18 Burst results for "Dr James Hansen"

"dr james hansen" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

04:22 min | 2 months ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Of it. Had hearings on the climate, and they called Dr James Hansen of NASA to testify. Hansen said he was 99% confidence the world was getting warmer. And there was a high degree of probability that it was due to man made greenhouse gases. And it was kind of interesting what they did. There was a little bit of theatrics there. This is what worth said to PBS. You said quote. We called the Weather Bureau and found out what historically was the hottest day of the summer. So we scheduled a hearing that day and bingo. It was the hottest day on record. Washington Or close to it. We went in the night before and opened all the windows. So the air conditioning wasn't working inside the room, so they had a sweating Dr Hanson. They're talking about global warming, and it was very, very effective theatrics. But when you're later, the United Nations set up the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. And within a year the I. P. C C concluded that humans are causing dangerous climate change and just three years later at the Rio de Janeiro Earth Summit in 1992, 45 nations and the European Union. Signed a treaty, saying they would reduce greenhouse gases. And for the last 30 years or so. A government's been arguing about how much and when to reduce greenhouse gases. But we've seen, uh much lower global temperature, Rice and the climate models actually had forecasted. About half or less. And nevertheless this thing the world jump to conclusion and we've got a bunch of things, pushing it. The United Nations is one of those They have a number of objections objectives. Uh, one of those is a redistribution of wealth. Uh, they want to send up $100 Billion Climate fund where the where Europe and the United States and other wealthy nations pay money into that, and that goes to Developing nations to fight climate change. They want to reduce what they call over consumption and overproduction. Because they think we are wiping out the world's resources. And that seemed that the United States and Europe and they also are interested in a world government. And, uh, the climate movement has sort of fill that role. And then you have industries like wind, solar and biofuels that have have joined this and And that computer modeling groups scientific groups, so there's kind of a pooling of interests that has pushed all of this forward. And where does you know diseases fit in. Do they into this mix? Well, they're kind of they're one of the minor catastrophe said it's supposed supposedly caused by man made warming. Um people say Well, dengue fever is worse. Malaria can be worse. Other things can be worse because in warmer temperatures Um, those diseases can prosper again that does not fit the data. Um In the in the 19 twenties. They had a massive, uh, epidemic of malaria. In Russia, and it was above the Arctic Circle. It was way up in our candle. They had thousands of deaths, and so there are bigger factors than temperature. Like what the mosquitoes are doing, and, uh, whether they're draining swamps and all that sort of thing, how people are managing their environment that are much bigger factors in terms of disease. Although the interesting thing as well, we can get into that a little bit later, but Uh, there are some important factors about temperature and whether warm temperatures are cold temperatures are better for For people, so well, that's that's a good point. You know, we we sometimes cold weather is not bad. It's refreshing. Yeah. Do we have time to go into that right now? We got a couple of minutes before the break. Sure. So back in the June of 2019. There was a U. S called action by 74 U. S medical and health organizations. And they said that Climate change was a U. S health emergency. That was the conclusion. So again, I gotta kind of scratching my.

Russia NASA June of 2019 99% Hansen European Union PBS Washington Arctic Circle Rio de Janeiro Earth Summit United Nations 45 nations Weather Bureau three years later 1992 Hanson James Hansen 19 twenties $100 Billion U. S
"dr james hansen" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

08:51 min | 2 months ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"You should to tune in today. Newsmax. It's great television. Coast to coast continues on 5 70 K. L i f And welcome back to coast to coast. George Nori with you, Steve Gorm with us, Steve. What was it that you must have seen years ago? That got you to think the way you think now. Well, it was kind of an interesting process for me. I was just an out of work business executive in 2000 and eight and Couldn't get a job at the same level without moving out of my area, which is Chicago and decided to look for topics to write books on and got involved in the climate debate. I read all of Al Gore's books and Things just sitting ring true, and the more I looked at the issue, the more I decided that Uh, much of society was going in the wrong direction on this, Um And that we didn't really have a problem here, and this thing is continued to continue to move in that direction. We have As you know. Now, every community signing up to be net zero by 2050 and Um, all sorts of solutions. We all have to drive electric cars. We have to get rid of gas stoves. We have to Time to get rid of, of course, coal and natural gas plants to replace them with wind and solar. And so we're talking big dollars. Now the world is spending over $500 billion a year. And renewables to try and, uh, stopped the planet from warming. So it really is a huge effort. And you know the ironic part about all this. This is not clear that that effort is actually going to Measurably affect global temperatures. Let's take a moment to talk about some of these wildfires and get back to some of these other issues. I mean, they seem to be all over the place. Tahoe has had some problems. Northern California have has problems, but they've had problems forever, haven't they? Well, yeah, that the US West right now is it's got some issues. There have been some droughts and Lots of players. Um, So the question is what is causing these fires? Um Uh, For example, in California they have had Uh, 10 of their top 20 most damaging fires. Have occurred in the last 10 years in terms of structures destroyed. And governor. Newsom has attributed that to climate change frequently. This is a quote from September 2020. Quote. I'm a little bit exhausted that we have to continue to debate this issue. This is a climate damn emergency. It is real and it's happening. This is the perfect storm. He was at that time he was overlooking the Oroville fire in Northern California. The thing is that we've only had about maybe two or 3/10 of a degree. In temperature warming over the last three or four decades. So why are we having so many fires? And the and the sensible answer. Appears to be The way we're managing our forests in three areas, fire suppression, declining forest harvests and insect damage. There was a little Hoover commission that studied the issue in 2000 and 18. And they said the century of Forest Fire suppression and California produced disastrous results. Basically we were not letting natural fires burn and for a long time putting them out. And so we had fire we have forced that were choked with tinder dry brush and worsens worsened conditions for insect damage and disease. And they recommended frequent low intensity fire. In other words, controlled burns. To make these forests healthy. Um Another thing is is the forestry business. Um, California harvested only 1.6 billion board feet of timber and 2000 and 18. That was down 30% from the year 2000 and down 65% from the late 19 eighties. And so California is not harvesting the wood, and it's continuing to grow. And these choke forests have created ideal conditions for insect damage, particularly the bark beetle. The U. S. Forest Service estimated in 2000 and 18 that California had 147 million dead trees and most of those that died in the last 10 years since 2010 or so And so you have this situation that when these forests that when he fires start, they just burn and they burn and they burn. And what about arson? Steve? Yeah, Players are starting a lot of different ways. Lightning will start fires, people start fires, campfires or arson. Um and also the power lines of Pacific gas. And we saw that problem A couple of years ago chased on that quite a bit. I don't know what the exact fraction is about. Intentional starting fires. The interesting thing about all this is last year, NASA published data Again from satellites. And they showed that and by the way, they looked down, and they look at the burned area on the earth. Throughout the year. Every year in August, we have about 10,000 fires burning across the world. But they found that the percent of global area burned has been declining. From 2000 and 3 to 2015 declined by about 20% across the world. So you've got to kind of answer. You've got to kind of wonder. You know, it's a head scratcher, so if global temperatures are going up In global burned areas declining across the world. Despite that, why are West Coast fires worse in California and Washington, Oregon, and the answer is that it's not global temperatures. It's not the climate. In any case, the governor is is not going to. There's no way that this This problem will be solved by Um electric stoves or electric vehicles Just not going to happen. So quit making excuses. Get to the fire management and work on the problem and that way is it possible, Steve that this could be a weapon that some nations some nation may have launched some kind of like huge magnifying glass that uses the sun and his burning up these places. That would be interesting. I think we would see we could see one of those in the space, though. If it were up there, you should see the beam down. That's unlikely, although they could be sending agents out to start fires, But again, I have no information and in that direction are you concerned about our climate future? Based on the way things are going right now. Well, you know, I'm concerned about efforts to fight the climate that the the sensible solution is to adapt to climate change. We've done that through all of history. Um Uh, you know, and people are going to adapt and the nations that are wealthier. If you look at the death rates, for example. Death rates have been declining throughout the last 120 years or so throughout the 20th century from disasters. Even though we're having about the same number of disasters, and by the way, the dollar level of hurricane hits has been rising. But that's because people are building on the ocean and homes are more expensive. But the death rates are down by more than a factor of 10. And particularly in the wealthy nations, the nations that are wealthy and have high incomes. Have very few people that die anymore relative to history. In terms of Floods or droughts or anything else. So, uh, adaptation is the solution. There is no evidence that we can Stop the rise of the oceans or make the storms less severe. In terms of a United Nations effort. What are they doing? Sure. Well, let's talk a little bit about how this thing got started. Um So back in 1988. It actually started in the United States. The Or it was given a big push. In the United States. There were Senate hearings. And, uh, Senator Tim Wirth and Al Gore was part of it. Had hearings on the climate, and they called Dr James Hansen of NASA to testify. Hansen said he was 99% confidence the world was getting warmer. And there was a high degree of probability that it was due to man made greenhouse gases. And it was kind of interesting what they did. There was a.

Steve September 2020 NASA United States George Nori California Hansen Steve Gorm 30% Washington 2000 65% 1988 99% 18 U. S. Forest Service Al Gore last year 2015 2050
"dr james hansen" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"This is Dr Laura of Greenpeace. The rapid loss of is in the Arctic is a stack is offering indicator of how closely our planet is circling the drain announced. The Arctic melts more heat will be absorbed by the ocean on all of us will be more exposed to devastating impacts of climate break down the trump administration's tap to meteorologist who questions the link between extreme weather and climate change to be the new chief scientist at Noah, the National Oceanic Atmospheric. Administration Ryan Maui is a former scholar at the Libertarian Cato Institute has publicly criticized many prominent climate scientists including. Dr James Hansen and the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on. Climate Change. Texas has issued disaster declarations and over two dozen counties and Louisiana has declared a state of emergency as tropical storm that made landfall late Monday causing flooding along the coastline and washing away Galveston. Texas peer the Atlantic's record breaking hurricane season. This year marks just the second time in history meteorologists have had to start naming storms using the Greek alphabet after exhausting possible names from letters a to w. In California to COO. Land Defenders, were arrested on Monday as the community engages in an ongoing protests against trump sport or wall on sacred land. I Land Defenders and allies have peacefully camped and held prayer ceremonies along the walls construction route in the San Diego area for several weeks successfully blocking the construction of nearly a mile of the border wall, the Bureau of land management. Yesterday presented order to vic the cap threatening protesters with arrest. If they don't leave, the camp has also faced surveillance and harassment from border patrol and ice and local white supremacists in related news Gizmodo reports, customs, and Border Protection Drones conducted flyovers near the homes of indigenous anti pipeline activists, including Tom Goal Tooth of the indigenous environmental network. Meanwhile. In Arizona Toho Land and water defenders led a protest Monday blocking the border walls construction for several hours near a six spring inside the Organ Pipe National Monument protesters carried a banner that said borders equals genocide no wall on Odom Land National Park Service and Border Patrol agents on the scene started shoving protesters forcing them to disperse after an hours long standoff WHOA. Construction crews and the Snarlin desert have destroyed pristine landscape and pump millions of gallons of groundwater used to mix cement for trump's wall. The Government Accountability Office is investigating the Pentagon's interest in using heat rays against protesters near the White House, as well as the use of other so-called non weapons that were deployed on anti police brutality protesters in recent months, demands for an independent investigation into the use of force began in June days after federal police violently cleared peaceful protesters from Lafayette. Square in DC with tear gas and smoke. In Florida Republican, Governor Rhonda scientists announced plans for new legislation that aims to clamp down on protests. The new measures of pass would charge protesters with felonies for property damage and impose mandatory jail time for hitting a police officer the bill would also block local jurisdictions that moved to fund police from receiving Florida State grants in Nebraska. White bar owner who was indicted last week in the fatal. Shooting of James Scarlett a black protester died by suicide Jake Gardiner died Sunday the day he was due to turn himself into authorities James Skirt. Lock was shot dead on May thirtieth during protests over the killing of George Floyd. He was twenty two years old and in Kentucky the Louisville Police announced a state of emergency Monday as the city prepares for grand jury decision and the police killing. Brianna Taylor police fatally shot the twenty six year old black emergency room technician in her own home on March thirteenth federal buildings have been closed for the week in Louisville and federal forces were called into the city last week. Meanwhile, authorities in Wisconsin have announced the investigation of the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha has entered its final stages and those are some of the headlines this. Is Democracy now democracy now dot org the quarantine report. When we come back as cove spreads an ice jails and another immigrant was reported dead from the virus Monday in Georgia ice jail, we'll go to Georgia to speak with a nurse whistleblower who says ice ignored public health protocols during the pandemic and forcibly sterilized attained immigrant women. Don wooten.

Louisville Police Border Patrol Land Defenders Arctic Jake Gardiner Texas Dr Laura Dr James Hansen George Floyd Bureau of land management Ryan Maui Arizona Toho Land Georgia Odom Land National Park trump Florida James Scarlett United Nations Intergovernment Noah
"dr james hansen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"When weather around these involved in Madagascar from around sixty million years ago when their ancestors flew right over that and they've evolved to be flightless an incredibly large compared with an ostrich for example is an ostrich we think around three maybe up to four meters if you stretched out to ready tool so total than us absolutely torn us but we I tend to think about size in terms of mass a Verma Tyson would have been around seven eight hundred kilos in in mass when did he die out because they to some very impressive well they thought about thousand years ago we see big extinction event happening in Madagascar at that point we see large amounts of archaeological settlements coming in and waves of humans arriving from other possible especially Africa that time and we see habitat destruction and we see a change in hunting behavior as well so you see there are jointly mathematic ask others picking hippopotamus and of course I love him but and when we look at the tool marks in the cut marks on these plans they old exist on the vines in human settlements and tell about thousand years ago and everything changes I need to stop saying any of this big animals and you start to see people hunting the smaller animals to Lina's as well so it was us it does seem to be a button of evidence upon humans having wipe them out yes medic ask you mention a few times it's it's a an extraordinary place to study these things because of the isolated way in which it's flora and fauna developed and evolved yes you have this unique subset of animals on Madagascar that have evolved during this oscillation sick leave the most famous ones of Li miss what we see now is only a few of the remaining spaces left in fact there with red a size Lima's Boone likely miss and much larger other Kuwana giant versions as while picking hippopotamus at least two spaces I think and for at speech development that unique aardvark like animals crocodiles all sorts gone all gone as Dr James Hansen and on the subject of African ecology we got a film about a scientist in the Democratic Republic of Congo on our website it's the story of Connie wango who stayed in the attorney forest in eastern DRC throughout the civil war at great personal risk to try to save the research project he was running you can see that film.

Madagascar Verma Tyson Africa Lina Li Lima Boone Dr James Hansen scientist Connie wango DRC Kuwana attorney
"dr james hansen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ever lived right describe those then and when when with a around they should have all the Madagascar from around sixty million years ago when the ancestors flew away with that and they've all to be flightless an incredibly large compared with an ostrich for example the most if we think around three maybe up to four meters if you stretched out to ready tool so total than us absolutely torn us but we I tend to think about size in terms of mass a Vermette Tyson would have been around seven eight hundred key lies in in mass when did he die Oxley to some very impressive well they thought about a thousand years ago we see big extinction event happening in Madagascar at that point we see large amounts of archaeological settlements coming in and waves of humans arriving from other possible especially Africa that time and we see habitat destruction and they see a change in hunting behavior as well so you see there are jointly missing Madagascar this picking hippopotamus and of course I love him but and when we look at the tool marks in the cut marks on these plans they old exist on the band's in human settlements and tell about thousand years ago and everything changes I need to stop saying any of this big animals and you start to see people hunting the smaller animals to Lee Mrs well so it was us it does seem to be a bad enough evidence upon humans having what them out yes medic ask you mention a few times it's it's a an extraordinary place to study these things because of the isolated way in which it's flora and fauna developed and vote yes you have this unique subset of animals on Madagascar the have all their initial selection sickly the most famous ones of Lima's will be C. now is only a few of the remaining spaces left in fact they were Kereta size Lima's Boone likely miss have much larger other Kuwana giant versions as well we have lots of us at least three spaces I think and for at speech development that unique aardvark like animals crocodiles all schools will go on hold on as Dr James Hansen and on the subject of African ecology we've got a film about a scientist in the Democratic Republic of Congo on our website it's the story of.

Madagascar Vermette Tyson Oxley Africa Lee Mrs Lima Boone scientist Kereta size Lima Kuwana Dr James Hansen Democratic Republic of Congo
"dr james hansen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:51 min | 2 years ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Survive in the presence of this fungus Dr Karen lips was speaking to a hundred mountains and joining us for the rest of this hour is doctor James hands for its research fellow at the institute of zoology in London he specializes in extinctions so I'm the issue of the frogs it's still with us even though this is hope that perhaps they might evolve to counteract the fungus yeah I'm we have a huge problem with the catcher fungus affecting amphibians across the world today but we have a global effort of scientists to try and perception how we might be able to counteract in understand which species might be able to survive as well but it wasn't human action the because this was a natural fungus which involves to attack the frogs what humans didn't invent a fungus or try to created in any way but they'll probably responsible for transporting across the world and acting as a vector to impact everywhere ground love creating and pandemic of this infection just shows how one little knock to the delicate balance of an ecosystem can have such a dramatic impact absolutely once you start affecting species of animals or plants of fungus is and start changing the makeup of an ecosystem it's so complex that we don't understand how it might spiral out of control change irrevocably over the vast span of these to the planet there be many extinction episodes of many animals have gone extinct as as the phrase goes one of the main threats at the moment which of the species which you would be most concerned about well getting back to the amphibians and the public the catcher fungus I think the something around five hundred spaces on fibbing have gone extinct and lost fifty is a site about these con exactly be exactly linked to the fungus itself the send the other problems associated with it such as habitat transformation climate change and the way humans are impacting the world and if you can I bring it down to one defining point is probably humans but in terms of the the species which are most attractive mean we hear about the rhino for example and but that there must be others that are right there at the top of the threat list yeah I am when you think about extensions we tend to think about these icons that we look at but there are an incredible number that we have to focus on and trying as of today if you think about in a global matter a party Southeast Asia is the biggest target geographically but I'm Fabian's under incredible amount of threat mammals birds everything from efficiency as well Dr James Hansen from the institute of zoology in London for the moment many thanks the next extinction story from the past is arguably one of the most famous for this we're going back to the beginning of the seventeenth century that was when European explorers reach the uninhabited island of malicious in the Indian Ocean on it shows they discovered a remarkable flightless bird they named it the dodo and within a few decades it would be completely extinct Simon what's is used written records from the time to chart its fate is generated the dodo which the shape and read this man taken eyes the Phoenix of Arabia her body is round in fact few way less than fifty pounds on a is a small warned like to diamonds round in routing train three small plumes shorts and in proportional appetite strong and greedy well they look like birds yes but not like a typical bird that you might see in the in the garden not like a spiral responding these look like very extreme things Errol fuller is the author of data from extinction I calm they look rather like say a a great big fat Turkey if you can imagine or even a a formula chicken this sort of three times the size the wings were very significantly reduced because this was about the couldn't fly and the most important features this massive head and a great big baby looks rather I'm real it is sort of gross fatness why do we think the data you had developed in that way I wanted it lost its wings and develop this is huge belly what we think happened is the a group of pigeons chanced on the island of Mauritius I'll be there were blown by storm what they found a Mauritius when no mammals no catch no dogs no bears nothing that could endanger them also they found plenty of food so the gradually that evolved into bigger heavier things until eventually though too heavy to actually take off into the air soon basically they involved into a a specialist eating machine yes that would be absolutely the truth so why did they decide to cool this extremely creature of day today there are various explanations one of them is that it might be just a fanatic rendering of the birds cool Toda another is a Dutch word double Dawson which I think meant clumsy or some such thing another explanation is that maybe it was a Portuguese word which meant stupid but really pay money to your choice so it all comes you'll stupid neither of which is particularly flattering absolutely not it may have been clumsy and stupid but the day to day captured the European imagination it was a popular subject for Dutch painters and at least one life specimen was taken back to England as I walked the London streets I saw the picture of a strange looking for hello hung out upon the clock I myself with one or two more in company went in to see it it was kept in the chamber and it was a great file somewhat bigger than the law just Turkey cult what's the altar I'm thinking the keep the cold it's due to but sadly for the day to day it's very promptness led to its down full to sailors crossing the Indian Ocean the defenseless birds what irresistible although not necessarily tasty there are conflicting stories some writers said that I tasted absolutely horrible thought the fact is to stopping the same and that probably been living on hot biscuits and goodness knows what C. rations for weeks and weeks and weeks from the enemy tasted quite delicious I imagine and it wasn't just the sailors who ate the birds the animals that arrived on European ships also fed on the helpless Thursday we didn't just settle it by our own prisons we on settled it by taking all sorts of mammals their cats dogs monkeys peaks and these creatures they may not be big enough to hold the adult data but they would certainly hunted that shakes and might be stolen their X. wraps and things would go there right so we don't know to what level all of these things because the extinction but the combination of old seventy it was us that took everything there that brought about the extinction within just a few decades dodos were wiped out on the mainland of Mauritius the lowest recorded sighting was by a Dutch sailor whose fleet was shipwrecked in the sixteen sixties he saw a small colony of dodos who'd Kong home on one of malicious is offshore islands one of the ships most of the people manage to struggle ashore eventually although there are various horrible stories about what happened to them before they go to show some of the most sacrifice to the wives some of them were going to be eaten by their ship mice that didn't actually happen but anyway the whole thing was a bit of a disaster but eventually Stephan Avison managed to stragglers shore onto a an island just off the coast of Mauritius that was linked by so sandbars and things and and he maintained the on the small island there weren't does and like others before him he managed to catch some of these does need them one party of us would chase them so they would run towards the other party who then grab them when we had one tightly gripped around the lack he would cry out and then the others would come to its aid and they be called as well and then as now come to be regarded as the lost definite record we have of the dodo all intents and purposes this bird was extinct within sixty is of the Europeans arrival Mauritius over the next two hundred years the day to day was slowly forgotten them in the nineteenth century natural history became fashionable in Victorian started wondering about the flightless birds they just came a time when people realize that this creature in the stopped buying jeans and these are the descriptions could no longer be found so it was assumed that might be it never even existed maybe it was just a a mythical creature they made up and then bones of the Duggar were found in immersion swamp which confirmed by and large the early descriptions and the early paintings naturalists were able to reconstruct dodo skeletons from these buttons on the bird featured once again in books and exhibitions then the dodo was immortalized once and for role in the fictional world of Alice in Wonderland Lewis Carroll and the little girl that was to be immortalized Alice used to go for walks around Oxford one of their favorite Wilkes was to go visit the dodos head in the Ashmolean museum anyway what could have been more natural I suppose when Lewis Carroll's watching this book for this little girl was fantastic done in as one of the characters the dodo sat for a long time with one finger pressed upon its forehead well the rest waited in silence I'd lost the dodo said everyone has won and all must have prizes but who is to give the prizes quite a chorus of voices Aust why she of course said the dodo pointing to Alice with one finger he gives it a very anthropomorphic attitude it's adultery data it's innocent ten dot three does the yeah yeah and there's a story that Lewis Carroll whose real name was George seven pound has some sort of stocks and he's going to that that that that that that that that does for you that's one reason why I identified with the data and it was Lewis Carroll's inclusion of the dot on in Alice's adventures in Wonderland that sort of rocketed the dodo to what we might call an extinct superstardom because before the publication of that book the Duggar was just a footnote in the logical history after it the data was something that was on everyone's lips so it was Lewis Carroll very much that created the cult of the delta I'm the cult of the dodo continues the clumsy stupid giant Mauritian pigeon currently appears in books and on posters mugs and stationery and every child knows that nothing's as dead as a dodo Simon what's with doctor James hands for a research fellow at the institute of zoology is still with me can get very nostalgic about the dodo and is this emblematic bed I one of the first extinctions that people were really aware of I think the danger is probably the most famous extinct animals of the modern era of what we can say from about the seventeenth century but I I have a you know to have beef with the data but a pop to gets too much press for my liking I am more interested in some other giant bites from the Indian Ocean region I've spent my last years of my life for searching the Addison pads of Madagascar which included some of the largest buys the.

Karen lips research fellow London James institute of zoology
"dr james hansen" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Brush we're not cutting down the trees and so on we have a fire we have these huge conflagration that nobody can stop again this is nothing to do with two tenths of a degree temperature rise almost it's almost negligible is there a big money in man made climate change issues well it is I think it's one of the factors yes follow the Cambridge over three hundred billion dollars a year right now to try and force a switch to renewables all sorts of other factors we have vice presences to stay ability of companies and deans of sustainability universities weapon viral desk the newspapers we have wind and solar and bio fuel industries and and all these things have become big business now these are the there's nothing wrong with renewable so what's wrong with that okay I'm I'm not necessarily against renewables I just think that we should be subsidizing enforcing the adoption of renewables with the idea we're going to stop the climate from warming of the planet from morning there's no evidence of that we also have some what I would call kind of a severe movements now we have something called electrify everything why don't they simply say those Stephen we're running out of natural resources folks we need renewables it has nothing to do with climate change we just need to be able to save the planet because one day with all these people that are being born on this planet we're going to run out of natural resources we're gonna be up a creek why can't think then it has been an argument the fact is though it's not true is a talk about an outside the green box so called resource depletion isn't happening we have literally because of the Uyghur carbon revolution from fracturing we have centuries at least a couple centuries of oil and gas remaining we also have these methane hydrates the the coastal shelves under the under the ocean where they literally have this ice that is full of natural gas of those estimates are ten times as large as all the gas reserves in the world so there's really no evidence that we're running out of of resources so that argument doesn't work very well either what now what's your take on a hundred U. S. cities that have pledged to be a hundred percent renewable by twenty fifty yeah it's it's it's a big fan of it we have give some extremely sample Saint Louis that's where I am right now but for your right now now is I think like twenty thirty five they want to be on a percent electricity renewable but the state of Missouri gets about seventy seventy seven percent of their power from a coal electrical power in ninety seven percent from non renewable sources Ohio is similar both Cincinnati in Cleveland mayors are city councils of pledge they're going to be a hundred percent renewable Ohio is three percent renewable today of these so the city leaders have absolutely no idea how to do this and what it's going to cost but the evidence we see around the world as it is going to raise energy prices for the residents the big issue too is scientists are warning of a major sea level rise by twenty one hundred and of course they're blaming the carbon dioxide pollution for this they are former vice president Al Gore in in his movie and in his books talked about a twenty foot rice with your twenty one hundred to get the data from Dr James Hansen at at NASA others have predicted big rice's but we have very good data tide gauges inside your tight gauges around the world we have all the world show on average rice of seven or eight inches per century further you can go to a site at NASA and and SO tells us that the oceans have risen a hundred and twenty meters of three hundred ninety feet in the last twenty thousand years and scientists can tell you a natural sea level rise stop the man made sea level rise began so the great news is we're probably going to have to adjust to a seven or eight inch per century rice the the bad news is water ski Manhattan postcards are not going to be in big demand not not gonna happen so yeah any any pull a politician is also you know sort of stop the rise of the seas I think you better get though a little better a little bit of personal follow now is there any companies leading the way to get this thing taken care of where people don't panic and think it's all man made well I'm I'm sorry to say most of the industry has bought into this is Tom tremendous pressure on companies I talk about it now said the green box companies are spending millions of dollars every year on environmental methods or procedures that don't really do anything thing for the environment such as subsidizing purchasing renewables counting the carbon dioxide foot print even buying carbon credits in a lot of other things when I go in it is that the companies I say there's only one place for this activity that's in your public relations department because it doesn't do anything else but they're under terrific pressure even the the the petroleum industry has come out saying that we have a great product everybody wants it but it's causing the climate that to change and it's hurting mankind so what we need to shoot.

hundred percent seventy seventy seven percent three hundred billion dollars three hundred ninety feet twenty thousand years ninety seven percent three percent twenty meters eight inches twenty foot eight inch one day
"dr james hansen" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

07:55 min | 2 years ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on WTVN

"Thirty years which is No Way abnormal compared to global cycles and it you know it can't possibly be the the deciding factor in California's forest fires for example a couple of tenths of a degree over a few decades it's it's just but people lose the perspective the goal things are really getting hotter we've got this problem but the evidence doesn't show that hasn't the California governor basically blamed human caused climate change for these wildfires when it's really P. G. an eagle the R. electrical power company yeah well P. Jeannie probably say it plays a factor because if power lines can cause sparking and all the rest and it's dry and it's drive but govern Newsome you're right as as blamed climate change the problem is though again we're talking about a couple tenths and a few tenths of a degree in a few decades and to think that that is a big deal with and and the dryness again if you look at data from from no there are if we we've gone through dry periods in the past over the last century there were there was a study done in just a couple years ago called the let me find it here the little Hoover commission report Hoover commission report in eighteen and they said there were three big reasons why California's having to these disasters players and they are getting worse and the burning more area but one of the reasons is we've had a century of fire suppression and so they've prevented these forest fires for a long time and the forests are not crowded with tinder dry brush and it's also worsen conditions for insect damage and disease I think it was the the US department of agriculture the estimates that we have something like always use for service a hundred and forty seven bill million dead trees in California and most of those dying since two thousand ten the other factor is they've cut way down on forestry it's down about a sixty five percent in the last two or three decades so we have all these these forests that are choked with brush we're not cutting down the trees and so on we have a fire we have these huge conflagrations and nobody can stop again this has nothing to do with two tenths of a degree temperature rise or or almost it's almost negligible is there a big money in man made climate change issues well it is I think it's one of the factors yes follow the Cambridge over three hundred billion dollars a year right now to try and force the switch to renewables all sorts of other factors we have vice presences sustainability of companies and deans of sustainability universities we have environmental dusted newspapers we have wind and solar and bio fuel industries and and all these things have become big business now these are the there's nothing wrong with renewable so what's wrong with that okay I'm I'm not necessarily against renewables I just think that we shouldn't be subsidizing enforcing the adoption of renewables with the idea that we're going to stop the climate for morning or the planet from warming there's no evidence of that we also have some what I would call kind of a a severe movements now we have something called the electrify everything why don't they simply say those Stephen were running on a natural resources folks we need renewables it has nothing to do with climate change we just need to be able to save the planet because one day with all these people that are being born on this planet we're going to run out of natural resources we're going to be a part creek why can't think then it has been an argument the fact is though it's not true is a talk about an outside the green box so called resource depletion isn't happening we have literally because of the Uyghur carbon revolution from fracturing we have centuries at least a couple centuries of oil and gas remaining we also have these methane hydrates the the coastal shelves under the under the ocean where they literally have this I use that is full of natural gas of those estimates are ten times as large as all the gas reserves in the world so there's really no evidence that we're running out of of resources so that argument doesn't work very well either what now what's your take on a hundred U. S. cities that have pledged to be a hundred percent renewable by twenty fifty yeah it's it's it's a big fan of it we have give you some extreme sample Saint Louis that's where I am right now but Israel right now is I think by twenty thirty five they want to be a hundred percent electricity renewable but the state of Missouri gets about seventy seventy seven percent of their power from coal electrical power in ninety seven percent from non renewable sources Ohio is similar both Cincinnati in Cleveland mayors are city councils of pledge they're going to be a hundred percent renewable Ohio is three percent renewable today of these so the city leaders have absolutely no idea how to do this and what it's going to cost but the evidence we see around the world as it is going to raise energy prices for the residents the big issue too is scientists are warning of a major sea level rise by twenty one hundred and of course they're blaming the carbon dioxide pollution for this they are former vice president Al Gore in in his movie and in his books talked about a twenty foot rise by the year twenty one hundred he got the data from Dr James Hansen the at NASA others have predicted big rice's but we have very good data on tight gauges inside your tight gauges around the world we have all over the world show on air Bridger rice of seven or eight inches per century further you can go to a site at NASA and the message tells us that oceans have risen a hundred and twenty meters of three hundred ninety feet in the last twenty thousand years I have NO scientists can tell you a natural sea level rise stopped and man made sealevel rise began so the great news is we're probably going to have to adjust to a seven or eight inch per century rice the the bad news is water ski Manhattan postcards are not going to be in big demand not gonna happen and so the I. any any pull a politician as does the you know so to stop the rise of the season I think you better get though a little better a little bit of personal follow now is there any company is leading the way to get this thing taken care of war people don't panic and think it's all man made well I'm I'm sorry to say most of industry has bought into this is trump tremendous pressure on companies I talk about it now side the green box companies are spending millions of dollars every year on environmental methods or procedures that don't really do any financing for the environment such as subsidizing in purchasing renewables counting the carbon dioxide foot print even buying carbon credits in a lot of other things is it when I go in it present to companies I say there's only one place for this activity that's in your public relations department because it doesn't do anything else but they're under terrific pressure even the the the petroleum industry has come out saying that we have a great product everybody wants it but it's causing the climate this to change and it's hurting mankind so what we.

California hundred percent seventy seventy seven percent three hundred billion dollars three hundred ninety feet twenty thousand years ninety seven percent sixty five percent three decades three percent twenty meters Thirty years eight inches twenty foot eight inch one day
"dr james hansen" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Gas remaining we also have these methane hydrates the the coastal shelves under the under the ocean where they literally have this I use that is full of natural gas of those estimates are ten times as large as all the gas reserves in the world so there's really no evidence that we're running out of of resources so that argument doesn't work very well either what now what's your take on a hundred U. S. cities that have pledged to be a hundred percent renewable by twenty fifty yeah it's it's it's a big fan of it we have give you some extremely sample Saint Louis that's where I am right now but Israel right now is I think like twenty thirty five they want to be a hundred percent electricity renewable but the state of Missouri gets about seventy to seventy seven percent of their power from a coal electrical power in ninety seven percent from non renewable sources Ohio is similar both Cincinnati in Cleveland mayors are city councils of pledge they're going to be a hundred percent renewable Ohio is three percent renewable today of these so the city leaders have absolutely no idea how to do this and what it's going to cost but the evidence we see around the world is that is going to raise energy prices for the residents the big issue too is scientists are warning of a major sea level rise by twenty one hundred and of course they're blaming the carbon dioxide pollution for this they are former vice president Al Gore in in his movie and in his books talked about a twenty foot rise by the year twenty one hundred he got that data from Dr James Hansen the at NASA others have predicted big rice's but we have very good data on tide gauges anti G. tide gauges around the world we have all over the world show on air Bridger rice of seven or eight inches per century further you can go to a site at NASA and the message tells us the oceans have risen a hundred and twenty meters of three hundred ninety feet in the last twenty thousand years and those scientists can tell you a natural sea level rise stop the man made sealevel rise began so the great news is we're probably going to have to adjust to a seven or eight inch per century rice the the bad news is.

Saint Louis Israel Missouri Ohio Cincinnati vice president Dr James Hansen NASA sealevel rise Cleveland Al Gore air Bridger hundred percent three hundred ninety feet seventy seven percent twenty thousand years
"dr james hansen" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The coastal shelves under the under the ocean where they literally have this I use that is full of natural gas of those estimates are ten times as large as all the gas reserves in the world so there's really no evidence that we're running out of of resources so that argument doesn't work very well either what now what's your take on a hundred U. S. cities that have pledged to be a hundred percent renewable by twenty fifty yeah it's it's it's a big fan of it we have give you some extreme sample Saint Louis that's where I am right now but Israel right now is I think like twenty thirty five they want to be a hundred percent electricity renewable but the state of Missouri gets about seventy to seventy seven percent of their power from a coal electrical power in ninety seven percent from non renewable sources Ohio is similar both Cincinnati in Cleveland mayors are city councils of pledge they're going to be a hundred percent renewable Ohio is three percent renewable today of these so the city leaders have absolutely no idea how to do this and what it's going to cost but the evidence we see around the world as it is going to raise energy prices for the residents the big issue too is scientists are warning of a major sea level rise by twenty one hundred and of course they're blaming the carbon dioxide pollution for this they are former vice president Al Gore in in his movie and in his books talked about a twenty foot rise by the year twenty one hundred he got that data from Dr James Hansen the at NASA others have predicted big rice's but we have very good data tide gauges anti.

Saint Louis Israel Missouri Ohio Cincinnati vice president Dr James Hansen Cleveland Al Gore NASA hundred percent seventy seven percent ninety seven percent three percent twenty foot
"dr james hansen" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Dr James Hansen the at NASA others have predicted big rice's but we have very good data tide gauges anti G. tide gauges around the world we have all over the world show on air Bridger rice of seven or eight inches per century further you can go to a site at NASA and the message tells us that oceans have risen a hundred and twenty meters of three hundred ninety feet in the last twenty thousand years I have NO scientists can tell you a natural sea level rise stop the man made sealevel rise began so the great news is we're probably going to have to adjust to a seven or eight inch per century rice the the bad news is water ski Manhattan postcards are not going to be in big demand not gonna happen so yeah any any pull a politician as does the you know so to stop the rise of the seas I think you better get a little better a little bit of personal follow now is there any companies leading the way to get this thing taken care of war people don't panic and think it's all man made well I'm I'm sorry to say most of the industry has bought into this is trump tremendous pressure on companies I talk about it not say the green box companies are spending millions of dollars every year on environmental methods or procedures that don't really do any financing for the environment such as subsidizing in purchasing renewables counting the carbon dioxide foot print even buying carbon credits in a lot of other things is when I go in it present to companies I say there's only one place for this activity that's in your public relations department because it doesn't do anything else but they're under terrific pressure even the the the petroleum industry has come out saying that we have a great product everybody wants it but it's causing the climate that to change and it's hurting mankind so what would you do.

Dr James Hansen NASA sealevel rise air Bridger Manhattan three hundred ninety feet twenty thousand years twenty meters eight inches eight inch
"dr james hansen" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Power from a coal electrical power in ninety seven percent from non renewable sources Ohio is similar both Cincinnati in Cleveland mayors are city councils of pledge they're going to be a hundred percent renewable Ohio is three percent renewable today of these so the city leaders have absolutely no idea how to do this and what it's going to cost but the evidence we see around the world is that is going to raise energy prices for the residence the big issue too is scientists are warning of a major sea level rise by twenty one hundred and of course they're blaming the carbon dioxide pollution for this former vice president Al Gore in in his movie and in his books talked about a twenty foot rise by the year twenty one hundred he got that data from Dr James Hansen the at NASA others the predicted big rice's but we have very good data on tide gauges inside your tight gauges around the world we have all over the world show on air Bridger rice of seven or eight inches per century of further you can go to a site at NASA and the message tells us that oceans have risen a hundred and twenty meters of three hundred ninety feet in the last twenty thousand years I have NO scientists can tell you a natural sea level rise stop the man made sealevel rise began so the great news is we're probably going to have to adjust to a seven or eight inch per century rice the the.

Ohio Cincinnati Al Gore Dr James Hansen NASA sealevel rise Cleveland vice president air Bridger three hundred ninety feet twenty thousand years ninety seven percent hundred percent three percent twenty meters eight inches twenty foot eight inch
"dr james hansen" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Down the trees and so on we have a fire we have these huge conflagration that nobody can stop again this is nothing to do with two tenths of a degree temperature rise Sir almost it's almost negligible is there a big money in man made climate change issues well it is I think it's one of the factors yes follow over three hundred billion dollars a year right now to try and force the switch to renewables all sorts of other factors we have place presence of sustainability of companies and deans of sustainability universities we have environmental desk at newspapers we have a wind and solar and bio fuel industries and and all these things have become big business now these there's nothing wrong with renewable so what's wrong with the way I'm I'm not necessarily against renewables I just think that we shouldn't be subsidizing enforcing the adoption of renewables with the idea that we're going to stop the climate from warming of the planet from morning there's no evidence of that we also have some what I would call kind of a a severe movements now is something called electrify everything why don't they simply say though Stephen were running on a natural resources folks we need renewables it has nothing to do with climate change we just need to be able to save the planet because one day with all these people that are being born on this planet we're going to run out of natural resources we're gonna creek why can't think then that has been an argument the fact is though it's not true is a talk about an outside the green box so called resource depletion isn't happening we have literally because of the Uyghur carbon revolution from fracturing we have centuries at least a couple centuries of oil and gas remaining we also have these methane hydrates the the coastal shelves under the under the ocean where they literally have this I use that is full of natural gas of those estimates are ten times as large as all the gas reserves in the world so there's really no evidence that we're running out of of resources so that argument doesn't work very well either what now what's your take on a hundred U. S. cities that have pledged to be a hundred percent renewable by twenty fifty yeah it's it's a it's a big fan of it we have give you some extremely simple Saint Louis that's where I am right now but for your right now is I think like twenty thirty five they want to be a hundred percent electricity renewable but the state of Missouri gets about seventy to seventy seven percent of their power from a coal electrical power in ninety seven percent from non renewable sources Ohio is similar both Cincinnati in Cleveland mayors are city councils of pledge they're going to be a hundred percent renewable Ohio is three percent renewable today of these so the city leaders have absolutely no idea how to do this and what it's going to cost but the evidence we see around the world as it is going to raise energy prices for the residence the big issue too is scientists are warning of a major sea level rise by twenty one hundred and of course they're blaming the carbon dioxide pollution for this they are former vice president Al Gore in in is movie and in his books talked about a twenty foot rise by the year twenty one hundred because the data from Dr James Hansen at at NASA others have predicted big rice's but we have very good data tide gauges inside your tight gauges around the world we have all over the world show on air Bridger rice of seven or eight inches per century of further you can go to a site at NASA and the masses tells us that the oceans have risen a hundred and twenty meters of three hundred ninety feet in the last twenty thousand years and scientists can tell you a natural sea level rise stopped and manmade sea level rise began so of the great news is we're probably going to have to adjust to a seven or eight inch per century rice the the bad news is water ski Manhattan postcards are not going to be in big demand not gonna happen so the I. any any pull a politician is also you know some of the stuff the rise of the season I think you better get though a little better a little bit of personal follow now is there any company is leading the way to get this thing taken care of war people don't panic and think it's all man made well I'm I'm sorry to say most of industry has bought into this is trump tremendous pressure on companies I talk about it now said the green box companies are spending millions of dollars every year on environmental methods or procedures that don't really do anything thing for the environment such as subsidizing in purchasing renewables counting the carbon dioxide foot print even buying carbon credits in a lot of other things is it when I go in it presenter companies I say there's only one place for this activity that's in your public relations department because it doesn't do anything else but they're under terrific pressure even the the the petroleum industry has come out saying that we have a great product everybody wants it but it's causing the climate that to change and it's hurting mankind so what we need for the.

hundred percent three hundred billion dollars three hundred ninety feet seventy seven percent twenty thousand years ninety seven percent three percent twenty meters eight inches twenty foot eight inch one day
"dr james hansen" Discussed on GrowthBusters

GrowthBusters

13:24 min | 2 years ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on GrowthBusters

"Little technicality out of the picture but let me mention that when I interviewed polar for my documentary the growth busters. He told me that he liked the term climate disruption. He wasn't suggesting that we use it. Because climate change had already taken hold old and I really think climate disruption as a much better description of the climate change or even climate catastrophe or destabilization. Yeah Yeah but search engine. Optimization requires that we keep talking about climate change so I'll be sure to include links and the show notes want to make sure people have a chance to see the videos that you have been producing at SCIENTISTS WARNING DOT TV. And you and you. It didn't stop just because cup. Twenty four over your continuing. Oh yes new audio content. I closing a couple of parentheses here the TV the branding as a TV. He came out of out of. What was it twenty one in Paris when I had thought I was going to be filming a documentary there and managed to get a retired? TV News cameraman from England to come down and fill in for me for free for the price of his lodging paid his ticket as lodging lodging for him and his assistant and and he filmed for me for free and at the end he said Stewart. I don't want to be a wet blanket but I. I don't think you have a movie here but I do think you have a brand so he put it in my mind. That climate matters dot TV was a viable brand. And so with that in mind. I've been angling toward that. And yes I've managed to turn these free resources that the UN F triple C.. Gives to any NGO non governmental organization that is accredited and shows up at the talks. I mean that's a whole other level of administrative bureaucracy but as long as I get there for the price of paying a ticket lodging I get a press conference room which is my sound stage and they have four cameras and they have a sound controller and they have a mixer who edits it all together and then I set up a couple of GOPRO cameras so I have bureau shots from side angles and so I basically. I'm in charge of filming my own work. And then I send it off to a team of video editors so that turned into the scientists warning dot TV brand with the from climate matters dot TV. I broadened the scope to. It's an ecological problem of which climate is the leading edge but that allowed me to very directly discussed thus the elephant in the room population. It allows me to discuss any of the ways in which we are assaulting our mother Mother Nature and of course you scored beautifully by having Greta. Thunberg the fifteen year old superstar of cop twenty four on a couple of years for TV episodes. I consider myself the luckiest person in that people. I'm working with in Stockholm. They have a project called. We don't have time time dot org last Earth Day. They did the first no-fly World Summit on climate had people videoing in I had to wake up at two. Am to be ready to go by three am. Because I'm on the other side of the world from them and I'm working with them and they mentioned that Greta Reta was going to be bub-bubba. Greta found Berg. They said Oh yes yes yes and so. Can you introduce me. And that turned into her father. And she driving down onto Poland and being on for my programs and the first one was her alone and usually my guests are on stage with me but that one I said no my instincts were have her sitting in the front row and introduce her and have everybody plotter because she was already becoming world famous. And I put on the last slide if you'd want interview if anybody wants to interview Greta his her father's name and phone number and he said his phone did not stop ringing after for that so. She became world-famous. She was invited to Davos World Economic Forum where she very expertly stuck her fingers in the eyes of the assembled glitter rati and said quote paraphrase. There are many people and companies. He's and leaders who are knowingly stealing our future destroying our future so that a few people can make enormous sums of money and some of you or in this audience at the end of her to misspeaking. There was slowing strained silence. Broken by Bono of rock and roll old fame starting the the meagre applause. Greta is a blessing she and and so I got at her and her father of the badges for week one of the COP and Antonio Gutierrez the Secretary General of the UN gave them their badges for week two. And what point did they invite her to speak this part of the conference. The COP officially started on Sunday. And when I asked if you needed another day which you knew you would. Why didn't you added on the end? And they said because the first day nothing gets done so we wanted to make the first today a wasted day Sunday so that the second day Monday would then be. Everybody's ready for work. There settled into hotel. They know where the bathrooms over. The lunchroom is ready to go. So that was their logic nick so she and her father came on Sunday arrived in Poland and came to the cop to get their badges and I don't know whether they met him or or how it came about. But a member of the Swedish negotiating team met them again. I don't know how that came about and told the UN that they were there air and so in Tony Guiterrez passed back to them an invitation for Greta to appear at a private meeting. He was having with youth with global youth. It's a few youth leaders from around the world before the COP Monday morning and so she participated in that and it was extremely private. I was not allowed in. She brought with her. A cameraman was filming a documentary. That was being made about her in Sweden. They wouldn't allow him but someone recorded that and that's it's available up on my website. The two minutes that she spoke to world leaders sitting between the head of the UN and the head of the climate talks at the UN and again again she has this way of pointing her finger gently as only a fifteen. Now she sixteen can do but with clarity and power and innocence all all at the same time but a blessing she is so back to world science Let's see scientists warning dot org first of all. That is a website where anyone can access that scientists warnings second notice and I think there's a link to the original nineteen ninety-two scientists warning there too. So you can get that you can read it. It's short you can share that you can learn a lot more but also there is something else that people can do for you for the scientists for our future at that website and it's not. It's not donate right. There's no donate button occasionally. I'll get comment from somebody. I noticed. There's no donate button on your website that speaks volumes. We need engagement agenent involvement from the people who come that is we are always looking for people to say. I've got some spare time. How can I help? I've already mentioned video editing. We need translation. We need people to translate our videos subtitles for. We need a lot of things but there's also a wicky under the menu item learn and act and people can go there to learn more and to figure out what is doable in their situation. Okay one of the big ones that I'm emphasizing right now is civil disobedience now I cannot probably legally encourage encourage children to skip school but I can mention that there. Are Hella kids doing it right now. Taking their future in their hands realizing that they're being screwed crude K.. And Jim Hansen. Dr James Hansen said that in Paris when I presented him publicly said world leaders came here and at the end into the talks. They're going to pass one another on the back and said we did good. We had a good result here. We're going to handle climate change. If they do that that they're screwing next generation and all the following ones. He was nervous about saying he was playing with his microphone but he said it. And that's really where that's out. You know we are screwing in the kids. Who are realizing they're getting screwed? I mean they're not stupid and they're beginning to say this doesn't go down and we won't go go to school. We will not obey your because we're preparing for your future that you are destroying won't be there. You may be not able to see it but we can we. We haven't bought into the system yet. We don't have student loans that force us to take a job that we're not happy about you know so we're seeing seeing a revolution. It's like the Greek playlist Estrada where the women come rushing out on bond. They don't do it in quite this way. But it's two warring warring sides in early Rome. I think are going to go to war and the women decide. They've had enough of this and they're going to deny marital pleasure to their husbands on. Both sides is until the husband's agree to a truce and it worked in the play and our kids are saying that to us so can individual individual members of the public are you. Is there a place to sign up to endorse the world. Scientists warning or is that only for scientists and organisations no no no you on the allies world scientists scientists website. They are still calling for scientists only to sign we are calling for everyone including scientists to sign okay. They don't share their mailing lists with us US 'cause that was their agreement but we are willing to share with them so many scientists come in and sign with us then we will be presenting that group as Co signatures and those will go on the main. Osu website also so please come to scientists warning dot org orgy and there is a adjoin menu item. And you go under there and you can join as an individual if you have an organization that you represent anything from Garden Club to an Ngo you you know and then you can sign as a scientist so as an individual as an organization as a scientist you can endorse slash sign that warning so please come. Thank you could talk to you well. That was a journey down several corridors in the mind of Stuart Scott Executive Director of the Union of concerned citizens of Earth. We're just on many topics and several weeks mentioned so be sure to hit the show notes for further reading and some viewing also in the show notes. We'll be links to a two part essay just just published in the Thai online newsmagazine published in British Columbia Canada. The Essay was written by Bill. Reese who I consider one of the brightest minds on the unsustainability of human civilization as we know it reese is professor emeritus of human ecology and ecological economics at the university diversity of British Columbia back in Nineteen ninety-six Bill and one of his students Mattis Walker novel develops the concept of ecological footprint Brent Walker. Nago went on to found the global footprint network which annually computes the total biocapacity of the planet and the total demand. Human beings are making of the earth in other words. How far we are into overshoot? Be sure to check the show notes for a link to our episode with Walker Knuckle earlier this year this week. The title published a two part essay recently penned by reese the essay makes to queries the first. The modern world is deeply deeply addicted to fossil fuels and green. Energy is no substitute. Am I wrong. The second human nature and our methods of of governance are proving incapable of saving the world. We need to get real about climate science. Am I wrong. Let me share a few few highlights just a wet your appetite. So you'll be sure to look these up from race policy for climate. Disaster Avoidance seems designed to serve the capitalist capitalist growth economy and make the ladder appear as the solution rather than the cause of the problem also wrote the international community. Despite the Paris accord Greta tune Berg climate strikes and mass public protests seems determined to stay its growth driven fossil. Fueled course the the green new deal won't do the trick now on the green new deal subject in this essay Reese Proposes Eleven Point Green..

Greta Reta scientist UN Paris COP Reese dot TV Poland Davos England Berg Stewart Sweden Dr James Hansen GOPRO Stockholm Rome
"dr james hansen" Discussed on GrowthBusters

GrowthBusters

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on GrowthBusters

"And so they issued this second warning same name world scientists warning morning to you second notice and I say this final notice. We're not going to get another notice. We're not going to get another warning. I don't think it won't be time. And so now we are closer to the falling off the over the edge condition and my belief is we are over the edge and have to scramble to safety as quickly as possible if it's still possible that's my job I'm the cheerleader. For scrambling back to safety one of the elitist and so that became this world scientists warning to humanity that. Now I'm trying to force it down everybody's throat look look at this look at this. It's important for your kids. And guess what for you so bill. Ripple and one or two other colleagues league's Ronald Citizen Authors on this paper but the eight total the two of them were the most active. Okay so they publish this paper. They published that paper and then because there was a huge demand for it that is it was really well sited in they got loss of interviews. Initially they created something that they call the alliance of world scientists and the website for the Alliance of world. Scientists is on the Oregon State University server so it comes comes out at Osu Dot Edu and that's their website to me. It was not engaging exciting it was an appeal to scientists to sign assign the warning and so i. They allowed me to do this website. which was the public interface? Allowed me to reach out to their twenty thousand mailing list saying I'm going to be doing these programs at the climate talks in December December of two thousand eighteen. And would any of you like to join me as guests or or to help put them over and I got some very very good responses. The Co host Victoria Earth from on the UK. She came to me through the world scientists warning. She was one of their signatories and a fellow of the name of Peter. School Bala Polish fellow. Hello Scientists Ecologists. He wrote me right away and he said I live in cut vici which is where the climate talks were and if it had not been for Peter boy waited. He's I can't begin to say how helpful he was. They allowed me also to do these programs under the banner scientists warning DOT TV and they were very he please. I was hoping that they would be pleased with the results. Because my editorial input that I always inject act into my programs is what we're doing here. Is that our growth. Economics is killing us and I didn't know whether they would like that or not and a couple all times I used a strong word. I was highly critical of the idiot. And Chief I wasn't sure but they really liked the programs and they sent link out to twenty thousand of their scientists so so for anyone who is really now just discovering Stuart Scott or just discovering world scientists warning in a nutshell you ooh created a little. TV Network Cop Twenty four the TV network goes back to two thousand fifteen in Paris. When when I managed to successfully getting Dr James Hansen who I call? Paul Revere of Climate Change. He was the first scientist to go public in testimony just a month before Congress saying that climate change is.

Peter boy Paul Revere Alliance of world Ronald Citizen Authors DOT TV Dr James Hansen Stuart Scott Oregon State University UK Bala Polish Paris Congress
Former Vice President Al Gore talks climate change solutions in the Twin Cities

Climate Cast

10:37 min | 2 years ago

Former Vice President Al Gore talks climate change solutions in the Twin Cities

"Former Vice President Al Gore comes to Minnesota. I'm N._P._R.. Chief meteorologist Paul Hutton here. This is climate gas. He's arguably the most important historical figure in expanding climate change awareness in America <hes> and the world his two thousand six film an inconvenient truth introduce climate change science and solutions to millions. His work earned the Nobel Peace Prize this weekend former Vice President Al Gore is here in Minnesota training twelve hundred climate activists through his climate reality project. He sat down with me at the event in Minneapolis Mr Gore thanks for taking the time to talk with us on climate cast today and hey welcome to Minnesota. It's great to be back. You know you're here in the the twin cities this weekend for this climate reality project training event. Why did you start climate reality and what does this accomplish well because I came to the conclusion Susan that the only way we can change policies in time to solve the climate crisis is with grassroots pressure from every state in our country from every county and so I decided when my first movie came out I used one hundred percent of the profits from that movie and the book to <hes> to set up the climate reality project and to mobilize Aisa thousands of people tens of thousands of people to put pressure on their elected representatives and business leaders and civic leaders and community leaders nice to to make the changes that we need to make let's go back thirty one years ago this Summer Nastase Dr James Hansen testifies before your your committee in Congress and he says there's a ninety nine percent degree of confidence for a cause and effect relationship between the greenhouse effect and observed warming? How important was that testimony in your path to climate change awareness well? I think that was an important moment. <hes> in making lots of people realize is that this is for real and we need to do something about it unfortunately in the wake of that hearing and the others that I and other members of Congress Health <hes> the fossil fuel <hes> industries took the playbook prepared by the tobacco companies companies back when the doctors and scientists say hey folks <hes> smoking cigarettes causing lung cancer or disease and they hired actors dressed up as doctors and put him on T._V.. To falsely tell people that there was no health problem at all well that same blueprints what's been used by the fossil fuel companies with the point of bring that up is in a healthy democracy where the truth was turned into power testimony like that of Jim Hansen you asked about would have led to dramatic policy changes reason it hasn't is because of the political influence of the coal companies the oil companies in the gas companies but we're gaining on them and these grassroots activists including an impressive number of them here in Minnesota are really making progress ars you talk about policy. You came within a whisker of the presidency in President Gore I like to think it would have been completely and totally different of course in our country. A president has to persuade the Congress Congress and asked to be a skillful politician and getting support for his or her initiatives but I like to think I would have been able to to put in completely different policies that would help to avoid some of this <hes> heartache and hardship and I still think we can do that. We've lost some ground for sure. Some damage has been made inevitable now unfortunately but we still have time to avoid the most catastrophic consequences so rather than looking back and crying over spilt milk as they say. I look forward and try to figure out what I can do to serve in different way. Just watch you give what we might. Call the talk talk at this climate reality event not that dissimilar from the one you used in an inconvenient truth but how has your presentation changed in the thirteen years since the the movie is changed dramatically in a lot of ways because I can bring up examples of floods or droughts or storms or whatever whatever not from ten years ago but from yesterday or last week and literally every night on television news is like a nature ager. I threw the book of revelation and the examples that illustrate all of what the scientists have been warning us about are all around us now every single day. I think that does make an impression on people I know it. Does it makes an impression on me. Yeah I WANNA get your assessment of where we are with the big big picture on climate change today. We're seeing the positive side rapid progress on solutions like renewables Minnesota here. We generate twenty five percent of our electric power. You're from renewables as you know last year. That's way faster than people thought it would happen fifteen years ago. Public opinion is shifting. We know that a little bit and yet greenhouse gas emissions are still rising globally and this administration is basically a wall or going backwards on solution so what's the right urgency level here and what's your assessment of how this plays out for the next ten to twenty years the dramatic truth is that those of us who are alive today we have in our hands decisions to make that will have enormous consequences for thousand generations to come. Tom and that sounds overly dramatic but it's the case. We're putting one hundred ten million tonnes every day of this heat. Trapping pollution into the sky stays there for a thousand years on average and it's trapping so much extra heat <hes> the amount of extra heat energy every day is equal to five hundred thousand or Rocha uh-huh class atomic bombs exploding every day. That's crazy but that's what we're doing. Now what I think you're getting at in the first part of your question is how do we see this. They're contracting interesting trend some good some bad <hes>. We're gaining momentum for the solutions but we're not yet gaining on the crisis crisis because the crisis is still getting worse faster than we are mobilizing solutions yet because we're gaining momentum we may soon have within our capacity the ability to gain on the problem there was a famous economists in the last century name. Rudy Dornbush who once said things take longer to happen than you think they will but then they happen much faster than you thought they could. I think think that it's likely to be true. Where are solutions to this crisis. It's taken longer than many of us thought. It would hoped it would anyway but. But I think that we're now getting to the point where it could happen faster than anybody can imagine to take one example <hes> when the cost of electricity <hes> pity from solar and win gets not only cheaper than electricity from Cohen Gas but way cheaper then no matter how much political political power the fossil fuel companies have it would just take a complete idiot to continue spending way more money than necessary to create dirtier and expensive electricity when you can have it for much cheaper when cleaner air and more jobs and I think we're right in that region now where we're going to see see this flip over and more rapid change. I hope that I'm not pollyannish or overly optimistic but that's the pattern I see unfolding right now. Let's talk about about how that seems to be happening a little bit. I mean if you look at investors. The big insurance firms Swiss re Munich REC- this changing catastrophic loss model we saw P._G.. Any go bankrupt <hes> because of the fire liability in California right. I mean some saying that's the I fortune five hundred climate bankruptcy. How important is this growing investor risk awareness in driving that positive change you talk about Oh. I think it's extremely important there was a story this this morning about the largest private investor black rock losing many billions on fossil fuel investments and they're still the largest fossil fuel in bed. I'm not picking on my in respect them a lot but there so many investors who are taking a close look at the fact that these carbon assets <unk> are really not that different from the subprime mortgages of a few years ago you know there were seven and a half million subprime mortgages meaning mortgages that it looked as if they were triple. A. Rated assets with a value that was based on <hes> false assumptions when actually they were worthless because they'd been given out to people that couldn't make monthly payments and good make down payments and there was a mass delusion and people finally pull pull back the layers of the onion enough to see the truth of it and they suddenly collapsed and that's what caused the credit crisis and then the great recession well. We've now got twenty two trillion dollars worth of carbon assets the reserves of coal and oil and gas and the stocks and these as multinational companies that are based on the assumption that all that fossil fuels going to be burnt well it can't be burn won't be burned not just because of some mm treaty or some law but because solar and wind is going to be much cheaper and efficiency is reducing the demand for what they're selling an electric cars or a progressively destroying the market for liquid petroleum assets and it's only a matter of time before they wake up to this the largest sovereign wealth fund in the world the Norwegian Fund which got all his money from oil and gas. They're really smart. They just announced they're going to divest one hundred percent for from oil and gas assets a so those who are taking the time to read the handwriting on the wall are coming to the conclusion that they need to get with this change and move onto into renewables and the sustainability revolution.

Minnesota Vice President Al Gore President Trump Chief Meteorologist Fuel Industries Minneapolis Congress Paul Hutton Congress Congress Dr James Hansen America Mr Gore Congress Health Gore Cohen Gas
"dr james hansen" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

11:41 min | 2 years ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Dan were a WBZ newsradio ten thirty with us this evening Dr James Hansen professor of history at Auburn University but he has lived history as the biographer of Neil Armstrong if you had a tough time just getting to meet Neil Armstrong I did why don't we do only one but the first room some some reason no one thought for me as I was about twenty years in my career this is a little late nineties and I was to be a graduate seminar in space history of Auburn and I'd my students were asked need on the very first day of summer while I was still working on mac you will be asked months but the only one that really at this news on stone on he was a very private man I hardly even get a hold of them I got an address book with the message was too program for a number of years in one way or another yeah I got an address for him and wrote in offering sooner I got all nines mother back from him is basically the whole I know he told me that you had a number of authors contact yours and he just wasn't quite ready to make a commitment to the still active on a number of corporate boards any Justin did to that on the first floor despite the letter in the summer students in their own press no it's impressive this is he wants on signature on a letter but I also didn't that was good and then one day can run was born on August and I so I sent him a box so with this box with a couple of my more recent books on it and old ones apple around again Lois what about full moon is one of the books and it was closed in the red one of them pretty carefully and he said well let's keep the door open with us you know and I think was really the kind of books by right I mean they were I I was a historian of science and technology and I was wearing my with varying works seamlessly also I think you saw saw me as someone that was no that would you're not just the person say silicic way and not just know what's going on now is only about nine years of his life it really treat this whole this whole out who was crying as a naval aviators all up in my lap also the moon landings so it really took about two years and it's a long story but it took about two years and the key also writing one compass and stand in the midst of Cincinnati and we had a long conversation is out in the one hundred year old but I was pretty confident after I left the house the lost world trusted my approach when it seems wound would eventually work out which which they did how long did it take for you to spend your time interviewing him and then ultimately to write the book well I am the provinces to five hours of tape recorded interview with them and you don't do that you know in short time spread that out over many many months now but I would do is out of town for about three days yeah they stay in Cincinnati and in three days of parking yeah he was one out and I was I was too inside I would leave him alone for go off and do research and just all ties to interview other people I ended up hundred and thirty five people now I'm almost always go astronauts and you've already gone to school with is a Korean to split the whole range of things insulin I'm come Bob maybe in another month and a half or two not be with them for another three weeks four days when I would approach it sequentially I start popping bottles will years in its handling and then just move through was in our lives and so I didn't talk to about the moon landing some you know somewhere in the thirty hour range which flows from them and not special now than bone since twenty twelve and I I knew at the time all special it was but now I really know how or why I have that sort of Pauline Wilson just well sometimes is why still would come in and sit down quietly and listen to what you're saying no it was just to have that full time which in many more times in the afternoon when the second third day and the next day and we look out the window and say let's go walk nine holes of golf we'll both fall closing so we won't stop but on this club so I would order asking because I don't have much IPC corporate the one with the world so we use the word we were on the golf course usually we kept it to parking lot call were you near would tell Cody jokes you know you would ask me about my family so I I made sure I didn't miss anything significant but really trying to interview him quite well do you do you think that he was overwhelmed by what he experienced obviously he was very competent and capable and qualified but you know sometimes when people had that big moment and there aren't too many people would had a moment as big as that that they they want to kind of move on or or or or not put it behind them but they they want to they're not he's not someone who's who's going to go out and and spend the rest of their life making money off of that one moment in time absolutely wanted to continue to contribute there was an engineering courses for most you graduate we'll be running are not ones nearing an wanted to continue to and so well it's clear that Nasser was really good I mean they won't be a lot of the astronaut corps almost immediately after all up and then they give him a job as an administrator and now I'm off and you're not a call for them what I've been fine airplanes will his first passion I mean this last actions well in it they just let him do his job Mister miracle programs been very popular what is the best job in Washington and instead of leaving them alone they would get a call almost every day there come over to this ambassador embassy or this congressman's office they wanted a photo shoot well some V. I. P. and also are you got you know he got tired of that and so on you chose very surprising well not surprising went back to Ohio state where he grew up with a teaching job in aerospace engineering at university of Cincinnati which was kind of surprising all we would do that and we have any number of opportunities in line some people on the run for governor and Senate in and take reform positions on different boards and he just wanted to do was in there and work hard as normal life because but it was hard to do when you were first found the moon attention mostly in the first years after Apollo but it never made it too much I mean I've looked at all the correspondence yes personal papers now and we will see all because there's like eighty thousand pieces of spam all in there and for some time off all of the news getting ten thousand letters a week yelling the unit yeah I'm sorry it's Nancy shock speaking why did why did they move him out at NASA because he was just too valuable to take chances with with home again it's only been as an astronaut they felt like you know we we don't want to risk means become this great iconic hero of the gore entire planet in and their own by that time was clearly they're only going to be six more missions and that would that have been made clear in their other ask what kind of in the park on it so I didn't combination of that with that other restaurants would go and do their determinations and they just didn't really wanna so so obviously he he read the book I mean did he ever talk to you about he must have such a great job with the book a obviously the main the movie was made after his death but did he ever how do you say you know Gee Jim I wish I pointed that out or there is there was any arrive to in the book they there he said he talked to you about another well what about Neal and I think this was not was not true or any of the other astronauts me most of the Apollo asked not to be done on the more or work with an optional on a book once you agreed to me to write his biography which is the answer my questions it was really amazing when I you know one that he would try to control the content you could say well John let's talk about this let's not talk about that or not to do this and basically I wasn't smart enough to ask a question about something I wouldn't worry about it so I had to use it well of course I had been teaching rose this is Chris with one five and so wasn't once but I didn't know he gave me a room only one compliment one comment really about the book it was was classic Armstrong what he said to me movies thanks for viewing the last chapter of manuscripts I was getting ready to loose with my hotel on certain stood up and shook my hand and said June road exactly the book all right follow following much the comp but some coming from Armstrong someone new people had tried to one minute story on one thing trying to get him to do another one the trust issue is real in certain to save our lives that we work though I promise tomorrow's going right that well I'm from a guy who with his reputation everything I think that's the ultimate compliment that he could have given you because you basically but he's basically saying to you is mission accomplished and you told the truth yeah yeah our guest is doctor James Hansen Auburn University the biographer of Neil Armstrong fifty years ago this month it was Neil Armstrong who took the first step onto the moon we get that I can talk a little bit of a Wii he thought what he thought or maybe the the the the future programs would go I know that there was a commitment now to to get back there and maybe we'll talk with doctor Hansen about that if you have any questions feel free to join the conversation six one seven two five four ten thirty triple eight nine two nine ten thirty awful what happens on doctor Hansen was we interview a kiss against of your caliber I everybody sits back and assumes that we're going to ask the question well sometimes that doesn't happen so there's a question that has been lingering in your mind about the the moon the space journeys to the moon travels to the main but mon but particularly the first because the first is the one that we all remember and Neil Armstrong is remembered and will be remembered for for centuries as the first person to step foot on the moon six one seven two five four ten thirty triple eight nine two nine ten thirty we are coming right back on right side side with Dan rate the news watch never stops WBZ newsradio ten thirties.

Dan Auburn University Neil Armstrong WBZ Dr James Hansen professor of history three days two years one hundred year twenty years fifty years thirty hour three weeks five hours nine years one minute four days one day
"dr james hansen" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

06:44 min | 2 years ago

"dr james hansen" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Before we get to our guest this hour the dog to James Cantonese professor of history at Auburn University down in Alabama he's the also the biographer most importantly for our purposes the biographer of the first man to the moon Neil Armstrong his book first man first and only authorized biography of Neil Armstrong we're gonna talk about what is going on in the past a few days earlier this month the fiftieth anniversary of the moon landing let me just as I promised my guest last hour Steven Marcus of the Crohn's disease foundation if you do suffer from Crohn's disease and you're interested in getting any information on the disease or if you have anyone who has that disease and you want to get information for them the Crohn's disease number in Massachusetts is seven eight one four four nine zero three two four seven eight one four four nine zero three two four then again thank Steven Marcus yet tourney who suffers from Crohn's disease and Shaun Murphy who highlighted his fight with Starbucks on the bus to go over that article will be the Boston will tomorrow morning now joining Nancy in me on the on phone is doctor James Hansen the doctor Hansen welcome back tonight said we we had you on the show what last late late last winter I believe yeah I think he did it there's been a lot happening since then it's been a whirlwind for me both with the movie and and movie first man that the premiered in the late fall of twenty eighteen and kept showing through twenty nineteen so I was very pleased with that and then with this anniversary I've been falsely you almost all over the world giving talks about Armstrong and all of the mission we're we're were you on the the the evening which would have been the evening for us I I remembered pretty vividly as he as young guy young young teenager where were you at the moment in time when the fiftieth anniversary was actually marked yeah I did well for my watching well when I was seventeen I was between my junior and senior year I lived in or anything and I would taking college entrance exams in our family this is back in the near when family all sort of watch TV together I mean we had one major television one very small portable that was kept in the kitchen family room so the ball always watch TV together so we were all watching it we want to be a US of a lot of people did that with Walter Cronkite in more there or watching okay can all for that the Apollo coverage uses the good the regular news and so I was usually one for sitting on the floor and I was right for the TV set and I had my my Polaroid camera this is simple the younger listeners tonight this along with four DVRs with long before the piece you are at recorder the only way you could take any image on the TV it was actually take a picture of it and so I took a number of snapshots we can't let you know that calm and the picture coming right out of the front of the camera and will start running so well yeah the whole family was watching it together the afternoon was landing and then late into the evening was the moon walk so so I I don't think you got my question my question is where were you fifty years ago after that where were you let this month I should say I I believe you in Scotland correct yeah yes well you misunderstand that I'm all yeah I actually wrote no there were events all over the country I mean the major events from Washington and Houston in Huntsville Alabama and I had been to a number of these locations prior to the twentieth of July which is the date that date of the anniversary well go to a little town in southern Scotland called lying on anyone who was the the ancestral home of the Armstrong clam and in fact Neil had visited there in nineteen seventy two and was there was celebrated business great Armstrong you know a descendant bagpipers in your hand yes free citizen status of the town and so we will go on one twelve Armstrong association in one in town invited me to come to be kind of the the major cast and the speaker of diplomats and it was a and I hope all the places to go that would be I mean there's a place meal it on and I thought it was would be it would be the most charming and maybe fascinating model places to go in and I wasn't wrong it was really a wonderful experience I met all kinds of people all kinds of Armstrong's Neil Stanley dates back to that area of northern England and southern Scotland goes back we have increased we still got your sixteen on family and so that was where I was asked in a course in Europe the the the landing took place on July twentieth two acts will walk with with the time difference was on the twenty first so it's actually a little more complicated to talk about the dates of the moon landing in Europe because the land was one yet the Norwalk twenty first but other wonderful I guess is doctor James Hinson here teachers at Auburn University professor of history he's Neil Armstrong's biography we get back I'd like him to explain to us how difficult it was for him to actually get in contact with the man who we would eventually produced the hit the biography off of that Neil Armstrong was not an easy person to reach and not an easy person to convince to to it to sit down and spend some time with him I I remember from a ridge of you last winter it's a fascinating story so I hope you can recall some of that for us on the other side of the break now if you have a question about the moon landing or about Neil Armstrong or anything there is a space related as to as to the Apollo program I suspect that the individual who was most qualified the country to answer that question is with us tonight so for those of you out there who are space junkies Dr James Hansen await your comments and your questions six one seven two five four ten thirty triple eight nine two nine ten thirty side.

Auburn University Alabama James Cantonese professor of history fifty years