17 Burst results for "Dr Jacobson"

"dr jacobson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:46 min | 2 months ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Just joining checking it to my brother you out of your mind? Don't go back and stay away. But he must. He must have made Kennedy feel good because he kept coming back. Kennedy loved it. So he tells his brother and his brother G. Told with his brother what he did to dramatics. His brother. Explosive goes, Bobby. I don't care if it's horse, Fifth It makes me feel good. And so Of that six and send the letter to Evelyn Lincoln to resign. Kennedy goes crazy, and he flies to New York and he goes to the Carlyle Hotel. And that's why he always stays and he has this floor. And Kennedy's pacing back and forced for and the man that Max comes in sin, and he's the president at that time. Is the president. Now he has All of the secret service there that we interviewed Paul Landis and Clint Hill were both there, right. And so he calls it, Max shake ups and he goes missing. Dr. Jacobson. I'm so sorry. It wasn't my brother. I need you. You're important to me. They're the only ones who care right back. I'm able to walk. And Jacobson. He's giving injections or Jacobson gave 25 MG injection did it didn't help Kennedy, though these injections They helped them in the short term, where he was able to really Walk better and move better because of He had Addison's disease, and he had his absolute from World War where it should stay with us. We're gonna come back and take phone calls his promised. Next on coast to coast. Am feeling lost not by your radio. Grab your smart phone or computer and listen, toe I heart radio pick up the free I heart radio APS in the APP store or go toe I heart radio dot com..

Clint Hill Paul Landis Evelyn Lincoln New York Jacobson World War Kennedy Max Bobby both six G. Addison Fifth 25 MG injection Carlyle Hotel I com
"dr jacobson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:04 min | 8 months ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"At UC Davis health for its unique properties. And when those cells come back from the laboratory, we then infuse them back into the patient in a single ivy infusion and those cells and seek out and hone in on the cancer as white blood cells and immunologically attacked in the same way that your immune system would attack cell that was infected with a flu virus. UC Davis health treated the first patient with this therapy last year, But Dr Jacobson says this innovative treatment has been yielding promising results. Therapies leaves her missions and a majority of patients, and many of those were emissions are quite durable, where we've now follow patients out multiple years and haven't seen their cancer come back. And Dr Jacobson says that their treatment advancements will hopefully extend to be on blood cancer One day right now we're treating a handful of certain types of leukemia, lymphoma. But what we've learned from from these therapies will invariably translate into being able to offer this to other types of leukemias and lymphomas, as well as to other types of cancer like breast cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer. Man you could hear more from Dr Jacobson and read more about that whole story in Cape okay dot com. The afternoon news with Kitty O'Neil Well. The news Duke University will rename one of its campus buildings after one of the first black women to become an undergraduate at school. Sarah Bartlett has that story. The university's board of trustees voted unanimously to change the name of the sociology psychology building to the Reuben Cook Building. After Will Amina Reuben Cook, she enrolled a Duke in 1963 as part of the first five, a group of black undergraduates who were the first to attend traditionally segregated classrooms. The South Carolina native who passed away in 29 Thine is the first black woman to have a campus building, named after her Sarah Bartlett News, 93.1 kfbk and Coming Up on Our Afternoon news will check your top stories, traffic and weather. We're also going to get a preview of tonight's debate. Just a little over a half hour away is when that starts. Which will have life for you here on news 93.1 kfbk and life everywhere on the I Heart radio at Coney.

Dr Jacobson UC Davis Sarah Bartlett Duke University Reuben Cook Building Amina Reuben Cook flu Coney lymphoma South Carolina
"dr jacobson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:58 min | 8 months ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Landscape and changing natural history of these diseases for patients and improving outcomes on some of them are understanding what's happening at a genetic level in the cancer cell, But I can't imagine hydrotherapy even more individualized. Then Carty cell therapy, which stands for time. Erica Imogen receptor T cell therapy Because this type of therapy we actually take T cells ourselves from the patient's immune system out of their blood their own cells. We engineer them in a laboratory to become better cancer fighting cells, and then we give them back to the patient so that they can, you know, go seek the cancer cells and attack them the same way they would that flu or some other some other virus. And so the therapies have really revolutionized treatment for leukemias and lymphomas in recent years right now approve for patients who have whose cancers have not responded Tio conventional therapies like chemotherapy and radiation therapy and who have very few options for effective treatment for their cancer is And thankfully, because of these cartels, therapies, huge proportion of patients are responding to these therapies and their cancers air going into remission. And for many of those patients permissions appear to be quite durable, where the patient's cancer has not come back years after the party cell infusion. This is really a phenomenal breakthrough in the treatment of patients cancer. Couldn't be more individualized and taking their own immune system to fight their cancer. That's incredible, you know, and I'm talking from a from a standpoint here of outside the medical community, So I look in and all of these various things going on. We can all take a peek once in a while. Get updated as to what's going on. But you are right there on the front lines, and I have to ask you as a highly educated, thoroughly immersed in this industry and in this research When you first started in this line of work, you know, following your passion into the medical community. Would you have ever thought these few short decades down the road that we would have this again for lack of a better medical term? He sort of Star Trek. Innovations with regards to individualize therapies. You know, back in the seventies, Theeighties. If you heard of someone getting a cancer diagnosis, there was a far different mind set at the time. Then stay we have today. You got to pat yourself on the back just yet, But I know you won't. So allow me to do it for you. But when you first got into this industry when you first got into this profession in this passion of yours, did you ever think we would be these kind of light years ahead? Did you see that on the horizon? Or is it just a cz? Much? A delightful surprise for you as it is, for the rest of us? I was absolutely a delightful surprise. I have to say, you know, to be ableto encounter therapy like this on breakthrough like this and to be able to offer it to patients beyond my wildest expectations. The type of therapy is going to open door is not just for more patients of leukemia lymphoma. We have research is going at an astronomical pace. We have new car to sell products that are coming into clinical trials. And I am Papa. That it will improve outcomes for more and more patients. I think we're gonna learn how to use the therapies for other kinds of cancer, including breast cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer cancer that I think a lot of your listeners are more accustomed to hearing about. Oh, absolutely. Now when you start hearing about these new therapies, and again these air so new on the horizon that people don't have. They haven't had a lot of face to face contact with it. It's something brand new. So they're gonna have some fears and some doubts and they're gonna think what questions should we be asking? What are some of the upsides? The downsides, the the amazing advantages and the things that people wouldn't expect. Yeah, that's a great question. So obviously the upside is the fact that these cells work, they kill the cancer cells, and they put patients diseases into remission and neither diseases that have been very resistance, other types of therapies and many of these patients. As I said, don't have their cancer has come back after years of follow up, which is really remarkable, and we are crossing all Fingers and toes that these cancers will never come back and the patients will be cured. But you have to realize that nothing comes with a free ride. And so this incredible efficacy comes with some some side effects. Work of these parties held back Teo, a patient that caused a huge inflammatory response. Can you present like sort of a flu on steroids? And so these patients often have to be in the hospital and be observed in that first week after the party cell infusion and then the other side people experience, which is also temporary and gets better. Time, but it is a neurological side effects, which presented confusion. People can have difficulty finding their words. Sometimes people become weak at all, and it could be very distressing for the patient and especially their family to watch. But it gets better from this and return back to their normal cognitive status. And many of our patients are back at work 6 to 8 weeks after their car T cell infusion, So thankfully, these attacks happen early and are generally 100% reversible, and that's also reassuring and And I'm taking notes as we're talking here And while thank God knock wood. We don't have a huge precursor of this in our family tree. We've had a lot of friends and neighbors and stuff. You know, a decent amount who have had this in their family tree. So we hear about it was sometimes we help them through it. That kind of thing, And I'm willing to bet any and all of those side effects you mentioned are thes tough cookies out there that are fighting the stuff would be only too happy to Come out the other end of that and and deal with all that, If it means the benefits that you're describing there, I don't know One person who who lacks the chutzpah to go through and get that kind of stuff done. So everything you're describing sounds worth it for lack of a better word. It's looking forward. Don't look in the day Look a year from now, two years from now, 10 years from now, when you're hanging out with your kids and your grandkids, where a generation ago perhaps not so much. I knew the time was going to fly. So I gotta get one more question and for the people listening to you who are so inspired by what you're saying, and they want to get more info. Where's the best place for our listeners to go for more information on this, So I would point people in direction of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society website as well as the Lymphoma of Research Foundation website or wherever you're closest Carty fell treatment center is to your home. You can check out their website because they will invariably have carefully curated went great information. Outstanding. Dr Jacobson.

Carty cancer flu Leukemia Erica Imogen Tio engineer Theeighties Lymphoma of Research Foundatio Lymphoma Society Dr Jacobson Teo lymphoma
"dr jacobson" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:01 min | 9 months ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Ah, that don't have privileges at hospitals that are perfectly fine by the way they're certified, and they could do those procedures in their office. But it's an outside scrutiny that Is helpful to you. If the doctor has privileges at a hospital to do those procedures, So those were some of the things and then of course you could ask friends or other doctors. What do you think of this doctor? And those are some of the things that give you an idea whether or not the doctor is a good doctor and one that should be operating on you. Now, then you have to take care of yourself because some doctors will say You know, you need clearance by an internist prior to surgery. I require all my patients to be cleared by an internist. I'm not an internal medicine. Doctor. I'm a plastic surgeon. I'm good at what I do, but I'm not an internist. I want an internist. Those were the doctors that specialized in diseases and conditions in adults. The heart, lungs, kidneys, liver like Dr Jacobson, as we had on earlier tonight. So you want someone like that to look you over and make sure that the plastic surgeon who has expertise in what he or she is doing? Hasn't missed something important. Like you know about thyroid disease that you didn't know you had. If your heart rate is racing at 110 a minute, and the doctor didn't quite realise that that might be graves disease, You know you want your internist, Teo to see your beforehand. I also require my patients over the age of 62 have a stress test and exercise stress test. Not every doctor requires that I think it's smart personally, because there are some things that can happen in the operating room. And one of those is a problem with your heart. If you do have a stress test, and you do well with it, then For the most part, you're not gonna have a problem with your heart during surgery. And then you want to. You want to talk to the doctor about the length of time you're going to be in the operating room and the problem in Florida, and the reason we're talking about this now is because this particular person at eight hours and 15 minutes of surgery And I think that's just not a smart thing to do, particularly if you're going to be staying in an office. My attitude is that if you're having eight hours of surgery, first of all, you should probably not. I mean, there are some procedures like body lives that sometimes can go that long. But you really want to break up the surgery And if you're having a tummy tuck, you want to have no other procedures with atomic attack. If you're having facial cosmetic surgery, you know, four hours, maybe six hours. That's that's enough. I mean, there are complications like blood clots in the legs and infections and things like that. That are time related in the operating room. So that means the longer you're in the operating room. The more likely you are to have a problem. You want to set yourself up for success, not set yourself up for problems. And so that's why it's very important. I have a whole book on this topic. It's called straight Talk about cosmetic surgery still available on amazon dot com. You.

Dr Jacobson Teo Florida
"dr jacobson" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:07 min | 9 months ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And I hope you're having a wonderful weekend. I have a A really special guests coming up in just a minute. I've got Dr Ira Jacobson on the line. Dr Jacobson is a gastroenterologist. That's Aggie. I doctor's an internal medicine doctor. I met Dr Jacobson way back when I was the burn fellow at New York Hospital in the 19 eighties, I was I was in high school at the time, and I met Dr Jacobson. He was a junior faculty member, and he has had the most stellar career that I want to tell you about in just a minute. Dr. Jacobson, are you there? I'm right here. I want to thank you for taking time on your Saturday evening, so so way back in the old days when you were at Cornell, and I was at Cornell, you know, you went on to become the chief of of G I at Cornell. And right now you are the chief. Of hepatology of liver disease at GNU. And now Dr Jacobson has had an incredible background and and he's very very modesty. Did a fellowship at Mass General, which is a Across the street from where I trained in Boston AA a wonderful place. He was got his M D up at Columbia. But we don't hold that against. I'm on the faculty there. Of course, it's a great place. So and IRA is now at GNU. And he's on this week because for very personal reasons, you know, I talk a lot about my own medical history and IRA did my colonoscopy a week and 1/2 ago and thankfully He said It was all okay. So, Ira Thank you for a wonderful colonoscopy. It's my pleasure. And thanks for the entree, because legally I couldn't have brought that up. If you hadn't Well, you know, I talk, you know, hip, hip A is, Ah is very important. Privacy's important we can always talk. About ourselves. We can talk about other people. So Ira Jacobson is one of the great liver disease specialists in the world and was actually in the group that helped cure hepatitis C. So, IRA tell us a little bit about that. I know you've spent decades working on liver disease. Tell us about how this happened. Well, I always.

Dr Ira Jacobson Dr Jacobson Ira Jacobson IRA liver disease Cornell Boston New York Hospital Columbia
"dr jacobson" Discussed on Mythology

Mythology

04:41 min | 9 months ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on Mythology

"Crutches he'd look like a weakling in front of the whole world press so he decided to call this guy doctor Max Jacobsen. Doctor Jacobson was sort of mad scientists slash doctor to the stars. He treated everyone who's anyone and he had this miracle shot that gave his patients so much energy and euphoria that the actually called him Dr Feelgood which just as an aside maybe never go to someone called Dr Feelgood. So with this summit, coming up Jack Invites, Dr Feelgood to the White House without consulting any of his regular doctors after one injection jack is practically leaping across the room without his crutches he feels on top of the world clear-headed. No pain. So he even asked Dr Jacobson to come with him to Europe in case he needs and other fix. So you're probably asking what was actually in these magic injections mostly amphetamines. So if you're keeping score, the president is now shooting up speed. He's on Royds, downers narcotics, and whatever else was in Dr Jacobson's shots because even today no one is totally sure what the full recipe was. But Jack said I don't care if it's Horse Piss it works. The thing about amphetamines though is when they stop. You are in a world of trouble especially if you're trying to negotiate a peace treaty with the Soviet. Premier. When Jack arrived in Vienna for the summit doctor. Jacobson gave him a quick injection and then he was off to the races. I mean, he was even described as bounding down the steps of the embassy. Looked like he could run. Around the sixty, seven year old Khrushchev. But. As soon as they got to talking Jack was clearly not functioning at one hundred percent. He bumbled his way through the whole afternoon without accomplishing really anything by dinnertime even reporters who saw Jack leading the building could tell that his energy was crashing. And by the end of the second day, well, it's generous to assume that he was going through withdrawals because the only other explanation is that he just lost his mind during their last meeting. Khrushchev. Threatened is up to the US to decide whether there'll be war or peace and Jack replied. Then MR chairman there will be war it will be a cold winter. Now. This was the exact opposite of what the US was hoping to get out of this event. Jack said it best himself in an interview immediately after the meeting worst thing in my life he savaged me. For a minute, it looked like Khrushchev might have rhetorically beaten him to death a week or two after he gets back to the White House on June. Sixteenth Jack comes down with a fever I mean he can't even get out of bed. He has to cancel his appointments, his doctors on red alert because when you have Addison's disease, any small infection can potentially be. Life threatening. So they decide to pump him full of antibiotics and steroids and narcotics even more than usual but his condition just keeps getting worse for a whole week by June twenty second. He nearly dies all the while the press is being told that he has a mild viral infection. The public has no idea that the commander in chief is basically on his deathbed. Miraculously, Jacks health finally starts to turn around he makes a slow but steady recovery and when the test comeback they all finally find out what caused this near fatal infection. Arab actor Clohessy, a bacteria that outside of a hospital setting is usually sexually transmitted. So the president just almost died of an S. T. D. and the burning question pun intended is who gave it to him? Well, it's a little hard to narrow down because in his downtime between creating international crises and shooting up enough drugs to kill a racehorse. JFK was sleeping with just about every woman in.

jack Doctor Jacobson Dr Feelgood Khrushchev US White House president Max Jacobsen Addison Europe fever Clohessy Vienna MR chairman S. T. D.
"dr jacobson" Discussed on Kingpins

Kingpins

04:22 min | 10 months ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on Kingpins

"And he had this miracle shot that gave his patients so much energy and euphoria that they actually called him Dr, feelgood, which just an aside, maybe never go to someone called Dr. feelgood. So with this summit, coming up Jack Invites Dr Feelgood to the White House without consulting any of his regular doctors after one injection Jack is practically leaping across the room without his crutches. He feels on top of the world clear-headed. No pain. So he even asked Dr Jacobson to come with him to Europe. In case he needs another fix. So you're probably asking what was actually envy's magic injections mostly in Fettah means. So. If you're keeping score, the president is now shooting up speed. He's on Royds, downers, narcotics, and whatever else was in Dr Jacobson's shots because even today no one is totally sure what the full recipe. What's but Jack said I don't care if it's horse pass. It works. The thing about amphetamines though is when they stop working, you are in a world of trouble especially if you're trying to negotiate a peace treaty with the Soviet premier. When. Jack. Arrived in Vienna for the summit doctor. Jacobson, gave him a quick injection, and then he was off to the races I. Mean, he was even described as bounding down the steps of the embassy. He looked like he could run laps around the sixty seven year, old Khrushchev. But as soon as they got to talking, Jack was clearly not functioning at one hundred percent. He bumbled his way through the whole afternoon without accomplishing really anything by dinnertime. Even reporters who saw Jack leaving the building could tell that his energy was crashing. And by the end of the second day, well, it's generous to assume that he was going through withdrawals because the only other explanation is that he stripped lost his mind during their very last meeting. Khrushchev threatened is up to the US to decide whether there'll be war or peace and Jack replied then Mr Chairman there will be war, it will be a cold winter. Now this was the exact opposite of what the US was hoping to get out of this event Jack. said it best himself in an interview immediately after the meeting? Worst thing in my life, he savaged me. For a minute like Khrushchev, might have rhetorically beaten him to death a week or two after he gets back to the White House on June Sixteenth Jack. Comes down with a fever I. Mean, he can't even get out of bed. He has to cancel all of his appointments. His doctors are on red alert because when have Addison's disease? Any small infection can potentially be life threatening. So they decide to pump him full of antibiotics and steroids and narcotics. More than usual, but his condition just keeps getting worse for a whole week by June twenty second, he nearly dies. All the while the press is being told that he has a mild viral infection. The public has no idea that the commander in chief is basically on his deathbed. Miraculously Jacks health finally starts to turn around. He makes a slow but steady recovery and when the test comeback they all finally find out what caused this near fatal infection. Aero b-actor clohessy. A bacteria that outside of a hospital setting is usually sexually transmitted. So, the president just almost died of an S. T. D. and the burning question pun intended is who gave it to him? Well, it's a little hard to narrow down because in his downtime between creating international crises and shooting up enough drugs to kill a racehorse. JFK was sleeping with just about every woman in the.

Jack Dr Jacobson Khrushchev Dr Feelgood Dr. feelgood Addison White House president US fever Europe Fettah Vienna Chairman S. T. D.
"dr jacobson" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

04:22 min | 10 months ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"And he had this miracle shot that gave his patients so much energy and euphoria that they actually called him, Dr Feelgood, which just an aside, maybe never go to someone called Dr Feelgood. So with this summit, coming up Jack Invites, Dr Feelgood to the White House, without consulting any of his regular doctors after one injection jack is practically leaping across the room without his crutches. He feels on top of the world clear-headed. No pain. So he even asked Dr Jacobson to come with him to Europe in case he needs another fix. So you're probably asking what was actually these magic injections mostly in Fettah means. So, if you're keeping score, the president is now shooting up speed. He's on Royds, downers narcotics, and whatever else was in Dr Jacobson's shots because even today no one is totally sure what the full recipe. What's but Jack said, I, don't care if it's horse pass it works. The. Thing about amphetamines though is when they stop working, you are in a world of trouble especially if you're trying to negotiate a peace treaty with the Soviet premier. When Jack arrived in. Vienna. For the summit Doctor Jacobson gave him a quick injection, and then he was off to the races. I mean he was even described as bounding down the steps of the embassy. He looked like he could run laps around the sixty seven year old Khrushchev. But as soon as they got to talking Jack was clearly not functioning at one hundred percent. He bumbled his way through the whole afternoon without accomplishing really anything by dinnertime. Even reporters who saw Jack leaving the building could tell that his energy was crashing. And by the end of the second day, well, it's generous to assume that he was going through withdrawals because the only other explanation is that he stripped lost his mind during their very last meeting. Khrushchev threatened is up to the US to decide whether there'll be war or peace and Jack replied. Then MR chairman there will be war, it will be a cold winter. Now. This was the exact opposite of what the US was hoping to get out of this event. Jack, said it best himself in an interview immediately after the meeting? Worst thing in my life, he savaged me. For a minute like Khrushchev might have rhetorically beaten him to death a week or two after he gets back to the White, House on June Sixteenth Jack comes down with a fever. I mean, he can't even get out of bed. He has to cancel all of his appointments. His doctors are on red alert because when have Addison's disease? Any small infection can potentially be life threatening. So they decide to pump him full of antibiotics and steroids and narcotics even more than usual, but his condition just keeps getting worse for a whole week by June, twenty second, he nearly dies. All the while the press is being told that he has a mild viral infection. The public has no idea that the commander in chief is basically on his deathbed. Miraculously. Jacks health finally starts to turn around. He makes a slow but steady recovery, and when the test comeback, they all finally find out what caused this near fatal infection. Aero b-actor Clohessy, a bacteria that outside of a hospital setting is usually sexually transmitted. So the president just almost died of an S. T. D. and the burning question pun intended is who gave it to him? Well, it's a little hard to narrow down because in his downtime between creating international crises and shooting up enough drugs to kill a racehorse. JFK was sleeping with just about every woman in the.

jack Khrushchev Dr Feelgood Doctor Jacobson Addison president White House US Fettah Europe Vienna fever MR chairman House S. T. D.
"dr jacobson" Discussed on Survival

Survival

04:40 min | 10 months ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on Survival

"Crutches. He'd look like a weakling in front of the whole world press. So he decided to call this guy doctor Max. Jacobsen. Doctor Jacobson was sort of a mad scientists slash doctor to the stars. He treated everyone who's anyone and he had this miracle shot that gave his patients so much energy and euphoria that they actually called him Dr Feelgood which just as an aside, maybe never go to someone called Dr Feelgood. So with this summit, coming up Jack Invites Dr. feelgood to the. White House without consulting any of his regular doctors after one injection, Jack is practically leaping across the room without his crutches. He feels on top of the world clear-headed. No pain. So he even asked Dr Jacobson to come with him to Europe in case he needs another fix. So you're probably asking what was actually in these magic injections mostly in Fettah means. So if you're keeping score, the president is now shooting up speed. He's on Roy, Bates Downers narcotics and whatever else was in Dr. Jacobson's shots because even today no one is totally sure what the full recipe was. But Jack said I don't care if it's horse pass. It works. The thing about amphetamines though is when they stop working, you are in a world of trouble especially if you're trying to negotiate a peace treaty with the Soviet premier. When Jack arrived in Vienna for the summit Doctor Jacobson gave him a quick injection and then he was off to the races I mean he was even described as bounding down the steps of the embassy. He looked like he could run laps around the sixty seven year. Old Khrushchev. But as soon as they got to talking Jack was clearly not functioning at one hundred percent. He bumbled his way to the whole afternoon without accomplishing really anything by dinnertime even reporters who saw Jack leaving the building could tell that his was crashing. And by the end of the second day, well, it's generous to assume that he was going through withdrawals because the only other explanation is that he just stripped lost his mind during their very last meeting. Khrushchev threatened is up to the US to decide whether there'll be war or peace and Jack replied then Mr Chairman there will be war it will be a cold winter. Now, this was the exact opposite of what the US was hoping to get out of this event Jack. said it best himself in an interview immediately after the meeting worst thing in my life he savaged me. For a minute, it looked like Khrushchev might have rhetorically beating him to death a week or two after he gets back to the White House on June Sixteenth Jack comes down with a fever I mean he can't even get out of bed he has to cancel all of his appointments. His doctors are on red alert because when you have Addison's disease, any small infection can potentially be life threatening. So they decided to pump him full of antibiotics and steroids and narcotics even more than usual but his condition just keeps getting worse for a whole week by June twenty second he nearly dies. All the while the press is being told that he has a mild viral infection. The public has no idea that the commander in chief is basically on his deathbed. Miraculously, Jacks health finally starts to turn around he makes a slow but steady recovery and when the test comeback they all finally find out what caused this near fatal infection. Arab actor Clohessy a bacteria that outside of a hospital setting is usually sexually transmitted. So the president just almost died of an S. T. D. and the burning question pun intended is who gave it to him? Well, it's a little hard to narrow down because in his downtime between creating international crises and shooting up enough drugs to kill a racehorse. JFK was sleeping with just about every woman.

Jack Doctor Jacobson Old Khrushchev Dr. feelgood doctor Max Addison White House president Jacobsen US Europe Fettah Clohessy Bates Downers fever Vienna Chairman S. T. D. Roy
"dr jacobson" Discussed on Serial Killers

Serial Killers

05:18 min | 10 months ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on Serial Killers

"Himself. How could I have been so stupid, of course, it might have had something to do with the FBI storage lockers worth of drugs that he was taking, and despite all the meds his underlying conditions. Conditions were only getting worse in fact, just a month later in May of nineteen, sixty one he throughout his back during a tree planting ceremony I mean so bad that he couldn't even walk. This was a problem because in a couple of weeks, he was supposed to fly to Europe to meet the Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev in the Cold War perception was everything he couldn't show up hobbling around on crutches. He'd look like a weakling in front of the whole world press. So he decided to call this guy doctor Max Jacobsen. Doctor Jacobson was sort of a mad scientists slash doctor to the stars. He treated everyone who's anyone and he had this miracle shot that gave his patients so much energy and euphoria that they actually called him Dr. feelgood. which just as an aside, maybe never go to someone called Dr Feelgood. So with this summit, coming up Jack Invites, Dr Feelgood to the. The White, house, without consulting any of his regular doctors after one injection, Jack. Is practically leaping across the room without his crutches heels on top of the world. clear-headed. No pain. So he even asked Dr Jacobson to come with him to Europe. In case he needs another fix. So you're probably asking what was actually in these magic injections mostly amphetamines fettah means. So if you're keeping score, the president is now shooting up speed. He's on Royds, downers, narcotics, and whatever else was in Dr, Jacobson's shots because even today no one is totally sure what the full recipe was. But Jack said, I. Don't care if it's horse piss. It works. The thing about amphetamines though is when they stop working, you are in a world of trouble especially if you're trying to negotiate a peace treaty with the Soviet. Premier. When Jack arrived in Vienna for the summit Doctor Jacobson gave him a quick injection, and then he was off to the races I mean, he was even described as bounding down the steps of the embassy. He looked like he could run laps around the sixty seven year old Khrushchev. But. As soon as they got to talking Jack was clearly not functioning at one hundred percent. He bumbled his way through the whole afternoon without accomplishing really anything by dinnertime. Even reporters who saw, Jack, leaving the building could tell that his energy was crashing. And by the end of the second day, well, it's generous to assume that he was going through withdrawals because the only other explanation is that he distributed lost his mind during their very last meeting. Khrushchev threatened is up to the US to decide whether there'll be war or peace and Jack. replied. Then MR chairman there will be war, it will be a cold winter. Now, this was the exact opposite of what the US was hoping to get out of this event. Jack. said it best himself in an interview immediately after the meeting? Worst thing in my life, he savaged me. For a minute, it looked like Khrushchev might have rhetorically beaten to death a week or two after he gets back to the White House on June sixteenth, Jack comes down with a fever I. Mean, he can't even get out of bed. He has to cancel all of his appointments, his doctors on red alert because when you have Addison's disease, any small infection can potentially be. Be Life threatening. So they decide to pump him full of antibiotics and steroids and narcotics even more than usual, but his condition just keeps getting worse for a whole week by June twenty second. He nearly dies all the while the press is being told that he has a mild viral infection. The public has no idea that the commander in chief is basically on his deathbed. Miraculously. Jacks. Health finally starts to turn around he makes a slow but steady recovery and when the test comeback they all finally find out what caused this near fatal infection. Arab actor, Clohessy, a bacteria that outside of a hospital setting is usually sexually transmitted. So the president just almost died of an S. T. D. and the burning question pun intended is who gave it to him? Well, it's a little hard to narrow down because in his downtime between Ding international crises and shooting up enough drugs to kill racehorse. JFK was sleeping with just about every woman in the. Beltway. To find out what happens next listen to very presidential with Ashley Flowers, free, on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts..

Jack Nikita Khrushchev Doctor Jacobson Dr Feelgood Europe US FBI Addison president Max Jacobsen spotify Clohessy Ashley Flowers fever Dr. feelgood. chairman White House Vienna
"dr jacobson" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

06:09 min | 10 months ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"The ability to control their kids destiny and have a meaningful choice. And so for May If parents believe that the distance learning is the way to go there, not comfortable in a face to face environment for their kid, then I think they have that right. Governor De Santis in Orlando yesterday. Of course, the question Around all of South board. At this point, will parents have any classroom options? And increasingly, the answer looks like know in addition to a delayed school year. So we'll see where that old ball lands. We'll continue to follow it. I'm gonna have a followed by the way to the real information about what parents want. Not what you hear reported, But what parents really want There's a lot of spin a lot of spin on this particular topic, but first, right talk about the cancel culture and we are joined by William Jacobson. He is a Cornell law professor. Doctor, Dr Jacobson. Thank you so much for taking the time with us. We appreciate it. Thank you for having me on Okay, So let's talk a little bit about the cancel culture because what about great frustrations in life people that latch on to move movements? That might not realize the implications of it. For example, if we take a look at often on of younger people, they'll believe that I am being a liberal. If I go along with the cancel culture, unlike those back in the sixties, say at Berkeley who understood that Hey, that means free speech these days. You don't even have free speech on a campus like Berkeley. You whatyou have ultimately is the lack of tolerance. What is the landscape behind the cancel culture? And what are your thoughts about where this whole thing is going? Well, I think one of the things that's developed over the last 10 20 years is a concept that most single most important thing is house how you feel about something, and if somebody says something that makes you feel uncomfortable or upset you, you define that as hate speech and you try to stifle it, and that's the problem. We're going through that when people have disagreements with the present prevailing wisdom. Which on many campuses is liberal or leftist, that anybody who speaks out against that is viewed as offensive and is viewed as engaging in some form of hate speech because it upsets other people. So this whole notion from the sixties and seventies and I grew up in the seventies and went to college and set late seventies. That you wanna have this debate. You wanna have a disagreement? You wantto hear the other side That is not the prevailing wisdom on campus and mourn its increasingly not the prevailing wisdom in the society. Instead, you try to get somebody fired where you try to get them kicked out of their job or demoted or whatever it happens to be or their speech cancelled and that's what we talked about it as cancel culture. It's rather than debating the issues. It's trying to use power to start. Little people. You can interrupt memories. Now remember being on an island among couple understood students in certain classes on certain topics, and and I went to school in the nineties and it was extraordinarily challenging, then could only imagine how bad it is on campus today. What We take a look at this entire concept. What bugs me most about it is its bigotry. Why is it that we don't have more people that understand This isn't the best way to engage in discourse, calling it what it is that those that want to cancel are not those who are the most understanding. They're actually just being bigots. Well, whether you call them bigots or whatever you call them. The whole point is that they're trying to use the power that they have no social media corporations on campuses to prevent other people from speaking and they do it through that Cancel culture. It's intolerant. It is a totalitarian in many ways, and it is repressive, and I think that's the problem that these people who claim that they are the most enlightened, actually are the most repressive because they want to stop other people from speaking. Well, and you mentioned intolerance. That ultimately is what bigotry is its intolerance for those who hold differing views, and that that's part of what I found is that people do not like being presented with the notion there being bigoted. But they actually in many cases are and this entire type of culture is is very much rooted in that and and you know, in terms of awakening. Do you feel like we're at that moment of a potential pendulum swing to where you know things have gone so far towards the cancel culture? We will start to say things swing back the other way. Well, I think there is to some extent there's a huge undercurrent. I mean, I've been dealing with this cancel culture at Cornell. People trying to get me fired, etcetera, and there is a backlash brewing, but a lot of people are afraid to speak out because they don't want to lose their job. They don't want to be called some name on the Internet, which could interfere with their job prospects. So I don't I think there is a backlash brewing. I'm just not sure what's going to be the breaking point where it breaks through. And people more aggressively speak out against it. Because you know, a lot of people don't have job protection and you tweet something. Will you said something privately to somebody and they run to your boss and all of a sudden you're fired. It's a very negative culture that we have here. I hope it swings back the other way. I think there is a backlash. I think there's a huge, silent majority who are really infuriated with what's happening, but it's going to take some event or something to cause it to break through. So now I want to ask you about somebody who might be exposed to this. Cancel culture. This bigotry this institutionalized Groupthink. From a legal standpoint. If you have an organization that embraces the cancel culture. Is there not potentially liability from somebody who is repressed within the.

Berkeley William Jacobson Governor De Santis Orlando Cornell professor
"dr jacobson" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

11:48 min | 1 year ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"Doctor Jacobson our platinum invis- line providers and are active in the digital community as members of cavs the Ada Austin clear liners AFE dodger. Berkeley and Dr Jacobson. Show a unique bond in that they develop a business partnership forged out of a long standing friendship that began while they met in two thousand nine in dental school. Right here at a Midwestern University in Glendale Arizona. Just right up the street from hair having worked alongside one another in a corporate setting for several years Doctor Barclay Doctor. Jacobson went on to leverage their gained insights and build their own private practice from scratch in just two years since opening. Tooth Bar has become Austin's premier dental practice founded three mutual desire to elevate the dental practice experience. There is now a five month waiting lists for people to wait it to be part of this. Innovative Experience aesthetics and dental care experience. The two doctors enjoy living and working in downtown Austin and continue to prove the best friends can start a successful business together and I must say as an old man you look like the Bob C. Twins named starting your dental school. So I think that's the thing so you guys met in Dental School in Glendale Arizona. That's where you first met. Yeah we actually were roommates. For four years you attended Donald School we on the dental school facebook. What side and we both found out that we're not Weirdos then. We decided to live together That generated in created a friendship. Justin friends percents and we're both born and raised. I can't pass a better story than I do. I let her go. First from overseas was born in London Negro kind of traveled around the world. My parents are from Spain so we traveled a lot and then kind of randomly ended up mistakes for high school on. I stayed here ever since. So yes great in Jay's actually from yeah. I grew up in Chicago until I was thirteen than lived in Arizona. Our two key you went to desert As always went. Yeah I graduated in two thousand high school and I went to university Arizona. I I know you're not guess fan because it was free. They just hand out free diplomas. Wally probably would have gone to. Is you in same story. I love trash-talking you. There's nothing more delightful so These these how did you end up in Texas? Then data pretty randomly. We actually came out towards the end of dental school. Trying to figure out what to do and my family didn't live here veget- Talking about Oh do change move somewhere and so came out for south by southwest festival which actually sadly got cancelled for the first time due to corona virus this year and it's been a pretty big impact on our community but was this whole up south by South West. Yes it's a really great interactive music Festival and head of all the newest greatest things. Come out very often to really big startup community which is really neat and we just loved kind of the Vibrancy. Here everyone implants. No one's really from Austin. Everyone comes here. And there's a really great inspiring mentality here that we're really attracted to and so just kind of randomly ended up here now so what raise call each other. I mean wh you guys call each other. I I hear you saying Dr J. or DR K or what. What what do you call needs? I was Jane Doctor. Dr J. and Dr be interesting but you know I really believe Every time I meet someone that's really thinks outside the box and really profound. They were moved around a lot as a kid. And I remember meeting Tim and Eric Crown up the street from all of the founders of insight and I asked him. I said come on union brother from Iowa. I'm from Kansas. How did you figure this out? And he really knew me and my brother were army brats and every couple of years different country and we'd sit there in our own thinking. Why is this country so different than the last one? The one before and he said by the time we got out of high school we knew macroeconomics. And we we we out the whole thing and so a lot of people. They're born in a tribe and they think this is the way it's always been it's always the only do insurance pays only people. Tell me that America's the greatest country. I don't even have to ask if they've ever flown across these. I know they have if I've looked fifty countries. If this is the greatest country you probably only have taken the bus You know I mean so how did you? Where do you think this vision for this innovative? I mean I think we're the only office booked up five months but I'm GonNa Stop the conversation right now real quick and dismissed a corona virus If you log onto dental town right now there's twenty five different threads about corona fires. What is that? Look like on the ground in Austin Texas to you to did for US lately. What we're struggling with is Reno. Were active on every exert looking at CDC and who in it's really hard I feel like you know with the to get consensus of what we should be doing settled practitioners. Should we only be seeing emergency patients? Should we continue to see? Our patients is a really hard thing. We haven't really sound is solid source even just awesome. There's so much variant. Some offices saying absolutely close -mergency only others are saying no just keep going. You are always practice universal precautions. I'm just edited a little bit by asking questions. Your patients industrial tests. What we're doing now. I think our biggest thing is implemented so many extra precautions doctor was saying screening making sure that our stop in patients are always protected by the frustration from us. And I'm sure that we've been hearing this from all of our other colleagues not even just in dentistry but then medicine. There are any clear guidelines direction that we should be taking. I know the I don't know for Arizona but Ohio Louisiana Virginia in California now have taken from a state level and we've just been waiting for Texas to give us proper guidelines so we're just in from Texas to give you proper guidelines td. Because I know that the California Don Association reprimanded all first of all with the American Dental Association. I mean first of all a quarter of the Dennis aren't even members and it's a member when you're in Texas where the TDA filed a suit against the dentists who is claiming to be a specialist implant technology and and California at the Ada said. Well that's not. Even a recognized specialties. A judge said go home. You're a membership club. You're not estate at Thornton. Get outta here and indeed. This guy was practice limited implant technology and if your patient focused patient centered. Yea IF I had a problem with an implant I was getting the run around. I'd WanNa go to someone who just specializing implants. Regardless if their membership club approved Gave me a sticker not but the Health and Human Services The government The the White House the Governor. I only waiting and all these viruses over the years started with HIV. I remember in Donaldson Jeans. Everything is what made us all wear gloves. So we've been gradually increasing universal precautions. And what I don't want at all to here's at the Dennis have to close with the hospitals can stay open which further confirms that. We're not really doctors. I mean to an oral surgeon yesterday J resnick. And he's an he's is dude. I don't have anything elective on my schedule this week. It's pain faction abscess. And so and so would we be your definition. So we're yet now. Are You thinking of And what what is the percentage of like in Austin? That's where you're at now Austin Texas. How many Dennis are there? And how many do you think are not seeing patients or reduced to emergency only talking to my friend right now? The Austin area. They're staying open. Which is Great? The biggest thing is I said her as far as not being there. Not considering loss especially Shortages were not. Dentists aren't considered a lot of those protocols from government which is really upsetting and we are providing patient care and it's really frustratingly so really trapped for us. Our patients actually aren't wanting to cancel. They're still coming in on. We thought it very different. As to be honest where pretty booked out silly anything? People are actually calling us to come in. Because they're hoping that we would have cancellations again practicing guidelines on there. As far as we don't have a ton of cases in Austin I think we have six Positive cases and as far as done offices right now that really up in the Air I know the couple of big corporate chains have just arbitrarily state of the all of their practices throughout the. Us should be emergency. Only but again we are. We're clinicians for doctors. That is just really exactly. You said a lot of it is not let and so. We still really stuck where we are to be. Honest feels a little bit. Like a Freeman's land right now. You said you heard a big dental chain amid announcement towards yes yeah. They are practices being closed down. Heartland I believe is leaning towards seeing emergencies always a big large group practice in Austin Is LEANING TOWARDS EMERGENCY PATIENTS? An awesome rose okay. Another great and it's it's really hard. 'cause there really are no guidelines on this matter and it's a lot of other things that we're realizing is that a lot of you know. Dentists are posting. Oh you know patient base. We should be canceling it. It's just it's really hard. Coops lifting advice on everything so I think it's Dennis over you know while some there and we're just continue to assess our patients and see them. Keep practicing what we do and edit accordingly so I know it's just a day by day crazy Merisi week and this is going on crazy crazy. Well let's go back to our regular scheduled programing your dental offices. Don't get booked up five months in advance. How did you do that? Looks back to. How can our DR BS than traveling around in and pulling from all different areas Similar to your friends. We did that too. We didn't just pull from dental offices. In in trying to create tooth far we pulled from other industries such as ours hotels. That's kind of how we created the name. First and foremost is we wanted to take. The traditional part of dentistry has tooth. And then the bar you kind of a a modern spin in bringing in just something where people thought of to as their local hang out or a place that he didn't have this negative stigma to it. So that's where we surveyed our patients when we had worked in that Like group practice however that corporate dental office that we worked together for for four years and use that as an opportunity to.

Austin Texas Dental School Dennis Arizona Doctor Jacobson Texas Dr J. Doctor Barclay Doctor American Dental Association Ada Austin Midwestern University Donald School private practice cavs Glendale Arizona Glendale Berkeley Spain Chicago
"dr jacobson" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

08:33 min | 1 year ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on Skullduggery

"It includes the people who run our public water systems and keep the electricity and Internet going so there are a lot of people who are essential for those of us who are able to work from home following these guidelines for a few weeks and really taking them seriously will let those more essential workers who need to be out of the home do their jobs to keep everything functioning as best as we can under really challenging circumstances doctor Jacobson one of the things that public health officials. And I'm sure you as well are most concerned about is the pressure the burden that all of this is going to put on the health system and the danger of it collapsing in some areas. How worried are you about that? What are you specifically worried about? And where do you think we can kind of mitigate those threats to the public health system? Well what do we have to think about is that there is already uneven access to healthcare services so for example people who live in rural areas generally don't have such easy access to healthcare services as people who live in urban areas there are also gaps with how people can access care based on their employment situation their insurance their income levels that those problems existed long before Corona Virus? Came the idea right now. Is that public? Health measures will hopefully reduce the burden on the hospital system a month or two from now if we do nothing and we continue life as normal and everybody is out interacting with each other in just a few weeks maybe the end of April maybe early. May We will see lots of hospitals that have way too many patients who are seriously ill to care for them properly. If with this public health distancing were able to slow that down we can keep those hospitals from being overrun or at least we can start to delay it until we've got some better treatment protocols in place till we have time for more ventilation devices to be created more face masks to be produced. We have to protect our public health. Workforce we can't afford for doctors nurses and other healthcare workers to be out sick and the way we protect them is by slowing down and giving them time to get the gear that they need the training. They need the scientific information that they need to handle this in the coming months. If somebody made you The Corona virus czar. Tomorrow are there any steps that you would order? That have not already been taken. I think we're getting untracked now because there's so many recommendations that have come out over the past several to is. What are the challenges that any corona virus czar would have is that our public health system is not one where the CDC just says? Here's what everybody's GonNa do the CDC for most things issues guidance and then it's up to the states and in some cases the local areas to follow through so we've seen with school closures. Governors can shut down schools in a state. Local school districts can shut down schools. It's not typically the federal government. That does that kind of directive so we have some challenges with the way that this response works and no one person has the ability to make some of these. Things happen or happened quickly. The key thing that we need to do this week is to work on getting more tests out to people getting more people tested and really mapping where this is. We know that there is some hot spots in Seattle. There's a hot spot in New York where where of some clusters of cases. But we really don't have a good sense in a lot of states of how widespread this is an Intel. We can do that. Mapping there is not really an ability to do tailored responses so it could be that there are some places that aren't really affected very much yet. They may be able to do schooling in a different way than heavily affected areas. Where we really don't want kids going to school for many weeks to come. We need knowledge. We need science to be able to do that and tell we have the tests. It's kind of a holding pattern. I WanNa ask you about best-case scenarios because we like to be optimistic on this podcast notice. That doesn't but I do if things go as well as you think they can go if we as a government and a society and a people respond as well as we possibly can. And if social distancing becomes a daily part of our lives and we embrace it as a society if testing works as well as The government is now saying it's going to work. Is this a public health? Emergency that will last for a few weeks do expect. It'll be many months. I know this is hard to speculate. But I'm just looking for a best case scenario from you. I would be very happy if say two months from now. People say wow. We kinda overreacted on that. I don't know that that's going to happen. I think it's going to be at least two months before we have a sense of whether we initiated these more aggressive public health measures fast enough or didn't so I would like it to be that people say those epidemiologists they throughout those worst case scenarios and it really turned out to be okay but that's not going to happen and less people really take seriously now. And what is your sense of whether people are taking it. Seriously now yeah. It was a bit discouraging this weekend to see the stories of people going out to bars and having parties and I heard of college and university students who said well our our campuses shutting down. We're GONNA party the weekend away before we move out of our dorms. Those sorts of behaviors are not recommended at this time. I hope that moving forward will have people who say it is now time to hunker down at home but I have one last question on this which is about communications rhetoric and where the line is between not instilling panic in people but giving them the information that will make them do the things that need to be done in a situation like that. How do you think about how that should be? Communicated TO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE. What are the biggest challenges we have right now is? There's just still so much uncertainty and it's really hard to talk about uncertainty and to say well this might be done in X. number of weeks or it could be this many years right. We have to put rangers out there of how this might work. That's hard to communicate and then it also makes it seem like people were not being open early on when we get new information and we can become more certain so I hope that people will be. I guess forgiving of their public health officials if they have to clarify things as we get more information so we need transparency. We need openness. We need to be very clear about why interventions are happening especially if things like transportation restrictions go into place if there are curfews people need to trust the those are being done for a very well-supported evidence based reason that they are being implemented in. It's fair and that they're going to be removed and people can go back to normal life as soon as it's safe for them to do so so we need good communication. We need to figure out how to talk about uncertainty. And Yeah it's going to be an interesting few weeks here but expect that a week or two from now we're going to start to see some slightly different recommendations as we get more information about where this is worst. Well frankly what I think we need is more conversations like this one and we really appreciate your expertise you're sober tone and your willingness to come and talk to Yahoo News our audience and be a part of this story that is going to be with us for a while so thank you so much Dr Jacobson for joining us. We're delighted that you have come on board as our public health contributor an expert and we look forward to talking to you again soon yes. We'll talk again soon. Be Safe everyone and please do. Try to listen to those recommendations and follow him. Thanks to Yahoo News reporter Alex Zarian and epidemiologist and public health expert. Catherine Jacobson your news public health contributor.

CDC doctor Jacobson Catherine Jacobson Yahoo Intel Seattle New York reporter Alex Zarian
"dr jacobson" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

08:22 min | 2 years ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Blower. What happens next George Karachi had been a whistle blower, once before. So he knew how to go about filing a key Tam lawsuit. He found a lawyer very good Relations Council who came to the US attorney's office and met with the chief of our civil affirmative litigation unit and agents of the FBI, and HHS, health and human services and he shared with them. The story of what had been happening that was on a Friday afternoon. And I remember getting a call from the CEO say Peter Kaplan, wonderful lawyer, who immediately recognized, you're the US attorney now, you're, you're the boss. Yes. And Peter immediately recognized that if what he is saying is true, then people are being injured every day that Dr Fata is in practice, and what he said, and what I believe, is, you know, these cases can be really hard to prove because the spectrum of what is reasonable medical care is, is quite large. And so, even if the doctor is being very aggressive. It's. Probably not beyond what is medically reasonable. But just in case we probably ought to treat it as if it's true, and I agreed with him. And so if agents HHS agents in USA's worked around the clock for the next several days over the weekend to try to confirm whether this was true they were able to access records through the Medicare system and hired an expert to look at these records and out of the Representative sampling. And she looked at twelve patient records, they went twelve or twelve people have been diagnosed with cancer who did not have cancer, these types of cases can take months if not years to prove, and you had a team of agents and prosecutors who in seventy to ninety six hours, establish probable cause the believe the doctor Fata was committing a crime. I don't know that people will appreciate how fast and how well they did their work. I agree. It was incredibly fast in part of it is because they immerse themselves in all weekend and worked on it, they did get. That confirmation from the expert. In knew what they had. They spent all day Monday putting together a search warrant affidavit search warrants a complaint for an arrest a plan for executing all of those search warrants. They searched every one of his locations seven plus his home in an arrest warrant. And so all of that materials dump at the other thing, they did Chuck that was so impressive is thinking through patient care because if they were to take down his practice on that Tuesday morning as they intended that meant patients scheduled to have chemotherapy treatments that day would be turned away. And so one of the other things that we had a wonderful victim, witness coordinator name sandy Palaiseau. She worked with her team to put together a list of alternative cancer providers in the area and a protocol for patients to get their patient files which they would need to take to a doctor to get care while the agents and prosecutors and civil attorneys were working on the plan to arrest. And search Dr Fatah's home and. Premises. The victim witness folks were working on a plan to take care of the patients. I'm so glad you mentioned the victim witness folks, because when I was in the Sistan US attorney we had several in our office, and they were magicians. They do anything immediately to take care of people and their level of commitment and passionate dedication was, I think unrivalled, it's a part of the us attorney's office that I think lots of folks don't know about I think we don't see it. But it's so incredibly important when we had victims who were testifying in court involving loved ones who were murdered. Or when we had children who were testifying cases of child exploitation or sex trafficking. The victim witness coordinators, were, they're making all the arrangements, but also sometimes sitting in court and holding somebody's hand or escorting them around the courthouse. And so they really do wonderful work. I wanted to share with you. Bob very brief story about a case I worked on as a junior junior prosecutor. We had a doctor in the eastern. District of Virginia cease Jacobson, who was a fertility specialist and committed to different types of fraud on his patients one is he was inseminating patients with his own sperm, and the women who was treating the families. He was trying to help have a child didn't know that and second and just isn't Citius. He was injecting his patients with massive amounts of h g union on it out atropine the hormone that woman's body would produce if she were actually pregnant, such that their bodies were mimicking pregnancy. And then after eighteen or twenty or twenty two weeks he would tell them falsely that their fetus had died that they lost their child all that was a fraud. And again, as with Dr Fata, it was just unfathomable that a medical professional do that to patients, I think perhaps, for the same reasons, money and power is incredibly shocking, when you were working on that case. Check. How did you deal with? Victims in that case. Well, again, I was the junior junior prosecutor was led by a very talented a USA name, Randy bellows, who's now at a state judge in Virginia. And so I basically did a lot of research and whatever Randy needed me to do. But when you mentioned victim witness specialists again, here's a place where we use them, because we had to figure out even how to approach people to let them know what had happened to them and some care deeply and some didn't want to know. And so we needed the expertise of ethicists and victim witness specialists, and other doctors to help us understand how we could approach the victims of Dr Jacobson's fraud. And what did you end up doing? I'm not sure I would know whether I it's better to tell people about this or to, to not tell them is. That is at less cruel, as I recall, we sent out a letter to those who had been victims of the insemination fraud and told them that we might have information that might be. Important to them, and they could avail themselves, if they wished and many didn't some did not. We were counselled to give, as much choice to the victims as possible and not to just drop a bombshell on their front doorstep out of the blue. I think that's one of the things probably the public doesn't see a whole lot is the care with which people who are victim, witness coordinators spend a lot of time, thinking about how best to treat victims of crime also lucky bar, because I learned from Randy bellows, and his cO council, Dave Barger, who were consummate professionals about how to handle not just a complex case. But a case that was fraught with a motion. Whatever happened to Dr Fata in your case eventually entered a guilty play the evidence is really quite overwhelming against him. It was really irrefutable medical records that could prove his guilt. And so ultimately he pleaded guilty. He was sentenced to forty five years. And, you know, for a man who is about fifty years old at the time of sentencing. That is essentially a life center. Since into some of his victims wanted more more time or even the death penalty, which was not eligible in a case like this. But, you know, I thought it was a substantial sentence in an appropriate under the circumstances and paroles not available federal system. Yeah. That's right. So he'll serve close to forty five years if you behave yourself in prison, you do get some modest credit from the time, but he will serve a substantial sentence. And I think when you think about all the reasons that we have sentencing deterrence and protecting the public promoting respect for the law, and all of those things, and even just due punishment. The sentence was appropriate case like this remarkable how somebody's interested in money and affection for power could hurt so many people, there are other doctors to who really horrified by this behavior, because, as we know most doctors are attracted to medicine, because they want to help people overwhelmingly, so absolutely. And so, I think that's why it was just so unthinkable that Dr Fata would view patients, not as. You know someone that he wanted to heal, but a prospect for profit, a remember talking to some other doctors during the Cecil, Jacobson investigation, and I think horrified is the right word. They could not begin to understand how a member of their profession could do this to people, and in many ways, I think it caused patients to accept advice that they might otherwise have been skeptical about. And so, you know, the.

Dr Fata fraud Dr Jacobson US attorney Randy bellows HHS Virginia Peter Kaplan USA Fata prosecutor Tam George Karachi Dr Fatah CEO Relations Council FBI
"dr jacobson" Discussed on Crimes of Passion

Crimes of Passion

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on Crimes of Passion

"They pulled him back and wrestled him to the ground. He kept screaming. I wanted die. I wanna die. Someone called the doctor soon. Burt was a dark room. Someone was talking to him. Then he was being led down a dark hallway. He tried to shake himself free. But he felt a syringe Pierce his arm everything when black. When Burt woke up he was lying in a bright room with a strange man sitting on the edge of a bed next to him. He realized he was in a psychiatric hospital while Bert wasn't formally diagnosed with a mental illness at this time, his friends and doctors were aware that his behavior was spiraling into dangerous territory. He was losing control of his actions and endangering both himself and others. And the best thing to do in his doctors professional opinion was to bring Linda back into the picture. Later that morning when does mother Bertha answered a call from Bert psychiatrists, Dr Jacobson bird had been ranting and raving nonstop about Linda any thought it would help him. If Linda came down to see him birther replied that Burt could drop dead doctor Jacobson replied that someone might die. But it probably wouldn't be Burt. He was violent and extremely unstable. And in the doctor's words, we can't keep him here forever. You know? Later that day. Birt's wife Francine arrived at the hospital and signed him out. He spent the Christmas holidays with his family planning. His next move a few weeks after that incident in early January nineteen fifty nine Linda agreed to meet bird for drinks after work for five minutes and five minutes only when she arrived at the bar bird was already there nursing a scotch. She sat down and told him she didn't wanna drink. They might as well. Get to the point Burt told her he was giving her three choices number one. Mary him number to sleep with him one.

Burt Linda Bert doctor Jacobson Francine Bertha Dr Jacobson Birt five minutes
"dr jacobson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Boomed in Asia. Despite concerns about a slowing Chinese economy in a trade war with the US and Archer Daniels Midland delivering its first earnings disappointment and five quarters as lower ethanol margins are reaching nation results have blunted growth in the agribusiness giants soybean business. That's a Bloomberg business flash. Tom and John. Karen, thanks so much before we get to brand Jacobson Wells Fargo. There's a raging debate. I wanna make clear the David Malpass down only has been a wonderful friend of Bloomberg surveillance, but has given perspective to me at Bear Stearns over the years, including writing a key chapter book, which came out in the Mesozoic era and Malpass is a front rate economists. He is arguably the best English skills of anyone I know in market economics. And of course, John Farrell hugely and controversially nominated I believe by the president to take over for Dr Kim on Dartmouth at the World Bank. This is a debate this morning, and you've got a tweet from someone qualify. Yeah. I'll be diplomatic about this some people questioning. The caliber of some of the candidates significant positions in Washington DC as a moment, Stephen King. Formerly the chief economist at HSBC weighing in on Twitter, saying can I nominate myself to run the World Bank. After all I was the chief economist for Bank that didn't fail during the global financial crisis. I'm not sure how common is Tom. I think it's part of the debate. David melt that is essentially a friend of yours, not a friend of mine. But I do think it's part of this happening of the last week man of these individuals fights around the World Bank's someone say physics from Colorado. College of survive course, three two beer while his physics at Colorado college. I think the bigger concern is who they're going gonna nominate for the Federal Reserve, and whether McCain is qualified to be at the at the Federal Reserve, let us get to it. Brian Jacobson with us right now, Wells Fargo asset management and wells capital management with us today. The strategy out there, I love within your math in the PHD for Madison, and Dr Jacobson the idea of risk premia. This is something that John. And I talk about all the time to find my risk premia risk premium the risk premium, plural. John Latin the risk premia. Why does that matter now? Well, I think that it really matters because. You know, risk premia. It just refers to what are those compensations for risk that investors. Expect over time two years. I I need a larger risk premia out ten years. That's correct. So there's like a term risk premia as far as locking up your savings for a long period of time. There's a credit risk premia for extending credit to entities that could possibly go bankrupt the equity risk premium the value premium size premium, right?.

David Malpass World Bank Bloomberg Jacobson Wells Fargo John Farrell Tom Archer Daniels Midland chief economist Federal Reserve Brian Jacobson US Wells Fargo Asia Colorado college Bear Stearns Colorado Washington Karen Stephen King
"dr jacobson" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"dr jacobson" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Was diagnosed in kind of a almost a routine health screening with general doctor when i was having just a regular checkup and you said your psa scores high and i like i don't even know what a psa score is and he said you better see your reality just and i went and started researching and i had a biopsy thereafter with another doctor and the the gleason score came back and it was was i think a seven at that point three plus four and you know i didn't really know what to do so i went to the medical college to get a second opinion and met with dr jacobs said and their path allergists rod michelson scorer as a three plus three at that point so it was like a sex and dr customs l let's do active surveillance so we did that for for a while and kept coming back to get my psa read about every three months or so and eventually my psa score just started creeping up and i can remember one time it was way off way off the chart did another biopsy came back and then i had a cat scan and it was recommended at that time that was aggressive enough that i should have the prostate remote texture jacobson do you see this relatively commonly where patients will come in as jim had mentioned for a second opinion and perhaps the pathology report might be a little bit different so your recommendations would be slightly different than where they would go elsewhere how commonly do you see that some of it is dependent upon the overall disease so we often see that too path all just don't necessarily agree there is some human factor there actually we know that if you have the same pathologist read the same slide honored times he doesn't necessarily he or she doesn't necessarily think it's the same thing every single time but the important thing for jim ears that he overall had looked went at initial diagnosis had low volume disease which we felt was low risk and his experience highlights the importance of selecting the right patients for surveillance because he came back for routine follow up which is one of the key parts of surveillance i'd also highlight with him that the ability to run a half marathon is dependent on your bill after surgery is dependent upon your ability to run a half marathon before speaking of surgery how was that experience obviously both of you had surgery with dr jacobson mr hall if you could just tell us what your experience was after surgery and how was it that you able to run a half marathon shirley shortly after sure it was you know the day of the surgery it was you know i was i was.

dr jacobs jim shirley rod michelson dr jacobson three months