay. Just and that's it. That's that's the Kobe hand wash and I thought it was so smart when I saw this and I. That's what I do now every time when I come in but Just Place Open Water. The virus code for all of its of its infectiousness. It has vulnerabilities. I want to continue. My wife is a library director and she gets books that are returned. What should she do about those? Just leave him sit for a day and they'll be good. I don't think I don't I don't have the answer and I don't think that we're gonNA drive each all of us crazy if we if we have to worry about imagining hidden virus everywhere it's GonNa make everyone OCD and we're you know people are. It's already causing so much problems in terms of mental health and suicides depression. And Look you cannot just elevate the air US good handwashing social distancing and I think that by and large. You're GONNA be fine. What are you doing yourself in your peers to keep yourself safe since you're right in the middle of it okay? So now. We're going to go into some controversy. I would. I saw the study on hydroxy chloroquine early on within day the famous French infectious disease doctor. That was seeing these amazing results in terms of our clearance when he combined hydroxy. Clark win and Zithromax if I you know I wonder why Zithromax it's an antibacterial but apparently it has antiviral properties as well. Unfortunately that medicine has been so politicized and I believe that it's criminal the way that that doctors that look at this you know are so angry at that. Studt it was. I think it was a hit job intentionally because the doctor that apparently did the study never took care of a Cova patient. He's a research ophthalmologist. Which study was the so-called? Be a study that against hydroxy chloroquine. They didn't publish dosages. They were just so many things wrong with it. They were they. Were looking at people who are already in of chrome storm and in a very end stage state and saying well. It didn't work well. Nothing would work at that point now. We have brim disappear which gives us some hope but the point is that hydroxy chloroquine has been around about seventy years. Hens and tens and tens of millions of people have taken it millions of people every year as anti malaria prophylaxis as a medication for lupus or rheumatoid arthritis the rheumatologist to my knowledge who've used it for decades and decades they the many of them report never having a significant complication. They don't do. Ekg theoretically it can prolong the q t interval and which is not a heart attack. But it's something I won't go into. But it's there are a lot of things that theoretically can prolong the tea interval but in terms of of of the way that that drug has been used successfully mass populations it has a very well established safety profile. And so I can tell you a story. I've a very dear friend who is a CARDIOTHORACIC surgeon whose wife has lupus and has been on that drug for years. How did she feel when all of sudden the news is reporting that People Hydroxy Cora Cohen is getting heart attacks? It was totally irresponsible and frightening people who need that drug for Lupus and rheumatoid and for Anti Malarial. You know a lot of my colleagues. Take it when we go into. Malaria prone regions soldiers. It's a very common drug soldiers. We AT PHNOM ERA soldiers. So go back to your question. What am I doing is I I got on hydroxy chloroquine zithromax and most of the Er docs of the front line. Docs in intensive care units that I know of did the same okay and they just don't talk about it because it's so political now. I don't know I just know what they did and what I did and and and it's criminal that I'm sorry to use that. It's a very strong word but politicians need to stay the hell out of medicine right or left. You know. We need to try to do the right thing. We're at war against a an invisible enemy and in were you do things differently if something might health and it won't hurt you go for it because you fight the battle with the tools that you have. It makes total sense. Some for one of the questions I had is. When do we know that we should check ourselves out? And one thing that I heard is blood. Oxygen monitors could be useful. Okay okay. Let's talk about that so when I did this zoom session two sessions actually for NAT. Go colleagues around the world on Thursday and we had to do to. Because you're a lot of people in different time zones and so the only what I told it was the only time I would recommend buying a pulse. Ox is if you're let's say out in the middle of nowhere eight hours from the closest healthcare working out in the field and you feel like you're getting sick or you you've been around someone that turns out to have and you want to know when you need to seek medical care when you go drive that eight hours through the Bush in order to get healthcare. Well then you know the pulse ox makes sense. Oh by the way let me before I forget there is a Yale. Healthcare has a protocol online about hydroxy. Clark guess what their first line drug is for their impatience. It's Hydroxy Clark when this is Yale Yell and that was may I. Last time I looked at it so bays ago it was there. It was their first line drug for hospitalized patients who were meeting and what made me think of it was when you're asking about the oxygen level so if you have. Kobe does something really strange. With a certain segment or certain cohort of the patients. Get it and it causes the oxygen levels to drop in a way that we've never seen before and so people can have oxygen levels in the low eighties. Or even the mid seventies and ordinarily they would become a toaster delirious and they start to have organ profusion problems and these people are using their organs. And they're talking to you. You know the the science behind this is not clear but if you are out in the field and you feel like you have it and what I told my my colleagues is if you start to go down into the eighties like the Mid Eighties. Then drive in and get healthcare. Or if you're let's say ninety and you exercise in your in your pulse ox Up Your pulse ox similar drops by three points when you're exerting yourself that would be another criteria but otherwise I would not buy a pulse ox because you're just gonNA drive yourself crazy. Don't try to play doctor because it's covert is way more complicated than than you can figure out by looking at the Internet. It is a complex disease and most of the people that you know that right now there is no official treatment except for Ram disappear on an emergency authorization. Only so is a medicine for people who are really really sick in an ICU. Or in a hospital. Who makes the? I can't think it's Gilead. Is that a government funded medicine. Our I don't I don't I don't know the details but I know the Gilead has received a lot of praise for pulling all the stops and getting you know produced and giving a lot of away and so that's what I don't know the controversial mix or is it just another thing that has any FDA approval to my knowledge right now and it's just for really really sick patients. It's not something that you know you you. There is no other treatment for Cova. D- right now except for things that are off label like hydroxy chloroquine and Zithromax. And by the way that Dr Finished I think in about eleven hundred patients several weeks ago put together a non randomized study but I think he had almost ninety two percent rate of viral clearance while it was pretty remarkable numbers there were seven or eight deaths and I think one complication out of eleven hundred patients so it was very good numbers and I think there are other studies that are there undoubtedly that are coming out now but but you have to be very careful in what you're hearing in the news It there is a lot of misinformation with numbers with statiscal. That's a question I had actually that there is some question of there's over inflated numbers about all the out there all over the map and it's a lot of it is designed to create fear and panic in my view and it's irresponsible so some people would say the only number we can count on. Is the death number. Okay at least in the United States where we have fairly accurate reporting of deaths but even in the US that number as we're discovering can be higher. A lot of states have politicized it and and doctors are being pressured to write cove on the death certificate. When it's maybe Kobe but it's probably a heart attack or something like that was a question to somebody. Came in with a brain aneurysm but also at Kobe. What would be the cause yeah? They're blaming it on Kobe. I said and it's it's politicized and it's unfortunate. That's not always happening. But I understand that it's happening it. That's that's an example where politics has intervened with medicine. And it's giving US numbers. They're also under reporting with people in nursing homes or homeless or New People. Dying at home they may not be accurately reporting those as as Cova Desk. So it's not as tight as we want it to be and and then in terms of these numbers about recovery and how many people what percent have it and death rates? We can't trust those numbers because we don't know what the denominator is. How many people actually have Kobe? What what we kind of assume I think personally. I believe this is the case. Is that way more. People have had it. Then we know that's hope is an. That's actually a good thing. The more people who have had the better though so that goes into another area of uncertainty. Because we don't know right now whether having antibodies protects you from another covert attack okay and our reports of people who have anti the I G G antibody Release the GM antibody who are still shedding virus. So it's it's a you know the the the In fact the FDA took the antibody tests off the market or the they require requiring them to now be certified because there were so many scams and so many tests that that cropped up out of nowhere out of Control. You know that we're that were being highly commercial taking advantage of people. You didn't know what the numbers meant. They weren't standardized so now the has kind of put the Kabosh on that and they're restarting that whole program and so in terms of Let me just go through at least as of last Thursday. I haven't checked since but this Cova thing for doctors is the same everyone else. We all feel like the ground is shifting. What was true. Yesterday is not true today. In many cases we've never seen anything like it so the ordinary public should know that doctors are going to the same sense of dread or walking quicksand. Yeah like everything's changing but when you accept that and in fact I wanNA say something that I love. Just it's very calming. When the power of the modern world disappears. All we have left is each other and that really. That's what we can count on is each other and we see that in such an amazing way. We see incredible altruism. That's what we count on right now. Is each other other human beings helping other human beings complete strangers risking their lives to save the lives of complete strangers and that is the most remarkable beautiful fingers. This bashed reservoir of human decency and goodness that lies just beneath the surface and it erupts like a volcano. We don't even know it's there until a crisis and then we see you know what our country is made of and it's never about race or about gay straight or rich for any of these jobs. It's just human beings helping human beings. Actually you know what that is a perfect perfect message to wrap on. I just love India non hope like that so I'm hopeful and please be hopeful and please write your state and local and national leaders and tell them it's the weather stupid Dr Jeff Guskey. Thank you so much people can find you at Jeff. Guskey DOT COM. Yes they can also go on youtube and posting. There's I have a show at the Smithsonian show at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. They can learn about that on on Youtube. Also posting a lot on linked doing a lot of interviews and I'm pushing bit the viral safety index on every weather report and to get indoor air safe as fast as possible is trying to make it happen there my Eric. It's an honor to be with you. Thank you so much for to Nina. I hope you enjoy that and got serious value out of that episode. I know that I did not want to encourage you again to please check out the live streams on the Youtube Channel. Youtube dot com slash Eric. Only and if you want to have something to do this weekend my friend Brett Allen has a conference he's put on called book your dream guest and I will be speaking. You can find it. I've put together a little pretty link at UNSTRUCTURED POD DOT com slash book. And that will take you to the facebook group which you can join and that will show you the conference when it comes live. It's completely free. There's a lot of great people who will be there and I hope to see you there too. Thanks so much.

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1309 Designing Your Optimal Facility with Pat & Jeff Carter : Dentistry Uncensored w/ Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

1:20:25 hr | 11 months ago

1309 Designing Your Optimal Facility with Pat & Jeff Carter : Dentistry Uncensored w/ Howard Farran

"It is just a huge honor for me today. PODCAST interviewing Pat Carter. I which enter International Interior Design Association sitting next to that man with all that gorgeous hair is Dr Jeff Carter. DDS Eighty s pat attended clemson university and graduated with a degree in interior architecture from the University of Tennessee in seventy five practicing pissing as an interior designer. She started her career with hospital and hotel design project for several architectural firms TAT was VP of the design. Inc Thank for twenty years prior to form her own company. The practice design group. Would Dr Jeff Carter in two thousand two who I assume as her husband he is here still renewing his lease. Pat has written articles on dental office design in dental economics and other publications -cations and is a frequent speaker many national and state dental meetings including the ADA annual meeting Henman Texas Greater New York Chicago Midwinter South Western John Conference Pat was at the forefront of the evolution of dental office designed that utilize architecture interior design to elevate dental facilities from realm of generic office space since seventy nine. She has participated in the design construction of over three thousand dental facilities and is considered a leading expert on the provision of dental office design services. Nationwide The man sitting next to her. Frankie Valli Jeff Carter. DDS It's we're guys don't even think it's a real dodger Jeff Carter. DDS graduated from Colorado State University with a BS in biological sciences. And Seventy six in one thousand nine hundred eighty receivers. DDS degree from the University of Colorado School of Dentistry Were My radiology instructor. Denise Castenbaum is now the d a while Ah yeah she's just the most. She was the most amazing intense person from Young Casey that I remember in his ears as a proxy dentist. Jeff practice as a young associate. Dentist grew grew practitioner and enlarge clinic setting and as a solo practitioner zone. Practice in nineteen ninety-seven. Jeff was hired by Design Inc of Austin Texas during his thanks her at ten year at the designing Jeff implemented technology integration services a much-needed adjunct to the dental office designed services in two and thousand Jeff developed the workstation and pendulum mounts to effectively integrate dual monitor systems of the dental offer dory and other medical settings since nineteen ninety seven jeff has been involved in the designing construction of over five hundred dental facility. So He's about one sixth of his wife including dental school and has published Over seventy five articles on office design and equipment and technology integration. Jeff is also a frequent speaker teaming with PAT to present over three hundred courses verses on dental office design nationwide just multifaceted career also includes working as a series seven licence. Investment broker writer stuntman and B.. Movie actor and Two Thousand and two PAT and jeff form the practice design group in response to dentists seeking and more collaborative and innovative design design resource that was available Through the dental supply houses and other formula driven dental office designs. The reason I am so excited to get them on the show is because I for thirty two years I watched Dennis come out of school and some supplyhouse rappers say hey I can design your floor plan for Korea and go do some quick five dollar you know. What are the dimensions of your space? Oh Mine's forty wide and sixty. No problem I can do that in a minute. And then they don't realize that for twenty five to sixty five thirty your life. You're asleep a third of your life. You're at home. And thirdly life your dental office in this cramped condition that you don't like people and then the other thing that's just really bizarre. Is your dental offices the business and and when you rent a thousand square foot crappy location but you live in a three thousand foot home that you own the land and building and you WanNa leave your office fisk you want to go home and you're tired and you WanNa you know your dental rich people. Their business they own the land and building and it's bigger than their consumption attention but a lot of dentists have more debt in the consumption of their home. I mean patients come in. I'm across street from the Guadalupe Guadalupe Indian reservation for thirty thirty two years. You know some boil. Come out here and he'll want me want to take me outside. He showed me his new car. And it'll be some low rider hot thing and I'm look buddy. Look I said that is consumption assumption. I know you got it because the chicks are going to love it but you know what Maria really wants you to have a fancy low rider. She wants to have dental benefits. And you should've. You spent the money on this car to go to some tech school to get a good job at Intel Dab dental benefits. So what would you say to somebody who who lives in a three thousand square foot home and owns the land and building they rent and a thousand square foot. Dental officer burned out. There cramped up. They don't never break room if they don't feel good. They can't sit down anywhere they can't lay down and then they wonder why they want to leave their dental office. and Go home my my home. My my my home was my dental office was four thousand square feet and my home was slightly less than that so I've had enough. Wh what are your thoughts on. We'll we'll burn outs a big deal. What what is your thoughts on that? The actual dental office might be taking the smile off your face. Well let me let me give here. I didn't fly off in the middle of this description dates. So that's why we're in this and that's really are passionate about dental office design and you're absolutely right and we've had somebody experiences. BLAME IT on a spouse. You have a doctor. That's burned out tired. The cramped office. They're not happy. They drag home every night to this fabulous palatial mansion. And sometimes sometimes it's especially you don't need to spend on a dental office. It's like I said they're they're a third of their life a half their life so I tell Pat. Pat Doesn't know a lot of the kind of average dead who's out there you know through her career and Ashi Arthur. We've worked with a really kind of select group of doctors in Israel and people that are sensitive to the environment of the dental office. They they've perceived see that at some point in their career and I actually in retrospect perceive that in my career that I realized what the impact of facility was a lot of the things that discourage which may a lot of things that you know took my energy when stuff we're actually facility related. They had nothing to do with the dentistry and had everything to do with a poorly designed facility Zili where it was small. I was cramped CLAUSTROPHOBIC. People were on top of each other. There was no privacy and come home at the end of the day. And you're just like mush north capanna dentistry has really Har- united as I got into designer learn more and more about design principles of the thing called zoning and things like that but it could actually alleviate some of those the issues so we've been lucky we've worked with a lot of great practitioners look people with a vision for what dental office could be. I think what really separates those those people from people not sensitive to that as they're in tune with what the experience is in the facility. What does it feel like? What is experience I have ended up facility? Will they be focused on the clinical dentistry. But they're you know that's a big part of it. They're very sensitive that that'd be little sound sexist being. We've worked with a a lot of women female dentists. They're actually in a lot of respects more in tune with add. They're more in tune as sort of a nurturing supportive environment. Oh I wanted to be nice and comforting take welcoming. I want people to fill relax here. I don't want him to feel like gee there you know everybody hears every word they say they have an issue or something they can tell me in private in a private conversation sation at a nice consultation room or something like that so I would say you're absolutely right on that Naturally what motivates us to do what we do. And how you how you get a doctor is explain to them is an interesting challenge and arte part of what prompted. Our podcast was with you. Is You know mid Mark Mark announced. We're starting for two thousand twenty another. We're doing an packed Zion series for mid markets a C course dental office design but it gives us a chance to get in front of hundreds of doctors a year. Hundreds of doctors manufacturer Reps Dental Reps. And really just talk about the impact of the facility on their office and get people to open up. It's an interactive thing and it's just it's it's a real pleasure for us to feel like maybe we're and impacting people to give them a sense just like you said just you can't spend a third of your life in this thing that drags you down and makes you know makes you exhausted. Pat Jump I think to add to that. Yeah I think there's been a mindset for the longest time that you're you're prompting thought that I think it's changing if not already change. Is the dentist actually believing being that they deserve a good space to work in. I think the dental facility for the longest time has been in. I wouldn't say it's a blame of the Dow suppliers but the limited limited thought process put into what the environment is like how it works Your inches specific in what you need is far as clearances in that kind of thing. But there's also that added all album starbucks for that the expectation a patients for an experience the expectations of what the quality he is that they're gonNA receive by what they see. I hate to say that to Dennis. I I tell Jeff I know that hurt your feelings but the reality is patients. We can't fully appreciate the skill sets that you have to do what you do. As far as we're concerned here is good as the guy down the street. So the way we discern the quality of of your dentistry is often times going to be what that facility looks like how it works how it accommodates my needs how it accommodates my sense of quality. If if you will because I take those accused on what I see and I think that is a big shift. Hopefully that we're having an impact on Thera Arab. VP of the design. INC is that now called deserter. Go Desert Go. No we were. The design China's how we pronounce it stood for total health environment. And it is in no longer as I understand it shortly after we left our while after we left they close. Is there so sounds like you're the the the ingredient keeping it all together but my point was going to be for that has since You were with a total environmental longtime ago. You've been in this a longtime has it. Is it changing. I mean I yes yes I think it is. I mean I think the impact that we had through a gentleman by the name Dr Jim Pride that you may or may not recall inch guy I source into good news about him. He was kind of a love. Hey gentleman out there but one of the things that I will give him full. All credit for is creating the dentist and appreciation for the Ergonomics of the dental laboratory and is trained by him. You know this is before I married a dentist before I knew dentistry. So you better. You better not today to dentist but but I did anyway. That's a long story. But I WANNA I WANNA go back to the Jim. Probably what Because his dentistry uncensored I. I don't want to talk about anything everybody agrees with. You said Jim impre love hate Controversial why why what was controversial about Jim process controversial because he's simplified he exp- well did two things so I think he is simplified. The equipment is driving the dentistry and he expanded the view of the facility itself as accommodating equipment and and I think what was being missed their and that's his point in what he was looking at at the time with an architect partner. He said it doesn't work. It's not the equipment failing if acidity. That's failing he also felt that. Dare I say the dental suppliers were driving design and they weren't sensitive to the fact of clearances clearances of our economic of some of the things that we talk about fairly regularly today and Dennis appreciate today especially those that are impacting. Yourself yourself for many years you understand physical challenge of performing dentistry and so if you have a facility that's in your way or stands in the way of you being affective and efficient. It just adds to the stress and stress it adds to the stress so I can vouch that Jim Product. The first time I heard him was was right when I graduated in one thousand nine hundred seven. He was lecturing here at the Arizona. Dental society and the big hot thing was cameras and everybody was saying we had to have an insurance camera and he said you know what He goes when you talk to physicians. They don't talk about their equipment and their MRI and all this technology stuff It's it's a relationship ship and I'd I contact is shaking her hand and architecture and then when you went out to visit him what I couldn't figure I bet Jim Pride is I mean. He had a beautiful winery. It was like it was like like dentistry. Was this side Gig and winery in the. You know the whole because wine is all about marketing. It's all about branding. But yeah he was. He was an amazing raising a thinker. I right up there. Omar read another's but so so some people the diss towards everything. Jim Pride or you guys are doing doing is that. You can't build a million dollar Taj Mahal. I mean it's just too high overhead hall so million Anymore Howard. It's amount of million anymore. What is it two million now? Well it depends talk doing. Here's where we the Hudson so this is uncensored and we do this stuff. Nobody gets into well as I think. This is interesting so jim private as a trailblazer and so damn right but they created a lot of principles that actually hold whole today most of those principles in terms of flow and patient interactions are still really ballot. But what there was. There was sort of a schism I would say. So you talked about you. The GO-TO dental equipment supplier and I get five dollars floor. Plan them off run and then that's it well. There were the the dental design people there. Jim Pride Harry Demery Mike unthank- split off the designer novices name was actually part of. The design at one point. I showed up years later but all those people kind of went off on their separate ways and for many many years. They weren't odds with the dental. The dental distributors or dealers. So the shine of the ban. Costa Patterson's they were odds with them because they were selling Elliott against what the dealer was offering a design package and actually part of the way they were doing. It was within undercutting sort of equipment costs and cabinetry and custom designing dining things with knocking off things so it worked for many many years will around one technology showed up at tweak. A lot of things. So part of what pat and I in the last several years we we take a lot of I we I felt you know a lot of cry that we sort of formed a relationship. We work really hard to form a relationship with manufactured by mid mark at Healthman Crane. Leave were you know. We've had interactions all those people shine. And Patterson Ben Co Burkhart all the independence and we've actually come back towards them to try to combine good equipment. Integration you know good equipment support through the people that we're not sell equipment were designers but but to help support them enact but then mix merging with great design. Bring the two together to where we're not you know picking at each other not trying to undercut each other and really I think the the the main things were contentious were especially in the opera Tories so typical of G. Pr where you have at twelve o'clock dental cabinet uh-huh and the head of the chair and that in a typical kind of dual head entry concept. Well that thing is just a complete difficult. Won't cost on a podcast the way it's a very difficult thing to custom bill. It's really a hybrid cabinetry and equipment. So we love you know we love the mid market merging the aid Helming Crane version of twelve o'clock cabinet. That's fully integrated with Labor units. Nitrous oxide timers storage all of that stuff sterilization Shen. There's some great sterilization cabinetry systems. Mid Mart makes one atom Nadal. That's a tough thing to do. You get some crummy in custom mom and pop shop cabinetry battery a sterile. As the sterilization process will eat that in about a year. So we're very supportive of their of their interaction to project and their specific products. I I think because of the advancements technology are just essentials in a well-designed office so designer economics has their own little kind of delivery unit system. They may self self. My Gun Bank is somewhat gone away from that but pat and I are you know we take those grave design principles but we want to merge with state of the art good quality equipment Batman that has sold and installed and service and maintain by aiming our dealers are people that know how to you know how to take care of that stuff so I think I think we're actually we're actually better designers because we have a good collegial relationship with those people we learn every time we of course it's Fulla wraps everywhere. Doctors we learned something every darn project from that and the stuff of balls. I mean equipment evolves and so I would say anything's controversial. We've come that we've kind of come back back to the center with a lot of those people and like you said Harry the five dollar floor plan we try to go back and hey guys just. Don't throw this thing in a box. Let's help the doctor. Let's consult what. What are you doing with this? What is your vision for this thousand square foot space? You'RE GONNA CRAM and five ops and everybody's going to be miserable now let's take a step back and see you know how we can better assist the doctor advances visually as you said the three zero three Trailblazer Jim. You said Harry Demery Harry Dan. I the Demery D. A. R. E. E. and he trained me D. M. A. R. E.. And the other one you said was Eh David. hearn David hearn as the desire economics guy there in the northeast all right and then my gun. Thank was another T. G. so we're kind of wet slapped of the dental specialty people. Yeah and you mentioned. We lost We Lost Ken and his wife share. I still remember taking my four boys there for vacation and at one end Pallets of leather and plastic and metal beads or there was edey chairs cheers and Ken and Joyon took my four boy. I mean they were like four six eight and ten and they spent two hours with them. Walking down seventy nine nine. They were so amazing. But but again the You know I said the disc for this deal was I. Don't want to spend a million dollar charge all a lot. The people say well you know the patient can tell the difference in a deck chair and chair half the price of imported from who knows where Do what what would you say to a kid who's wants to save money on a chair. I mean I know what I would say. But what. What would you say to him? I think that condemning so the chairs the function of the charity. Earning domic's of the chair so catch the census uncensored. You know we've had all kinds. I've had that exact question posed by several class. So for example these names. They were com comparing atop the top tier amid marred. Eight eight Helton macrame top tier cheers. There's a whole middle tier citing. He got his little. Those top tier shares are channel. Two thousand dollars. Why wouldn't you know it? Looks the same to me. So he looked at a mid mid tier journals. O'Kane examine that share. You know. Tell me what you see. Well I go there expose bolts and nuts and stuff that rosser sharp things how well as at craft. It's like anything. Have you start breaking down. Well yeah it. Doesn't you know now that you said that doesn't quite. It doesn't quite look the same when I look at some of the the finer details details of. How high does it? Elevate does it have a headdress. Have Multi position so I would say some people can do fine with amid church with with a mid tier share other people. You know. They're just if they take the time to examine it. They see the bonuses. If it's like a it's like a high end car versus amid your car you get you get insomnia start okay. Well now I see this is more and I see why this is more. So I wouldn't say everybody's GonNa buy into that but a lot of people that would pursue pursue a kind of a more of a state of the art office that that's that's variant to without the patients. They're going to be sensitive to even the chair in a look. Look at that. You know that chaired looks better. Feels better. It's more comfortable has more options as better ergonomic positioning. Maybe it has a massage action and it looks cooler. You went through the eight attack thing. I mean they. They put a lot of care into that share. There's that thing where the chairs get beat up on the assembly line where they show you the cheer folds up and repositions like a thousand thousand times a day and it's still going after many many years of ending with midmarket and they're they're very proud of that plant tour. In the craftsmanship that goes into their products. So it's like the chairs is part. You know it's another piece of the puzzle of this of this office that either worse for Unit in works greater or it's you you know it's a detriment to the advancement of your career. I'll put another spin on it Howard and I guess I'll come from a design standpoint. One of the things I say over my career the air is really about design following dentistry dentistry. Following design. By that what I need is the procedures and modalities doughty's that you do and perform a dentist especially a season. Dentist nowadays is so far beyond what we were what was happening in industry. You know fifteen eighteen twenty years ago design was simple because dentistry was more simplified as. We've gotten more complicated. We've got more technology. We've got more requirement firemen for procedures. That are longer for patients sitting in that year longer periods of time with higher expectations. What that dentistry is going to that dentist will outcome? There's going to be the expectations that are going to be higher for the equipment so I think the equipment knee as a startup. Practitioner might be more simplified. Dare I say but as a seasoned practitioner more the practitioners that we work with that have been practicing for fifteen plus years. Their expectations are different. Level Oh and the expectation for the equipment is at a different level. The expectation of the facility is in a different level. As far as making a statement of quality. I would say that's the biggest thing on our side of the fence. As far as design to speak to that chasm that schism that Jeff was talking about that was in dentistry. Sorry the protein. I think that all suppliers were often taking whereas spending if they're spending money on the facility. They're not spending on equipment and that was not the equation. They were looking or and I think that's what Jim Prime was creating out there in the shake-up about balancing equipment with facility that there are needs the facility had had that were not being delivered to the dentist and away getting if you will the marketplace to how Denis should deserve and should benefit benefit from something that is very thoughtful and deliberate in design on the design side as well as the equipment side all kinds of conversations about equipment but no conversations nations about the design of the. Let's throw a chair in this room so I would say over time and has become more complicated the expectation acquitting does but I would also say that the the dental facility does as well and I would agree with you. There's a line that you can step over if you were to say Beverly Hills and we pattern experience in Beverly Hills facility expectations. How that's supposed to look they're shiny lots of blaming? and that's the expectation tation of that community of dentists. And so that's what designed delivers. But it's very different. I think in most other locations in the United States as far as what the facility will do to deliver to the dental expectations to the community expectations. That kind of thing but I think there definitely is a balanced Beyond which you don't go into design. There's I think there's a loss if you will be on your investment that you don't really Garner from the patient's this experience by spending all kinds of money beyond the need if I say that way so how are just look look at your set them staring at your set while pats talking pass I say Europe but right behind. His Barn road is at Barnard. PAT recycled way in a recycled wood looks. LS place. I'd go and have a beer be fairly comfortable last so you could be. You could be positioned in front of a stark white sheet rock wall but see you chose that shows that net has an impact on us. You know watching you how we perceive you so that was a conscious choice. Fight I think call or a backdrop I gotTA. I'd say one thing that you brought up a Harold L. Demery DDS. He passed away April twenty eight two thousand nine Just an an amazing man University of Nebraska College Dentistry graduating sixty one Born in sixty two. This guy was a while back but an amazing. I'm in my in my class. I you know we always. I always say that the smartest guy in my class was brian new worth. I mean he was just Just an amazingly brilliant I really am man. And when I visit his office and Hickory North Carolina. The first thing I noticed is the operator twice the size and some of them had couches and things that and he goes he goes. I knew I was going to be an oral surgeon in here for forty years. I don't want people coming in and stumbling over the edge of the chair and trying to sit in a chair to watch their daughter hold her hand while she gets her wisdom teeth pulled out or whatever he does so she could just walk in. Hang up your jacket in the story. Sit on a couch couch or SOFA or a chair I mean and I just thought Oh my God I mean so hit the average is about ten so he built his twenty by twenty. Ah Thinking through the experience of what it's like to have your wisdom teeth removed and be accompanied by an adult. So he didn't he didn't show up with that he said that the somebody and they they designed around it if you had a rationale if you have a rational how you want to do something designs your tool to deliver that and if it's well grounded in sort of you know in in clinical besieged and how we treat people. Usually it turns out fine. I don't want to waste a bunch of space. But you know he had. He had a specific reason. He's in purdue and that and if that's how he practices that supports him people people are. That's a reflection of how he perceives. A patient's it'd be more comfortable. I don't want I I want. I don't want like you said I don't want to trip over the J box at the toll of the cheer at the end of the procedure. MOMS in Oh get wrapped up in a billable. Corn can't get out the off-limits Admiral Apple. There's a lot of us so yeah that's a great example. Who really is your target market is? Is that the young kid coming out of school. That's been but an associate of for some data's or work at Aspen for five years start their own practice or is that really You know getting to first base the second year really more. The person who's been around the block a few times and is ready to expand into something bigger. I would say to that question Jecklin. Add to this which I'm sure he will but I would just say we seem to attract who we're attracting now are the practitioners that are more. Seasoned that are looking for actually building buildings near wanting to invest in that equity talked about that earlier on. Why dentist don't own? Oh narrow practice their facility when a lot of professionals do out there that I think is a shift. At least we're seeing and we seem to attract at dentists who who is wanting to no longer put out the lease payments and wants to invest equity into his own practice or their own practice. So that's the other side of the equation is group practices or multiple doctors building a single facility. That kind of thing but I will also say and I'm going to say to the benefit of those that have called and talked to Dr Dr Jeff Carter on the phone. We've had start up practitioners knowing nothing about design knowing nothing about the process where he'll talk to them for an hour or so on the phone. Tom Just coaching them. Whether we designed the office or not which oftentimes they're dollars are just not there for them to invest to the level that they will further into their career but just the council that we can offer someone about how to finance space what they're looking for in guidelines of square footage setting setting up at least the tone of what they are trying to do to balance what they are otherwise requiring an equipment obviously to start a practice and then what that facility will require Laron square footage to accommodate that. So I mean what would you would say that sure you can always start on. We have on the startup guy who is in his senior senior year residency Piatra resonates Ohio state at this guy had two or three little kids was finishing up his residency. And we were helping undecided opposite was moving to Texas that I got this guy has gotta be ten times smarter than heated Jiagelo one. He actually had a lot of good thoughts. I I just. It's it's a challenge for the startups because of the lending marriages you know Howard. So I don't know I know this is your show but what we liked it a little hypothetical because you said hey to build a million dollar Taj Mahal. Have you give us an opera Tori did so you said you were maybe in four thousand square feet. Let's say you're on how let's let's say you're you're thirty five. You're GONNA do your ultimate office dental opposite you've come to asking for advice. Just give give give us some like a hypothetical and start with how many ox walks. You want what I I. Actually I can do that. I WANNA spit it back the other way. you're go out to Ohio. I'd just lectured at the Ohio state dental meeting. That's where mid mark is John Q.. Bom Bom man is there you do a A really great if you go to their website and again this is not a commercial John Q.. Bomb and I've asked him to be on the show For years I don't think he knows I am. You GotTa return emails. So there's definitely not a commercial but he has a deal called. The mid market does dental design center. Impact design. And so. My question is You're a big hit out there who is showing up for these design seminars. And what are they asking. So that's the flip and coming from all over the country so even out of the country would what I what I like about. Ohio is a lot of times you know. Like I'm lecturing in Israel next week when when you go lecture and a lot of countries they think that New York New York City and Beverly Hills and key Biscayne. Those are Richfield. Ohio is just country Kansas in the middle. So you know things can work in Beverly Hills Key Biscayne in Manhattan. That do not work in Dayton Ohio. So when you see a bunch of soliciting international folks when they see see something working in the heartland they know they got a better shot at it in Cambodia and Vietnam and Indonesia than Than say Beverly Hills Calls Nine one one zero where your hair belongs on. Hold through the rest of this could blow it anytime our. ooh These people come in at first of all. How many shows do you do a year at mid mark? Well so we may average in Tanay worker ten to twelve so then how many people show up well it so it's a mix of doctors and APPS and we just did too. We had I think forty five and fifty one in Las Vegas seems to bring out people's enter one and Balaj you really you know. Sparks no opposite design interest and then one and actually Newport Rhode Island Great. So but they're they're it's an interesting process so their doctors are interested in design but they're brought there by their dealer sooner shine presentation Summer Patterson summer the in some of the independence. And then they're working partnership with mid Mark Reps but we over we've done this for seven or eight years. We have a reputation as we can help. Doctors that are stuck so doctors are pursuing soon new office but the dealer perception is they're stuck so maybe the dealer maybe Henry Shine has done fifteen floor plans and may get up you know. They can't get pass there and I don't know I just. I don't know what I'd look at the plan. I don't think that's GONNA work. I just I'm not sure that's what they want. I'm not sure that's what I want. So they come to. The course will the courses Berry interactive. So we literally will bring kind of like you try to do on this or are doing on this. We'll bring stop out of doctors in a in a group setting anymore. They'll they'll express their frustration. We had a guy all my current ops. I Hate I had my fate. You know one of my officers right by the front desk and he goes so I don't WanNa go back by the Rhonda's because Mrs Smith is checking I just had a top go around the off right. I want to run into so he'll go hide in the bathroom next to the front desk and wait for her to leave the front desk before he goes the odd. That's right next to the front density hates so no waste you know five ten minutes a twenty minutes a day hiding in the bathroom breath room by the front desk so the people at the front desk check out and get out of their students to run into him again. I mean what's that and Melanie and the guy that you know. This was like a forty five year old very successful. Missile Guy admitted in a group of like forty people that he was hiding in one of the bathrooms to dodge people at the front. We also have young people that are coming in. They're just just getting ready or they know in a year or two that they WANNA start a project but they don't know anything about design anything about the construction process and so they come to the course to learn more about about that just to get a handle on what it is about to venture into. Some of them are coming as associates. Some of them are coming having been an associate now ready to start their practice so I mean we cover range of individuals that come to that course usually there I can. I can spot kind of a designee Dr within a sentence or two. They asked up like well. I was envisioning. That's kind of warm and inviting. But I need some privacy but now has no no natural. I need more light I spill. It's claustrophobic they don't go. How much this costs you know what you know? What are you guys? Charge design off as they have a whole vision. And it's not everybody but it is a significant number of doctors. Have that sort of sensibility. So and say. It's it's driven by dealers out there the equipment specialised beschloss called the field. Sales consultants those kinds of people. On doctors do new opposite they start the normal process with the dealer but then they get stocker. It's more complicated complicated than a typical project right. So they come a lot of them. Are Ground up remodels get really tough. There's a lot of remodels where you're in the office and you add the ad on you. Add additional space. You don't have any space but you tear up the office while you're in there trying to practice. Those are very difficult as a very complicated very difficult. There's a thing called called phasing. How you kind of work through things like that but one of the things? We feel that we want to be able to do as you know. We do a handful of projects every year. Maybe ten to fifteen. There's so many doctors out there several pursuing things that they're actually never gonNA pull off because the parameters are so far off so you'll have people looking at property property thinking maybe their vision. I want to build a ground up ten arbitrary office so and they're pursuing a lot. That's maybe less than half an acre. They think suspend a million dollars. They have no chance of poll up but nobody will tell on that. Because they don't WanNa they don't have the troops an emmy Taco contract. You probably do yellowish Sablan. Someday when you get there they may have a commercial broker. Selma piece of property with big setbacks utility easement run across and not enough space as the site this building but they don't know they don't know the specifics of dental so we like to head off things we think. There's just no way you know you're not. You're whatever never busy you have is not going to fit on this piece of property and it's not gonNA fit within the budget you you have so that's just hypothetically there's there's rules of thumb weaken coach people in a few minutes. We have project specifics and at least give them a fighting chance of pulling off. Whatever it is? They're envisioning and not spending years to to get to the end of the road fat guy. I just spent one hundred thousand design in my building malt fit on this piece of property that I bought five years ago. I should've I should've done some due. You D legance. I should've had somebody with gentle. Specially design expertise. Look at that side lantern building layout parking show-me access from the street all that but all of those kinds blames the biggest thing is giving them tools to assess the best project for themselves Someti- and the reality is many of them. Don't have the Mayor Marty went. Why would they haven't built an office abir or are? They haven't built an office in many years. So we're there to provide updated information so that they am step into this project is wide wide wide open very informed about the project that they're doing and they have a realistic budget neighbor realistic concept for the product. They're endeavoring to do. And there's a lot of relief by payback. Comes to them about going to this course and feeling like okay on the right track or the track was on. Wasn't going to get me where I needed to go but now I know what I need to do to make this thing happened so do you. I I WANNA go back earlier. the last you know when you look at Franchises like McDonalds where they have forty thousand locations. They have a budget where they intentionally redesign all their locations every seven years so seven times twelve is what. What is that m eighty four? So they put away a little money every month and then at seven years they they redo it so when you walk into any McDonald's in the world it's anywhere from looking brand. Dan New the best to seven years to worse and you go into dental offices. Were some guy will put in this rock and hot dental offices in twenty years later. You're like dude the Japan and the fog light and the You know is not blend and for my office. I couldn't get everybody who had been with me ten twenty thirty years to agree so we actually flew out to San Diego to the Benko facility and having everybody in that room at the same in time. What was most important to me? which is that? We got the decision. Done you know three hours in that building where we were done whereas before you know it kept getting the decision couldn't get made because that's so getting your team all in one place you're doing it you know you're you're doing it in Ohio and Vegas all over the they vary just every year they pick different venues so about a third or and in actually for Sales Ohio and the others are out in the field and Canada. We've done we didn't want to New York. City is interesting that the northeast and sort of Atop Ako Las Vegas Casse just depend work with all the dealers Aiglon. Benko Patterson Shine Burkhart. So we've done not as much with Benko we've had over the years we've had interactions with everybody. We spent a lot of time with shot Konate Benko. He's actually been in the office right here on came and visited us so the the mid mark impact is mostly shine in some patterson on occasion of Burkhard. Yeah the independence that choice. As far as how they participate at to what degree participant actually the the former head of the dental division of mid market is now the president of Patterson Eric Shirley's he actually is. He's from Effingham isn't he. He's from Orange from Elsa Gun. No Manhattan Beach California. He started there and he it was a catcher in Long Beach Stadium. It's a catcher. Tony was at mid-march many years. He's had a lengthy Now be just within the last year it came on as president of Patterson so we're hoping to advance at relationship I love. I Love Chuck Chuck Cohen Had Been Co.. I mean he's he's He's been such a mentor die but my original mentor was Actually Pete for Shat Patterson because my older Lou sister Is She in her none. or She's a Catholic nun in Lake Elmo. So every time I go to visit her I need to do some business for four hours and one minute so I either either go to Patterson and next to P for shot or. I'd go to three. AM and So I'd buy them but man when I go to Patterson I'd walk other I say gotTa kill for one minute. He was good. Just just follow me around my meetings because it'll be good to have a young dentist perspective and these meetings just he he was. He was so such so incredible of a man but anyway so now Eric Shirley's down there and all I can say late Eric. Shirley is Ma'am with P.. For so you got some big shoes but anyway So what advice would you give right now to someone who's like Oh I hate my facility but I'm I take a lot of PPO's I mean you know what advice would you give them your ideal cut. Who's listening to you right now? On the hour commute to work I hope hope Garnier commuter hope you're not one of the guys on the treadmill or stairmaster But if you're on that stairmaster just just get off and go have a beer beer here. You're not going to live any longer. But who's listening to you right now. That needs to take a next. Who's your ideal dentists listening to right? Now what we hope. It's a dentist the vision to change the circumstances they're in their current facility. Something about facility doesn't work many things probably don't work for them Eh as driving and to do something else but they're not sure what to do so that that's really who we want you know so somebody that has had some experience you know. Maybe they're starting to build up a prakash because they're seeing the limitations of facility so we want to know what is that vision so like you said that. Maybe it's OK well. My production has plateaued at the end of the day. Were exhausted. Austin my productions plateaued but we can't bring in any more patients because we're maxed out. We got four chairs hygiene is booked eight or nine months out. People get there. There's a new A lot of times. What motivates? There's a new office down. The street is the kids right at school. makes our office look bad. We gotta do something to compete. It's actually a lot of times. It's that more than anything to peer pressure. Knowing that you're not keeping up just like you said how people will invest twenty years ago and a great dental office and not doc touch. It won't even flip the pillow around in the waiting room twenty years you know. I don't really understand that but I think that is definitely because I would say the number one thing we hear often is. It doesn't look like the dentistry. I'm doing today. My oth- doesn't look like the dentistry. I'm doing today. I go in there and I even challenged Dennis. They leave the course. I said. Go back the person you do. You walk up front door and put your patient hat on and you start looking at it if you've got clatter if it looks tired and all get rid of it or fix it because all of those things are accused about what you're doing a dentist whether you choose to believe that or not and then I would also just say we find that. We're a lot of dentists we think. Oh I can't do this. There's no way I can do this. I can't change. I can't remodel. I can't do a new building. I you you'd be surprised at the abilities. Thanks to the lending Environment and especially now be surprised. How many dentists are actually in in a position if they would take it up to do something about it was not encouraging? My pet peeve is you know I I don't and I'm only known for a few things one is I'm the only person on earth who listen to all thirteen hundred of the Howard. Dentistry uncensored podcast. No one else has done And I think I've had a I drink more beer with more dentists in Arizona than anyone I don't know who has shaw had more But the thing is every single time I've ever walked into a dental office. I mean is write it down and and I'm talking to my team. They're like okay. Tell me what happened. You got it there but every time you go to a dental office the dentist is in their private office waiting because surely is dismissing patient. Then she's got to clean up the room uh-huh and set the next and I'm like okay doc you know the ADA says average sixty five percent overhead. So you're thirty five percent of the cost what you're one third of the cost. What what are you doing? I'm waiting on a chair after after you. Thirty five percents. Labor's twenty twenty five labs eight to ten supplies Blaz four to six. I mean we don't even get down to opera Tories until we were after the electric bill and then like I don't have room for an arbitrary. Well where you're sitting is operatives Tori. I mean superman were out of the damn phone booth Whitey. You if you work in Superman leads a phone booth and I can put an auditory in. Your chair are the same way. I don't have room to expand. Oh yeah because you're renting so you're letting a landlords Key concerned trump your entire existence and purpose opus. Because you decided to be a renter for forty years in the same location as opposed to be an owner. Oh but you decide to own your own three thousand square foot home. I mean no. You don't leave your car even own your car but you write your nose so all I can say is when I look at the income that people make a lot of people Shortchange change the the specialist. They say oh well Orel surgeons and ended on us you know they. They get more money for their procedure. You know it's multi variant but we look at the fact that oral surgeons make the most money at four forty eight Perry non US exit three thirty ended on US next two three zero seven. The one thing they the specialist all have in common. Tom is about eighty percent of their referrals. Comes from about five offices and twenty percent of the referrals. Come from about another twenty offices and when they're one or five referrals calls up and says hey dude. I got a patient with a toothache. Can you squeeze them in. That ended. Honest is not going to say no because they don't want you to find another in an office because he knows you don't do any molar Endo's in their thousand bucks a piece so every Perry on US oral surgeon I know they all have one one or two extra opera tores that are never scheduled and then you go into any dental office and you say well what. What is your big problem on income? Well you know I've plateaued. I've been collecting the same amount of money every month last year. Yeah that's because if I call your office right now and say I broke my tooth. Can I come in. The first thing you do is is start looking for a chair. Share your constraint is a stupid chair and the specialist that's not the constraint that constraint is win can you come down here to catch the fish. I might not do the root canal now but I'll give you some antibiotics or pain or have you bike it in or just straight heroin or whatever it is you need and then and every dental office the dentist is sitting in their Pretoria all day long waiting on a chair. The receptionist can't get anybody to come in right now when people come in and say you know. I got a toothache. Well we're we're the corner. Forty Elliott right next to save way. When can you be here? We don't start looking for so so so you don't have an opera story. That was not empty. Never used at least every other day. Then you need another opportunity and if you think there's another constraint in your life that you need to go to the Pinky and soon learned tm J.. Or you need to buy a laser cad cam look. I'm on the phone tooth broke. I need a crown. And you're you're looking for a chair. You should never be looking for a chair. You should have so many damn chairs that have a homeless guy came by and say can I just live in that room. We say yeah. Because because I haven't had a patient in there a year so you add offertory until they're never used again they That that's my rant. So my whole whole deal is i. Don't care what the design is. I just WANNA come sit in a chair. I don't care if it's a lawn chair and and you're holding a law of the land you know and I need Tair. We would call that up LAXA. We want everybody to have an overflow flexible. So they're not just crazy trying to get people Ramaz. Must we and we challenged Dennis on the number of their count. If you will of Opera Tories what are you win now. What are you proposing to in this new chain whether it's remodel or new building there whatever and what's the rationale or because what we're looking for is exactly what you're talking about is that do you have women? Hurry that term. How how am I The same age you guys never heard of a flexible Tories. An Ohio word or is that really into this all the time. I don't know how do you thank you Texas. Yeah of all places. Just outside of Austin does that give us a little way right there. Four four out of five of my grandchildren learn living bevill Texas. We're beaver. Its downward by Texas bye bye. Mike Corpus Christi. We know where that three hours from here. And that way so you agree. Agree that if If that opera Tori is your constraint and that's going to blow out your overhead that's can bruhns efficiency of your staff. I mean sometimes the what I love is you know you work through launch a squeeze it emergency and it's at the end of the day and the whole office looks like a tornado just made out with a hurricane and I can go home. Everybody was seen. I mean I. I assume that dental assistants were there till midnight. Yeah Yeah we we got everything done so so if if someone goes to again I was super impressed by the the website mid Mark Dot Com dental design center impact design Zayn. They have design center. They have architectural resources designed tools impact designed seminar. So if someone's one's thinking about that next level can they go to the website and do that. Should they go to the horse. What would be the next step for them? You can go to the website and they. They have a registration capability. There you can register your interest in that You can talk to your dental supply partner. Assuming that you've got a partnership with a with with a donald supplier and just say. Hey I want to do this course. Tell me I need to get registered. So you're saying it was their dealer. Now you're saying it's our dental supply rap dealer delek dealer thing Shine Patterson Ben Goldberg Arnold those dealer from college the the new dental I the Las Vegas one what I wish you guys would do. Is we put up. Four hundred one hour online see Acorss Donald Town and they've been viewed a million times. I I wish you would make a course of an online course dental time because it's kind of a You know they saw you for an hour and met you and got your chemistry and all that that would make it easier to make the next move of going to Ohio or Las Vegas. It kind of deconstruct sells sells process. Because I really wanted to make a good decision and my my main purpose is that this is another bias. I've seen so my entire life. Whatever for a dentist designs five years later they all regret it not being bigger? I've never heard anyone say five years later. I wish I would have made it smaller. They always say say God. Instead of four officers on six six eight eight says twelve is that I wanna good high-quality decisions do do you. What would percent a dentist you think at sixty months after a new office regret that it's too small of course wrestling? We always have to the one with the ones that coming one anyway. Just the industry I would say typically ours. Don't aw but you know part of it Howard as you you know you give it your best shot so five years ago you give it your best shot number Bob size of Zili and it's really. They're all budget driven at some point. A number is going to determine a lot of what you can do so we actually just had some guys in Abilene three three years. They slapped on an additional four ox. Beginning we went from fourteen to eighteen because they started to get cash ready. Get in. They're going to be completely maxed out like a year so they had enough force also because there's three of negative for the budget aged lead going from fourteen to eighty hour. Say We've never specifically got got matt feedback and anybody. That was highly concerned. You know. Well you know this is a big. So here's here's a typical scenario single doctor. They want to build aid ops. They don't have an associate or a partner but they had been growing practice they had visions of bringing them on on. You know with them and they there and it's a struggle for like a single doctor presenting building up grabbed eight up ground up building. So maybe they'll they'll they'll will complete four or five ops dry box the other three. They won't complete part of the insight and now get all that up and running and then two or three years they may bring on an associate. Oh see that may go grain turn into a par then also they max out that aid off slowly so we have conversations about that. Somebody's highly concerned. That goes back to Picking a piece of property. So let's say the original opposite camps shooting for eight odds but who knows in on. I'm in my thirties. It's weakened tell we've worked with some great kind of high profile practitioners. We can usually tell who's going to build up a big booming practice based on their personality how they interact with revisionist while they're highly concerned. Let's let's get a little bit bigger piece of property. WE'RE GONNA Master Plan and ate up billy that if you ever outgrew it so we're going to be able to add on former odds it's GonNa flow right into conditional four obstacle ever get to that point knowing can project. Now you know make Kostas in five years. We don't know it's going to be more. Hypothetically you could could expand this facility from eight to twelve ops so he went sort of a safety valve fallback position. Sometimes you're just land lot. Sometimes it doctors on a piece of property for ten in years. Five years doesn't matter what we do. We're not gonNA ever get more than three thousand square foot building on there and we got to know that okay. You know. Three Thousand Scorpio. Maybe we can get a good six or seven in office. You're never going to go past you know. Is that going to work for you for the rest of your career and sometimes people have actually sold land and move somewhere else but you know that that is a good point. You've got you know what what what are you envision now but what is your. What is your ultimate vision future and many doctors? It's a single doctor. I love to have two or three associates at turn into partners were. I'm spending a course time managing this practice or maybe spin up another breath. I don't WanNA partner at all ars. It's not who I am. I don't WanNa be unroll or skates I mean. Tell the truth about who you are a dentist in it and I think that is a lot of immed- back to your question earlier on knowing who you are as a dentist telling yourself the truth and then telling the designer here's who I am as a dentist. This is how I like to practice. This is where I wanna take my career career. I need a facility that supports me. In that way you talked about that URL surgeon. There was a reason why what he knew what he wanted as an oral surgeon when he he wanted providers patients there was a rationale design should have a rationale and it should be backed by hopefully some level of experience and some level of truth telling I call all it is a dentist. Who are you? I mean we have no judgment here about who you need to be there Dennis. Sometimes I think it's unfortunate that feel like they have to have a certain number raw us or somehow they haven't accomplished what they need to accomplish or I have to be a part of a group or should be doing this or I should be doing as and why I I mean if you're really good and this is who you are and you can provide that service to patients beyond anybody else in the area. I think that's I think that's the way I just always always be true to yourself. I mean there's eight billion people on Earth. You weren't born to live someone else's life and to say that old when people who say described the average dentist yes well you can't describe the average as hell you says that my neighbor's house has a full grown rottweiler. And it's afraid of the cat. I mean I mean whoever emmy emme no one would ever say a rottweiler afraid of a cat I mean my gosh. Everyone's different just be true to yourself but I got two more specifics. Because I can't believe we. We already went over an hour but to other questions. What would you say to somebody? Says you know the only thing I'm really interested in is I want to fix this up for when I sell my practice to some day and another another people are saying well you know now that Dso's APP through mergers and acquisitions of snapped up about twelve percent of the dental office The the dicey on supplies. DSO's Irvine about eighteen percent of supplies at a twelve percent of the locations. A lot of people are hearing things that. DSO's aren't interested in your. They gotta be at least a certain size for their business model so two questions. What if what what would make me? What would help me fix up my office so I can sell it someday and number two? What do I have to make in size? The number of ops so that I have a liquidity did he play with. DSO's couple basis. We'd spiffing up your office so you can. You can salad. Alydar create some kind of transition strategy. So it's like you said earlier. Howard we see doctors will come to us? They've been in there up twenty thirty years. It looks like it's from the seventies or the eighties wood. paneling horrible old outdated. Well no really old outdated equipment making fun of the Brady Bunch. Seen No with the home and garden television they read. They redid the Brady Bunch House and he watched that took like toys. It's so it's so you know you have to okay. Who are you going to sell it to somebody? Right out of school is gonNA walk in there. There's no way in the world. They can ever envision themselves else in that space. I'm not going to spend eight hours forty hours a week in the space so you have to try to create something that has some appeal to actually the the new end user. The Person GonNA sell her transition too so that can look a lot of different ways. Sometimes it's equipment. Sometimes you got an update the equipment and you just have old outdated. What's interesting interesting is beginning to deliver units and stuff like that but the ergonomics of how people are trained in dental school now so almost all dental schools have what they call kind of splint delivery where the doctors module is in front of? You could be on a car could be on a swing arm. Attaches to the chair will some back in the seventies eighties. We did a lot of what they call dual function rear deliberate where the Doctors Ham pieces and the assistance module were directly behind you and some of the even older units there one hundred percent the X. You can't move around with their next to impossible if you're not used to work in that it's really difficult for you to adapt to that. So one is look at the equipment have any technology do I have any kind of technology overlay over an office. It was probably designed twenty or thirty years ago so it has to be some level technology. 'CAUSE people right out of school are very tech Tech Savvy. Sometimes it trans. You GotTa have a few monitors and a couple of computers laying around doing something to entice somebody and then what does it look like. You know like you said at retail every every seven years of McDonald's spiff up something that can be finishes paint. You know new new stuff on the exterior. You've got a spiff up the finishes it can't be so so dated looking than it just looks like you're moving in with their grandparents. You know you have to take it to level and it can be budget driven you can back. In or doctors to K- I WANNA transition transition. I WANNA sell this in the next five years and I'm willing to spend a hundred thousand dollars to spend two hundred thousand dollars. I wanted to spend thirty thousand dollars. Get realistic from what budget it makes sense for you and then you can back into what's possible at that you don't need somebody. Tell me Oh you need to do this and spend five hundred thousand dollars. You'll never sell it no you. You have. Every every right to make a budget determination what makes sense to you to invest an APP so to say you've got to be sensitive and are most older. Dennis have children or you know nieces or nappies. They understand kind of what a younger person has attracted to experience wise in a space and trying to translate that back to your office and at least bring it up to a level level where they can get in there some comfortable and then make it make it there in a year or two after they can make it. They're all making basser money. And but you gotta you gotTa have the bones or the the core of a decent functioning office that can be developed over time. You GotTa do you mostly do family practice general dental offices already already doing either specialist. You do everything we've done asking. We've got a lot of special just because sometimes it's hard the dealers that the dealer designed people they don't do as much as we'd done a lot of oral surgery two or a ton of orange. We don't do a lot of Endo for some reason and that at that they're Simpler offices but of all the special do a lot of pita pediatric is really interesting because of and well actually I when we're done with this driving deaths attacks us to do a site visit visit on a on a twelve year. Six Thousand Square with big smiles ranch is really gonna be something that's nationally but you know there's something I I would say when to your question that we're seeing the GP's bringing or possibility that will allow her neurosurgeon to come in or an orthodontist to come in or period honest to come in that may not otherwise be available in the area and now they get to the one-stop shop. I think it's sourced a little bit by a competition with the DSL. It might provide all services to you know everybody. This is their version of that and so when they come to US or Afghan okay. I'm going to be the the primary caregiver in this facility but I wanna have an oral surgeon come in once a month or twice a month what do I need to provide that all surgeon in this facility to to attract them to this facility so I think to say that is another thing. We're starting to see in the marketplace which makes a lot of sense to us amid expands your availability ability to the community expand the marketplace for the specialist. Who may not want to build a building in poughkeepsie Mississippi? But I'll go there because it's thirty miles else. Outside of where I live on oily drives Sata town. That's not I made that up but you get my drift so it is just to say that I think that's pretty smart for GP's as well. Well you said something extremely profound and that is you know the retail. The business is the model for over two centuries for all of America's existence as you go back to the early eighteen hundreds of New York City. You know you had this small little shop stop and everybody lived above it and the next generation. They rented two shops. Put them together and put the one shoppers out of business and kept getting bigger and bigger and bigger until it Max all all the way for Walgreens and Home Depot Kia. They're all these two hundred fifty thousand square foot centers. One Stop Shop before Walmart admitted they they got too big and now that was scaring people away so they served closing down facilities in their backing off from that size and that retails not GonNa Change You. Keep seeing in where I you had pediatric Denison orthodontist and then those two were like peanut butter and chocolate and they combined and now mom's like well. I'm going to go to this pediatric office. Because 'cause they have an orthodontist and the one stop shop is going to rule dentistry for the next one hundred years because it's ruled world retail we. We've seen it completely plan retail. I'm sold when I started lecturing down under in Sydney when I've gone down there every five years on the tour of Melbourne Sydney Adelaide Perth Gold Coast and jump over and do Auckland New Zealand on the way back but when I started doing Sydney in one thousand nine hundred ninety I mean here I am staying at a Dennis House and we had to go here for the meat at the butcher than here to the Bradman than here the Veggie shop and I'm like well. Where is your grocery she store that has all those departments of one place and at that time? They didn't even have hygienist our hygiene school. So you can literally go back in time came when I went down there in nineteen ninety. You were going back in time in retail now. Now it's all caught up and how they have to publicly traded. DSO's at America doesn't have but the bottom line is mom. And when I asked the dentist or you focus on the dentist. Is this all about your you. Dentists centric Customer Patient Nations Center. I'm I'm definitely patient centric. Oh really so. Your hours are Monday through Thursday. Eight to five and the Federal Reserve has thirty two hundred full-time impeached economists. And they say one third of America cannot see a healthcare provider. Monday through Friday eight to five so by intentional design. You just told one third of America. You're not when you have a question you always have to refer to another office. I'm so these. DSO's love him or hate him if they get the retail right if they get the one stop shop right So so I I tell us. I'm in on Saturday coming Ascoli at half a million dollars in student student loans because he went to a private dental school in a three year deal and then he married some woman who had the same thing so now combine there like one and a half million dollars dollars in debt you know combined and I said well why are you going to go buy land and building. Startup ended on his foreign. She'd go find the five biggest practices in town and go do all their endo and split it fifty fifty. You have no overhead. No no you know all that so so. When you're talking about this flexible I I do see the future? Being a specialty opera Tori were specialists rotate through to provide one-stop shop. Do you do you agree without is out. Exactly what we're saying but I'm GonNa just and this has been burning in me since we started talking about the off and adding the and one of the things I say and I mean in his very sincerely the way dental office has had failed as a facility is the notion that I can just give up. My doctor's office put in a chair. Give up my staff. Lange put in Pitcher in all of that works on the production side but what was not happening was any consideration of what was happening in the Waiting Area. The front desk area. And then you started hearing all these Upsets about the bottleneck at the front desk. So I have more patients coming in because I got more chairs more availability but I didn't accommodate eight that increase in production and the front areas of the office. So what we try to impress upon dentists and design is dull build such that the the production can increase increase without understanding. It's going to have an impact on the front part of the office. So to your point it is to say. Bringing in the end donnas raking in the period honest the oral surgeon urging whomever they have some uniqueness in even on the transaction side consultation rooms or exam with consultation that they may Bana fit from. And so what are those other aspects. Besides not count of cheers that will facilitate that ability to bring in those kinds of patients nations on those days or or even expand your hours in the facility so that you can allow for that as well so I I think I think the breaker it was so important. it's got to and our office had done something really neat. They play this game where they They named food or something. Like I'll go in there and I'll be eating a a ham sandwiches said Karen on it. I game a game. They play. I'm last one last question for you. Go when I got out of school and eighty seven the biggest guru in practice manuals Omar read and Jim you mentioned are but the more read. You always talk about front desk looseness. He wanted a the front desk. And you just said bottleneck at the front so I know I can hear his words thirty years ago there while you can have a front desk. So what would you say this only said. Hey what do you think about front desk closeness through that time and we would personal doctor. They're trying to get rid of the front desk. And then we talk through the rationale king. So how are we going to replace apprentice. We're going to do everything in the we're GONNA have a credit card. Swipe irs in the odds attached to the charity. Go you know and it always broke down and conversation. We Probably Fifteen twenty times based on Omah read saying that had a doctor's that went in into design and we started with no front desk and slowly over time. We just put it all back in. We just went right-back. Same kind of design principles today Harris. Well they're the hygienist agents second reappointing their own rooms they never do. They actually need to get out of there. So we they have hygiene assistant was a breakdown room. Clean it get another patient there. It's more efficient. The hygienist goes to a hygiene support me reappoints at patient versus maybe go to the front desk turnover the room but it's all part of the experience with now now we I mean we feel actually even more strongly about the front desk over time even with all the technology were still the thing. That's maybe change over time as we. We partition sort of checkout area. So there's more privacy so we would say in today's environment you can't. You can't introduce too much privacy now back maybe the seventies and eighties. Everything was open a wear jeans and everybody. Here's everything out genes with bell-bottoms. Everybody everything everybody says. Will you know people are just much more sensitive now and they. They expect some level of privacy but yet all of that that lasted for a while it just it never. It never took hold. I would then as you know. percent design follows dentistry dentistry. Procedures are much more expansive. It's not ten dollars at the front desk check for. I'm writing much bigger. Check some investing much. It's more dollar wise. I need to have a lot more education understanding of what you're doing because I've never had a root canal. I don't know what is what I don't know about been in years. I need to understand more about that. My Gosh I'm GonNa Spend Two thousand twenty five thousand dollars. I need an education experience. I need to be able to do it private. I need to tell you why I'm afraid whether there I can afford it or not etcetera etcetera so we have our patients commit to their dental health which we do and we have all these things that we can do beyond what we used is to be only do fifteen twenty years ago. There it'll be pleasing alka without a lot of pain. We need a facility that will accommodate those adjustments. Smits if you will and I. I just emphasize the Front area of the office helps feed production of those opportunities. So the Opera Tories our turnover if I can say I don't. I don't mean like McDonald's hamburger but there's a turnover ratio that we wanna see happening and those stories and we don't want patients sitting there occupying achier through a transaction process process or through a lengthy education process or a lengthy diagnostic process. There might be other spaces that can prove more beneficial to you. What are those and so I think what I hope you're hearing in this? It takes a lot of discussion with any practitioner. What is it that you do? How do you bring patients in? What are you providing being in service when he wish you were providing service? Do those patients let speak of. Let's create a facility. That's going to do that for you. And it's not about spending being money on Taj Mahal things it's about function and it's about delivering to the production ore to the procedures and to the community that you're trying to sir so I know there's one hundred ways to do everything and But you've done. I mean three thousand offices the big question is should. Did you have a treatment plan presentation room or should you do in the story where you have the Radi grass pulled up and all the stuff what would you you say At all your experience doing this for three thousand offices do they need treatment plan presentation room or is that just this is easily done chair side. Well the answer is yes and yes. So there's going to be obviously when we say we definitely recommend a consultation row of some some sort or treatment presentation room and then we have a conversation about what you need in a treatment presentation around how many people would be at any one time in that treatment presentation room and we you would design it as such but when we say that oftentimes Danis will go well. I- I present treatment in the story. Of course you do. That's where the opportunity presented sell. Obviously we're not eliminating that as anything that would go away because we have a consultation but I want my teeth straightened. I want my teeth white. I they have things that are beyond a conversation that I might have in my hygiene appointment today and I'm really serious about that was going to be involved with that. You need to educate we need to understand how I'M GONNA pay for but I want to have it done and those are the situations where we say treatment to opportunities that are for more expansive can be presented very well in a tweet. Myspace plan that way. The other thing that we're seeing in GP practices at Ruby uses intake. Area I'm a new My Best Friend Veronica says I need to go see Howard and here I am. I'm your new patient and I've had some kind of history that you I know nothing about but you can take me into that treatment area. Introduce yourself it could be the financial coordinator. Does this treatment coordinator does this to explain. This is is what we're committing to here in this practice to use a patient. What are your goals what you want to accomplish? What are the things that made you wanted to do that? You haven't had the interest ESPN or the opportunity to do. Let us see what we can do to facilitate those in your endeavor and treatment. Presentation Room can do that. Really go on record so so hard. So your highest producing per hour specialist is an oral surgeon. Correct yes or all oral surgeons have console rooms. They have exam console console awesome with a dental chair that they would never bring someone into there may surgical op and explain to them. What an implant extraction for wisdom teeth so many? GP's can take that as an example. You know your present complex. You know high costly tweet. Minutes talked to do an an opportunity. You know it's much better. It's much better and constellation of a different setting. Are One hour interview is now at a hour and a half but I just want to say that I still think. First Impressions are setting lead. They come in. They see your facility for thirty two years. I've had pee th. They don't know what a stat him. STERILIZER is. But you know many old ladies told. Yeah well you know. I mean. They're waiting room and they got dust all over their dust boards they lamey backing. There's water stains and I don't want to you know I don't even think that place was filthy and and then another thing is what we've always done is when they come in. It's their first impression. Will if if you guys don't do this but I know girls do. If a girl goes over to some other other girls house for the first time. That girl will always give them a tour of their house if I went over and visit Jeff I don't really WanNa see his closet and I really. Yeah but I know. It's no thing but every single new patient when they come in for the first time they give him the walk through the and so there's a hygienist us oh there's amy there's brandy there you know and our scenario and then they bring him in that new patient. Are The treatment plan presentation consultation room whatever and then I want to go on there and take and go in there and look at them standing up shake their hand and then sit down and that person per se so Jeff Pat. White White did did you. Did you just move to Phoenix. Congratulations to move for ten years. So you haven't been to the dentist for ten years or is that no I you know. I'm changing gene. And you you get that initial relationship and it's all about trust because if I tell you need four Modibo that they they don't know if you knew what Modem owed any of this stuff they have to see a team of facility and I also like name badges how long you've been here. Because when they see that the lady who shook their dawn has been at the front desk for two decades. And and and you know everybody's been there a decade plus than they searching trust and you're selling the invisible they need to see a facility. They need to see long-term staff. They need to see eye contact. I need the Dennis available and then I always give my card. It's got my office number my cell phone number my personal email number and say hey you know you ever have a problem. The BUCK STOPS CBS here. And you know there's myself number and only women never man will call me call that number while they're still in the office because because they they just know it's going to be you know some it's not going to be my cell phone and then all of a sudden you know your phone's ringing in your pocket and you pick it up and then you find out. Yeah yeah she's sitting right there really your cell phone number But Hey on that note. Thank you so much for all that you guys do for dentistry and to try to get. I'm trying to get the the John Q.. Bahman off the next summer. They're our kids. Liked the late podcast. They like an hour online. See and they don't Wanna fly across the country before they exhausted. Did you see at least seen what you're about on Youtube are on. I see but yeah doing online. See Course and get John on the show and I thank you so much for all that you do for dentistry coming on the show today thank you. We really appreciate you. Now you can go gloat the arrested about Clemson. We gotTA DRIVE DESA A I'll go out during it have a great day

Jeff Dennis Pat Howard Dr Jim Pride Costa Patterson Beverly Hills Ohio Ohio Dr Dr Jeff Carter Patterson Eric Shirley Jim Pride Harry Demery Mike un Taj Mahal VP Pat Carter Israel ADA Dr Jeff Carter Arizona Colorado State University
BTM171: Escape the High Wage Earning Trap with Dr. Jeff Anzalone

Before the Millions

1:02:17 hr | Last month

BTM171: Escape the High Wage Earning Trap with Dr. Jeff Anzalone

"What is going on the people before we get into the episode I just WanNa, extend a personal invitation from me to you to come in join me on my brand new live masterclass. So as many of you know I've been investing in real estate since the day I became an entrepreneur. Growing my passive income to replace my job enlist in two years and owning or being part of deals ranging up to forty million dollars and personally coached over seven hundred students over the past four years over time period I've discovered the exact things that differentiate the wildly successful investors from most investors the ones that struggle that never get deals done that continue to stay at the starting line. So this brand new masterclass that I'm inviting you to over at before the millions dot com slash masterclass is really a culmination of everything I've learned. Up until this stage from starting to managing and growing passive and active income through real estate. So if you're still committed to making twenty twenty the year that you finally start in growing profitable real estate business, then I'm absolutely excited to invite you to this masterclass and help you potentially shortened that learning curve and become thriving investor faster and more profitable. If this is something that interests you head over to before the million dot com for slash masterclass. Seats are limited to one hundred and fifty people, and this is a live masterclass, and at the time of this recording, we just have to dates left on the calendar before this masterclass goes into the vault for good. So if you're interested in learning two of the most profitable strategies and real estate today, the key shift that disconnect your time from your income, the highest convergent approach to closing deals with the motivated tellers and the single most effective way to become a state investor in the historic twenty twenty. Two before millions dot com for slash masterclass. Now is getting to the show. Are you ready to be the master architect of Your Life? Are you ready to design your business and invest in needs that commute the lifestyle you've always? To, are you ready to learn from entrepreneurs and millionaires who have achieved a certain level of success? Hey, this is Derek Location Independent Entrepreneur, and you're listening to the before the millions podcasts. I am Gina Lofton I'm an investor and you're listening to the before the millions podcast. Hey, there my name is heather. Haven would marketing coach and Global Entrepreneur, and you are listening to the before the. PODCAST. Hey, this is mark with the host of the seven minute momentum podcast global entrepreneur, all round Geek and you listen to the before the millions podcast I am see lobster the cash linenger and you're listening to before the millions spot cost you're listening to the before the millions font cast a whether you're looking to invest more cash flow. All built an online business that allows you to be location independent you come to the right place Mr Hollywood. Himself presents the before the millions podcast. Now your host Diriye. going. On that people. Welcome Twain, brand new instalment installment one, seven, one of the BTM before the millions podcast welcome to the tribe I'm excited for this episode as I am excited for every single episode. But for every single episode I have a very different reason for my excitement. For this particular episode, it takes a look at the American dream and let me not call it an American dream. Let me call it an American reality. And? Although it may seem as though, this episode is geared towards high wage earners, which primarily is and you'll learn as a high wage earner what other high wage earners specifically Dr. Jeff on this episode is doing to invest his money and create passive income, but this episode is really for any and everybody who is Creating of income through their w two corporate job or they're professional job or Any way they see and. No matter how much money you may career you're making sixty grand a year or half a million dollars a year. You somehow find yourself. Tired. Worn. Ou- broke. Frustrated wanting to make more. As making more is going to alleviate you from all your troubles in your pain and I've went through this. Dr. Jeff Anzalone on this show has went through this and we're GonNa talk about some of his realizations throughout his process. Some of financial hurdles he's had to face what he's done to overcome them his roadmap to getting out of debt. and. Then once he got of that, he completely changed his philosophy because financial philosophy. And spearheaded a new philosophy to create passive income in addition to his active in Dr, Poe so pay close attention to this episode. Again, we're not giving financial advice but ultimately, if you can grab one or two nuggets in his financial plan that helps you take yours to the next level then we've done our jobs but by no means, should you participate or not participate in any offerings based on any of these episodes to your own due diligence and seek expert guidance? To raise tip of the week. So the other day, I was live inside of our facebook group for the maintenance tribe and. I mentioned three tips to help real estate investors take their business to six figures and beyond. And I wanted to share those with you here. Just in case you guys having get joined the group. Has If you're a budding entrepreneur and you're looking to take things to the next level here in two thousand twenty and beyond these tips will help you do that. In fact, I'm going to cover these tips in detail on my brand new masterclass that should already be signed up for but if you're not head over to before the millions dot com for slash masterclass. But tip number one to take your real estate business to from where it is. Now two six figures do not take these tips. Slightly number one is mindset you may be like, oh. Yeah I. Know that. Let's get to the good stuff weight. Because without this, you will not make it. There's an adage that I absolutely live by. Your Business is only a reflection of yourself. And until. You can work on yourself and improve yourself. Your Business has very little chance of improvement. So if you're a season subscriber, then you know how much mindset work we put into the content for these episodes. So I'm not going to be Labor that here but mindset is absolutely number one. You have to believe that you are six or seven figure entrepreneur. You have to believe that you are six or seven figure an investor. And then you have to take the actions in accordance with that belief. Systems, you can buy that. You can purchase that you can google and youtube that anywhere. But people don't make million dollar businesses just by Youtube in the system. You have to first start with that mindset and then do what it takes to get their. Number to build your team. This is absolutely imperative, build your team and many of us as. I mean the definition almost of an entrepreneur like we know what to be is just like the solo person working in a basement. Many. Entrepreneurs are a one man band where one woman band. And that's okay. I still operate my business primarily as a one man show. But what you have to understand is to get to the next level right. I'm trying to get you guys to six figures. To get to the next level, you can't do it by yourself. Press whether that's employing team members. Hiring virtual assistants putting in systems and processes that have automation. So that, you can focus on the profit generating activities. When when you could bring on a lender, we can bring on a contract or coach to help you take your real estate business in the next to work with contracts to make sure that you're doing everything according to Code you don't need a whole lot of skill and you save an immense amount of time doing everything in your business, every little thing. Rather delegating. and. You have people in your corner. So you don't spend your wheels against saving more time. Again guys, I covered this on my master class in detail had over before the millions dot com for slash master class so that I can show you how to build your real estate business from beginning to end. So you've all the keys you need in place. Again, mindset work is absolutely number one, number two, his building, your team. Number, three is going to be building your system. We're not in this for onesie Tuesday deals we're not in this to get a deal done and not know how to get another deal done right I mean many times that I deal falls in your lap. But to recreate that deal to make sure that it happens every single month. Go, have to has to be a system in place that predicts that measures. This I always like to use analogy of an ATM because that's essentially how we build businesses. Right. If I put five hundred dollars towards marketing what Kinda yield, what kind of return is that GonNa get me? So a five hundred dollars crates fifty leads whether that's through direct mail or cold calling. or driving for dollars just for gas but a five hundred dollars creates fifty leads and close to deals for every fifty leads. An. Average ten, thousand dollars a few every time I put in five hundred dollars I get out twenty thousand dollars. So that works out to be ten dollars a lead that means that I now know how much it cost me to get a lead and all I need to do is get twenty five leads to get one deal. Fifty leads gets to deals and I know that as long as I get twenty five leads. The law of averages says I'm going to close a deal. That's powerful profit generating stuff because now have the ability to control my income. Maybe I can figure out a way to get lead at nine dollars. Maybe the company that I was using for my postcards were overcharging and now found another company or maybe found a better paper that's cheaper or maybe I've created a list with higher quality leads whatever the case may be got some just giving you guys these small tweaks in examples because now if you're getting leads at nine dollars do not spending five hundred dollars to get the amount of lead you need to close onto deals. So. If I know my metrics, I can now control my income. I cannot tweak a few things to make thirty or forty thousand dollars. So system is absolutely imperative to take your business to six figures and beyond but you because you have to know how to control how much revenue your company is bringing in. Again. You cannot fall into six figures. There has to a plan in place, and if you want my plan to help you get to six figures, make sure that you are signed up for the masterclass. The masterclasses absolutely live and there's a Cuna portion at the very end. So we can get all your questions out and make sure that you are well on your way. That link one last time is before the millions dot com. Slash masterclass. And now your feature presentation. About two weeks before I finished my training. Surgical training. LSU Supposed to come here with a group practice want to move back to my hometown, raise my family, my family and relatives are here. So. For whatever reason the deal fell through? So. We had over three hundred, thousand student loan debt. A two month old. But the worst part is, I, had no clue how to start a business run a business a practice nothing. And we had already purchased a home. That that, we liked in our the neighborhood I grew up in. And, this was back before the you know the two thousand, eight real estate crash. So literally I just got on the phone onto a banker and he said I know the group going in with sign a paper or two, and you can have the house I mean that's the literally how easy it was back then so I was just paying interest only own a house with like nothing. as you can imagine, it was a bit tough then but Luckily, I network with some people they helped me out i. Started, renting from someone and he showed me the business aspect out of high school and College I had a lawn service. So I actually started mowing yards again. Just to make ends, meet a member knocking on a lady's door to hey, you remember may I used to mow your yard and just letting them? You know I can mow your yard this summer she said son. Aren't you supposed to be a doctor by now? Yes my but that's just how it is. You know. But We we set a goal to to pay off all the debts within ten years, and luckily we're able to at about seven seven and a half years. So That was Roku. Excuse me but we were skiing about. Five years ago I would say and we got off the ski. Lift. And this kid like cut in front of me like those ski schools or something and I like a dodge to not kill him and kill myself and when I feel like fellow my arm. And I and I kinda got up and was moving my wrist. and. My Wife's are you hurt us said Noah mob at that I think that incident started may thinking what would I do if I couldn't use my hands? Because I was just relying on my active income. And I mean, that's more important. You know your hands are more important than the average person right I mean they're freshness. Yeah I mean unless you're Michael Thomas or somebody you know using It's a ball, but but yeah, I mean, that's got a disability policy and that SORTA, thing but but other than that and actually i. Two weeks ago a orthopedic surgeon is a Sports Guy, my age forty, six call me. And said, he can't practice anymore. He got diagnosed with epilepsy and he can't operate and. What what what I do? So I think that was the first. Thing that just kinda started thinking you know what? I need to start looking into getting something other than just relying on my own active income from you know treating patients. So I started doing some research and there's all these you know Dr Side hustles this and that but everything kept going back to real estate. Real estate at an only real estate I knew about at that time was I bought my house. It's it. So that. That wasn't the best experience Nah. So that that's kind of what led me to down the path to start looking at you know passive income real estate, that sort of thing. Just before we move forward. Talk to me about the experience of going to your own neighborhood knocking on doors of your neighbors. As Dr Like it was at a humbling experience in kind of walk me through your mindset as you were able to actually do that people would be would. Succumb to that. Right. How did you? How did you warn you? What was the Self Talk Thank you if you're a redneck from, Louisiana really bothered too much. You know but you're right. It was very humbling. I think at that moment mob mob mindset shifted a think. More towards the scarcity mindset and it took me a while to get out of it because before. I was thinking you know, hey, I've got all this debt, but I'm in I'm in training. I'm going to get out and make good money. I'm GONNA, be able to pay it back. You know not a big deal. So you know was concerned about the debt at that point and the house no because you know I thought I was going to have some money coming in but once that incident happened it was just like literally switch I, went from, Hey, everything's gonna be cool abundant mode to lake survival mode. I I now you know with a wife and two months old, it was like. You GotTa do what you gotTa do just went back to my roots and and I've I've worked my whole life. You know since hours nine ten years old which you can. You can attest to that as well and it's just. Part. Of My DNA. So I didn't even. Really talking about it. Now I think people like, oh my Gosh I can't believe you went back yards but looking back on it was like I had no problem with it was humbling but Did. You GotTa do man you said that you thought. When you got to the end of the tunnel, right you got to eventually where you wanted to be in life that you would be able to pay off the massive student loans and you said that you thought that. So it seemed to me as though they ended up not being the case. That's what a lot of this thing like once I graduate right whatever our degree is our master's degree is our PhD is in right? Really believe that once we get to the other end of that. It's going to be okay I worked hard for this I worked hard to get to this point. I'm able to take these funds import back into the education that I paid for. Why maybe wasn't the case? Well. I was a hundred percent relying on that group to pay me a salary but also to teach me what I didn't learned the whole business side of it of running a practice hiring firing training, all of that. I. Mean the only thing that we know how to do we get out a medical school dental school nursing school whatever is just your trade. And, I think that's why we see more and more people not starting their own practices. Now, because number one, the debt you get at so much and so high number two You you just don't learn anything about he's still don't teach anything about a running a business a number three don't teach anything about money. I mean, don't teach anything about money and high school or college or you finances or. Not. You. Know you only thing that teach you about how to. How To you know go to school get a Job And Save for forty years in a our a four one K. and hope you've got enough you don't run out and that's that's what we're tall. That's that's all I. knew you know so but but now you it's it's totally different. Now just because I'm learning different things, you know from this person that Persian or your podcast or somebody else's book booker whatever and I'm able to to think. You know you did a podcast not that long ago about probably one of my favorite books, Polian Hill. Thinking grow rich well. Do you have to agree with one hundred percent of that book? No. But take a few things out take a few things from Dave Ramsey here or from Robert Kiyosaki from whoever and then you know think about it how it applaud to you. How would it make you better and then go forward So back in the day. Here's here's my here's my thought process. Jeff. I'm thinking that. You stumbled upon Dave Ramsey and you created a plan to get out of that bad debt and that plan have lasted. Three, four five years. Can you walk us through that process of getting out of debt whether it was Dave Ramsey or you created this plan on your own or how how you how you tackle that? Because I know many people out there are graduating college they just graduated of this massive amount of debt and they're trying to figure out should I should I pay off this debt shy invest in real estate? WHAT'S THE SMART OPTION? What are the smart choices in if I do decide to cough this debt? What's the best way to go about that process? So, walk us through how you did that. That's a great question I. Mean I think it all depends on your personal situation for me. I was lucky enough remember rod down the road a New Orleans You know flipping channels was like a am station which probably some of the listeners don't even know what that is but I. And it was his talk show and he wound up being him. And Like caller after caller had these stories I was like man I thought I was in a bad position, but you know these people were calling in. A eighty thousand dollars on May twenty, thousand a year. I have a trailer in a four wheeler and a truck and what am I going to do and so it's just like story after story like that. And then I you know. I you know I was twenty, six, twenty, seven years old fairly educated and that was the first time I'd ever heard somebody tell somebody else to save up and pay for a car. I I didn't think you could do it was just like will you go and you pay one, ninety, nine or two, ninety, nine, a month I was like what? Are you talking about saving up for a car? So it was just like. Who is this guy? But you know off and on listened to him a little bit read a couple of his book, the total money makeover but Kinda put it on a shelf and then when I got to the point where I had to. Really, get going and start digging out of debt while I dusted the the dust off the book and. Followed his baby steps seven baby steps to the T.. Pretty much. You know he's Banal looking at it. He's more for the masses Yo for the general public and it's great. You know for for people that. Have a lot of consumer debt. They don't really know where to start and he's like step one do this step one to do this so that that's what we did to to get out of. Consumer debt. After like you're already leading to my very next question because again you've you've sounds like you graduated from school of thought that help you in a pivotal moment in your life, right? Like have all this debt who's the best person? The best resource that'll teach me how to get out of this debt. Now, you're in a new place. You've gotten rid of that debt right? You've taken those principles similar to what you said about Napoleon Hill. There are some of those things that you can you can listen to when you can. You can internalize you can go out there and actually do some of those You're like you know what? That's not for me I. Don't know if I believe there are that's that's something my wheelhouse right when. You Cross that chasm and you've already paid off this. What are some of the things because you also namedrop Barbara cusack window some of the things that you you started to shift your belief in that may be Dave Ramsey taught you and you're like, okay. Well, let me let me let me go go in this direction because this morsel matches my beliefs in my my goals desires now on the other side. That's a great question and I think one of the main differences is. Day Dave is a real big pay cash for everything including real estate. Well, there's just a lot of people that can't do that. You know if you WANNA buy ten single family homes. It may take you your whole career to do that, and then even if you get ten ten homes cash and that's that's not. The you know that's that's great but it's just not. It's not really really great. You know as you know. So at a look at it from. What Allah you know what I like I can't push what I like on you and vice versa so that that's again that's why take different different. Things from different people and okay like this about him. I like about, for instance, Robert Kiyosaki. He is just like almost one hundred percent debt guy you know just I don't care if you'll have ten million or twenty million in debt a snow. Big Deal. This you know and Hey that. Doesn't mean you have to turn off the Robert Kiyosaki TV. Because guy makes some good points. I mean his rich dad poor book is I think. Number one if not, the closest. real estate financial book ever to be sold the most number of copies. But For me it was more of a kind of a mindset set. Shift from. Thinking I was going to have it all to scarcity big-time scare shitty survival mode to. Started to and I'm and I'm still work on it on a daily basis but just just really focusing on that abundance mindset you know you know when when the basically the world shut down in March of Twenty Twenty Way we weren't able to see patients for two months. And you know I'm own a bunch of financial forums for doctors in this and that, and just the comments just people. Didn't have any money and these are people that make good money. But you know as you know, wealth doesn't equal and income. In a lot of them were saying, hey man if I ever get out of this I'm I'm going back to the Dave. Ramsey no more consumer dead and I'm paying cash for everything and so again, they're almost going back to the scarcity mindset but. Luckily, we were able to. You know how to Rick Big Emergency Fund and you know had passive income coming in so but I think of that may a lot of people rethink their finances and maybe rethink Not. Just relying on one income source. So that I think that really woke people up. I've been doing this this interview segment on some of my most recent shows Jeff. It's helping individuals who are just getting started in real estate religious build out their system get the first deal Dennis fast as they possibly can and get them mental going. So a lot of the guests that I've had on the show recently, I've asked them a lot of these wholesalers people who are actively in real estate. I've asked him like if you had you know thirty days to completely start over resources. No anything no connections no capital how would you get your first deal done in the next thirty days? It's absolutely awesome. The answers that I've been getting now obviously, they're not really going to get that opportunity to start over and prove that they can do it. But. I wanted to speak to your son who's fifteen years holding what kind of mindset in frameworks you're putting in front of him for him to start in the best possible way that he can as he pursues his career as he pursues a lifestyle design, right? As he may be pursued money. What are you based off what you've learned I? Mean you've gone through a little different mindsets, right? It's just like do like I have this this knowledge I'm still learning more so much more from you to learn. But what what are you starting to put in place now to help your son grasp the concepts issue think are most important. We'll have a fifteen year old and a thirteen year old both boys and I'm not concerned about my thirteen year old at all. He's like his dad but his fifteen year olds like his mom you know I had one hundred dollars and I gave it to my thirteen year old. He would say, Okay With Dad, put this Ima- savings to counter put this Emma. Mutual Fund investors for me and Oh by the way. Can you give me twenty dollars? So I can go get some candy. I mean he's he's like he's not touching his money but. If I, give it to the fifteen year old. You would probably think well, okay he's going to spend it. No, he's already spent. A Fran Twenty dollars from let you know so but anyway, he He he when when all stuff shutdown march again, you know school shutdown and after a while you know he was just. He. LOVES THE WITH HIS BUDDIES and go out to eat this and that we said you know what? If you're at home, you don't have school you all money. You gotta work. So he wound up getting the job. Actually, two jobs a summer we haven't given them a dime and he's an specifically hopefully, he doesn't watch the show but. They? Got Him like you know just hard physical Labor eight ten dollars an hour to really see what it's like to work. So once he does get maybe a better job. You know maybe a nicer paying job will he'll have something to compare it to instead of just giving him some. Hey come come work off as I'll give you twenty bucks I mean. No. Thank you. so that that's one thing we're making them work. The second thing is that The cashflow. For kids game I got the cash flow the one for adults and it was a little bit. A little bit over their heads, they got it but the cashflow for kids game. That's a great thing to do to get your kids going. What, else my on my thirteen year old you know the goal is to get out of the rat race. Robert Kiyosaki gain and to get out of the rat race, you know get over tall the what's what? What you WANNA travel or stuff? So, of course, he beat dad he got out of the rat race I. Never. Forget this. He looked at me. He Says Dad. Are you still in the rat race. Nothing Yeah you see on the Bloor, his nose like no in real life. Are you still on the Rowlett? Right? Right rice I said. Abedin. I'm I'm working on trying to get out but I'm still I'm still a rat race and he said. That's gotTa suck it. So, so thirteen, he gets it. And I'd said, son I wish somebody would have showed me that yeah that's that's that's thirteen. That's crazy. I love that. That's such a great analogy and. Man That's powerful on haven't played cashflow guests nuclear. What do you think about the? One of the overarching concepts and cash flow and that. The. The in this is my premise I'm I'm curious to see what your premises but the best way to get out of the rat race in cash flow. To buy value stocks right by value stocks white. So you get you know in real life wait until they appreciate a wait until in the game, you get a car that that allows L. stocks to appreciate. Your like you're staking your claim on these values stocks over and over again team get those big cash pops right. What do you think about those concepts in real life and how were and how maybe you're applying that to escape the rat race or what you think about the strategies that you're using do that? That's a great question and I think for kids and and even your listeners just. Think about what what we spend our money on and about what we quote think is rich with back from Dallas weekend were. Getting. Ready. To close on two, hundred, fifty, two units with the Group apartment complex and one other thing that I that I do my kids I forgot to tell as we're down the road like, Hey, look you know look at. Those apartments going up or so that a mega aware that. Hey. They can. All these tenants could be paying your money whereas I never knew I mean, you don't think about that. Especially your kids you know. But. But but teaching, you know teaching them, you know about that about What. So we went to a restaurant and they were lamb bows ferraris. Some guy had a convertible Bentley and Jose got his license plates. It said drop top on it. You know so. What we think guys rich. So we think we have to buy stuff to be rich I mean that's that's the world we live in today you got the offer are you're rich? So what I'm trying to to get them to think of I think what that game that talking about casual? Game. He's trying to get you think of as. Focus on. Investing in assets first and then let that money spinning off of it pay for the crap. That you won't instead of what other people do by the crowd I and then they don't have any money invest in. Absolutely so that's what I'm trying to teach them. I love, and that kind of brings us back full circle with maybe some of your workers back in. Now March April like you said, everything was shut down for two months and they're starting to realize. Yeah making a lot of money. What am I really building like I I'm I'm frustrated. I'm angry I'm broke right And you know when you're in a totally different position because of the enlightenment and the experiences in your the exposure that you've had over the past odd years. So. Talking to that, we're no longer talking to your thirteen fifty year cable talking to people who are in a position to take. Action. Day. Right, which brings us back to what you do in the apartment space facebook. Those people that are in a position to take action today that they'd been slacking. They haven't been exposed yet. Right or maybe they've been they've been hearing. You haven't been listening to you. What are you? What's your advice to them? Now how do they get out of there whether it's going through your exact plan? Hey, get rid of all your duct through the Dave Ramsey method. Once you've done that you have two thousand dollars come back talk to me and let's talk about putting your money here like what what would that plan look like? I am I have these conversations. I've got Looking at Mugu cal three of them up tonight and I always ask is. What do you want? They're always like well, Jeff I won't passive income. I want some passive income and ask them why like? I don't know I just I just won't so will. Not. Going to happen what are you talking about US said until you specifically can tell me What's going to get you up every morning? You know kind of like if your four hundred pounds, he just had a heart attack at your doctor said if you eat another chilly dog own DA. You gotTa have something that's going to motivate you not just I won't pass a real estate income coming in and that's it. So I always talk to them. You know the Simon Sinek books start with Wa up. That's why I start with you. As you know, you've read that book. I'm sure star Wa, and that's going to be your motivator. What is it that you won't? and. Then that's that once you get it, it's easy to work backwards. It does work backwards new on an eight Let's say. Jeff I would love one hundred thousand dollars a year to live on. Okay. Perfect. Now, we have a goal to shoot for. We're. Going focus on getting. Assets that produces one hundred out eight, thousand dollars eighty, five, hundred dollars a month. Now, we can shoot for something. To work backwards but until they can you know? vocalise AD, it's tough. So. Let's let's say that the goal is is something right around there is very similar. I think that that's go that a lot of people can relate to. What does that process look like what in your world right I? Know it's different for every investor in every niche your world what's that? What's that next process look like to get them to eighty three hundred dollars a month. Well Some people WANNA focus own. Maybe just real estate you know for myself I take advantage of I like to be diversified. So my wife and I are practice she works here. We Max out our retirement accounts are index funds. So we're. You know we're we're investing in a course, a different segment of the market. But we're taking tax advantages. Of Practice. So we do that and then everything else we final it towards saving money towards a real estate specifically syndications you know pass because I'm I'm working full time so I don't have time to be a landlord. So. If you think about if you can get up about seven percent return on your money annually on these, that's making numbers up. Well, the Million Bucks at seventy thousand a year. So about another half amaze probably one point five billion. In syndications and that's about one hundred, thousand a year that's not including all the other benefits that come along with it but that's Brod what you? We know what somebody like that should be shooting for, and that's Dutch very realistic to get as you know. Yeah. So walk me through this I. Think this is where the in the interest of my listeners are peaked. So okay. So put aside one point five over what time horizon, where do you again these these individuals I'm assuming that you're talking to They've just recently gone through a process whether they already had dead now they've paid at all for their coming with coming to you with with no debt whatsoever. But is there like every three months? Hey, like make sure that you're saving up fifty grand in you know these are the opportunities that are presented to me. I'm going to present these to you and you can decide you know what like, how does what was next step in that process? Most most of the deals that I personally invest in their therefore accredited investors only and it's a fifty thousand dollar minimum. So. Based on the individual's income you know they may be able to save. enough to do maybe one a year some people to year More some people like to take money out of their four one ks that are doing nothing and put it in a May. Know maybe a self directed IRA or Or something like that to where they can invest that money. In to real estate so there's there's different ways that they could do that but just start putting money on the side I tell them and you know make it. You know it's got to hurt I. It's gotTa be. Oh. Crap I. I'll out of money coming out you gotta be if it doesn't hurt it's not gonna work so. I usually like to tell people to go try more. And that's too much and back back down. But you know if you could do at least thousand dollars a week and take two weeks off, you know it's fifty thousand a year. That's one. Do one a year. For Ten years will. That's. That's pretty darn good. But but I'll tell you this most people they. They think too small. As. You know you know you read the probably 10x grant card, own book Just I'm always ten x semi goals. You know I want to save a million this year or whatever what should be tim million will. More, than likely I'm not going to save ten million this year but that releases my brain to think. So much more as you know than just. Right here. I mean you can play that Parkinson's law. It's it's absolutely phenomenal. Guys how expanding our goal expands or mindset. Shrinking are timelag expands our mindset. So absolutely loved that there's so much. We can rip off of that but I think that the you laid it out just right now in terms of allocation is your what is your advice? I know that you may follow a certain set of principles because you're allocating your funds in different places but for somebody who's just now starting now they've they've come to you a few weeks ago they got the first fifty grand or hundred grand ready. What does at allocation was shit that allocation look like? Will again, it's it's different different strokes for different folks. It just depends on the person when I started off ours ninety eight percent in the stock market just index funds and I knew that I wanted. To my goal was to at least shifted to fifty fifty. Fifty percent in the market two percent real estate. Now we're moving mortuary it's going more towards real estate just because. It's just it's just doing so well for us even through the pandemic. Oh, yeah I mean it's I think. The the quote, the worst one of our deals have done, it's gone from monthly distributions to quarterly. So we're still getting paid but It's And it's really encourage Jamaica's her so much as you know, there's so much good that you can. Not only provide good safe clean housing for people. But. It's just once you explain this to somebody it's just like the lightbulb goes on it gives them hope. You know a friend of mine was a dentist here and Unfortunately he committed suicide last year. And part of it was finances and burn out. and. If you could just give somebody hope that you don't have to. If you hate your job, you don't have to do it forever. There's other things you can do for money. To me it's worth it. One of the reasons I started my blog so. Absolutely. This is this is amazing stuff and I want to get so much more into this but I definitely do WanNa, talk about the tax aspect of investing which I know you're well-versed at. So I mean, tell me tell me the advantages right? You talk to the typical doctor and they're not taking advantage of a lot of the tax breaks sicher taken advantage of right. Tell me some of these tax breaks in how high income earners could really utilize tax breaks We have we just really don't know about. Well first off, I'm not a CPA. So definitely consult with your CPA adjust. This is based on my personal experience with doing this and with the accounts that I know but As a doctor, you're. GonNa, probably pay after it's all said and done about fifty percent in taxes between federal state Medicare social security sales tax all that I mean we're just we're taxed to death. But but the thing is percent of your income taxes guys. I'm just repeating what you said o your income is going to taxes. And the issue is that's all we know. So we. What do we do? We WanNA get better. We WanNa make more money. So we go to courses seminars we bob books we do this and that. To make our. Active income higher. So we're just GONNA. Pay More taxes. So once you get, you know once you get to a certain level. I mean, you have to make so much more just to put more in your pocket just because you know as the tax rates are so. I've. I've learned that you don't have to make near as much money as people. Thank you. Do if you've got stuff on the side, that's that's giving you these tax benefits. And the probably the best. Thing that you're going to get out of a real estate knows depreciation. Cadillac you buy laptop right now. Five years later what's that laptop? Worth. Nothing basically because it. It goes down in value. The same thing with real estate the irs code was written four to encourage people to buy real estate. They want that they. It's like they're just giving you these gifts yet people don't want to do it and I just don't WanNa take the time to learn it if you don't WanNa. Take the time to learn it. Then you're not called reap the benefits from it. But So a perfect example would be if you if you invest, let's say one hundred, thousand dollars a syndication that Pettis. Eight percent a year well. Roughly. You'll get eight thousand dollars a year. And that's pretty much going to be tax free. Because of the they're able to depreciate. Asset which is going to offset your income. So you got to think about how much money you have to save. To spinoff eight thousand dollars. In income. It's it's a lot more than that. So, that's just one just one way. Of. Tax Benefits. You're talking to me as I'm looking at your your, you're wearing a face mask like we all are but I mean it's totally different reason you're going surgery gastro scrubs on. What what type of I have you have you built for yourself and what do you enjoy most about the life that US bill in this is kind of a question that asked at the very end but hopefully, we'll find some more negative at the very end, but I'm really curious as to. What you've done and how do you feel you happy do you now feel successful? You're in a totally different position than maybe what's the goal over the next few years to get to the next level? That's a that's another great question and actually. A local dentist call me two weeks ago and asked almost asked me that exact question because he'd been practicing almost as long as I have and he had some things change within his practice dynamics to where he's by himself now whereas he was with more people and he said Jeff. How can you help me with scheduling my day scheduling, my practice, my patient, and I said why was going on and he said I wanna I wanna work three and a half days a week and take off at three o'clock every day like you. And I just told him we'll use have to again is is comes down to planning. You know what's important you know working out lifting weights playing tennis you know playing basketball being there with my kids coaching my kids that comes first So I have to plan that Emma Day. So and I do that. So I plan my work around that. You know I get to work around seven in the morning and you know but if it's three fifteen, I'm I'm fifteen minutes late, a something's going on you know. So I mean I'm when I'm here I'm working. And and that's my goal. That's my priority. Again, what's once once they're out of the House and they're in college it'll. It'll probably be something different. But as of right now you know my families my priority. So I'm luckily able to work my schedule around that to do that. Hey, really quick. I just want to extend a personal invitation for me to you to come in, join me on my brand new live masterclass. So as many of you know I've been investing in real estate since the day I became an entrepreneur. Growing my passive income to replace my job enlist in two years and owning or being a part of deals ranging up to forty million dollars, and I personally coached over seven hundred students over the past four years. Over that time period, I've discovered the exact things that differentiate the wildly successful investors from most investors the ones that struggle that never get deals done that continue to stay at the starting line. So this brand new masterclass that I'm inviting you to curb over at before the millions dot com for slash masterclass is really a culmination of everything I've learned. Up until this stage from starting to managing and growing my passive and active income through real estate. So if you're still committed to making twenty twenty the year that you finally start in, grow a profitable rose they business. Then I'm absolutely excited to invite you to this masterclass and help you potentially shortened that learning curve and become a thriving investor faster and more profitable. If this is something that interests you head over to before the millions dot com for slash master class. Seats are limited to one hundred and fifty people, and this is live masterclass, and at the time of this recording, we just have to dates left on the calendar before this masterclass goes into the vault for good. So if you're interested in learning two of the most profitable strategies and real estate today, the key shift that disconnection time from your income, the highest convergent approach to closing deals with the motivated sellers and the single most effective way to become a Rosette investor in the historic two thousand twenty. Head over to before the millions dot com for slash masterclass. Lifestyle. Design Acceleration Hanks. What is your favorite before the millions book? I would say to books. You know it's something that I read every morning the Bible. And the King Solomon within that book the Book of proverbs literally anything you WANNA know about wisdom wealth debt. It's their man. I mean you you can ask me a question right now and we can go find it. So. That one and then liked the book that we talked a little bit earlier about Napoleon Hill's I mean girl rich if you can't beat them, join 'em he interviewed hundreds and hundreds of millionaires and billionaires back in the whatever it was twenties or thirties and noses common theme. So an those principles can still be used today. Absolutely. Love both and then I would say with. But. Then probably, the one that really got me to really start changing wasn't so much about real estate but it was about real estate was dad poor dad it just gets you start thinking. There is a different way to do something. Now, you have a, you have a a super big one, hundred dollars Bill I. Don't know if it's a poster or painting or you know it's a canvas I can't. It's a canvas. There we go. It's it's huge. What what what does that for? What does it represent? Somebody will story behind that Well, I. Don't know. If. I can take my camera and show you why Kinda one of the reasons that I did it is because All of my deer antlers used to be in the background. So when people would interview me they go. Do you have horns on your head look like? So and and I, saw this home this. Group that was doing it and that had those campuses like do that'd be so cool in my background. So you're actually the first podcast interview since I just put it up. So you're. As more of a you know there's not really much of a story money on your mind the money. I love it. I. Love It. Second question what is your favorite lifestyle design at this can be a business APP or tool. It's gotta be Google Calendars. TREADMILL. Yesterday, we were at the Ritz Carlton, in Dallas Own Little vacation with the family and checking out some apartments. And I'm on the TREADMILL I get vacation. I might I got a guy the plastic surgeon the most talk about investing if. I wouldn't have reminded me I would've forgot so. That's that's my GO-TO APP for sure. Absolutely I love that. What do you enjoy most about the way your lifestyle is currently designed and this is a follow up to the question. We asked general segment. Is I could set my tom on and with my interest right now is my family. So Most important thing to me now. So You gain by Tom. Time I love the what were the sacrifices that you knew you had to make before the millions to get to where you are today. Thought. And I was raised probably like you and your listeners that you had to work hard. Really really hard. But now I know that's not the case. You gotTa Work Smart. I wrote an article this morning that says, Hey, if you make ten thousand dollars a month and you want to get to twelve thousand dollars a month yet at that, you could possibly exert more effort. You know a few more hours here and there to get your goal but she wanted from ten months it's at thirty thousand dollars a month you can't just will that you can't just effort that like you have to operate from a new line of thinking right so a totally resonates what just been super powerful. Who was essential to your growth before the millions and why? There's a my dad went to high school with the guy here. That's probably the biggest real estate investor in our area. and. sat down with him last year and he's I. Think he's one of the few billion with a B.. Billionaires Louisiana and I had two and half hour meeting with him. I said I WANNA know about real estate and I walked out of there and I call my wife. I said I learn more in two and a half hours. Than I did in two years of college. No La. So he did he just completely open my mind like this this crazy. This is all it takes. Is One little moment that one little deal something that was just like. Boom. Thought I was going to say, yeah, we're we're scheduling conversation number two to talk about that conversation but but no, seriously so so Maybe just touched on it but. Walk me through maybe the biggest enlightenment the biggest moment that that conversation gave you. ANYB-. If you really won't something. You really can either find a way to do it or get somebody to help you to do it. I mean I'm not talking about something unrealistic light may ban the world's greatest quarterback at forty six years old physically. Couldn't do but I mean if you wanted to do something realistically like. Doesn't, agree. But but I've never thought about it. But if but if I truly set my mind to go I, want to be a billionaire. That's possible. In today's age I mean there's enough people enough resources. If that's really what you WanNa do you could do it. So there's don't let people tell you you can't do it because. As, you know the more successful you get more people try to bring you down kind of like that deal when people said, you get a bucket of crabs. You've heard that. Right Yup Yup Yup. Absolutely. You can just lay down their running everywhere when you put them in a bucket whenever one tries to get out what happens they pull them down. So that's how life is our. Yeah absolutely end. So that conversation for you was it was it more. So inspirational more how to. It was both it was probably seventy percent inspirational. But thirty percent out to. It just took that one deal that he had that he in Houston actually it was in Houston. one. Big It was A. Commercial Building Downtown that the company gone bankrupt. And GAC as uncle caught him up said, hey, there's a building downtown it was thirty million, he said. Like, you can get it for like seven million. He said, where am I going to get seven million from? So, he flew there and he offered the guy three million. They did have three million. Three million. So I'll get back with he said, he flew back to Louisiana guy called him. He said I'll take it. In like three years later, he sold it for like twenty something million. And he bought it for three He after that that was it. It was just like to the races have one deal. Wow. Wow. Yeah I'm glad we pulled out. That's absolutely amazing and super-inspection olive of that. Last but not least. Why do you think so many of us are stuck before the millions even though we have every intention of getting to the millions. That's easy. It's it's. It's either what you think about finances or money or or what you've been taught a what we've been taught our whole life from parents, teachers, coaches. Society. It's. It's. Just, the same thing over and over again, why do you think one percent of the nation holds ninety? percent. Of. The wealth. Is True and once once you start. Connecting with those people and realizing what they do every day then you'll know Why Perfect example is most millionaires have. Three to seven streams of income and read five to ten books a month. Do you do that. Well if you're listening to this, you probably GonNa say, no, we'll start doing it and watch what happens. There we have it ladies and Gentlemen Dr. Jeff anzalone doctor. This has been absolutely amazing if listeners WANNA learn a little bit more about you find out. What you're up to or come and get connected with some of the ways you're investing these days where can they go to find out more information? Probably the best places on my blog, it's debt free Dr Dot Com, and if you want to put a little guide together for your raiders, you can go to debt free Dr Dot com slash free guide. That will get you started and passive income. Ella and the links to everything that we discussed on today's show, we'll be in the show notes. Man This has been a powerful episode I can't wait to get this out Thank you so much what you do in the community. Thank you so much for the way you've done to porn to my audience, not only mining's what you've done across the. Airwaves to point the so many other people get their minds right to help them get their money right after we'll talk to you very. I appreciate it. But Man, what you're doing is phenomenal I mean I've listened to your podcast I've been on your website and. and. What's what's going on right now and I don't I don't know if people are seeing this video or whenever but I'm a white guy. You're black guy what's going on right now in the in the world and how? you know with this racism in all this, and there's I grew up in public schools and seeing how everybody you know almost just oppresses the black people you can't do this. You can't do that. You're not going to be any good and and it's just not true. May We all came from one place? You know I mean that's what I believe. We all came from now God and when you go to heaven and all matter what color or race you are whatever I mean it's that's it. So being I don't care who's listening to this I don't care if you got one leg and you're. Puerto Rican, Giannis? Black White whatever I mean. You can do whatever. You won't Burgum. I'm serious and seriously what you're doing to to help people especially the black community and all that on. Know you help everybody but it's. We need way more people like you trust me. I can show you words online search and destroy your listeners to know. He didn't tell me to say that. List I'm speaking it real man I love that I love that so much I. appreciate you for Tuning in. Works. On WHATSAPP. Share and. In an absolute pleasure on your wealth of knowledge continue bragging forward saying that you continue Spain. Our.

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The Five-Finger Approach to Restoring Patient Function

Mayo Clinic Talks

20:40 min | 1 year ago

The Five-Finger Approach to Restoring Patient Function

"This is male clinic Toksay curated weekly podcast for physicians and healthcare providers. I'm your host Daryl chapter a general internist. At mayo clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, physical medicine and rehabilitation is a medical specialty that aims to improve and restore and individuals functional abilities and quality of life in those with musculoskeletal pain, physical impairments or disabilities yet physical medicine can do so much more. And we'll learn more about the specialty today from Dr Jeff bro, a physiologist in the department of physical medicine and rehabilitation at mayo clinic, Dr Brose specializes in hand in spine issues. Jeff thank you for being here today, Dr chart ca thank you for inviting me, let's start by just kind of a broad question. I think the the the specialty of physical medicine is probably one of the least understood by practising physician. And so what are the goals of physical medicine? The goal of physical medicine is just to restore patience function. We're specialty that doesn't have an organ system, and all we don't have a heart such as cardiologists or central nervous system like neurologist or or the peaks with musculoskeletal we're pretty much wrapped around the patient's function and restoring that. Functional ability of the patient. So you are a physician trained in physical medicine yet. I suspect many of my colleagues, especially in rural areas work, primarily with physical, therapists. When should we be specifically, referring patient to a tryst rather than to therapist? Typically, if a physician has a question about the diagnosis, they're not secure in their diagnostic ability. Referring to a physical therapist typically needs a diagnosis. So if you're looking for a diagnosis physiologist is a good avenue, or if someone is not improving in the timeline that you would end -ticipant for of specific problem. Like, let's say someone has low back pain most low back pain patients improve within two to three weeks sometimes up to three months, and if they're not showing progression that may be a time to refer to physiologist. So you work with physical, therapists. Are you team is a team model that you use? It's very much a team approach again as I said, we're we're kind of the physician at restoring function. We use multiple different professionals in that team. We have physical therapist is one ocupation therapist in some settings. We use nursing recreational. Serviced any profession that helps restoring the function were kind of the team leaders of that speech therapy fits in their fifth in there. And in a lot of institutions outside of male speech therapy is also part of the medicine rehabilitation group. All right. I know you see a wide variety of patients, but what are some of the more common referrals? You get for physical therapy. Well, where I live in the hand in spine center, see predominantly, those individuals, but outside of of mail physiologist, see as you said a quite of quite a breath of patients, including stroke, spinal cord injury patients amputees anyone who's had something happen to them that decreases their functional level design interest have seen and they work with that team that we talked about improve the function of of the patient in. A lot of times people think were the pain doctors, and we're not really pain doctors. We we are much more interested in an improving function. And sometimes pain is the limiting factor that we have to to work around. But our goal is to increase function that always decrease pain. Okay. Now Jeff over thirty plus years of being here. I have sent I don't know how many patients of mind to physical medicine, and that one has come back and said dot they got nothing. There's nothing they can do. They had no therapy. That was going to help my problem. So do you have a therapy or treatment for anything? We send over there. You guys make stuff up once in a while. No one. Yes. There are as you know, there are a lot of patients who have conditions that are not going to improve the there. Sometimes degenerative museum example of a patient with LS or Lou Gehrig's disease in two thousand nineteen. We don't have a cure. So we know their function is going to decline. So the goal is just maintaining what they can maintain for as long as they can maintain it and. Kind of putting the life back in the years years into the lighten? So we want to improve what they're doing their enjoyment of life. The beauty of our is we have a team. So by utilizing the team we typically can find something to help the patient restore function not always getting rid of pain but restoring function. Well, I have to say it's reassuring to know that there is a department out there that will take my patients and work with them and give them something when I've can send them else play other places, and they say sorry, I just got nothing to to help us Beijing. But you always seem to have something. That's good to hear. I've been reading about physical medicine and came across the statement that physical therapy can help patients void surgery. What are some examples of how that happens a lot of times with the and I'll just use an example with the degenerative process, like let's say knee pain patients have fairly significant rightous or even minimal threats and have a great deal of pain. And you know, one of the be it. Be it a friend or, you know, another provider says, oh, you need surgery. It's it's degenerative. A lot of times we can avoid surgery with other things, you know, as I talked to my patients, personally, I always give them my five fingers talk about what's the possibilities. Well, the five fingers include surgery, we could all you know, we could send you to someone to have surgery. We have medications we have a lot of medications for different conditions, particularly degenerative, we I think last count we had sixty three different kinds of anti inflammatories. Some pain medications though, were decreasing their use for obvious reasons. Injections is number three steroid injection seem to help with some degenerative changes to at least get rid of symptoms were also starting to inject PRP in stem cells. And I know one of our physicians have been on this program to talk about that. The fourth thing we have is therapies, which I include physical therapy, occupational therapy of as the, you know, the some of the top two, and then we also have manipulation there's you know physicians. Chiropractors osteopaths doing manipulation, acupunctures is another variable that sometimes people use and then our final treatment number five is living with, you know, some people just need to adapt. The way that they live with it or change their functional -bility to live with a problem. You know, we we kinda run up that ladder. You know, the safest thing sometimes changing what you do and living with it. And folks specially with degenerative changes of joint ten fluctuation in their symptoms. They have good and bad days. Good and bad weeks bed years. So if we can utilize therapy to restore kind of the muscle function around joint sometimes we can avoid surgery so special. In the patient to may have multiple Comber abilities and be maybe significant risk for surgery. If they were given some help in cheating some activities that they want to accomplish. But can't at the present time, they might be happy in maybe decide maybe surgeries that needed. And that's one of the things that sometimes can be difficult as establishing a goal. You know, what is our goal of our intervention? And if the goal is one hundred percent pain relief, there aren't too many interventions we can do to achieve that. But if you're goal is like to walk to the mailbox to get your mail. Those those are goals that we can attain may you have pain doing sure. But if that's goal we can work towards. Come to mayo clinic in lovely Rochester. Minnesota for the geriatric update for the primary care providers. Held November fourteenth of two thousand nineteen catch all the latest updates in innovative practice models for evaluating managing and caring for your geriatric. Patients. Registration for this popular course fills up quickly. Visit C E dot mayo dot EDU for more information. Join us weekly here. At mayo clinic toxins, we discuss best practices and burning questions. Subscribe today, using itunes or your favorite podcasting app. I had a patient this morning who has pretty vast generous Rytas in one of his knees. And he's finally come to the decision that he's going to have a knee replacement in the near future would he benefit from seeing somebody in physical medicine prior to his surgery instead of afterwards. Yes. In that case too. You know, frequently what happens when people don't use a joint as the muscles around atrophy. So by seeing desire tree and physical therapy. And even occupational therapy. Sometimes in that case, we can build the muscles up around the joint that's going to be replaced pre-operative lead to give them, but her success post operative Lii, one of the most common things we see regarding musculoskeletal pain is low back pain. You must see a lot of that. When should we consider furring patient to physical medicine, physical therapy for low back pain again? Diagnostic confirmation sometimes. Individuals. Primary care physicians are looking for reassurance or confirmation that they're their diagnosis is appropriate. And that that's. Great referral, or if someone has red flags, including leg pain, leg weakness, loss of bowler, bladder symptomology, or they're falling because of the leg pain. That's a good time to refer those individual time. I have found significant benefit from sending a patient PM is a personal has recurrent, low back pain and even sending them over between episodes giving them some exercises that they can do to help prevent their recurrences. It's been very successful. And that sometimes the most difficult time when a person is in pain. There are a lot of things I can have them do exercise wise and activity wise to try to regain their function. But when they're not experiencing pain, sometimes it's hard to say, well, these exercises would help. So a lot of our our job is to establish that recurrent exercise program and kind of build it into their life. So they continue with, you know, with the low back pain just walking, you know, it doesn't have to be an elaborate exercise walking seems to be fairly effective in decreasing the frequency of those episodes of recurrent, low back pain as well as the intensity. So this is sort of a related question. Is there sort of preventive physical therapy evaluation. You ever get patients in for for maintaining the future, you know, like no livelihood prevention. We do we we get folks who, you know. I'm starting to notice like us walking to the mailbox that I'm having more and more difficulty getting to the end of my driveway and the mailbox and sometimes it's just performing some very simple exercises, even in chair or in bed that can, you know, keep you and maintain your ability to do those functional things that you wanna do. So sure you mentioned some other areas of physical medicine. What are some of the other broad categories that that you deal with in the field of physical medicine other than just musculoskeletal pain? Vast? You know, someone once said our profession is mile wide. But only an inch deep because we treat a plethora of of conditions, including stroke, traumatic brain injury cardio-vascular rehabilitation amputee. Neurological conditions like proven, rob Pathy. Sports medicine. I mean, we're in a whole host of of different areas, but all centered around restoring the patient's function I used to work in the incontinence clinic here for a while. And I even found benefits any patients to physical therapy for pelvic floor exercises. They have biofeedback and all kinds of interesting ways of teaching patients how to do good pelvic floor exercises, and that's actually run by public floor, nurses. So that part of part of the team our nursing team. I imagine another fast growing area in physical medicine is at a sports medicine. Are you getting involved in not only professional teams but high school as well? I'm not one of the sports medicine members here at the clinic, and they are here. But we're more involved in the community. Some of the areas were looking at that I'm involved with is with individuals with disability. I have a stepdaughter who has C P and she plays sled hockey. She does dapper of climbing at one of the local climbing walls, and we travel throughout the mid west links lead hockey. So there are physicians and residents who are helping with that. So not just sports medicine, the elite athletes, but the weekend warriors and and kids at your softball teams. Baseball teams all the way up there. Elite athletes so sports medicine kind of mental here, but other institutions treat all the whole gamut of athletes a little bit about some of the devices that you have available to us. I want said some very weird ridiculous pain and other. They gave me a tens unit which had not really used before. But I found it, quite helpful. Are there some other devices that you use to improve function and reduced pain? So talking little bit before physical medicine, the physical medicine component of physical medicine rehabilitation actually began here at mail under the to each of Dr Frank cruise who's kind of one of the fathers of our profession and his his background was in physical therapeutics. So not only tens unit we use Heaton is ultra sound sometimes which is a deep form heat and people hear about sound injections. We also use ultrasound to visually. Is sometimes if we're doing injection therapy. But again, all of it is to reduce pain. So we can increase function in some way. But then there's there's many therapeutics that have come and gone. Like, dia Thermie was one that came out of here that was used for pelvic floor pain for a long time, and they found better ways to do it. So there there are many physical therapeutics interventions that we allies you just reminded me of something back when I was a medical student week tour of the physical medicine floor and had these paraffin baths. They'll still around. Yes. They are. In fact, use a quite frequently in the hand. And the reason is the hand has had a very interesting shape. You you can't put heat on it or cold on it with uniformity by dipping it into wax. You can actually heat up all the tissues uniformly. And it's caught on quite extensively. I mean, you can go to a local retailer now pick up a pair of bath to be able to do it at home. So we use it in in the hand clinic. I am quite frequently. Will you mentioned working hand clinic? What are some of the common hand in problem at UC? Personally, a lot of degenerative changes, particularly the thumb base, which is can be quite functionally. Limiting we see a lot of carpal tunnel. We feel out attendant at these and being a tertiary institution. We also see a lot of kind of interesting cases of complex regional pain syndrome or break, your plex up these break, yo plexus injuries things like that. Finally, one more question in your field. What would you like to have known by primary care providers? In terms of what your specialty can do either. From what you've seen inappropriate referrals or referrals that you'd like to see sooner or anything you would like to tell primary care providers. How to better utilize your services? I'd have to say, we're not chronic pain specialist that our job is if you have someone who has a functional decline that knee has goals to work on the sooner. We can see him better. If pain is a component. That's fine. But seeing patients who have chronic pain that have had chronic pain sometimes needed different intervention, and we're not always the best specialty to see them. Is it a rewarding specialty, Amen. Yes. It is. All areas, and I realized now I'm in kind of a musculoskeletal area. But I also were competing after IX. So to see some of these kids. As they age as you help them develop and with their exercises and their ability to walk and doing certain interventions like botulism, toxin injections and things like that very rewarding or having a stroke patient come into the rehab unit. Unable to get out of bed and by the time they walk out. You're like at a part of that. Yeah. Yeah. I know I've given some presentations to physical medicine, physical therapy audiences and the always seem very happy. It's always a pleasure. Speaking to them. Appreciate that. We've been talking with Dr Jeff bro, a male clinic physician in the department of physical medicine and rehabilitation, Jeff thank you so much for being here and sharing your expertise with us. Thanks for having. If even -joyed mayo clinic talks podcasts. Please. Subscribe mayo clinic delivers more CME offerings nationwide than any other medical education provider. Find your next conference at cdot, mayo dot EDU, stay healthy and see next week.

Dr Jeff bro mayo clinic leg pain knee pain complex regional pain syndrome Minnesota mayo clinic Rochester Daryl Toksay Dr Brose Beijing botulism Lou Gehrig dot
NPR News: 03-02-2020 7PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 8 months ago

NPR News: 03-02-2020 7PM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer. Six people in Washington state have now died after Contracting Cova. Nineteen health officials announced the new deaths today as well as a handful of new cases bringing the total number of cases in the Seattle area to nearly twenty wellstone with member station K. and tax reports that number is expected to rise state health officials. Say they're still trying to contain the spread of the virus. Many of the serious cases involve people who are elderly or have underlying health conditions most are linked to an outbreak at a nearby nursing home. Dr Jeff Dussen with Public Health Seattle and King County the risk for all of us of becoming infected will be increasing and although most of the cases will be mild or moderate and there's a potential for many people to become ill at the same time do. Chin says they're still trying to determine the extent of the spread of the virus and deciding whether to take more drastic measures like cancelling public gatherings for NPR. News I'm wellstone in Seattle. Health officials announced today. There have been twenty six cases of direct person to person transmission of the virus in the US us. Senator Amy Klobuchar is ending her presidential campaign. The lawmaker from Minnesota is the Third Democrat in just three days to exit the race following former vice president. Joe Biden's win in South Carolina. Npr Susan Davis reports is the third candidate in three days to exit the race following billionaire. Tom Steyer and former South Bend. Indiana mayor P Buddha judge. Her decision to endorse Joe Biden is no surprise after. She often used her time on the debate. Stage TO ATTACK. Bernie Sanders has too far left to win a general election. Npr's Susan Davis some in Michigan. Who CAST absentee ballots for next week's presidential primary one officials to destroy their ballots as wd? Et's Quin Kleinfeld reports. Those voters that they chose candidates who are no longer in the race. Michigan recently changed. Its rules to allow voting by absentee ballot with no restrictions but with the likes of Pete Buddhis- and shower dropping out of the presidential contest. Some voters say they want to Redo absentee ballots. They've already sent in Detroit. Elections Official Rosalyn Kimbro says voters can submit assigned requests to quote spoil their ballot and receive a new one. All the way up to election day. We're going to get flooded with a lot of absentee ballots for this election. So crazy amounts are coming. Hundreds of thousands of absentee ballots have been issued across Michigan. An increase of roughly two-thirds over the state's two thousand sixteen presidential primary for NPR news. I'm Quin Klein. Filter in Detroit. Shares of micro blogging company. Twitter were up sharply. Today amid reports in activists investors take a state in the social media company to a person familiar with the matter Elliott Management. Taking a one billion dollar stake in twitter. Elliott is known for pushing for changes at companies that invest in stocks on Wall Street today amid hopes central banks around the world could intervene in the corona virus by cutting rates. The Dow was up nearly thirteen hundred points today. This is NPR leaders of the militant Taliban. They won't participate in Afghan peace talks as until the government releases. Thousands of insurgents held in lockups throughout the country. Those talks are part of a broader deal. The Taliban signed with the US appears de Hadeed reports from Islamabad. The deal signed on. Saturday seeks to have American forces withdraw from Afghanistan within fourteen months. It also calls for talks between the Taliban and other Afghans to negotiate the country's political future to build confidence for those talks. America's meant to help facilitate a prisoner exchange between the Taliban and the Afghan government but the Afghan government which was not a party to this. Us Taliban deal says the prisoner release should be part of broad negotiations with the insurgents and now a Taliban spokesman says those talks won't go ahead until detainees released. Da Hadeed NPR news. Islam ABBAD GOVERNMENT-SUBSIDIZED RAIL LINE. Amtrak has a new chief executive Amtrak announcing his name day. Former air cargo executive to the Post. William Flynn will take over. And Mid April who replace Richard Anderson who's stepping down after nearly three years on the job then ran air cargo company Atlas Air Worldwide for more than a dozen years. He's also a senior executive at CS. Axe a major freight rail company. He takes over time. Amtrak has reported record ridership and revenue figures for its most recent fiscal year with predictions. The money losing rail service could be back in the black sometime soon. Futures prices posted big gains today. Oil Up a dollar and ninety nine cents a barrel to end the session at forty six seventy five a barrel in New York. I'm Jack Speer. Npr News in Washington.

Taliban NPR NPR Michigan Jack Speer Seattle wellstone US Washington Detroit Joe Biden Susan Davis Amtrak Npr Twitter Richard Anderson Senator Amy Klobuchar Dr Jeff Dussen Quin Kleinfeld
Coronavirus cases in King County still rising. Highest numbers since April

KUOW Newsroom

04:00 min | 3 months ago

Coronavirus cases in King County still rising. Highest numbers since April

"This is Komo w camel. Kim We are heading into another summer weekend with some sunshine for a change and with cases of the coronavirus on the rise, public health officials are again urging people to mask up and keep their distance from others for the latest on what's happening in our region, K. U. O. W. News Anchor Page Browning. Is here page? Hi, Hey, Kim, and Kim, do you know it's been nineteen weeks now since the first cases were detected in King County. We've been talking about this for nineteen weeks now page. You know I feel like I'm in such a time warp. If you said nineteen years I wouldn't be surprised right exactly. Long and short. Time well, we have been watching this for awhile. We know cases are now heading back upwards around the state. So what is the latest here in King County and Seattle? Well like you said are cases are going up here, so here's some numbers I. Want to break down the seven day average for the week. That just ended a couple of days ago was about one hundred twenty cases per day. That was the average the seven day average for the week one. One hundred twenty cases compare that to the middle of June on June twelve. The seven day average was just over thirty five cases. These are the cases per day, and that is just a stark contrast thirty five, then one hundred twenty cases per day now on average. That's where we're at and to further explain where we are I'm going to defer to Dr Jeff, do, Chin, who's with public health, Seattle, and King County and he spoke with journalists earlier today. The disease is. Ever in the risk isn't going away in the foreseeable future. Are Challenge together is to manage covid nineteen over the long term in the zone between total show town and leading the virus run wild. And Kim. We're still in phase. Two of the safes start plan in King County. The rest of the states somewhere between phase one and three, but things are getting worse as far as the number of people diagnosed and people going to the hospital with covid nineteen. We haven't seen these numbers since back in April. What do we know about who is getting sick now and how it's spreading? Was We've been hearing for a few weeks. Young people make up the majority of cases now, so nearly three out of every four new cases is a person underage. Forty part of the rise in King County is due to college students. We've heard about people living side-by-side in fraternities at U. DUB getting sick. There's an outbreak there, but it is broader than that do chin. Says the people getting sick now are mostly essential workers or people getting sick from their own friends and family. This is in households and. And with people who are gathering. We've just had the fourth of July, a lot of people getting together. Yeah, absolutely and page. I can't help, but thank you know ahead to the fall. What is this going to mean for schools and they're supposed to reopen at that time. You know this is what really is worrisome to me. Especially Listening to Dr Chin today we never got over the first wave of this virus were still in it and do Chin said when it gets colder and people are inside. Yep the cases are going to grow a lot. I don't think we ever suppressed our first wave. Either locally or nationally I'm very confident that we'll see a much higher levels of transmission in the fall and winter, and that's a reason why people really need to take the opportunity now to make the changes, and that will really decrease decrease. Transmission is because the threat is going to be much higher soon. That that temptations really there now Kim to go outside. It's nice to get together with people, but he's saying. We've gotTA wear masks. We've got a social have social distancing, or it's just gonNA. Get worse in the fall. K. U. A. W. Page Browning sober words, but thank you for the update. Thanks, Kim, and for more on the coronavirus just head to the homepage. Our website is K. U. O.. W. Dot Org.

King County Kim Dr Chin Seattle Komo K. U. A. W. Page Browning K. U. O K. U. O. Dr Jeff seven day nineteen weeks nineteen years
What Happens After Shark Tank with Be Fit Food CEO, Kate Save

Building A Unicorn

47:25 min | 4 months ago

What Happens After Shark Tank with Be Fit Food CEO, Kate Save

"From Los Immediate is building a Unicorn, the show exploring what it takes to build a big global business I'm Chris Lawson. Food companies are everywhere. There's delivery companies like ubereats chains like McDonalds Dominos, and of course you're traditional family restaurants, but once you've eaten all that great food does also companies that specialize in helping. You shed a few kilos and today on the show. We're speaking with Kate Save CEO and Co founder of beef. It Food, a company which specializes in providing scientifically-backed meals for rapid white loss cake. Cake joined US via zoom for our very first building a Unicorn live event, and she has a fascinating Jenny that even involved in appearance on shock tank, which completely changed the trajectory of their business. Kate is a Dietitian and clinical exercise physiologist, and through seeing thousands of patients along with her co founder. Bariatric surgeon Dr. Jeff Diaper realized. There was a problem that needed to be solved. What the improper practices I guess nearly thirteen years I still be made amongst slow to twenty patients Jack and I am across that I didn't just need the advice to get started. Actually made the products that help him get stopped may weight loss journey as well. You know there's a lot of different companies that kind of kind of approaching this area. A lot of people really struggle with their weight loss journeys So, what is it about it food that makes you different from all of the other services that are out there. Oh Yes, our point of difference, each quite extreme I guess because we started out as clinicians, we never set out with a business mindset to actually build a food company, and we actually went to the providers amount, same woodbine food that we knew that Australians needed to be APP against dot and say sorry. We looked to find a company that would do what we couldn't find it. So at that stage We ended up buying. We teach up her lot converting it into A. And for the first couple of years we had five staff only kitchen than myself running the business hot of it, and all of the free nineteen services that we provide with rich initia- business grew. We recognized that it really wasn't just full rapid white, which was sort of a founding reason for the company to give people that Keillor's to wake sorta white keep stops. It was more than that so at products that she'll go for twelve vegetables me, which is good building a healthy got micro by iron, and assigns really kicked evolving showing that if you could build a really healthy Guston, not As labeet girls so sustained that white off because it's actually the microbes in the Gosto, responsible proud to certain extent. The showing the MA studying sway, they put my base mass nothing mass, and they don't fake transfer Angel- For Math nast within Mass Boston and the thing masks The speed even aging assign amounts accrued in the same types of food, and that was really I guess exciting crosses. Because we recognize it got the sleep I think when we talk about the gas Brian Connection, it's not justice, connection to hunger and fullness in energy, but it's also a happiness comes from the Gos- Said Ninety percent about Serotonin these actually produced in the garden. Well, sorry, we recognize that feared wasn't jest solution for. Changing your wife or your health than dumb eight maximum. You feel happy. It's how you feel about Nacelle. And of course your health is well. Take grew up on the Mornington peninsula just out of Melbourne and describes himself as a curious and adventurous child. She's spend time with their friends exploring the Bush and getting lost twelve, riding their bikes, and even from a young age. Kate says she was always interested in food, my passion for Food and help family. It started early Endo, I. Actually a child had down really horrible. Tummy hikes that I used to get never find the answer. Semi's the hospital. Humi Pepperdine Send Me Harm for the first twenty is in our life, and it wasn't until I'm really independent. GOING TO UNI had COBB. At least the comic huge problem would also Miami and. When I was twenty, they found what I thought was a Chima and they put me in for -mergency surgery. It turned out to be benign, but are the caused as other Forever, hold these annoying tummy. I can dumb that me really interested in nutrition because I knew that it was what I was doing was affecting me. The doctors actually didn't believe me. A time told me it was I lactose intolerant I had dumb. A reason to get out of school in the night plus student loved school. My parents need that watch end I will start otherwise dairy so I'd never eaten lactose later and I just need a rule to it. That was my passion Sean and obviously that passion for you turned turned into. You know wanting to study to become a dietician and shoe that as as a career path and was that. From from all you know. All of that kind of personal experience was that. Really what kind of likes? To to take that Ford as a career. I guess when a kid centering so the tendency and are the teachers site to us. When he saw me made a stop thinking subjects which unique WanNa Gory Suen. I had no idea and I was absolutely stunned. What I read today announced just thinking on. Do I aim high like try to moral? Do something like that? And it was actually my best friend at the time interim it's. I can't believe you don't know what to do. You love food. You've got to do something which food now back to good idea announced so passionate about it saying you're the easy and. I guess on strong studying nutrition. What recognized is that? You know the power of exercise to improve health and particularly Ryan Health, and so I studied nutrition dot Dietitian than I went back, and did a master's in clinic lakes in size physiology, and I'm willing to let a bat on I. Guess it the Brian and the link between the guts and the Brian and exercise units. No, that sort of thing, as well I always remember at school smiling unsecured than ever stop smiling. I wonder why kit smiling must feel the thirtyish. So? Yeah, that that was my study career nothing. It was just a friend of mine. He pointed out that it was something. That I always talk that lockton enjoy Tenet. Just say like a natural progression for me. And when you, you know you leave university, and you go out and you stop practicing as a as a Dietitian like during that period of your life, did you? Do you ever have? Any idea, you might become an entrepreneur that you might sort of go out on your own and start a business. When I was in your Lebanon, she won Lee scholarship at school to go in down. Stay on campus from university. Who three-day? Was At. The and that far Graham was unbelievable, so it was for the top one percent of the. Sisters and story or something like that and when World Weistein at Uni I actually put his lecture theatre made us watch this movie yet. That won't Disney. I've never heard the word on trump, no before Chile's Marivi and I decided the near limit I wanted to be an entrepreneur. I had no idea what offense Walt Disney had a little humbling. Chin created. And my goal was to change the welding. Some Wang like for Disney did Mike. We'll have the. And after the break, Kate stopped journey with beef food and soon finds herself on shocked tank. Will in strange world right now? Everyone is working from home as we look to stop the spread of covid nineteen and for many businesses, this is required a significant change to their processes and procedures. Working from home requires, you'd be organized and flexible, and you need service providers that can help you adapt to this new environment, and that's where law path can help. Law Path is not a law. Often there are technology powered legal platform to hope he start and run your business. You can find all the documents you might need and then customize them in minutes, plus if you need to speak to someone in person, low pass, legal advice plan gives you on demand access to lawyers through unlimited legal calls for one low monthly fake. Warpath helps stop save time and money when protecting that businesses and have helped destroy. Over one hundred million dollars in legal fees, and for a limited time, listeners of ash show, you can save up to forty percent on legal plans. Visit low path DOT COM DOT EDU slash Unicorn to grab your exclusive listener, Oughta that's law path dot. COM DADA use slash Unicorn to say forty percent on your legal plans. Law Path DOT COM dot. Slash Unicorn. From a young age, Kate Save you. That wanted to change the world. She worked seven casual jobs during school. And by the time she was twenty had saved enough money to buy a house. By the time she was twenty one. She had three. K. clearly had a level of drive that many twenty one year olds would never have had, and that's the kind of drive that it takes to be a great entrepreneur following university. Kate started working as a Dietitian and soon noticed a significant problem that needed to be solved, although initially had no intention of starting a food business. Sorry Jeff work together own my. Maiden case before we started thinking about We're thinking about me the within the first five years working together about. Nearby actually drenched that way would create a food company sorry. Jeff's white male search unser he basically says patients and some fine timeless surgery that will help them always white, whether that's gastric band gastric sleeve gastric. State and our does and Clemmie Su or base able were banks. Wipe me surgery on bars and shakes dots which I absolutely heightened with a passion. I just thought. How could you take someone to lose weight and be healthy, but stopped him on chocolate chocolate chocolate Shite Sir something completely out official and. Investigated More Gloria and gold standard in the world was a synthetic files and shakes, and I can just say these huge problem that we were setting up a long-term file. Short term success was surgery, but for about two years some people start to Reagan white now could years a Lotta. People Starts Reagan. White went to a Lotta white so particularly when. all saying able from anywhere from starving permit the IB kilos to two hundred and forty yards this my heavy f Scott and down I think when people lose all the slight ahead this huge amount. And but in it starts coming back again E. IT's own luck yards Brian. It's all about A lot psychology behind it, but I also believe when you're losing the whites without using crew Disa- first medicine. We actually changing your eating and learning. What your body! Needs you, not GonNa have that long term success. No matter what medication. What surgery? What supplement she tight. It's just never going to be sustainable. Sorry I said to Jeff. I don't want to do with balls and shakes anymore. I I. Can don't Meal Plan. So Kate started giving out recipes to clients to help them with their weight loss ahead of surgery, the were designed to help by police weight, and also do things like shrink live to make an operation less risky. And she was doing this by focusing on a low calorie diet clients with seeing success on the meal plans, but many were looking for a quick alternative that didn't involve a lot of preparation. Sorry, that was the point when I decided with no one else got a Mike. The fruit believing this enough it on my professional find the way and not knowing anything about commissioner peaches for production, Hasek of madly researching and studying and Yeah, that me I discovered that. The was spice. I wanted to Bainian after a couple years after about two years, actually gave up private consulting side estate. I still have fat company, Piquionne or physical health nutrition. Sorry, we serve a stray private hospitals in ten medical centers than we provide paper with the advice, sang lead for healthy living nutrition, but we aren't sell food there and the reason I quit the. News Kazakh Shell really. Click did that I knew I had a product that would work white loss, but I couldn't sell it to people that were paying me for advice and then tell them to buy. My product is well, and it was actually a client of mine who confronted me one day and I'd only saying he wants to end on the way the chronic. He asked me about this brochure that was sitting there about screwed company, and I never really talked about it to patients, but I thought. He picked it up. I'll tell him what they all that, but I didn't sites my company, so he drove down to basic ferried and Yasa girl, who was working there time reese companies since she said Hawks Kite sites and he lost it. He's a canyon the next time and setback with these arms Half Hope. What is going on? What's what am I? John to the sky? He just he would hardly talk. Get anything out being. End In the end he goes. Do you want some business advice? Business I into business title when I remember thinking hostages disappear if I could just rolling a gripe, a call Ben Right now I would I would choose at. And he said it to me. You need through. Declare your interest in this business. Who put down Barshop and I say pop? He goes on Wednesday last week and you didn't tell me this job business at I bought food there that this is a conflict of interest, and from that dipoto out so guilty and sorry conflicted that I was doing the wrong thing, so that the I gave up my practicing. Practicing men because I decided will ahead solution for people and I wanted to help them with the food, and you know my team can do they support, but I wanted to make sure that people had access to these food, and he's turned out to be at business main tool to me and turned out to be one of the best things I've e but at. The turning points made a guard, the oil, nothing and that was in shock tag colts. Something that I'm interested in, and you mentioned early early on in the show. Was that you'll I? Kind of commercial kitchen was a fish and chip shop that you bought. Can can you tell me a little bit about that And when you were kind of looking around spaces like wh? Why efficient chip shop like what made that? Kind of decision to be able to access a commercial kitchen. Well look the honest. In the first few months we actually either shed kitchen spikes that the grew so quickly that we start about taking. We started taking too much. SPICING shed kitchen to the point where we got kicked out so then we had to find somewhere else. We shared east, but we heads the by had. Some, we had the payers, not sheets. Stabbings are the Latham. We were getting bigger running out a story. Sorry, then we would just on desperate to find another Ki Chan and we knew that we couldn't afford united that five hundred thousand two couple million dollars to actually. I have Chen sorry. My best friend's husband's actually within hospitality timely. I'm stumping Himeji lack. Butcher shop and old. How old something? Let's just got some structure there with some? Cool rains and extract the fans and. All the things that we would me that I just made the know about for these commercial kitchen, and so he came across the species missile. In time. I believe it with asylum for mighty in. Or something like that, so it was quite inexpensive. Compared where everything we've moved, ask. Any liens that actually the basis accords Dan. We go for dull, and we got to take everything within the walls of be species. will pretty siding when we did out. Until we found that actually were extract friends didn't were, and the place was a dirty filthy mix. It was an absolute horrible horrible clients to. Set maybe really passionate to renovate it to get it into working order, and we did have to spend a lotta money to get it up and running, but we actually had our own spice, and certainly won't listen actually going out and buying. Fully fitted that initially channel nuts enough to get a stoppage. Having having your own space can for many businesses. Like give them a form of identity. was that was that kind of the situation? Few is well like having your own space meant that you are on the map like you're a legitimate business now yeah I. Guess because we're only selling online and initially we're actually selling fruit to our current patients. The white will stations men the DIETITIAN patients, so no one knew we existed we just a website. We didn't know Radicchio or a CMO or anything like that digital thin. Sorry we reading just a website and nothing else and a handful of flies that we designed this sense. It wasn't until we had a store that we could professor sign up and Hulu. Cradle back then was. Basic food. It was Bariatric, essential, so Bariatric, manning obesity and essential for White Wall and Peyton Statin to find that by highlighted that nine, because when they cool a bag or a box of food, chained up in it, said Bariatric on quite a for people, so we took back the Bayan Leeann Created Bay, and then we would have people going to be and I didn't like healthier it'll the you know the word, so we went. We speak food because I want to be healthier, so that was have quotas and today. And it was at this point a couple of us into the business. That Cayton Jeff decided to take their business on shock tank. As many people will know shock tank off his entrepreneurs, the chance to put themselves out there in front of some of the best investments around to try and secure investment. The some the tank eats them alive, but the others they walk out with agreements and positive media coverage will change their business forever and for Kate. Jeff that's exactly what happened. Sorry look. We actually applied for shark tank. The Yup try and we got through to the end to be rounds and I said to my car found the surge. Beating she gone time running out of money, and we both foot IRA hundred outdoors H in business at least points and dumb. He said look I think it's really bad for reputation. It's quite dangerous on TV the shots. Bs and they might with television said. And saw cool down, and then the following year as you can imagine, we've poured hundreds of thousands more Dulles to these NASA and not a cent with INVA- going to come out of it and why we were running it, but possess clinicians to us the only thing that Madel which was to help April get food. They needed at Alex then. Their expense because we really just wanted to change their lives and give them. They screwed that we knew. Would do that and we. We knew how much April were willing to I and the. All sorry every time we sold crude Wayne Parma. Lost more money and I the only person that I married that. Surround. As a famous for leading the Time! I thought I. Wanted a out founder and I read today Nelson Sand I'm just absolutely gobsmacked by her journey, and what she down Swinestein ahead of. Get on, chunks. And Sausage to my Fan Reagan I'm GonNa. Do it run out of money I? Don Add any money stage, but I'm going to run this murmur. You'RE GONNA. Find a someone. Ten Helpless Romley Sly Profitable Beats Nest Ben. Charity helping pay better so. That's what I detail at the time with surge on will come Dante Bates too dangerous. My reputation and I thought nothing to lose I. Lose all my Murray Anyway or I'll lose my reputation, my money, but eight away. Those a chance, something could be guiding sorry. I decided to really prepare ourselves to go onto shock types. Six about three months and I watched Abriendo shock. mine wrote down every question ever asked here in the city and. Everything that I could about the business hours running and I think that this alarm. Helps Major Abedin. He's necessarily. And are. Now flying you manatt before and you know you get there at eleven. o'clock at Ni- zoster with the hotel faces the next morning. than we arrive and. You, actually don't know what's going on. Haven't really spoken to anyone you. All you know is at some point. You'RE GONNA. Walk those doors onto the red carpet, and there's going to be caught shocks, and that legally what happen a sit down. The cameraman said to him hats hammer these doors on on the set, and he goes there. What doors huge huge Any license out looking as going backwards bang, he smashes into the doors. non-flight gone this. Is a bad start, sorry. Sorry the DOE wasn't Standing near the cameras are on on shots the. Looking down speaking to each other making, you feel really uncomfortable without scraped ebay. Down I've been four shutouts in fifteen minutes absolutely real with every business question imaginable and I had it together pretty well and many neon unity all you actually but too often as one from Japan a month in state facts. And said. Would you like to make my program? But he came to see he's actually at Quebec. On come out. Yeah, my said we WANNA make him so I put him out and they grew jet for about fifteen minutes, so sorry and down. Bennett was fine a long time, and I knew in my mind that I'm there for Jimmy Sorry? My gut feeling just went. Darn thing that anything else Sarah offering a cody on all of these said stave has incredible skills in tech at immuno would hugely handy for an online business. My doctor just said sneak car with Jimmy the something she's got. Her in and that will healthy baby to at a business. That's what we need. Be Fit food walked out of the shark tank with an offer from Janine. The founder of boost Jesus for three hundred thousand dollars made up of a two hundred thousand dollar investment and a one hundred thousand. In exchange for thirty three point three percent of the company. And for food business going onto shock tank. You probably couldn't have gotten a better deal. But that's only stage one. Securing an investment in the tank doesn't mean you're going to actually save the money once. Filming is over through diligence and Kate. That process took an excruciating amount of time. Let's rewind to filming shot at your high fiving in the end. You think you've got these investment on line. Where do we get the checks from someone subject in awfully guard? Nine now. So you? Diligence went curve at a yeah, so we got no money for a very very long time. And we told that the show was to go to ask filmed in November. Two Thousand Sixteen and we got told it was Kinda guy to AA. One of the Said's inning. January February two thousand seventeen, and it didn't, and then we got told her Aaron March we will get money when sweat and just gave it hit getting pushed and pushed out pushed out. He'd signed on to Hawaii in terms of beaten state. Great Unilateral. Tell anyone that you've been on shops ankle. What happens Angie dark at the money yet? You're preparing for when these actually going to. Are you going to sell more? Trudy have to be prepared. So the main time I'd hide production manager and a much big out a handful more found papering maintains to make sure that we had a lot of food on hand. Handle ready to go, but. Ready Guard buttons every day every week, and to catch a yeah before white sweat. Sorry. We actually did a lot more cashing that year. China prepared for something that we thought actually may nearby. And I guess we hadn't got investment at this stage. As sorry, it was really hard slunk going from filming and having United Them exhibit, riding positive experience to these wising guy. WILL ANYTHING CHANGE OR was that just a drain? Did Not ever really has I am I still in the same reality. But the program eventually met to weigh in August of twenty seventeen, and the response was unlike anything. The company was prepared for and right after this break beef it food has to do with rapid shark tank fueled Greis. I JUST WANNA. Take a moment to tell you about how I came to start loss media. I was sitting in my journalism job thinking about the future of the media and all the discussions that I was having, and I realized they will all centered around podcasts. So I decided to go all in, and that's when the stress really began. Because suddenly I knew that I was studying this thing this business but I didn't know how I didn't come from the business world and I certainly wasn't a lawyer, so needed to think about whether I needed to be a sole trader partnership whether I needed to incorporate a company. I decided to eventually incorporate A. Then I had to think about things like shareholder agreement, employees, agreements, privacy, policies, terms and conditions, and it can be really stressful because if you don't come from that world. Don't exactly know what you're doing. And every found has to go through this process. Now, there are many ways you can do this one. You could go and hire a lawyer, but that can add up and become really expensive, or you can use low fat. Low Path is not a law firm. There are technology powered legal platform that can help you dot and run your business more than one hundred thousand distributes including US have used law passed platform to register companies create legal documents and get legal assistance in a fraction of time, cost and complexity of traditional systems. Have helped save trillions more than one hundred million dollars in legal fees, and for a limited time listeners of building a Unicorn can save up to forty percent on legal plans. Visit law path dot. COM DOT, Edu Slash Unicorn to grab your exclusive listener offer. That's LAS DOT COM dot. Edu Slash Unicorn to save forty percent on legal plants. Beef it food appeared on shock, tanking August of twenty seventeen, and the response was overwhelmingly positive, almost as soon as the show Ed, thousands of people started flocking to their website in volumes that the company just wasn't perpetual, unfortunately, though our website crashed, and it crushed every minute every four minutes every hour, if day and every week thereafter for six months, so we snuck story quite a few hundred thousand liens of Villa's of Samuel's. Eat once an absolute nightmare because we didn't know anything about the check behind website, we obviously have built it. We had someone help us. We fast, and we learn how to show. Go dancing to stop selling sheep. We had nothing. We earn the had what I was eight hundred boxes. Worth record white. Folks bulks obey rapid fruits. And the production manager loopy. Why after gone to Aaron? How long it in a tight you to catch up to Michael screwed lack seek flakes or something, and he's like Oh, I didn't actually Michael, the food online carbon and he got his. All I know you said you wanted hundred boxes that on trying to save you money so i. only made two hundred because I just didn't think anyone than a by it and I was like you're kidding. Kidding me so the next morning I turned it. We got the second retail side. At least point. These warehouse stored over trees and align about Mamata 'cause at front people getting out. This trucks is people that are forming from to the boxes. Agreed that a boat last night, so we can. Two minutes of the building are penny. Every scary could freed The building was gone. So you're from that point on one-star. T. E.. I actually went from a team of five people to sixty thousand people and. That's what it took to service. Something of this magnitude than. By no means did we do it well, but we just did it and Sorry. I always get asked questions about the high side of things have are who to Harare knows like Fannie inner if I could some vastly for like one, basically sorry I walk through the door now looking for work. And what did I need them to do anything we have a seven point reminds absolutely ringing like crazy, and fortunately I've actually high. The Cold Center is a backup should something at route to find mines, and by had thirty five coins across Australia in lawful finds it as well. Sorry. The problem was at the end of every day when I took a few hundred Michigan Mayday Malcolm Chris to us. We couldn't actually one of our seven fines without someone being on the other end, so we can never return. Anybody's because there's always a new one the other. Sorry needless to say it was a disaster. We break it all on. Me had to rebuild scratch in that party stash. Probably fish six months was really just absolutely destroy bright. The business someone had radioed systems one by one into. We're obviously talking about about being able to scale a business rapidly and you are. Food Business and food inherently has a lot of logistics around it. And you know it can. It can restrict the ability to scale rapidly. It's not the same as being you know an online service where you can just fire up a few more service, and suddenly you will you know your website is available? You know or your services available in another country with a food businesses, a lot of logistics get. Can you tell me about the steps that you have to go through to actually get a meal delivered to someone's Dole. All outside of I guess actually producing the coming up with the rest ceasing ingredients costing out work away. Producing packaging labeling it. Would we have agreed company that could actually deliver after Why end we initially delivered the food fresh. We found it too much about health. Risks of the Papal Went Tori memory relating food. Cease it still safe in our ten hour right? And when they go on and to be honest, nobody actually knows that question owens tasting. That proved sorry I decided that we should be sat. Phrasing afraid because it preserves the integrity, the food, the day of and more importantly, the good bacteria and bad bacteria grow so in my opinion, it's actually better for the microbiome. And each is fresh it's never gonna be tinged is old when Anyway and so we find a in Korea that the challenge to stop quick. And then we wanted to stand rage so initially we only delivered across Victoria, but Was a national TV show. We have people all across the style of wanting very so we very quickly expanded to new. South Wales Queensland, Been Stack Style Ya and wins obviously Victoria where we started, so it was a case of really finding a logistics had that had the I? Guess the quality of service that we made it and dumb, only accreditations that also had that h remove Korean companies about five or six times. Now I've been elastic seach news for those raisins. Tomato important thing is the food get sick. Citing a need tended order and that the customers happy, so you know. They're very important part for process. Now you obviously had significant momentum coming coming out of the shock tank. And you know when that Ed your business was growing rapidly, and you said for the next six months. You you kind of like dealing with issues around scaling that but. You know once once. There's a bit of time between win. The show has ED. You Know How do you actually go about maintaining momentum because you? You have continued to grow exponentially as a business so? Like. How have you thought about maintaining that momentum so that you can continue your growth? I guess in because it's always came from the signing flights. It's at passion. Enabling the first few years, we grew one hundred percent in your neighborhood shopping, and then when thank FM. We had huge growth still managed to do one hundred percent. Right near on you. There are the. Records. Might Vision is huge. If it's to change the health, ninety percent of Australians health latent fit, then that's a big mission, and we may be able to reach of households and I guess every opportunity that if they are bare, every opportunity to about or deliberate nutrition educational deliver the message on. Anyone that I can help offering free nutrition. DIETITIANS AFFORD I'm ban. An speak for my team when I say writing old team where they have blade in station, and we genuinely want to help take shape, better health and feel happier and. At what the company's abound, so the mentioned means That pay. It on such that if you feel really good about something in, you feel really healthy and happy having you give that to someone else said I feel that energy, and then you find backward the night bicoastal onto someone else. Since Shark tank beef it. Food has continued to grow rapidly. They now turnover more than eight million dollars in sales, and they have plans to scale internationally. Obviously Kovic has disrupted business sector in some way and Kate that meant pivoting their offerings to hope cater for the needs. Customers have right now. The website twenty twenty cents business estimates. That something missing, Sam I guess really started therein trae months ago. What Wade found is when people with food hoarding in one. Wayward, relayed the sort of food that you hold that insane that we were nutritionally completely refers. We had long shelf lives, so we actually started offering paper instead of white. Offering just healthy meal bundles that we nutritionally from flight a good for immunity. Sorry MOM WANNA strategy was meal, bundle and help site sell bulk meals mount. We found that people really starting to feel that financial strain, so he people had gone out, and Donald is spending in the first month, and then fooling backing the second Ma, so am strategy for that wants to offer free home delivery, and this was also points when some of the major. Issues. Times agree, and we would orch late. Sorry, it meant a people could get a food very quickly and it was. Guarantee does well unlike some of the GIS. Sorry. That was beneficial for us and then the third month. listening to customers them with what we call Bait Faisal, says about four and a half thousand paper in that group armaments, and they're extremely active, and we really gauge what the community! It's feeling and. How impacting them through the conversations that happen on that channel that only the. What we found is that mine's paper were feeling really really ordinary age too much. Their own theory advan drinking too much alcohol ahead. Nerve retains weren't getting answers, not end. It was a little comfort. Foods as well started wasteful that I. Guess as a cry for help to help them. Kindly, their is, so we started on challenge. That telling actually started, we recruited in Riot Stan run first of. Its biggest challenge, sorry fast are the twenty eight days taking just leave and bree nothing else breakfast lunch in snacks, available, little private route and train hunger than study eight people in that group at the moment, and they're extremely active posting every day. They're doing well they before five dollars, they weekly weigh ins and updates and i. absolutely love rating it because you hear. The must heart wrenching stories about how something's happening. Someone's life that who wants them to gain all? They will sign. What's going on the end Nancy? control again I feel empowered and they getting unbelievable results, so I think had fakery challenge on average able lost around six seven kilos on average in renowned lost twelve, will something key allies in the twenty eight days and this time around the. Yard that results are pretty astounding. Sorry are really really a- of. Linemen and my own cremation shown by the twenty eight. Sorry excited to celebrate with them. Now Understand that as a business you have you have plans for international expansion in the future? Can you talk to me about like? What's that going to look like when you're? You're expanding food business internationally, and what will be some of the challenges that you have to overcome. To be able to do that and also. Do you have any countries in mind? WHAT WOULD BE I. Agree Got Trademarks for the USC U K, N China I'm worried simply as well. Look for me. It's probably starting with the US just without the. Language barriers in the are basically epidemic card there. And they've very. True, alternative health, spank, nutrition and food. I think they the first entree we'd really will ask have had towards straying up next force regain working with the CEA. Siro was well sorry. Buddy certainly on the onset of dykes, yes, Coronas obviously upset. Some revolve planning, but that's that'd be first on the Honda and obviously it's such a big country through in this many paypal, the timber share and seventy lives to be changed. and then I the China Review Hi. Depending on, you know he really has to be a matter of timing and when her won't Landon Crews Maureen Recipro-. Everything that you've achieved with beef it food so far. And All the success that you've had but still you've got a Janney ahead of you, I mean. How do you feel at this moment in time? Like? How do you feel about how everything is going? To be honest. It feels like with still rod. Jess started the starting line because the began. The only thing that I'll stop is when I. Different to the hell, mistrial and Two young Keats, and I would hate to think that my children grow up with the current feliks around food and deicing. Synthetic, crude oil than prospered convenience that we leave in on that. I can have any impact We're working with the state. environment were. Trying governments to really be able to change the why paypal sacred food should be saying as for that's medicine, because if us I, and you may not need the medicine which are full side effects anyway, sorry. Will escape going down that off until we get there. Building a Unicorn is a loss in media production. You can find out more about the show and get episode transcripts at our website building a Unicorn Dot, com. This episode of building a Unicorn was hosted, edited and scripted by May Christopher Lawson production assistance by James Parkinson. A theme music comes from Nick Buchanan at Artwork is by Andrew. Neil list. This is the last episode of season two of building a Unicorn and we're taking a break where we work on some new episodes season three, but don't worry. We're not going away for very long. We'll be. Be Back again really soon with some new interviews with some amazing entrepreneurs, and if you've got any suggestions for guests that we should feature building a Unicorn, send them to Unicorn at Lawson. Dot Media, you can also find us on facebook and twitter. Just search for build a Unicorn and I'm at Christopher Lawson thanks much for joining us this season on building a Unicorn I'll speak to again soon.

Kate Brian Connection Cayton Jeff dot Reagan Mike founder Guston Aaron Kate Save Chris Lawson China Dr. Jeff Diaper Disney Melbourne McDonalds Dominos Jenny Keillor
084 Figure Out Where You Want to Go When Growing Your Practice With Dr. Jeff Trembley

The Millennial Dentist

55:54 min | 1 year ago

084 Figure Out Where You Want to Go When Growing Your Practice With Dr. Jeff Trembley

"Dentistry is changing technology. Education and resources are closer to our fingertips now more than ever. Are you ready to learn what millennial dentists are doing to exceed? Patient expectations enjoy dentistry. More and take more vacations or how this generation can join up with the previous ones to make for an unstoppable dental team. Well wait no longer hear your host of the millennial dentist Dr Holzinger Dr Perez and Dr Silly Sullivan. Welcome back. Everyone tried awesome. Hey super first off payment. I gotta say it's good to be back at studio minute. My new smile. I'm glad to be here. Super excited. Have Dr Jeff firmly back on the show? Look I'M NOT GONNA lie. We've had a lot of requests that want to hear about what Dr Tripoli's doing with his practice startups working and payments. Same Way that that's a that's a message. I think that I get a lot is people wanting to you. Know they heard about what was happening with startups. They heard about this. They WanNa Kinda see. Here's what I would like to almost title this episode and see if you see if you all don't mind going this route yes. I'm kind of thinking that we tell something like The top things I've learned or I wish I had known before I started my practice. Oh that's a good one or something something along the lines of like almost like the complication lecture. Yeah Gosh I wish. I wish I had known this. I wish I'd done this different I wish sooner or etc so first off before we kind of jump into the details of the weeds. Why don't you both give me an overview of kind of how things are going and just the overall sense of where the practices at and then I'm GonNa you know stopped me? Stop and I'll jump in and ask questions to try to dig in and kind of pull some of this out because I think that would really really benefit our listeners because we have so many people who are either have either bought practice. They're trying to make it their own more. They're considering taking the plunge and starring practice from scratch and I think that it would be very very helpful to list. Okay so jeff. Why don't you start off? Yes Jeff Okay. My Name Is Jeff. Tremblay I. I opened a practice about a year and a half ago November. Twenty Seventeen And this was a very sudden thing where I left an old practice ads you were an associate whereas associate and you've been associate for how many years graduated in two thousand thirteen. Ut Dental school. I I then left. That practice took up shelter in Dr Pay. Raise place he. He rented a room that was by the way I think that all the time. And how gracious you were imagine. Some somebody comes to you and says doc I need one room in your in your place you mind renting it out to me belly only did he. Do that. Gives you patience. Only did he do that? I didn't really do much. But it was so just laid back. I mean I would imagine because when I came over here I didn't get all my cotton all these things. I just used. Well in the end I ended up like you know I would. I ended up getting him back for it or hang him and you know it all worked out but he extended that that's cool being so so anyway so after two months of being here ms a lot yeah forgot about. I'm like I never signed contracts. You know I'd ask. I know word. I just got cool though. It's cool thing about it but now go ahead so yeah. That happened back in November or October. Right number October of seventeen right okay. So you could have had an and like most people do knowing you know you kind of had a kind of a rock bottom moment or a a moment of you know what it is time for me to smile. Yes I think. A lot of dentists whether it's getting ticked off with who they're working for. Whether that's you know money issue or just wind bill and cultivate with day. Want to cultivate and the culture you know at some point every every has this moment where I'm ready to take the plunge for you. Then you you start going. I found a beautiful spot. A fantastic space about three thousand square feet. I got five ops. It is beautiful. They're very spacious. I love it. It honestly feel like because I'm one of those people who are not wanted to get somebody else's practice. It was so garbage. I'm sorry but there is nothing good and I kept looking looking looking and then whenever this happened I was like where is it. And he's like this is right here. I'm like how is it and they're not winning in. I'm like dude. This is like a lottery ticket. So that's it's a beautiful practice will thank you guys but to to kind of keep this going. I got in there. I didn't have a single patient of record. It was a is using it as a satellite office. He would only come in on Fridays to see. I don't really know what his plan was. I think he you know life got busy for him. He just Kinda held on to hold onto it. I came in purchased it. I didn't purchase a single patient. So you basically buying equipment and renting the space. I don't own the building but it ended up being a blessing in disguise. Here's why the bank had a tough time lending me the money because you have. No how are you going to identify exactly? Well they also didn't know that You know I was receiving one hundred patients a month it my practice was one mater way. Sure and how do you communicate that? That's a hard thing the underwriters act so I had to go out and raise kabbage. Build that office though. Yeah don't want to talk about this so anyway so you had to fight tooth and nail to get help get money and get the dogs make to make it happen in twenty four hours. I found enough money privately to make it happen. Yeah well the reason I set that up. Is the listeners out. There are going to be in their own. Situations are totally have their own hills to climb the hill that I had climbed was unique in that I had to really fight and claw for everything even though I found a great space but the fight really began once I Wants the door open in the practice was mine? Everything from you know redesigning or or how do I update place without spending one hundred thousand dollars and how does how does how do you start to do that? Jeff like how do you like when you get because my question is when when you. You've you've leased space. You bought this equipment you you show up one day. Unlock the door. And it's yours and it's like heck yes I did it. How do you prioritize? What's next like attracting patients? Redesigning stuff hiring team members. How how did you even start to wade through that? That question right there could be a whole podcast but I can go into a little bit. Well okay so when I got there You know the one thing that was was actually okay with the OPS. They're nice and big chairs places to work with you ready to go there. One of the first purchases I made was an electric can piece two of them. I have to let you can't piece motors into the rooms. The two that I work mainly I bought my hygienist Nice Ultra Sonic enhance scaling. Just are equipped her char. I've got a few. Tv's to put in the rooms so he can look at photos and x Rays. And that's you know you can get decent. Tv's for not not a lot of money and they really can but also they're not Samsung. You can't do Samsung eight hundred bucks. I know that's true. So my my big thing is always been if I'm GONNA do Dentistry. I'm not interested in turning and burning. I WanNa be I WANNA do quality. I want to provide something that other. That patients weren't even really aware of and and if I could describe what my opinion of modern dentistry is. It's it would be The most minimal inter- intervention biologically to give you what you're looking for or even getting as close chairman so it's easy to slap tin veneers on a patient. Yeah but what about whitening what about What about doing Added additive resin. Maybe smoothing here Me and then you've got a beautiful smile. What does that look like? You know so. That's always been what attracted me to how I wanted to run an office. So that being said I feel like I'm still in the midst of what's next so kind of in between this for a lot of August that don't know you and they want to like to Kinda give our feedback or a flashback or what your personality is or what kind of finish you are so jeff is always about before even he even practice wanted to open this. His mind was always through a biological dentist. You'd like somebody who. Why do we need to cut? Why don't we change our materials to fit the patient instead of changing the patient to feed our materials kind of mindset so when he started or how that vision of building that practice that he's doing right now that whole vision talk about having vision or the passionate? He's very very passionate about doing that. So we're been never. He was doing this whole website to build out. Everything goes again he goes talks about he had TV because he's important for him. He bought electric campaigns because he's preps are so important so this is him whatever you are because a lot of people are going to be wanting to do for example surgery stuff they. WanNa do sleep stuff. It doesn't it just the practice that they wanna like have passion and that's good. How did you so whenever you have that vision that you this very unique Lot Of people love cosmetic dentist. It's like flash by employ a lot of social media before you even did the office. Tell people that you you started branding yourself as that duck. That's the thing right He used he took advantage of the social media even before he opened his office. Because that's a great thing. Feel like I helped you right. Well what the best move I ever made? I stand by today was contacting Dr Edward Owed the with the Y. Yes I found him back in. Two Thousand Fifteen got brought him to Nashville now. I will forever favorite can get him again. I I it will never be that one. That one was so that was so I was like you can't reproduce this up with Dr Apple. Took that course that was that was but no so he came in here so he got sure he was kind of like your mentor. He's he I would consider him a best friend right over brother. Great Guy I love him. He's flown out to to to San Francisco on a whim just to meet me out there anyway. But the reason that's important is. I realized that the photography was so important for what I was doing because I was seeing some other work for some guys who were cosmetic Denniston town in up until very recently up until the last two three years. How did you get that distinction you? You got that distinction by buying magazine. Ads and billboards. Yeah right exactly or or you. Just you worked long enough right. You became known by the Community Dennis but even still it was still largely perception because it was lack of it was it wasn't like there was no show right. Exactly that's the thing it's all perception based right so what I did was. I decided you know I love the a CD but the most boring thing is they're put us. Yeah and I understand why they have those restrictions but so what I did with my instagram which is J. F. Tremblay shut out J. F. Trembling Alum Nashville is my office. But what what was you know? And this is all kind of rolled up into how my office got going was. I realized early in getting my camera that taking a retracted view in photographing it putting it on the screen and I could look at it as sit back in my chair and look at it and things start revealing themselves to me There with my favorite case that I've done I ended up calling the ceramicist after he was already making the veneers and say we've got a candidate. Midland. I'm looking at this photo. You know we got to make this adjustment. He made the adjustment. It looked great so the photos. I got those going to show instead of taking out magazine ads. Having money to that I would just share. I would be an open source like this is what I'm doing if you see something that I'm doing that maybe applies to you as a consumer. Come see me. I had no idea how it would work in right now. Without a doubt my greatest source of referrals revenue. It's through instagram crazy in out arguments. It's even more just through sharing its direct to consumer marketing through sharing your your stuff right which happens to be one platform business. Graham facebook you know whatever it is but it's it's that direct to consumer right. I make sure I don't do it in a clinical way. I want it to be artistic. I always tell people on the artists who slipped in dental school. Sure you know Because I am. I don't have an not some brainiac so I continue just kind of stayed true to what my strengths were So you know the whole photo studio I had the choice of building out an extra op or putting a photo studio in and I did the photo so let me let me jump in now because I want to. I want to kind of dive into some of this detail. What's crazy to me? Is I look back and even in our early conversations last year when you're starting this is like that's A. That's a hard uphill battle to stay true to yourself. And when money's not coming in right you know when you're trying to fight to make it you know. As far as I know you really didn't go into the insurance route. You stayed fee for service. I Yep which talk about trying to start a practice in this day and age in Nashville with Dennis on could point how did you? What was it like early on? And for those people who are considering trying to follow their dreams when it's going in network with every insurance seems like the right thing to do to make the bills. How did you stay true to that when because I imagine there were there? Were weeks where you're like. Crap that there's no money for me to take out we'll ministries heart industries hard. Starting a new business is hard. I imagine on any platform so by no means. Am I sitting here trying to paint beautiful rosy picture? The struggle's been amazing. In fact this one thing that I've learned now where I am today. Is that the importance of data. And I didn't went opened the practice. My mindset was this is such a new thing that even I'm not gonNA toil over numbers because that's not a real high priority. I think if you deliver high quality product to people see it all work out right well if it's not time yet to toil over these numbers when I couldn't have been more incorrect about that so so talk go into detail. Give me some specifics. That like me like cash which I had seen that great. So so is you know. I'm not in network which means Which means golly. I connect all this but that means the conversation with the patient right away on. The phone is very important. I very very important in in people are uncomfortable with this fact that they've got this great insurance or everybody thinks he got insurance. So that means I get free stuff So realizing that you know the conversions was important. I initially started out in hygiene by accepting thirty five dollars. When you come in you pay thirty five bucks. We received the insurance check if it's short. What our fee is we. Keep the thirty five if they pay in full which a lot of them did. We'd kicked a thirty five back and then stop asking for it. That was the plan. It got so convoluted confusing that January twenty nineteen I said are without. We're going all in. We're going straight up fee for service. If you have the best insurance in the world great you pay US and expect to get that back. Wow this is that going back to them or going back to you. Gotcha which means he's filing a former filing. Oh we file it nice but you know what that means is I kinda doubled down on the philosophy in not on the practicality the business move because patients have left a handful of patients will cau- and and really almost be offended at that because they have heard of it. Before I would see that. Yeah but then about seventy percent once we process and explain it to him on the phone and when I say explain it it means any other way is is kind of a gamble. It's it's sort of a gambling on our behalf My Office is gambling whether we're going to get paid or not so what I did. Is I lowered my fees to something that I thought was Good for the area in in knowing that ninety percent of my patients are Gonna get their whole hiding check back every time yeah And then explaining to them why we do that is important without you know so. That whole process was really important. How did you learn how to do that? How did you learn you train your the person on the phone? Did you bring anybody? How did you also? Did you go through a consultant as you wanted to have some coaches? I do have consultant from. She's great Her name's Danny Monteverde she worked for Jameson and what Danny have really helped me with was looking through our system to find you combing through the numbers to find certain things that are happening that I wasn't aware of when I say I wasn't aware of. I never run a dental practice ensure me things I found out from twenty eighteen that about forty three percent of my hygiene patients had a second appointment while means aside half the time they were leaving and nobody was scheduling them. What is your percentage? Because I tell if we sat down mine hygienist and said you. Don't let anybody out the door without an appointment. I love that you take ownership on that. It's totally because I agree. Totally me you don't take ownership on everything. I'll be the first myself an idiot eight sites other idiots just like at some point. Look I say this all the time? We only have so much bandwidth you only so much. Focus on so much at a certain time. So it's the priority was certain things and so you know you you reset and look back in hindsight. Gosh here's a great area I approve. Let's talk about making this a priority and now sure what you'll see is. That number will start to skyrocket your priority. Here's what's here's what I'm trying to get to about that about pulling numbers so I think you know there are. There are things that are off the though the record book or off the Balance Sheet and then there are things that are on the ballot sheet. If you're planning to run a dental practice or if you're looking to getting into a new startup purchasing an old one one thing you've got to do is understand what reports to pull when the pull them not just pull them but spent some time looking at him thinking about them. What are they me? And I don't have it all figured out but I have a a group of of reports that should be pulled weekly in monthly and then adjustments be made to that because everything else is less concrete you know give you some other Other other reports are statistics that you've seen that have been impact for that. You're glad you're tracking now Well the hygiene reschedule rates won the that's big. Because that's that's essentially that's the the whole at the bottom of the bucket. If if that's not being you could be spending all this money or whatever. It is to get new patients in the door. If they go straight up the bucket. Sure absolutely no good. So you've gotTa Stop. The Leaky Bucket. You've got a you've got to create the behavior in the Office. Almost like impose it on the patient's not in in a forcible way but in a way that they're leaving with an appoints expectation that. I look I come here and then I get my next yeah Some other reports man like Knowing not only looking at reports but seeing how they change so new patients for the first bit I mean. We weren't even really coming through the paperwork. In making sure they filled out who they referred from. So then the next thing you this is important so we put the how they're getting here right so I made it so that the the IPAD. You have to put that in to go the next question. I've got a few of them. Were you can't leave it blank. Well then what so you look at these things and you say okay. Last month I had. I don't know forty to sixty do patients. Where are they coming from and then realizing what we were talking about before we started here? Is that truly? The best source for new patients is other patients in town referral. How does that change your behavior? Okay so I look at this. Say My best patients. My the things that are going the best for me here are coming from other patients and then maybe my instagram. That means how does that change my behavior. I realized instead of running around feeling like I'm in a rat race trying to get back to this or that I slowdown. I think patients for coming in I tell. Them that really helps me they. They want to post on their instagram. I'll leave and go up front with them. We'll have fun and and realizing that I need to. I need to give the gratitude. I need to show them that. There are important to me. And although you don't feel that right away you can see it in these reports over time you know for sure. We're we've been as a team we've been going through Paul homily his making it. Easier patients to say yes his whole kind of curriculum and one thing that he talks about his early on last week is if you're a practice or what. If if your restaurant what were you what would you serve? And if you think about it and you think about it like from a restaurant and hotel standpoint. But you'd think about someone like the Ritz Carlton or like a Fleming's whatever the experience that you get from the person that you know greets you too when you leave is such a different experience than you get at you know. Okay a maybe step down. Oh Charlie's or you know Cheddar or something like that To a Burger fi or AAA to McDonald's. What kind of chicken? You get exactly. Yeah like everywhere. When you think about it like you can get so for someone who wants to deliver the kind of Dentistry. You want to deliver and run. The press is so critical that your practice not only because when he talks about essentially as an. I love this. I think this is gold. Right here said the level of of the level of your dentistry has to equal the level of your basically experience and the care they give to patients because the problem is that to a patient. The quality of the dentistry is less important to some degree. Because it's hard for the they don't get it exactly so they don't. They see an aesthetic outcome. They don't know how much harder it is to do conservative restorations or to to make things blend without just veering. Eighteenth right so to them. It's the experience so we have to make sure that our experience equals the quality of our districts you know what else is interesting people. We have a tough. We don't do a good job of saying exactly what it is. We want people to know. Yes it's meaning. Communication Communication has all types of forms. You know but this. One Tinto Communiqu whenever dentists for example that goes back to our talking about how much we had hard time of a lot of dental students or dental classmates in ut for example or any dental students right now if you back and see that eighty ninety people in your class how many of them were really truly. Would you as a patient go to them and in the same patient or the dental students is going to be a dentist later on so I think the communication comes be a big big factor. Lot of dentists. They expect to pay a lot of money to their assistance to do that for them where they can do it themselves or they do. Like I think it'd be real directing this. Tell me be very very created a lot of drama right so you know the the one thing we podcast viewed by the way has got to find the one of our pissed off. Go ahead go ahead so what I mean is in and I'm not pull the best example from this but what I mean is if you you know if you don't say exactly what it is you mean in your range you know like the This this is my world. My office shore Obviously I WANNA act gracious to everybody in there but this is my turf. You know this. Is it to your name on the building or your loan. It's your s that includes you gotta say exactly what you mean to staff to patients. Expectations For example. I had a friend who cancelled three points consecutive Right so instead of my staff putting him through the protocol. I text him as like look. No more missed appointments. This really compromises me. I have staff here waiting on you. I can't make this up. I can't feel you spot. Don't do this again song today. He came in. He apologized three years ago. He did he did it. Two or three good. But it'd be it'd be so easily to thinking about it right also but what? I mean is with patients You know you you've got to be. I've learned that it helps to be very direct even with Older well whether treatment plan. Why do I WANNA do it this way? Well we could do it that way. But I think he's been finance example. Audience is talking about my own personal experience been built the office. Because we're talking about the same thing pretty much I had about one hundred seventy five thousand one hundred eighty thousand dollars. We've talked about before that didn't collect from the that I had done. These hybrid patients is like I did immediate loaded. Implants everything is there. This patient is not coming back so then I'm like. What did he tell them like? What were they expected? Like what we and what you just said as far as be direct debts what they didn't get from us or I feel like they didn't get but I mean honestly what you have to do what we're doing right now. In order to fix that whole financial problem is writing everything down as a Kaz sometimes also patients like to have that ruin think look is everything is computerized everything right right but then when gladys gets onto like when she's talking to them in the treatment consult rumor. They writing everything K. A. B. Agreed to this thirty thousand twenty thousand ten thousand even five thousand. You have to pay by this date initial this initial that scandalous and give it to them. Because that's your only copy then if you're not directly with them because this is how I was you can't pay it it. It's okay next time for your post op and then the post op became two years later. So that's why direct talking about T- Kazan struggled with the whole one hundred seventy thousand dollars. How much to write off and do it. It's it's hard to be directed till the the direct message to you. Is You just lost? Two hundred dollars not being direct. You learn very quickly. So so what would as we kind of Jeff? I WANNA bounce over to pay me here in second and kind of get his experiences from this way if you had to kind of give me the one what's been the one hardest thing that you didn't necessarily expect before you went in this whole journey. What would you say that's been you're asking me? Yeah okay The hardest thing the rate of well if I get real real narrow on it. I'm pretty savvy with Computers Photoshop. Light Room I can get through programs. I've had the toughest time with my website with my marketing. It's almost like the one thing that I that I run. Which is my instagram. Is the only thing she shooting? Us alive in in in the reality that nobody is ever ever ever going to give you their best effort right away unless you extracted out of them unless you don't you know how like for example. I had a meeting with a girl that I'm GonNa do some radio ads for It wasn't really clear how many how many actual radio spots I was going to have I was like I'm not signing still you right. How many total ads there are. She's like well. You can look at counted up. I know like go back. Redo this because I want to know how many because you you'll learn if you don't do that you'll find out you had twenty eight instead of fifty five like you thought and then it's too late you so I'm learning that One of the hardest things about opening the practice was having to be on top of so many things. Yeah and then also the realization that if you let something go or don't give it the attention it's not gonNA be. Yeah I got burned out now. Your yours was in websites which is thank God. I didn't have to worry about bat. But there's a lot of different things that I got burnt. First thing for me was like I always said it. 'cause COUPLE OF WEEKS AGO. I had another podcast with the students of North Carolina and this was my biggest thing was whenever I bill. Is it rainy? My biggest thing was when I built the office. I had no idea how much the front off because I was show. Workup up in the clinical world that I didn't know how much front office meant so going through opening the office and there were days. I remember my answer. The phone there working. I from what I didn't know how important the front was and did not just the front person because is what I thought and let me tell people because I'm going to tell you the problem and then tell you this Lou. Shir Scher so the problem was I thought my money. Whatever I save up I'm going to hire the best front office team in the world so I'm going to have like a Real Madrid Barcelona in the front and then I'm going to be like Real Madrid and Barcelona back because I got this right. The clinical mind and then just figure out how much you want or how much so now let me find his best front office people and trust me. It's not that person is then I realize it's not them. It's me is expected them to read my my expected them to know. I expect these people were getting paid. Pretty good sixty seventy even close to. Sometimes you're higher but me being they. I don't know if the word but like not wanting to go through the struggles of learning the front and wanting to have to pay for it. You know like Hey. Do it not learning. That's where he caught me. That's one hundred. Eighty thousand dollars came from swear. I saw that is missing and all of that. I got a dime a Pearl for pearls. So give me the Pearl. Recently office. A small got a front desk high jettison in assistant so obviously duties get blended between people correct a sharp separation. So what I did because I love lists. I've got clipboards upfront. Everybody's got their name on it just blank lines and so. Somebody needs me to send a photo to a specialist. They don't come to me. They go right it on the clipboard. Because if it's not on the clipboard it doesn't happen. I love that when it finishes I cross it off so right now list. I've got a whiteboard. Office is my giant Whiteboard for that reason. Whiteboards are great however their psychology behind it because I like because the crossing off saying and seeing that. Oh you see the progress you know. And then like if. Somebody's got eighty things on their list and one person has crossed off. You know what I say. Go grab her clipboard. And see what you can do. I'm serious it's great. It's it is like this thing I've done that's good. It's list ability being eternity which is nice so so payment. When did my question? What point did that become a priority for you or when did you really notice it when I realized the money? There's like my bank account is getting negative and then the bank is calling like getting overdrawn and that's been. I was like wait. This is getting serious so then I was like okay. Do I need to do. And that's when I started learning about the front desk which I'm still learning. I don't get me wrong. But what one of the things? I thought it would be cool. Not Cool but one of the things. I felt like we need to have done or should have had done. Is the vision for my team. Members like okay. So when are hired? Yeah tell us about that so I hired. When I first opened the office I felt like a lot of these things. Okay so it was your vision vision. It was like you guys talk about always your name on it and this and that and that's how I felt but then it is not the same thing to these people that work there. So how do you? How do you make that transition? How do you make them to be a part of that? How do you make that the how you make them feel like they are just like you kinda where? I'm here because there's almost two visions right like there's some degree there's your vision correct really. What ultimately makes what moves the practice. Is this this? Cumulative team being witch so you have wider in right so without seem vision has been the hardest thing that now that I have a good car. Gosh it's been two and a half years now that I have people the video but then we have. We have like a really. I think another thing that is really good. Good people that are like me a like minded people so for example. Talk about there was. There's so many people that want to work and there are so many assistance out there but they might not be the right person for you. Charles your vision. Whatever it might be why not be the same with like okay. So here's my thing. I felt like you know how back in the day they say. Oh leave whatever is at home. Don't bring it into your day. Forget that no matter what you do in their home matters so if I right now when I interview people I don't care about you tell me who is your honestly. It's all about your personal life because if you cannot handle your personal life you see you think you're gonNA handle these thirty thousand forty thousand dollars or this office. That has so much going on. So there's more to it if you have The staff member that or a struggling Like crazy on a lot of different. Bring him in talk to them and some of that stuff. I felt like helped me when I had these consultants recently. That are hired. Where we're going to have you had him on the show a couple of times crabtree people. That are Kinda. Lighten enlightening mean like. Hey you gotta sit down talk to them about. This is what you want to do and expectations. It'd be more direct so like you. Jeff already said it. How you gotta be more directly to be like telling them. This is what I want because a lot of times to you might. Perfection might not be what they're wanting to do when you'll be talking to buy in. It's it's dangerous right now and it really takes. That's been trying 'cause they're me more than because they're asking. Hey do this and this and I'm like Oh my God. This is what I want but before then he was just me trying to cry out for help luggage. Somebody sees what I tried to do and it was so hard. Don't get me wrong. It's still hard because I'm going through that whole transition and I feel like honestly I was talking to another person Somebody Akil Alexander Menia Minne- Minneapolis yesterday. Because he's opening his office and he was talking about it and I said how important how much mature I feel like. I've got or adult like literally thinking of building this office. Because he was asking me. Is it worth it or should I just do these corporate corporate corporate And I was manny makes you a different person. I feel like I'm so much more superior than what I was two years ago. Honestly in so many different aspects that it allows me to be more better for my patient's also will somehow you figured out how not to sleep and just work all the time right? That's his you know to to get on to touch exactly on what you're saying. I think we talked about reports. There's a story that's being told in your software. One of the first things you've got to do whether you have opened dental or you you're using we've if you don't sit down and learn all the intimate ways to run that you won't. I mean we've been operating with a lot of inefficiencies. I sat down. I watched some open dental towards I found out so many th- basically there are ways to pull reports that paint a picture of your practice. It's insane do you recommend dental or some of those reporting dental Intel atom pain or reports practice. I think at the end of the day ultimate miles says just track them. I don't care you do them. I like dental intel or practice by numbers. Because I'm because it's it's I'm lazy and it paints a very clear picture for me and some other aspects of it I like beyond the reporting from From a recall standpoint in finding patients ultimately they all pull the numbers from your practice management software meeting all the data's in your practice management software. So you can pull reports from Eagle. Soft opened at all districts softwares is. You could have somebody not you know like. Let's say you have a consultant halfway across the country. They don't have to get in your software to look right and that's a big advantage. That is nice Another thing is when you You know as we evolve as practice owners. I've learned that having the data organized is great but it has to become through. So what I'm doing now with my team. This very recent like in the last two weeks is pulling them together. Such as accounts receivable issue. There shouldn't be a single cat receivable now office. No fee for service for service's exactly so it should be in but they're on there right so what's going on. Why are these things exactly? It's or you know for me. It's okay what is the cumulative hygiene reported percentage but like I is really good. One suck okay. What what's your verbiage that they're not doing you know that they're doing or they're doing or what. What's your collection percentage? Or what's your what's your ninety day. Are you know what your you know all these things all these things matter? Will you know what I they do matter? But you know what I'm finding out in at least it doesn't exist right now. It would be something I would love to put together for the future generation. Let's talk about reappointment. Reappoint would be nice to review once a week because if you do it once a month. They may not remember that patient. Or what HAP- Shirt. So once a week daddy go down. There's an accountability and it's clear for a while. So we we were doing that for I was. I was having them every week for a while. I was printing out every patient that din reappoint. I wanted a reason why they didn't report. And you found that it was a waste because they were giving you good reasons why we gotten to the point where yes burdette into them and low at some point when you're ninety billion our like ninety to ninety nine percents so when you're when you're nine out of ten patients okay you're not going to have a hundred percent like there's going to be a college kid there's gotta be someone moving there's GonNa be stuff that happens sure so I just but I see that Or or it was stupid stuff right like not attaching procedures. It's like if you don't attach the if you don't if you just reappoint them but don't attach brophy code or whatever it is will but that's sloppy to me right. It's not sloppy. You're you're sorting through a problem when you do that. That's what I've learned is so important to go through with the sorting through the problem. Where you find out what's going on well because because ultimately because but because what will happen with these numbers crapping and crap out right so if you don't if you don't put in numbers I get shitty numbers. Yeah a lot of it. Lot of it was was that regard. But what I love about this episode though what I love about both of what we're y'all told me is nothing has to do with clinical dentistry. That's true we didn't talk about if you think about it. Not One thing. Y'All mentioned have to do because I think so. Much of it is the fear of. Okay what can I do this or can handle it? It is Gosh I mean it's nothing was clinical nothing. Yes it's interesting and so to me Stephen. Look at who to me to me GAM if I did the video of him look at this guy to the young doctor who our older doctor it. It comes down to business and building a team around you to help you sh- wade through a lot of that stuff. Well you know what's Funny Cam? You know we've been talking kind of the guys peeling off these new practices. I would love to run you through all these because I feel like you're much more seasoned his systemized mature office. You're dealing with more people more patients more. You got another doctor. It's it's similar the different it would be super. It'll be fun that the big differences are. It's the same stuff. It's just trying to is rewiring in existing practice. A lot of it do because what because the perspective that would be nice day too is the differences the differences between having to rework a practice already. Like you buy a practice outright. And now you're trying to redefine it versus starting from scratch. There was never no pre. There's no it is what it is. There's no no we used to do it. This way. You know that that becomes the difficult part is as well. We've done it this way for so long. So you know what I would have been one of the hard things that you've had to do would be tomato audit assistance like if you have somebody who's kind of had that front desk they're running the front. They're responsible for these systems their season. They're respected. They need to be audited too. I mean you need to see what they're doing And I imagine that would be a very difficult thing to come in and say. How do we make sure that this because everyone is flawed? Everybody's got their shortcomings. So how do we make sure? Everybody's how can I coach this person find out where they need to be coached without offending them or seeming? Like you know it's just it's it's tough. It's real tricky. I mean I still deal with that my staff. I don't want to seem like Coming down on them or being too hard but I gotta ask some direct questions to me though. It's easy for us Because what I what I say is it's it's I lead by example. Who takes more see than us who who works harder on what we do more than us who stays later like at some point payment can sit there and say to anybody because because if his team doesn't respect how much ever he's putting in himself trying to get better than he's got the wrong team you know so at some point like. I need my team if my if I truly if they if they truly know and believe in that I'm constantly trying to get myself better than they than they know what I come to them that it's more out of this cultivating of overall trying to better the tied result ships. Even Michael Jordan had coach you go on and on and on about look. It's not a it's not a negative. I'm getting mad at you. I'm doing this to me. I'm the one that's got like I wanted to. And when it comes from US point they either. It's either the wrong person or I think they get on board and a lot we have. We had eighteen members Before I got there only three of them are still there. Well so he said Joe. I'll tell you it was less that though a more they realized they weren't gonNA fit in the culture came to. I can vouch for this because I was. I'm insured. I see him every week. And I've been going back and forth back and forth and it is not really what he what he really did after he started working. There is what I realized after I started working at the corporate where I came in and I saw what's going on and I was like dude. There's no way for what I WANNA do to do it with these folks exactly. What he was doing was exactly what I did you get. There's no way you can work with these for because their mentality mindset is in the eighty s and most honest. Well Ninety minutes to go back to your point. Jeff is they won't and Stephen they'll be res they'll be held captive by exempting existing systems or existing team members even though their names on the building. And and I don't mean that in a cocky way are good but at some point like I gotTa have the people there that want to support the vision one because even though it's a team vision it'd be on the same page there. There's a lot of psychology involved. And and if you you know thank goodness for my dad. He got checks me. A lot asked me a lot of hard question. Do you may two and may two has staff patients. That's what I've learned patience. I tell you where I was three years four years ago. Whatever when I come in where I am. Now it's so much just like it one cooling off before I really assess something Not Trying to react in the moment yet. Don't be reactive. Be Proactive and trying to like. Okay let's take a deep breath. Let's let's gather the information. Let's think about it then. Let's have a conversation you know but but it's it's interesting. It's so it's so much more about managing people running a business. Those think I think the heart the heart aspects of what we do a lot of times. Yeah no you're right. You're right slowly in in for people who feel lost in almost like they're overwhelmed. Start with that damn checklist. Tell everybody you can even go as far as saying few initiate something. Write it down. I love it. I love the checklist so so I could see. Chiklis manifesto from Atop Gandhi have the book. I haven't read it yet. I read the first page is pretty good. But then it's to considerable. Yes too long. I want to wrap it up with this question. Yes What is what is something. You're you're try having come from where you where you've been having both now. I think you're both on the H. A. Incredible Path to success with these practices. What is one big goal? The you're wanting to achieve in two thousand nineteen with your practice. Gophers I go. I go go go I want to achieve. The my lifestyle is going to change your soon. I'm GONNA BE OWNING A lab and lab work in the House. It's big it's huge. That is my biggest thing. I've been looking forward. I just closed on a house yesterday that I'm not as excited as I am about building that lab here this so that's ultimately the goal is honestly not the lab is not the money's not all that is to me. I felt like I became a dentist because I wanted to control my work in quality and I just cannot do that with talking on the phone and communicating and Photoshop on worklessness. Billet here and do it all together. So that's my biggest goal dreamed this year. That's maybe hopefully next year. My biggest thing is to find a lab within a mile of me just couldn't payment my without a doubt the mine mine is. It's very similar to yours. Payment but in a different stroke plan is because I spend hours and you do too well. I spent hours waxing things. Yeah and he you know. He's got his own vaccine. His office Razi. Last time I saw waxing instruments was indeed one well and I paid somebody sorry base. And here's why give me a smile and I can. I can make it better additive. If I can't send them to Ortho and then I can so you WanNa be also on it so what I WANNA do is in two thousand nineteen to kit out of the analog in be digital the you know everybody I talk to says you don't WanNa be doing your own digital mockups. No way outsource set to the lab even payments says that. Yeah just like they told me you don't want to spend too much time on temps or whatever you WanNa make crappy so they come back. I've done the opposite. I'll do smile design four people. He's fine I for impatience from my chair. I'm like I'm like dude. You're making eight out of ten come to make so this is what I really WanNa do. I WANNA become a an expert in EXO cad. Because I see that that'd be cool that X. Academy as a dentist. The one thing that's really really important is smile design so I would rather outsourced a lot of the other stuff I'm doing now and just people come in. I look at them. Scan them take a few photos. Spent forty minutes designing the smile. Now I don't have the printer yet but all this stuff will flow out of four out of the right and there are guys doing that when you say forty minutes forty minutes or are you going to these. Because don't you think this is going to be a lot easier in the down next few months to where you can actually take six different teeth and put them in Chur or but it's the thing is again going back with Jeff. Jeff is extremely extremely Selective in terms of like what is your with to length ratio. What is the cusp is GonNa look like how much light is going to come in? If the the lateral is curved and a lot of these things that me and solely are like it looks the same for Jeff is five trains. Yup so that's why you gotta be like. Why are you GONNA DO FORTY MINUTES OF WAX DESIGN? Because you're not getting paid for that but you're going to charge patience for that are you. Well it all work out. Well what's going to happen very soon? Is You'RE GONNA pick. Yes a series of teeth. You're GONNA hit enter. It's going to sink it where thinks it should be and then you make the and then you send them to. My Buddy over here does along for a week later. Dr Diego good to see you. May you slowly to imprint. I don't think it's classic rightness for those of you. Who Don't know. This only Sullivan was in dental school. Yeah cray time. That's funny transit. Look up to this guy so much man. Cool man to his killing at Tony Robbins. Dench here all right bye. Thank you so much for joining us. I've really enjoyed this episode Help you to please reach out to us at J. F. Tremblay at Dr Pay Ray Admiral on Instagram. Yes please write us a good review or something. Oh we payment is totally off spot on. We're trying to build and we've been bad about asking our patients in this case our fellow colleagues and so we were asked to go on I tunes leaves at Five Star of you and you WANNA leave us a two star this. How many listeners? Do you have on any one episode a couple thousand okay. Everybody go on to Sullivan Dental partners. Please leave a five-star argue Asheville by new smile. Yes I hope to see. Thousand New Five Stars should not thank you so much guys. It's BEEN AWESOME FOR SMARTER. Not Harder thank you for listening to the millennial dentist visit. Us Online at millennial dentist DOT COM.

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059: Dr. Jeff Volek - 10+ Years of Keto Research, Cholesterol on Keto, Exogenous Ketones, and How Keto is Reshaping Outdated Nutritional Guidelines

The Keto Answers Podcast

1:00:02 hr | 1 year ago

059: Dr. Jeff Volek - 10+ Years of Keto Research, Cholesterol on Keto, Exogenous Ketones, and How Keto is Reshaping Outdated Nutritional Guidelines

"So. Hello. And thank you for tuning into Bikita answers podcast. I'm your host. Dr Anthony guests in this week. Join me is Dr Jeff bullets if you don't know of this guy's name. You do much research. He has been the author on over three hundred articles two hundred lecturers five plus books. He's just one of the first people in the space, and Dr Stephen Finney or the ones who kind of have pioneered they'll a movement ten years ago or so they started with the signs of low carbohydrate living book in and also the art insci- of low carbohydrate performance in with that. I mean, they were just years and years, and you're the head of the game and have pushed all the research forward. They're not doing a lot of crazed f so whether that's research in fighting outweigh the benefits are to move forward and drank diet or using verte health, which is the company trying to get reversal of one hundred million people from diabetes, and the work is just non stop. So it was great. Conversation with Dr Volk about everything that he's learned last ten twenty thirty years. I mean this. One of the most knowledgeable blanquita diet. So couldn't think him enough for being on the show and taking his time on his busy schedule. So without further ado, here's my conversation with Dr Jeff of elect. But before we get started. I wanna let you guys in a little secret that is we have some brand new key Avar flavors in. So the same thing that we had with brownie that you guys loved and went crazy about we sold out in five days when we release that one. We have lemon poppy seed in salted caramel. So these are just ridiculous lemon poppy seed, tastes exactly like a frosted lemon, poppy seed, Muffin or cake, or whatever you buy at Starbucks that delicious, but kills you don't buy those things, and then also salted caramel, which tastes pretty much. Like it says so care mouth. So these things are great on the go as a treat whatever same standards, we have the other bar. So we tested bludgeoned with this noble, spike, no Kitone levels, actually increased couple team members heat levels. And yeah. Otherwise, the exact same call Jin from ten to eleven just because you know, ten grams was enough that we go eleven otherwise these things are amazing. So if you wanna try up before they got a stock, which me happen, very very soon. We just launched them perfectly dot com and use the code new Kita bars at twenty percents off your order this whole month. So go suck up. Now. If you already have bingo favorite flavor nine is the lemon poppy seed on route that little sucker in enjoy it for this show. Jeff folic. Thank you for me on the show today. My pleasure. Great to be here. Anthony, you are a busy, man. I think and so really appreciate you taking time to concert. So for the few people who may not know of you, you give me a quick background of the year extensive work history. Think that when I was looking through in preparing to me like three hundred scientific research journals two hundred lectures, five bucks, many many decades of work in this field. So if you just maybe give people a short background. Yeah. I stumbled into this area. Boy, it's it's going on twenty five years ago or so early nineties as a budding graduate student who wasn't convinced what I was being taught by professors was exactly correct in an S bene-. Interesting rabbit hole to go down published. My first studies in in the early two thousand but I started doing experiments in the mid nineties, and and it's been quite a journey. So it's been really to, you know, two decades of research in this area and seen some highs and lows in terms of the. Acceptance in general attention on a diet, but I have to say the last couple of years in particular have been quite refreshing just in terms of the volume of science in overall interesting Kita genyk diets. Have a Google Scholar alert sat and it seems like every single day. Now, I'm getting some new stuff come across the my Email inbox a couple years ago as maybe once a week, I was getting something. So yet the pace has just been astronomical as of lately when user to going is you were just interested in the physical performance. What were those things that your professors were telling you that you maybe weren't on board with needed to solve yourself? Well, I was I started out in dietetic and became a registered dietitian. And so I had to classic training which unfortunately, really hasn't changed much today. So you know, everything was about low fat. Hi, car, lots of grains, and etc. But then I went onto graduate school in exercise physiology because I was interested in sport nutrition exercise metabolism. And you know, but it was it was right at the time of entering into graduate schools master's student when it really started to challenge some of the ideas of especially managing diabetics. I mean, we were taught as dietitians that we needed to feed, you know, anyone with type two diabetes over half their calories from carbs and wasn't quite smart enough to understand why that didn't make sense. I thought I just didn't quite get it. But it just didn't make sense to me the more studied it the more. I was right. It doesn't make any sense. But really inspired me to wanna study metabolism on a deeper level and understand this in the more got into it. A lot of it was self teaching and reading a lot of articles the more realized a lot of what we think we know is is actually incorrect in you know, in professors who were were not really advocating low car. So they were confirming the status quo, which is athletes need carbs was that just few strategies that the feelings register incorrect or was that what was the main problem that you have with it at that point status quo. Well, there's no doubt DEA both in general nutrition as well. As for nutrition, there's an emphasis on high carbohydrate diets is being healthy, especially in in for athletes where you have coming out of the sixties with a lot of the work in Scandinavia with. Glycogen being discovered in the relationship between high carb diets and glycogen is being obligated for. High performance, and and that really led to carbohydrate loading. So you have this carb supremacy paradigm that's been going on now for forty or fifty years, and it's more or less, you know, the more carbs better fuel before during after exercise in. We're seeing now that that doesn't work well for a lot of people, and we can get into this more. But you have a lot of athletes really struggling with this type of approach when they really abandoned their car bloating, folk this moron protein fat and limit to carbs. It's nothing short of transformative for a lot of these folks. So. Nutrition's very complicated. There's no silver bullets. But I think this mindset of. As pump as much carbs as possible is not correct. I would I would argue. It's consumers few carbs as possible while maintaining optimal performance is a better strategy Annette doesn't necessarily mean Kita genyk or even very low carb for some athletes, but it's a it's a mind shift. It's a different paradigm of instead of maximizing carbohydrate intake, you're really focused on minimizing it while trying to optimize performance in that could be different for different athletes. It can even be different within a person ending on their goals in life sore status. If the as you age, you tend to get more carbon dollar in in so your needs can change over time in in response to different events in your life. So this this is something that, unfortunately, is is very complicated. There's no simple answer. Here. But I think we've over emphasized carbs in general in Iraq. Nord low carb is an option for athletes in anonymously in. So was the first vertically dove into his performance in regards Kara hydro consumption. Well, actually, I always I would say that what you really started my interest in wanting to even go to graduate school and become was always leaving after a masters, but I really felt in lovers cert- with search in the decision was pretty easy to stick around another four or five years and get a PHD, but I became quite interested in fat metabolism in cholesterol, like protein metabolism. Because a lot of the current dietary guidelines are based primarily on the diet heart high popped assists, which was Ansel keys in the really primarily the sixties and seventies. It really disdain. This theory was promoted in his still in many ways promoted today, but that was all based on the idea that over consumption of fat, specifically saturated fat, raise cholesterol, and that intern increased risk for heart disease. So, you know, I really initially gonna get focused on studying how nutrition low carb diets affected cholesterol metabolism. And that's that's been a continuous interest of mine were still doing studies in that area. Because it's just fascinating end. If we're actually positive for a second. I mean, I think that I have heard on the Keita space this term of lean mass, hyper responder, how'd you break that down a digestible format for people who've who haven't really understood a lot of the science. Yeah. Well, the I think just to take a step back. If you look at how Kita genyk diets affect cholesterol metabolism in generally have very uniform response in terms of triglycerides down consistently. And that's good HDL cholesterol. Good cholesterol goes up in most people and LDL cholesterol. However, which is the one physicians focused on on prescribe statin, if that goes up that is quite variable in terms of colest- LDL cholesterol concentration we've done dozens of studies including highly controlled beating studies with precision controlled meals, and you know, you take hundred people feed them the exact same food for a month measure their cholesterol under the most well-controlled conditions in what you'll find is have the people their LDL cholesterol goes up the other half. They go down. Some people goes up quite remarkably might may be fifty points in another person that goes down fifty points. And and so if you dig a little deeper, you know, now, we have really good evidence that LDL cholesterol is not just a singer. Oil type of particle. It's small particles large particles have different composition in. There's very good evidence. Now, although I will admit this is controversial. But if you look at the evidence now, it's pretty clear, it's the small dense LDL particles that are most after Janik in confer the most risk for cardiovascular disease, and it's tied to triggers red levels. So it's no surprise on Akita genyk diet. You see consistently the small atherogenic particles go down in that's independent of whether or not you are a, hyper responder in terms of your LDL cholesterol. So that's just kind of the so you get into this paradigm of do believe, it's the total cholesterol, that matters LDL cholesterol concentration. Believe more on the HDL small LBL particles are the ones that. Our most important into you know, simple answers. Nobody knows for sure. But Kito a ketogenic diets definitely improve one in loaf. Head diets are definitely better lowering LDL cholesterol. So you have a sort of conflicting paradigms here, but you know, the idea of hyper bonders, so there seems to be in this kind of, you know, new area. There's only a few studies a lot of anecdotal testimonial. Data out there. But it seems that if you add exercise, especially high volume endurance, exercise to Akito genyk diet, a greater percentage of people manifest in hyper cholesterol mic response. So in other words, share in Durance athle- gonna care Jack died there's a much better chance you end up being one of these hyper respond IRS. And so we don't know exactly what accounts for that. Whether there's just. Some inherent genetic up propensity successful, endurance athletes, have whether there's trillion interaction between exercise I suspect it could be a little bit of both. But probably the latter simply because especially in these alternate Durance athletes that are very successful and well trained that they are prodigious fat burners function of cholesterol is to transport fat around the body through the bloodstream, and if you need to move fat around at a greater rate in more efficiently. It makes sense that you would expand your cholesterol pool. It's not that. It's Athar genyk. You just need more lipid carrying vehicles to move fat to the muscle and other tissues organs that are using a lot of fat than we know keyed after the athlete really anybody who's key to adapted devils their rate of fat-burning, but. Especially in these endurance athletes where you see extremely high rates fat oxidation. So we think it's a functional adaptation that's actually serves a purpose. More that it's a state of flux things moving around more. And I think that we can confuse that with a lot of clinical assumptions, which is at higher of whatever cholesterol that means bad in you need to go down because you're unhealthy. Whereas if someone's sedentary lifestyle, not moving the union bunch of terrible food that that maybe that correlation does make a little bit more sense. But if you know every other marker, we see inflammations low oxidative stress is low oxidized LDL's Lau, small park is low things like that. I think we can just come up with the with the updated model on this year's doing not exactly right. All the other biomarkers pretty much anything you can think of measuring improves so into it's very isolated increase in LDL. And you know, the skin. To the whole controversy around cholesterol is a risk factor, which you know, that's a highly beloved belief, by physicians in most healthcare professionals. But the reality is, and I don't wanna totally dismiss. But it's I think it's fair and accurate to say that it's been overstated how important cholesterol levels are in a lot of that's been driven by drug companies for as we have very effective drugs that can decrease cholesterol. So I think they've. That's just say influenced the narrative a bit on that. If you really look deep into the evidence relationship between cholesterol levels, heart attack, heart disease, are not Diculeng, strong and. You know, cholesterol is fine. If it's circulating in the blood. It's only when it penetrates the arteries contributes to atherosclerosis, which is really more of an inflammatory mechanism than a cholesterol mechanism. So we you push one of the first bucks on. I would say key die that the modern form of Arden signs of low carbohydrate living in kind of immediately after the hour, very soon. After that the same thing aren't signs of low carbohydrate performance in other me what eight eight tennis years ago now. Yeah, it's hard to believe. But I believe the ad were pro ching decades. So it's time to update what was so that's things. I wanted to touch with you on what are the things that you would update if you go back in really second versions of each of these generalize Kita outs or low carbohydrate leaving in as well as performance quarter. The things that we know now that we didn't back then. Well, a couple of things that probably the most obvious new. New newer area of Kitone research is the now recognition that beta hydroxybutyrate, the principal circuiting tone is a is a potent signalling molecule, so it's acting like a hormone in. This is in addition to its well documented a role isn't alternative fuel. So now, it's it's it's it's even more plead trope in terms of how we look at Kia genyk diets in how they're functioning, it's. It's it's it's really hard to pin down a specific mechanism because it works a lot of different pathways in. Now, we have a whole bunch more. You know, for example. We know that made hydroxybutyrate is potent h deck inhibitor Histon de assimilation hitter, which affects gene expression and up regulates antioxidant defense. It also decreases inflammation through the P three and flam. And so these are direct signaling effects of Keat zones. You know that happened to explain a lot of the clinical outcomes, you know, we had documented in many previous studies. But now we actually understand mechanism bit more. So this is really interested. A lot of the basic scientists now wanting to now look at various ways of inducing ketosis in for example, looking at longevity. You've got a lot of interest now in that area because of these signaling affects of key tones, so that's one we really didn't touch on that much at all in the books, and that's really because that work kinda started seven or eight years ago in their spent a lot of a lot of. Subsequent publications supporting that. So with that maybe lend a hand to people who supplement with key tones either with Saul to esters removes your viewpoint on the ceiling molecule aspect, obviously. Yes, it can. Allow yourself to have an alternate fuel or addition to fuel especially when you're becoming Kito adapted. But with a role catering supplements, I mean is there possibly that? They are providing a lot of signaling benefits, or what is your view on that? Yeah. Well, it's possible. But this is a whole new area too. And we're really in an embryonic stage and understanding how these Kitone and different forms of factors Yala Judy and whether or not they mimic recapitulate, the human response to a ketogenic diet, a big area of interest for me. But again, we don't there's so many more questions than answers and we've been trying to move this field forward. But what you have to realize is there's there's gonna be differences for sure almost guaranteed. But the question more is are there some similarities because a kid genyk diet? Some of the benefits are attributed to keep downs. But many of the benefits are more related to the restriction in carbohydrate, lower, insulin stimulation in signaling and some of the downstream responses to that. And you're not going to get most of those benefits such as enhanced fat oxidation just by taking his key tones consuming carbs along with. So I have an open mind. I think these these new supplements need to be investigated. But it'd be premature to say you could just replace the Keita genyk diet with exaggerates towns, keep eating all the carbs you want. But I do think there's probably going to turn out to be some important locations of exaggerate ski tens maybe even as an adjunct to the Keita genyk diet, or as a sort of lead into a. Jack died for people that may struggle with getting into ketosis. There's many many questions in potential applications. Just a lot of sort out. The yet likely difference is between the different types of executives key tones, whether it's Esther salt in what minerals are attached to the salts and so forth. So mechanism is one of the main things guys would have included. What about second third big big things that you know, now that we didn't know before. Well, just just the volume of research out there. I mean in almost every area. I mean, we had good evidence that diabetes was highly mental decay jank diets, but we have even stronger evidence. So we would just update some of the literature basis. You know, when we wrote the books there was not a lot of interest in cancer and some of the different neurological conditions outside of epilepsy. Alzheimer's, for example, there's some really. Strong preclinical data now for those targets that I think are worth writing about. Now, we still have a lot of questions because we don't have large randomized clinical trials, but I I allow that work is underway and the preclinical data animal studies in smaller human studies, case studies all very promising and just mechanistically metabolic ly- the theories of pretty strong. So it's really exciting times while we wait for some of this work to get done. So this there would be areas date around sort of other clinical targets beyond obesity, diabetes metabolic syndrome, which are pretty tightly linked to the insulin resistant FINA type. In his far as a performance edgy goes. I mean was one year I still a huge driving factor of researchy do. But I mean, what are the big things that we now is that tation periods. It electrolyte needs. Like, what are what are the big things that may be like, oh now that it's eight hundred nineteen we know this I should put that in before well that that that area of performance, which is kind of a broad term. But in terms of enhancing, physical performance and even meant mental cognitive abilities. It's moved forward. Slowly. So we could certainly update what we wrote. I think we were pretty right on with what we wrote there's been a few studies published that confirm a lot of what we wrote. But but that area moves really slow in part because it's really hard to get funding in general to study Jack diets in any area. But it's especially difficult in the area of sport performance red lettuce performance, just because it's not something the mainstream sponsors again, I h would would even consider. So it's it's really hard area to move forward because of limitations in funding. But, but there have been, you know, a few studies here their published over the last few years that that show positive effects of Kita genyk diets. If you had limited money to study, some of these things like what are the top few pressing issues that you think would unlock the next wave of research. Well, you know, we're really focused here at OSU in two main areas are thrust one is the performance side of it in that is really more on the military applications. So how can we enhance soldier health readiness resilience? So we think that very broadly in terms of just enhancing the human condition or optimizing human abilities, and for the soldier that can take on a lot of different aspects. But that crosses over into athletes as well at the end of the day these soldiers are need to perform just like athletes to in also because funding wise, we have opportunities to go to department of defense or darva until fourth them if we take that route. So that's one big vote. But it's pretty broad because we're looking at everything from you know, how ketosis might enhance physical performance to cognitive abilities to protection from concussions in enhancing, recovery, etc. The other big areas that were focused on here. No, she was cantor. And I think that's one of the next frontiers. As I said, the the data very promising now, but we really need better human studies. And so we have one ongoing trial. Now, it's still relatively small study. But compared to what's been published it's the largest human trial right now. And that's in women with stage for metastatic breast cancer in a can't talk too much about that. But it will say him. It's feasible in women except the diet. No problem in they they get into nutritional. Joses and the really results look very promising. And these are women in a really sick. They prognosis is is pretty poor with this kind of diagnosis and treatments more or less palliative that point so so we're very excited about that project. But we're we've got a lot of other projects in pipeline to to look at everything from combining gauging diet with different drugs that could be synergistic with Kita genyk diet in also looking in different types of cancer. So the think that's going to be a really exciting area over the next several years decades, really because there's a lot of work that needs to be done in that replacing some sort of stairs of care or is it as agile therapy. How do you imagine a best case scenario checking out is a great question. In most cases, I think most people are feeling ki ki genetic diets. As an adjunct to other therapies, so if you're getting radiation therapy or chemotherapy or even immunotherapy the hypothesized must cases the Decatur genyk diet would enhance synergies with those other treatment Paradyne's. As far as bringing it back to your your focus on military personnel. You said a study published last month immune group, people you want to maybe walked through findings there and me highlight highlight you guys got to refresh. Sure. Well, this is kind of a. Pilot study in many ways because we wanted this dash with military that we could even recruit a group of military personnel in get them to accept the diet in in get them into ketosis because that one of their biggest concerns to be quite Frank. They they don't think that they don't wanna change too much work to change the diet of soldiers. So so we recruited a group of of people into the study that are part of the Ohio State. Our army ROTC were most of them were from our we had a few others. So these were. Relatively young. I mean age about twenty five though the few up in the thirties early forties. And the idea was just to see if they would accept the diet. But we also did a lot of measurements too. So it was a twelve week intervention. We created fifteen now. People into the Keita genyk group in another fifteen into a low fat sauce standard American diet group and trapped them for twelve weeks train them into through a whole battery of tests, including everything from muscle biopsies resting metabolic rate in cognitive test in body composition, so forth. And we promise the first paper. We have other papers were working on now with the first paper was really focused on the body composition while it's focused on the these Billy park, which it was feasible was very. Was very well received just due to compliance. What was a measurement that you're looking at for feasability? Actually, measuring Keith Jones every day. We'd have them into a finger stick in measure beta hydroxybutyrate and have them report that back to us every day, and that really served two purposes wanted to measure compliance, but it also is a way for us to individualize the diet because everyone's a little different than needs to restrict carbs in moderate protein. To a different extent to be ketosis. So we got everybody above one million molar, which is quite impressive in these sort of outpatient studies. So everyone was in ketosis, and it was not a weight loss study. So we did not prescribe calories. We wanted that to be one of the outcomes it was dependent variable. But the it was quite a robust effect on weight loss every single person lost weight lean way loss was on the low over fifteen pounds, and it was almost all fat loss. And it was really the first day to measure visual fat. So the fact it's round your organs, which is much more highly sushi with cardio metabolic disease in we did that with the preferred advanced imaging meth. Using marai? And and so the Cuba genyk diet significantly reduced this real fat as well. And did not negatively impact or positively impact in relative to the high carb group adaptations to training. So they got stronger adapted to the training in the same way that the high court group did which is positive in our mind in a lot of that was focused on strengthen power less on endurance. So that was kind of another novel aspect because that's kind of a question out there. Whether not being key to adapt. It would negatively impact strengthened power in this case it did not Zo. We had wide range of performance parameters that we looked at. Did you see the initial dip off than can rebalancing twelve weeks? Actually, we did look at that in we expected, but it wasn't as profound as we thought. I'm not sure why. Because they're usually as a is a drop off. But maybe that's more specific to the endurance community where you really need to give it a good three to four weeks before you start feeling that normal, and that really wasn't the case too much, but we were very careful implemented well-formulated diet. So that adequate sodium in people weren't volume depleted, which can happen. If you're not aware of the natural ketosis and so forth. So that may have contributed some. But it was there wasn't a. No real drop office as we thought there might be. So the physical adaptation was the exact same pretty much or or similar the physical health markers were all positive outcome. So we had higher facts addition a lot of Israel, fat loss premiums and body composition. And did you guys truck? I mean, I feel like this would be a very important thing to look out for military application, but any sort of subjective or objective mental markers. As far as mental health goes, focus concentration energy levels. Anything like that? Yeah. We get a whole battery cognitive cash that we haven't presented that yet. Having to be honest having analysed yet either I can't speak to that right now. And we did a lot of surveys and things in overall. I mean there were few subjects struggled a little bit. But overall there were there were some amazing transformations in terms of. Decomposition few subjects, and they provided some very powerful testimonials for us. So it had overall very positive effect. But lease for that. I doubt in in arguably the primary goal of the study was. Really dress the obesity problem in the military because you know, it's it's it's frightening. But in three fourths of soldiers right now are either overweight or obese and close to around seventy percent of youth of seventeen to twenty three are ineligible for the military, primarily because of obesity Ennis's been described as a national security crisis because we may have trouble filling a military not because people don't want join. But because they don't meet the criteria. So so we really kinda played that angle more than anything in this. Initial paper. We have some other data to it was a little more of mechanistic from muscle biopsies, looking at glycogen might Kondracke functioning and so forth, the pretty provocative all very positive. So there are a lot of other questions. We were trying to address in the study to will likely get out them the later this year. What's interesting to me is I wonder if that I mean has there been any look as if that's before they're entering the military. Or if it's after the end of the military, either high stress or poor nutrition is leading to these things. I mean, have you looked into that at all? Well, I think you know. It's not been well documented, but but you see definite transit kinda mimic the general population. And if you look on these basis in what food is provided. It's it's very much modeled after the doctor guideline so's lot high carbohydrate and electrolyte of sugar available to these soldiers and. It's not surprising at go army dot com. The literal army website is says an Emory Marie which is a meal ready to eat. So like a winning combat what what soldiers can have access to eat. And it says contains phone Andre spaghetti side. Dish rice corn fruit or mashed potatoes. Cracker bread spread peanut butter. Jelly cheese. Bread desert cookies or pound cakes candy, Eminem skittles zeros beverages. Gatorade like mixes cocoa dairy shakes and hot sauce. It's yeah. I mean, this is what we're feeling are top soldiers with. I mean, it's it's sad. That almost like you said, this is potentially a pilot's additional deeper in feel figure out where we can go. But have to imagine that Kito friendly Marie would would only reverse though, VC problem. But but also just thinking about me personally being able to eat one meal a day really easily dia versus I'm always hungry three four five meals a day, if I'm not I mean, just that if you're in combat and in super stressed, and then you looking at things like it'd be b b also act as a signal to decreasing Zayed to improve recovering and things like that. I think that obviously we have love why that would make sense actually, I mean, you just named off a whole bunch of things were trying to study because you know, Kito adapting person profoundly changes every cell in the body. I mean in terms of the feels that using the, gene expression. And in that regard. I mean, it it can affect just about every performance parameter in health marker. We think in in a positive way based on a lot of the work done in clinical populations. But there's a lot of work to do to translate this to the soldier also kind of bus through the bureaucracy in the in the military in the department of defense. It's it's hard to move fast there. So this has been a long sort of effort to get them comfortable with key tones in Kita genyk diets. They are very interested in exile Gysky tones, I think it's more palatable for them to think about providing that versus changing diet. So they are funding quite a bit of research in that area of which is I think positive because it's like a foot in the door to maybe a convincing them than the diet would have even more applicants but having said that. I have gotten a lot of grants rejected, but I'm not quitting. So, you know, there is a lot of grass roots support for if you talk to a lot of soldiers at basis, they're they're doing this. But it's you know, it's gotta be met with some top down support as well. And we're not quite area. Will thanks between the work. Do all everybody is far as before you would have added more data Iran type two diabetes. And so if you'll know about verte health and what you're doing there. Maybe just a quick overview of the work. That's on there. Yes. So Verna health is a company that I co-founded with Stephanie might co author on the books as well. And in good friend and collaborator researches to. And then some Incan our currency owes the other co founder, so it what we've founded was a company that's really focused on reversing type two diabetes at scale our mission is to reverse diabetes. One hundred million people by twenty twenty five I think that might have been extended to twenty twenty seven now, but we are making very good progress. Our our initial focus which is to prove we could do this. And so we started a clinical trial couple years ago. And we've published one year data now and our two year data was just accepted. So it'll be published soon four hundred or so patients with type two diabetes prediabetes that we. Enrolled into our program, which at its core is Kita genyk diet, but we've combined that with virtual care model, which essentially means we educate people on Akita jank diet through nap and provide them with a hell access to health coach pretty much twenty four hours a day as well as the physician that is really key to all this because of the need to adjust medications from safety standpoint. And so we've basically built the infrastructure to practice telemedicine. From scratch. So that's the San Francisco based company, and we've published data now, we're working with several contractors to temple our program their in their companies, and even now talking with insurance plans and the results are quite extraordinary of in our clinical trial. We are able to reverse diabetes approximately half of the patients that were enrolled in that is while we're getting them off medications. So that we're getting most patients either off insulin or significantly reducing the dosage off so finery is in other diabetes in blood pressure medications, and they're losing significant amounts of weight, even though that's not a focus of our program. But they they lose -nificant amounts away. They've been able to. To maintain that out two years now. So the. Companies driving really in many ways, and in very much focused on scaling in being able to deliver this to many people's possible. And unfortunately, there are hundreds of millions of people cross the planet that need help than the early. Not getting it. So Huzzah workers far is a protocol is concerned you have a blanket recommendation. You say, okay, this amount of macro 's in whatever food you won the personalized to the person you give him food choices. What is well. So you know, we have the app and the health conscious basically, individualize the curriculum that we've developed fridge patient in. We also collect biomarkers to help personalize it and that is all being integrated then and and so there's a lot of machine learning. Artificial intelligence built into everything that we do. So the more people retreated better, we get in more automated, we can become which is really necessary to scale the numbers that we want to. So the. A custom on boring flows. They take a quiz. They work with somebody in generally. Yes. Like, you did with the study tracking more serum concentration of HP or mean, how are the ways that you ensuring that they are complying? Yeah. That's that's part of it is is measuring Jones. So we provide him buddy with a meter and strips and record their values in one way to individualize it and kinda monitor them we monitor their weight as well. So right now, those are really kind of the two primary biomarkers were tracking. And you know, as far as the education, they're getting it's it's variety of different some modalities of information from everything from, you know, video recordings to of online support group that the the one thing you sort of miss him when you doing this through an app, you can individualize the intensity in the content to great ext. Which lose the group support. So we have developed support groups that people can engage with other people going through some of the same challenges and so forth. I mean, so it's a very sophisticated program. That loops always things together in a pretty innovative way. And the results are quite quite striking. When you consider a Cording to Kaiser Permanente the spontaneous remission rate for diabetes less than one percent in you said around fifty percent, currently what you're getting his forest people who are either off of their medication entirely or those were retreating or reversing. Yeah. We define reversal as hemoglobin. Anyone see under six point five got and and off all diabetes medications, except the metformin. So that is about one half in. We have very good engagement with the program to as you know, most dietary interventions lifestyle intervention programs there's high attrition rate. But I believe we're just under a correction may be around eighty percent. One year is rob just a little bit from there two years. So we've had excellent adherence in. And that's really a big issue because, you know, at least in my experience others a lot of people that are convinced. The science is strong in it is in diabetes, especially, but they still believe no one can stay on this diet that it's it's too difficult and too much of a sacrifice in a burden. So that's the bigger issue. A lot of people have been a at least with our program the data. Would suggest otherwise. And I think that one of the things that you mentioned earlier that it's very important for someone to work with Dr Patrick back. Their medication can you speak a little bit more than that's somebody is joining trank key for the first time the feeling better, and they just trying to play around their medication. Whether it's cute idea EM in generally, the you guys very safe for most people. But if you're. If you're a diabetic on insulin. You really do need to be very careful because I mean, the main risk is if you're if you start a genetic diet and continue on your same dosage of insulin. You will very likely experience a precipitator hypoglycemia, which can be very dangerous in life threatening land you in the emergency room. And so that's the real risk that people need to understand if you're taking insulin or safari as or any drug that stimulating insulin. There is a need to adjust those medications quickly. This is not something that takes weeks months. It's it's pretty much right away. A that has to be managed by knowledgeable of physician who's has experienced with this of the Why's it can be very danger. So if someone's listening to this podcast, you know, they have diabetes, they know and they want to work with someone like this. Do you guys have opened enrollment or how does that work if not you have Hannah's doctors resources? Primate business miles to work with large self insured companies and insurance plans, so a. The ideas, you have a contract with company, and and then we get access to these employees and in in in enrollment into our program, but we also do a direct to consumer sort of pathways. Well, so that is available on the website. There's a site there where you can request more information. And we you know, we will accept them, you know, pocket payments to work with verdicts. Well, so you had to kind of go through a series of questions in in be screened. But that that's also a possibility is that you're looking to do to scale this two hundred million people by twenty twenty seven is hit make it direct access or is it more working with large companies in just killing little think working with the insurance plans is is the most efficient way to scale. Interesting. So what was necessary as far as the big mile since you guys are trying to reach in the next one to three years from from research standpoint. Just deciding we're contracts and and really continuing to build the foundation. So that you know, we can scale the results are nothing else out it really compares with this. So MRs matter of the floodgates open. We need to be able to to meet the need, and that's not trivial because you don't wanna lose the quality of the outcomes were giving now when you go ten x one hundred x which is what we're talking about here. So there's a lot of attention on on just tightening up everything we can in and making improvements to what we're doing. And in building a very strong foundation, where we can you know, we can really scale affectively keep great outcomes one of the things also as meaning to ask you is is four as individual aspect to hump Shiga focus on food. Polity or is it more so start with macro to get them, drip win, and then have an econ moral whole food real food. Dieter? What is the emphasis you guys have? There is one of the things that to to with research that sort of keeps diet is one that people just say it's quote, unquote, low carb, therefore, it's Kito or they feed them really awful quality foods vegetable oils that on occasion, diet and try to infer health outcomes about and so I mean was yours is approached ameliorate that or on rent people to getting high quality, healthy foods. Yeah. That's a really important question. And this is what's great about it. In a we emphasize whole foods were not really peddling a lot of supplements or fake foods were not a food company. Really? This is just teaching people how to clean out their cupboards in refrigerators, go to the store and buy different foods than they were before. And in teaching them how to prepare those into really highly palatable implausible meals. So there's a lot of principals to what we're doing because you're exactly right. It's more than just restricting carbs in elevating key tones, you can induce ketosis variety different ways. But it's not going to be effective in completely side effect, free and most important sustainable, unless you understand all the components of a well-formulated Kita genyk diet in. In that gets into you know, issues around getting protein in the right range, the quality of fat understanding mineral balance excetera, and this is what we teach people, and it doesn't take long time to the teach this. But what you have to understand is almost all of the components to well-formulated conflict with consensus. Consensus. Should mainstream ideas now of what's healthy? So there are lotteries in people despite their knowledge in really motivation to wanna stay on this diet still fail. And that's where the ongoing support in. You know, access to health coaches is really important to make this stick long-term. There's not a lot of people that really are. Promoting this idea of a will formulate Akita jank diet. And so that's if you wanna call it our secret sauce, so to speak, none of his priority. Really? I mean, we've written about it in books in doubt there. But there's a lot of people practicing gate genyk diets in a casual way might get your term success. But a lot of people really really don't make it stick long-term lease others. Just it's it's tough to against the grain for so long people may be ostracized by their friends or family from a different choices or someone's cousin her that exit still gonna kill you in. So then the another can have eggs in women in red meat is also terrible the main it's a lot of education. I think when people especially when the coming from a standard American diet in following Flaminio following what the government told us to do entering. I mean, a lot of family, friends, and even physicians in other healthcare professionals can sabotage the best. Efforts in the most motivated person. Those are things we help people. Navigate through all those challenges. Well, yeah. Love what you doing over there. Anyway, people can support verte. Let's say they're not direct comes customers or anything like that just to spread the word. Yeah. Great question. I mean, we're. This is out of my scope with company, but you know, we're we're we're think we're okay for now in terms of venture capital. So I won't you know, pledge money here media research instead, but yeah, preciado you just give me the opportunity to talk about Berta were or certainly, you know, wanna get the name up there in make people aware of it in in promoted in positive way. So that that I think alone is is very valuable to us as far as what's next on your plate like for research impersonal. Well, like, I said it in terms of research, I spent most of my day just on the hunt for money and a writing grants and trying to to keep the lab open funded because the type of work, we do it's not cheap. I mean, you know, he you can't do you'd be surprised, you know, with a million dollars sounds like a lot of money, and you can do some definitely some good work. But even that is a pretty relatively small moderate study. So that's the challenge is getting the standard of sort of federal sponsors out there to invest more money into this area. 'cause that's the challenge. But, you know, I'm working hard in the areas of cancer in in military applications in so pumping out a lot of grants. I will say hi states been great in terms of building multidisciplinary teams in. So we're working in cancer in have grades. Support from the colleges here in the religious love the patients come in and ask about it. And so it's very much on their radar one other area that I think is very promising is in congestive heart failure. So there's also a lot of new evidence that the heart really prefers key tones over other substrates and that when it's fueled by key tones, it's functioning better. And so it's would be naturally. A logical think patient with congestive heart failure would benefit from a ketogenic diet or potentially dodges key tones another area were were really getting some proposals out trying to advance jarmin concussions as well traumatic brain injuries, huge different areas of so excited about the next five ten years. One of my biggest fears is that. That was kinda fall off of it in the view as a as a fad. And then we just kind of have a movement away from that to something else. That's gonna biggest fear that we're trying to prevent days did day-to-day. I think it's so effective. Great tool for so many different things, especially with the state of the state of our side in we're from hell come right now. So think I agree. I worry a little bit about that too. But I I think the genie's out now. And yes, you're right. People still describe it critic described as a fad it's gonna go away. But. You know, I don't know. I think there's just too much science out there. Now, the massive data is is too much to ignore. Other people are still trying to nor it. So I highly doubt it's going to go away might might vigor concern is the scientists just been a trickle forward rather than accelerate forward because they're still challenges in getting funding and just the sort of way research is done sciences slow process. So I'm kinda really motivated to figure out new ways to celebrate the pace of science in translation of that science. So we can take advantage of of the benefits of this diet, different disease states or just for. Better functioning for everyone while you're doing your part. So thanks Jeff for being on show. Besides people going to PubMed in and Amazon is searching your name getting materials there or anywhere. You wanna point them for for more information? Yeah. I mean on the verte website. We have a blog that we try to get new content up every week or two. And so there's some really excellent information that is being posted there. Of some kind of people to that as a way to keep up on some of the relevant topics around key tones. Nutritional ketosis. Thanks again. Appreciate okay. Thank you anti. All. Right. Everyone thinks listening to another episode of Akita lenses podcast enjoyed it. But even if you didn't I would love review score itunes wherever you listen to your podcast and a review. So we can get about more people you'd better guess how the information that you need to please go to wherever you listen to your podcast review. If you to go over to perfect dot com slash podcast and enter Email for all top tips and guides getting started Qizheng diet. Thanks next time.

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Clinical Podcast: Cannabis within Healthcare | Jeff Konin

Evidence In Motion Clinical

30:23 min | 1 year ago

Clinical Podcast: Cannabis within Healthcare | Jeff Konin

"Welcome to the I am clinical podcast your host Dr John Childs and Dr Mark Shepherd. We'll be bringing you interviews with cutting edge forward thinking physical therapy clinicians and leaders the goal to further your knowledge base and bridge the gap of what was to what will be are you ready. Let's go welcome to to the EM clinical podcasts where we talk with diverse individuals within the healthcare environment and beyond. I am joined today by my co host Dr John Childs today. We are talking with Dr Jeff Conan Jeff is a PT ATC by training and is currently the clinical professor and director of the doctor of Athletic Training Program at Florida International University Jeff has worked with a number of athletes all over the country. He's also been an uneducated for many years at several different institutions and just to give the listeners some context jeff and I go way back actually to when I was in undergraduate the program at James Madison University where Jeff really served as a mentor to me before I started pt schools so it's Great Jeff to have you back and to discuss an interesting interesting topic today so welcome to the show. Thank you mark John. It's a pleasure reenact especially with this case mark. Yeah awesome awesome to see how paths continuously tenuously Cross and gravy on the show and it's funny because I look back number at gm you and L. things change over the years. I remember when we were working together. You are really into the concussion kind of domain and and it's interesting to see now where your focus is within the topic of cannabis within healthcare of care so I'm really interested to see how did you get interested in this line of Education and interest so ironically it actually came from concussion and I was out west teaching a concussion workshop and one of the participants who is a physical therapists from San Francisco California Post posed a question and he said many of my patients smoke marijuana recreationally in. I'm curious what your thoughts are Jeff if I'm treating them and they have posted cussin' symptoms should I encourage them to stop smoking so that I can have a better accurate assessment of their memory Marie perhaps of their gaze of their balance and I thought to myself never had to come up in a question before but sure it made logical sense to me. You want to do everything you can answer. Get good accurate assessment thought I was off the hook there but he asked are two of his question and the question was would about those who don't smoke and they have post cussin' symptoms that relate to migraines anxiety difficulty falling staying asleep he said should I encourage them him to try a little bit of cannabis in the field. I wasn't as comfortable answering that question and I really had no foundational education background to answer the question so I promise it when I got back home I would look this up summit reconnect with him and I became fascinated and I started to look at literature so I shot him a note back. I wrote what a blog about this and the more I read the more I became more fascinated. I started getting more questions about it. Then dawned on me that medicinal marijuana marijuana is legal in thirty three states and CD cannabis is now becoming more and more accessible throughout this country and there's another world out there where it's being used so I just really got excited and fascinated to learn about this and learn about how it works and what the differences excellent and most importantly how does it impact what we do from a clinical care perspective of our patients and one thing led to another. I put in a couple of proposals to speak on the topic. Jordan have been accepted now. I'm receiving invitations to speak on the topic and educator on this topic. My goal is is to help the practitioner understand how this fits into the realm of care. If in fact it does at all that's interesting Jeff. I mean it's kind of a hot topic topic here you know candidates within healthcare and I'm kind of wondering have you had any like criticism of getting into this line within our profession and maybe the realm home of course I had criticism starting in my house for my family and so what has gotten into you. What are you doing. What are you up to and and when I talk to our colleagues majority of them are a little bit skeptical aunt. What I simply say is. Let me chat with you for about ten minutes in all all. I'M GONNA do is share with you. How I got into this and what I'm learning about it and trying to figure out what's happening around us because quite frankly it's his big elephant the room and most of only know what we know from our perceptions of growing up from our hearsay. CETERA ET CETERA and there's an awful lot of aces out there in fact you know what's really interesting to me is the population that seems the most interested in this. Are The elderly folks there on fixed incomes but they're really tired of using a dozen plus pills that are very expensive and they're talking to their neighbors. They're using Google in their figuring hang out ways to try things in granted. They're certainly placebo effects a lot of what we do but it can't be coincidence that so many of them are saying. I I feel better and I've been trying all these other approaches and I found something that's helped me so while an N. of one is really not high level. Oh evidence a lot of ones that you hear over and over and over again just had me thinking about what is actually happy and surely I'm not the only one in and yes I still have some critics and again. I'm not really promoting the use of any form of cannabis whether it be t h C C CBD ham boils. I'm educating so people understand why patients are looking into this and what the research shows and how we need to get involved in the biggest concern I have if we turn a blind eye to what's around us if our patients come in to clinical setting and save you a marker John. What do you think about CBD if you don't know or your answer is completely against it it my gut senses. Dave already looked into it they may in fact already using it and this is an issue of them with your trust and if they don't feel like corre board or you don't know enough about it. They're not going to tell you what they're doing. They're going to go back and Google Sophomore and asked to France neighbors and I think that it's important that we understand stand the light which we can speak to that. Here's the facts that are out there. In fact let's be proactive and let's have patient education information that we can provide to them and say a here's what you should know about this unhappy to answer your questions. If I don't know the answer I'll look it up and I'll get back with you but think about this. If you are commuting somewhat you WanNa know what medications are on. You want to know if they're seeing other practitioners and if you don't have this knowledge because if they're taking cannabis in a medicinal format they're seeking different physician more than likely so now they're getting care from multiple physicians. We know so. I think it's a trust issue. I think it's also an issue of our quality of care to have a comprehensive background knowing everything that can impact the patient's illness or injury that we're managing Jeff. This is is a really timely. I mean as an entrepreneur get pitched. That seemed like a day goes by something doesn't come across some deal network on investing in some cannabis cannabis related business so clearly this is an emerging area and even within our own profession. We're starting to talk about within physical therapy educational circles all about whether cannabis education should be included in the curriculum and as you probably know jeff from being actively involved in this discussion. The House of delegates actually considered a motion at the next meeting in Chicago for Abtei to develop materials physical therapists could use as resources for educating patients since about you know the use of cannabis related to healthcare now that motion I think was narrowly defeated but nonetheless at least the first time to my knowledge. I think especially on the docket so I guess my question is you know as you look across sort of healthcare and you'll look into. Let's say the physical therapy profession or athletic training. Where are we in this discussion. Are we progressive in the fact that we even had this on the docket or in other healthcare professions. They're widely talking about this and we're way behind as Rehab professionals and just give me your thoughts on sort of where we are in thinking about this issue in terms of being ahead or behind the curve. That's a great question and John. I was actually in the Gallery in Chicago when the discussion slash debate occurred in the house of delegates this was RC for C. Sixty seven dash nineteen in an actually did pass past fifty one to forty nine and it was really interesting dialogue back and fourth. I have to tell you I had to be restrained in this gallery because the motion wasn't about advocating at behalf again it was about putting a worker together to develop resources for members for cannabis. I was really mind boggled why we would be opposed to that and honestly as I listened. He was like Oh Qasem of WANNA travel speak about this individuals practicing in states where there's significant get access to this were at supports and said he look. It's not coming year. I see this with patients every day. It would be really really a fault if we had a body of our membership helped together. All the resources and then others were in states where perhaps they don't see this much or perhaps perhaps her personal beliefs are against this fought against it and so it came to a really narrow vote but it wants proof but in discussions afterwards. I had certain people it did feel like even though it was approved it was going to be a priority our agenda of developing these resources anytime zip. I have had only two of my proposals to speak on this topic not accepted what was for the upcoming combined sections meeting and what was for the upcoming Educational Leadership Conference both physical therapy now. Maybe they weren't well written abstracts attracts. Maybe they didn't fit into the theme of the meetings. I don't know but your question about where this fits into. The curriculum is a really fascinating one for me. It can it at the very beginning as we try to understand. The physiology anatomy of the Endo can happen weight system which is not very well studied and really is all a band around since the early nineties at guessing most of us went to school with a number of anatomy and physiology classes and don't remember sea. Is that our books or studying. I think this could possibly fit into physical agents. You know this could be topical is could be adjusted. Tincture is lots of different ways to put this in your body. I think perhaps maybe most importantly it can fit in the ethical legal classes that we have a lot of different places where this falls across the curriculum and I think it's a great I talked to out of disgust not to take over the curriculum out to dominate the curriculum but what you talk about learning across curve this happened at the very beginning that one's education all the way into their clock a practice because it's real and it's here and so I think when you pose the question are we behind. I think we're behind hind in understanding and educating in one of the reasons I was supportive of this is that it's not really easy to find good quality resources and the argument made against this. RC passing was that we are all individually capable of doing our own research and sharing this education with our patients. The argument for for was the SE. Les Speak With one voice. Let's have common factual educational materials. Perhaps educational links that we can send people to that are being updated because this is a fast in fact. It's the fastest growing industry you mentioned. Entra parochialism fastest growing industry United States and there are universities Anna Community College. I just learned for example Miami Dade Community College. They are starting full degrees in the concept of cannabis degroot gooseberries. You can specialize in the cultivation of agriculture of the plant itself you can focus into the healthcare setting you can focus into the business setting setting whether it be the tax laws or banking industries and so to a certain extent. Yes we are way behind but with that said. I'm not not an advocate of rushing and getting behind this one hundred percent because I think if we go fast too soon we WANNA be obviously be careful of our credibility. Which is why live is fully support factual information coming out with what voice from an association. That's good historical perspective there you know on where parts fit in within the really physical therapy and you know. I like your thoughts about how this could fit into the curriculum because I think you know as educator Educator Myself. You know there's always this idea behind curricular creep. You know I it always seems every every year. Isn't it that we're always always like this would be great to add in you. Just start getting almost like bombarded with areas and topics that can be added in whether it be dry needling or this the topic. We're talking about now or something else you know. It's just it always seems like it's something and so it's nice to hear that you don't feel like you have to basically rewrite your curriculum to fit this in because obviously it's a part of many different systems that cannabis you know relates to infects so it makes complete sense that it doesn't have to be a major component on it but we need something in order to start learning about it otherwise we're like you said patients are. GonNa come in and we're going to have our own bias or perceptions or things along those lines so just good points to bring up in curricular creep is real and it doesn't unfortunately a company things that we remove typically so we're constantly putting more and more into the curriculum as of now a two hour presentation can't really provide a good solid foundation for clinicians to understand doc what it is. It's happening around now. We can expand that to a full day workshop and really have people get caught up to speed as it relates to the laws yes for example because as I travel around and speak to individuals of different states also tailor the presentation to their state however it's important to understand understand that regardless of your own state law you need to be aware of your surroundings straight loss because if individual can travel two hours across the lion and have a better opportunity to access with looking looking for certainly they will so. It's really important to know even if it's not legal in any form in Iran state in their pockets of the country where it's not it will be naturally. We're seeing some really interesting things everywhere. State laws are overriding federal laws and I think one of the interesting things is going to be the next national election cycle e costs. Let me give you greg's apple. I alluded earlier to how the largest population that's pushing his seems to be the senior citizens in Florida where I am in the last election in two thousand sixteen the President won the state of Florida by about one hundred twenty or so thousand votes vote's not a lot of votes right soon after that our governor was elected in our commissioner of agriculture was elected both on on a grow cannabis platform there are now three hundred fifty or so thousand medical marijuana carb users Florida Florida in it is estimated by the next election. There will be about a half a million. If you're a anti cannabis running for president candidate handed it you will not with the State of Florida which is a swing state in a national election. That's how powerful this issue is right now. Just in this state the state you're seeing similar. Events of other states where banking laws are changing industry is changing in. There's job creation as a resulted this it really what's happening is this has moved so fast that the state government are simply trying to figure out ways to regulate number want which is a good idea from safety perspective but in all honesty exit number two because what's really interesting in this business right now is technically a majority of it is still illegal. You cannot markets for example. THC It's still a schedule want illegal drug in the United States. However are you still pay taxes so you're allowed to run a business but this'll wanting allowed to have a dispensary you cannot take tax write offs S. You cannot deposit your money in a bank because they are. FDIC shirt and they can't take illegal drug money but you pay taxes to the government so it's like the wild wild west right out every aspect of this but we can't slow this down. This is moving at a speed unlike anything anything we have ever seen before and ultimately the laws will catch up federal regulation will standardize a lot of what we see at which will be faced with just a slightly different statute in each state but the neighboring states if they're equivalent of their statutes you will see people flock from one state to the other and we're seeing saying that now with Florida. I'm sure Branson Arizona. We see a lot of snowbirds that come down and they're trying to figure out if you will how they can access some more reciprocity so that they can do whatever they do. In the state. They're coming from at just transferred across state lines or Florida truly fascinating to hear that perspective give in to switch gears a little bit here Jeff. You know I've heard these different terms being used. I mean you hear about CBD. There's hemp medical marijuana and obviously recreational marijuana. What are the differences between these because I think it's important. It seems like it's important to know what that is right. That's a great question so so I guess to start is understand that this is a plant we're talking about. It's not a drug unless it's made separately as an a synthetic for but it's an actual plant in the plant is grown in many places it can be grown in Colombia can be grown up Portland Oregon in so the plant a- as it grows can come in different force and what are the forms that engrossing is CD and CD is a non you've four component of the plant and the other side you'll see is the thc or the virtuous marijuana which does have the euphoric effect act and what are the greatest concerns about the THC nowadays particularly from a recreational perspective is that it's a lot stronger than it used to be so if you go back into the sixties seventies in advocates say well. There's really no reason why this can't be legal adult recreational use. We used to do it way back. Then Cetera et Cetera or the concerns medically right now is that the growth of the THC in the plant is significantly higher than ever used to be almost three times higher than it was huck aids ago itself itself is actually THC however it's an incredibly low dosage of TAC's point three percent point three percent of of marijuana's count it so it doesn't have a thc in it to create a fork effect in fact the farm bill that was passed in December of this past year was passed because hemp is at natural plant product that is used around the world at any other countries to develop things like from industrial-style paper various forms of Colognes at lotions rope natural gases and so what we found here United States was at there's there's an argument to separate him out of the rest of the plant particularly out of the THC capone and use that to create jobs allow allow farmers to have opportunities to grow and export these products in why this became where it is today was decades ago through the Nixon mm-hmm and the Reagan administrations there was an original we call drugs schedule classification in the classification marijuana as the global term was scheduled in the first classification schedule one that was alongside of heroin and LSD in so one of the reasons why we don't have a lot of good studies on this right now is we're not allowed to study marijuana just like we're not allowed to study. LSD or a heroin. It's not likely it's going to pass an institutional review. Board objects can write whatever the government has created pathway for this at so through a number of different applications fair amount of money to apply for these applications and a couple of years you can get approval through the government to you perform your studies if thc is involved with a significant amount of restrictions and typically it limited forms of the type of thc they have and and again as I mentioned if they have one grow planters university in this country that has federally approved grow plants and that's the issue that we usually studies but the ground in Mississippi versus Portland Oregon versus Columbia is completely different in that's a really important point because if somebody asked you this where are patients typically say quite frankly. This is what a lot physical therapist asked me to is. CBD good does it work that sequence me asking you do you like micro beer tastes snack many different products and there's actually studies that have shown where individuals have gone up and down the streets of communities where they've been selling cbd various stores and they pull those out and go testament elapsed they find out there's actually no. CB Dan those products whatsoever and you can see that type of situation all the way to everything from CBD infused beer to obviously CBD gummy as an out as their golf courses in Canada that encourage you to come there so that you can enjoy CBD at each hole Ashok. Our various parts of the country is a significant arguing a recruitment tool in early. One of the biggest opposition to this industry streep was the beer industry but they maxi not one eighty and now there are some of the biggest investors because they were concerned that the people found usage Dan either recreational or St D. that they would stay all the burs so instead they found a match if you will and now you see microbreweries with CBD coming up all over the country Jeff. This is really just a fascinating discussion and I know one. That'll be super interesting for our listeners and an issue that you know on kind of the leading edge of where we're heading in healthcare as we move towards a close I wanNA throw one little SORTA curveball and maybe take us back to quote unquote more traditional sort of Rehab but you obviously have a dual role of having been very actively involved in both physical therapy education an and athletic training education in dual credential than so you've seen over the many years the sort of the rivalries scope of practice issues all the sort of been fighting whatever you WANNA call it between tease. ATC's and you know most recently I think it was at the next conference the President of the Athletic Training Association as well as Sharon done the president of Ta got together and it seems that our professions are finally starting to realize we're not each other's enemies but perhaps we're actually colleagues in this whole pursuit of a less invasive non-surgical less Pharma less imaging sort of future of healthcare both of which pt and athletic trainers owners. I think fit perfectly into that strategy so my question is what are your thoughts on this. What I think is a renewed sense of collaboration between our professions and where. Where do you see it headed going forward? Why Gye certainly hope you're right on that. This isn't New Era Tori Lindley came out to Chicago and shared a stage took Sharon done and then Sharon actually came out to Las Vegas for the athletic training and shared a stage with Tori. I think on the national level the leaders are on the Saint Age and what's really going to be important is that at the state and local levels we see similar relationships developing in many places they already are developed upped but from a political standpoint I served for three years many years ago as a liaison between two organizations nationally and I probably a las a fair amount of friends from both sides because we were at each other's throats at that point in time in the truth of the mattress scope of practice perspective you know if you look at Asu the AP Ta for example the percentage of membership that actually work in the sport setting it overlap with athlete trainees what they do. It's not a large percentage pitch so many physical therapists that are active are not even aware of this. They don't even know who or what athletic trainers aren't what they do. This is a non issue for them but there's so so much that we can do together to share it particularly nowadays whether it relates from the beginning of the classroom setting with interprofessional education alway to interpersonal actors is an teamwork in the settings that I've been. It's always been a hallmark for me for everybody to work together and I really hope we're seeing a renewed relationship here. Because many any of us are either Dole credential or were very good friends with each other. We do a lot of similar things together both of the job setting anything outside the job setting and so I'm excited to see that it would be really nice. If we could show the patients don't care they don't understand but if we could show the rest of our healthcare communities that here's a way to work together other including at the lights statute level. Would we each these things to change. You know I know down here in Florida. Physical therapists are not able to drive Adl and it it was because of the acupuncture board in fact that fought that well you know it'd be nice to have support with each other there and have another organization stand behind you to see positive legislation legislation. Go through in an effort to improve your practice so I'm glad you brought that up. I'm certainly an advocate behind those relationships it all religions for that matter. I mean charcoal is to get the patient better. There are certain things that we do that none of us all in a technique if you will but we share some commonalities this is a great opportunity charity right out with two basic leaders to do away and stuff to the rest of us to follow a great perspective great wrap up there. Jeff and thanks again for your time today a day just going through what you know about cannabis and how it relates to health care particular in our kind of backyard with the Rehab professionals but we look forward to hopefully having you back on the show soon and thanks again for everything. Thank you gentlemen. I really appreciate the time of the opportunity great to have you jeff. Wow what a great episode with Dr Jeff Cohen who is a dual credentialed physical therapist athletic trainer and would really had a good time I think uncovering a new very progressive topic on the area of cannabis education it certainly being discussed within healthcare in general and weather and win it should be the included in healthcare education specifically we talked about the physical therapy profession and the recent passing albeit narrowly of the RC the motion to develop resources for AP TA to develop resources that therapists can use an educating their patients about medical. Marijuana and cannabis use discussed a lot of the You know misconceptions you know in any new area whether it's a new treatment technique or something like marijuana that has been sort of previously illegal well in many states and now becoming more legal and mainstream in just all the truth fact fiction around its use in its potential benefits and healthcare so jeff is certainly a very valuable valuable resource and I know our listeners will enjoy connecting with him online about the use of of cannabis in healthcare so as always you can find us on the blog the evidence in motion blog at EAE MTM is our social media handle whether it be facebook instagram or twitter we always appreciate state your feedback and mark and I are always open to ideas about a guest that we might have on the show so without further do thanks as always for listening and we look forward worked to having you again on the show thanks for listening to the EM clinical podcast ast with Dr John Childs and Dr Mark Sheppard for more information on the podcast guests and the latest and physical therapy visit. WWW W. dot evidence in motion dot com slash blog. If you like this episode be sure to subscribe like rate and review on your favorite podcast directory.

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