18 Burst results for "Dr Ingles"

"dr ingles" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

NBC Meet the Press

05:44 min | 2 months ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

"Every Tuesday just search for wise is happening wherever you're listening right now and subscribe. Welcome back. As we mentioned earlier, we hit five million US cases yesterday for some perspective. The first nineteen case in the United States is believed to have occurred on February six. We hit one million cases on April Twenty, eight, eighty, two days later. It then took just forty three days to hit the two million mark on June tenth. We hit the three million mark on July seven that was twenty seven days later then just sixteen days later we rich four million US cases and July twenty third and again it took us just sixteen days to hit this five million reported case number right here in the United States joining me now is Dr Tom ingles beans, the director of the Center for Security of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Dr Ingles. Be Welcome back to meet the press. WanNa get a little big picture here. You know last week you were you put out a lengthy list of ten recommendations. You guys didn't call it a reset, but sort of like how do we get control of this virus? Now another one of your sort of colleagues in the larger sense Michael Star home is an op Ed. He's basically calling for a reset of some sort New York Times today editorial page calling this. It feels though as public health officials are all calling for some sort of reset. Partial. lockdowns things like this and yet we are not having that conversation at all on the political side of things. Are, are we doomed to sort of live with this virus now if we're not GONNA at all look at your recommendations I DON'T THINK WE'RE DOOMED To this fate I? Think we we know what to do. Other countries have done it. I think the purpose of these resetting reports these for a kind of a reestablishment of the basics. Is that we know that another country's universal masking fiscal, distancing, avoiding large gatherings. Those kinds of things have worked. If we look at countries like Italy and Spain and France, they have a total of about seven or eight deaths today and we have thousand, but it's not magic what they did. We know what they did. So I think if we act together in national unison, we can get there and that's what the purpose of these many of these reports are I want to bring up the issue of masks there've been some people that said if we had ninety five percent compliance unmask wearing, we could get rid of we could sort of get this fires under control. Is that unrealistic and we do need to do more than just mandating masks Do. Not, alone. Not by themselves or alone the solution, but they are a critical part of it. We know that physical distancing makes a big difference. We know that large gatherings are places where super spreading events occur and people have the opportunity or the virus has the opportunity to get around quickly and for. Many people at once. So we have to do a number of things together in terms of you know simple things like diagnostic testing results coming back much more quickly. It's it's unacceptable for the country to have to have testing comeback a week or even two weeks later it's not useful at that point there's no point even doing the test. So a number of that we have to do, but they're not they're not complicated they may be hard, but we have to do them kind of in unison. And all of those, they're not hard except when you when the word politics gets involved, it makes everything a little bit harder and I wanNa keep you out of the political space here. Let me ask you a question about that scenes and to sort of set expectations doctor Fauci implied that the first vaccine that we get, he hopes it's seventy five percent effective. The FDA has said they will approve any vaccine that's at least fifty percent effective. Can you explain to the public what that means what it means and what it doesn't mean and what our expectations should be for the first vaccine Well, we know that many of the vaccines that we use are not perfect. They don't prevent every case of disease but if they prevent a substantial portion of disease than that can help us get to a point where most of us are protected, the disease can spread quickly between people anymore a concept that is called her immunity. Herd immunity doesn't mean we will won't disease anymore. It means it's not gonNA efficiently as efficiently spread in an epidemic form. and. Is there a percentage figure in your mind that you think will sort of give us a huge? Huge step in the right direction is at a vaccine that is at seventy five percent or does fifty percent do you fear that could be a false sense of hope. I think we would take fifty percent because it's fifty percent is a lot better than what we have. Now we've we've no tools to no no vaccine tools or medicine tools that we can use to slow this down. So fifty percent would be would be far better than what we have. Now of course I think we all want something that is seventy, five, eighty, five. Ninety percent effective. But we'll have to see what we get and I think for the amount of time has passed since the beginning of this pandemic to have a vaccine that's even fifty percent effective in in the coming months or the beginning of twenty twenty, one would be phenomenal. But again, we hope it's better but fifty percent would be better than what we have now. Tom ingles be from Johns, Hopkins One of our experts that we have on here regularly, really appreciate you coming on and sharing your expertise with us. Sir. Thanks for have mature. Got It and when we come back. Some. Politics, the changing electoral where the presidential race stands right now..

United States Dr Tom ingles twenty twenty Tom ingles Dr Ingles New York Times Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Michael Star doctor Fauci Johns director FDA Center for Security Italy Spain France
Public health expert: 50 percent effective coronavirus vaccine would be 'better than what we have now'

NBC Meet the Press

05:21 min | 2 months ago

Public health expert: 50 percent effective coronavirus vaccine would be 'better than what we have now'

"We hit five million US cases yesterday for some perspective. The first nineteen case in the United States is believed to have occurred on February six. We hit one million cases on April Twenty, eight, eighty, two days later. It then took just forty three days to hit the two million mark on June tenth. We hit the three million mark on July seven that was twenty seven days later then just sixteen days later we rich four million US cases and July twenty third and again it took us just sixteen days to hit this five million reported case number right here in the United States joining me now is Dr Tom ingles beans, the director of the Center for Security of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Dr Ingles. Be Welcome back to meet the press. WanNa get a little big picture here. You know last week you were you put out a lengthy list of ten recommendations. You guys didn't call it a reset, but sort of like how do we get control of this virus? Now another one of your sort of colleagues in the larger sense Michael Star home is an op Ed. He's basically calling for a reset of some sort New York Times today editorial page calling this. It feels though as public health officials are all calling for some sort of reset. Partial. lockdowns things like this and yet we are not having that conversation at all on the political side of things. Are, are we doomed to sort of live with this virus now if we're not GONNA at all look at your recommendations I DON'T THINK WE'RE DOOMED To this fate I? Think we we know what to do. Other countries have done it. I think the purpose of these resetting reports these for a kind of a reestablishment of the basics. Is that we know that another country's universal masking fiscal, distancing, avoiding large gatherings. Those kinds of things have worked. If we look at countries like Italy and Spain and France, they have a total of about seven or eight deaths today and we have thousand, but it's not magic what they did. We know what they did. So I think if we act together in national unison, we can get there and that's what the purpose of these many of these reports are I want to bring up the issue of masks there've been some people that said if we had ninety five percent compliance unmask wearing, we could get rid of we could sort of get this fires under control. Is that unrealistic and we do need to do more than just mandating masks Do. Not, alone. Not by themselves or alone the solution, but they are a critical part of it. We know that physical distancing makes a big difference. We know that large gatherings are places where super spreading events occur and people have the opportunity or the virus has the opportunity to get around quickly and for. Many people at once. So we have to do a number of things together in terms of you know simple things like diagnostic testing results coming back much more quickly. It's it's unacceptable for the country to have to have testing comeback a week or even two weeks later it's not useful at that point there's no point even doing the test. So a number of that we have to do, but they're not they're not complicated they may be hard, but we have to do them kind of in unison. And all of those, they're not hard except when you when the word politics gets involved, it makes everything a little bit harder and I wanNa keep you out of the political space here. Let me ask you a question about that scenes and to sort of set expectations doctor Fauci implied that the first vaccine that we get, he hopes it's seventy five percent effective. The FDA has said they will approve any vaccine that's at least fifty percent effective. Can you explain to the public what that means what it means and what it doesn't mean and what our expectations should be for the first vaccine Well, we know that many of the vaccines that we use are not perfect. They don't prevent every case of disease but if they prevent a substantial portion of disease than that can help us get to a point where most of us are protected, the disease can spread quickly between people anymore a concept that is called her immunity. Herd immunity doesn't mean we will won't disease anymore. It means it's not gonNA efficiently as efficiently spread in an epidemic form. and. Is there a percentage figure in your mind that you think will sort of give us a huge? Huge step in the right direction is at a vaccine that is at seventy five percent or does fifty percent do you fear that could be a false sense of hope. I think we would take fifty percent because it's fifty percent is a lot better than what we have. Now we've we've no tools to no no vaccine tools or medicine tools that we can use to slow this down. So fifty percent would be would be far better than what we have. Now of course I think we all want something that is seventy, five, eighty, five. Ninety percent effective. But we'll have to see what we get and I think for the amount of time has passed since the beginning of this pandemic to have a vaccine that's even fifty percent effective in in the coming months or the beginning of twenty twenty, one would be phenomenal. But again, we hope it's better but fifty percent would be better than what we have now. Tom ingles be from Johns, Hopkins One of our experts that we have on here regularly, really appreciate you coming on and sharing your expertise with us. Sir.

United States Dr Tom Ingles Twenty Twenty Dr Ingles Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Tom Ingles New York Times Director Michael Star Center For Security Doctor Fauci Johns FDA Italy Spain France
"dr ingles" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:44 min | 7 months ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Cumulus stations news now the mail news before I'm a real leave and we start with breaking news this hour reports that acting navy secretary Thomas Mosley stepping down Tom Oakley has submitted his resignation as acting secretary of defense of course this comes one day after that very disturbing audio emerged of mostly speaking to the crew of the Kerrier to Theodore Roosevelt I wouldn't want where it is important because it's been hit with corona virus respond to Barbara Starr also new this hour the trump administration wants Congress to approve an additional two hundred fifty billion dollars for a small business relief program by the end of this week the president saying they want the funds to supplement a three hundred fifty billion dollar rudely relief program that was launched last Friday where in talks to supplement the fund and do more money so that's the way it's moving but we're gonna help those small businesses receive these loans in record time president trump and the White House coronavirus task force are scheduled to hold their daily briefing around five this afternoon and when that happens we'll bring it to you live Maryland governor Mitt Larry Hogan meanwhile says the Washington Baltimore corridor which is home to many federal agencies battling the virus has now been designated a priority area that will get federal help I tell doctor on governor Hogan's task force says the peak of coronavirus in Maryland could be later this month we are hopeful that the peak day of our epidemic in Maryland's is sometime soon given how early and aggressive the social distancing measures were put in place Dr Tom Ingalls be with the Johns Hopkins school of health one model that the White House uses has our peak occurring about ten days from now but Dr Ingles he warns the models are just projections in the meantime governor Hogan announcing more help for hard hit nursing homes today we are launching statewide strike teams Barbara Rick W. I. mailing W. a mail dot com in New York governor Andrew Cuomo says the state needs federal assistance to restart the economy and of the stimulus bill passed by Congress isn't cutting it as I've said at the time it was woefully inadequate from new York's point of view we then had some time to actually study the legislation actually gets worse when you read it and it's not even what was represented to us additionally British prime minister Boris Johnson continues to be monitored in critical care according to foreign minister Dominic Raab who is deputising for Johnson I can say he's receiving the very best cat from the excellent medical team at St Thomas's hospital he remains stable overnight he's receiving standard oxygen treatment and breathing without any assistance he's.

Dr Ingles Dominic Raab prime minister Barbara Rick W. Johns Hopkins school of health governor Hogan White House St Thomas Boris Johnson new York Andrew Cuomo Thomas Mosley Dr Tom Ingalls Maryland Washington Baltimore corridor Mitt Larry Hogan president
"dr ingles" Discussed on How To! With Charles Duhigg

How To! With Charles Duhigg

04:18 min | 9 months ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on How To! With Charles Duhigg

"What are the things that makes it hard? Is that when you hear about a disease like the corona virus this. There's this impulse to do something anything to feel like. You're actively responding and that impulse can actually be dangerous in fact long before. This outbreak of the Corona Virus Dr Angles be helped organize a simulation of a global pandemic crisis for a bunch of current and former government officials to see how they would handle it even then with experienced professional politicians. It did not go well. And so what. That exercise did was over series stories of mock National Security Council meetings they were presented a number of very difficult dilemmas and had to think through them together and make decisions about how they would respond so for example the discovery of cases of this new virus for which we have no vaccine and which is killing people We've we've discovered that virus in Germany Venezuela and the story and what is the proper response should the United States close travel and trade trade to those two countries to try and prevent the spread of disease into the country and on the one hand Polling in past outbreaks in the United States it shows that the American public strongly supports closing borders try and prevent disease from getting in on the other hand we know from science and public health. That closing borders never never ever has worked and the consequence of closing a border. Is that you interrupt the movement of scientists and people who can try and help and hand if you do take that action and then the United States gets a case do then risk the rest of the world saying we will now shut you out of moving in your people and goods around the world and to cascade it's like a domino effect and what's the right answer for the Germany events. The right answer is that we can do sensible. Oh screening at airports we can isolate people early. We can crash on vaccine development. Although it's still going to take probably years But we shouldn't take what we think is kind of the politically instinctively. The right move without understanding the public health and science shows. That's never helped before it could really I heard us. We've already seen this with krona virus in China in other countries. And so I asked. Dr Ingles be if so many of our first instincts are wrong. Then what should we be doing for people who are listening to show if they have a concern about a pandemic in the future what would they do and will they be able to get vaccine medicine and I think a call to their violators to say. Hey I'm tracking this issue. I I pay attention to this. I want you to support medicine in Vaccine Development in science around infectious disease. To make sure we don't deal with us. That's a good thing and I think you know people I think sometimes despair and say what is my voice GonNa do in a world. That's so so chaotic and politics is broken. I do think that relatively small numbers of people calling a legislator's office makes a difference. Call Your Congressman. That's Uh yeah that is one thing you can do. It's not obviously not the only thing you should do but it could be on your list. There's still a lot. We don't know about the corona virus but I had one more question for Dr Elizabeth Rosenthal like. Let's say we're not talking about corona virus. We're talking about virus. Excellence say it starts in the US and people looking up this podcast. What should they do to prepare? Like what what do you do at your home in Washington. DC I'm right now. Nothing okay okay you know nothing I I'm aware of what's going on in the world I read reliable news sources and You know if there were an outbreak epidemic. I would probably buy masks out of it not for this one for sure but if it was more serious I would have some son hand I would avoid you know. Public places that were enclosed. But you know the world is mostly filled with health not disease so you can make yourself a little crazy seeing you know the next killer virus around the corner so keep calm and carry on on and remember to wash your hands..

United States Germany Dr Ingles National Security Council Dr Elizabeth Rosenthal Congressman Washington China Venezuela
"dr ingles" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

04:11 min | 11 months ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Chemistry and if there are side effects then those are going to be noticeable then there's not side effects than usually the the party line is well then you're going to take this for probably a pretty long time until it either has side effects or stops working will add something else to it? So ideally we would be able to have a system where people people could opt into these more safe treatments rehabilitate their neurons firing and then ideally brain picks up for itself kind of like charging an engine or recharging. Engine to the fact that you wouldn't have to go back for T. M. S. or reuse pharmaceutical visits. Actually supporting morning. What's happening at the root level antidepressants or pharmaceuticals won't address the cause? Because they're just meant to address the superficial or or symptoms at the surface of the experience versus something like cms can actually rehabilitate the causes. Wow driving the symptoms symptoms in the first place. Dr Ingle. How do you prepare for TMS There's not really a preparation. That's required ideally. If somebody's interested then they would just do a google search TMS near me or local providers and then let's see what their website show. Do they have really good data for the indication that that person has whether it's depression anxiety. OCD ADHD etc.. And then get him on the phone and interview them. This is my experience have us. TMS For this. What's your response read? Been How many treatments can I expect. Backed Have you had any side effects or have as anything going wrong and essentially just interview them and ask them all those questions and then if it seems reasonable then go in and see how it feels. Most people are just curious to make sure that something stimulating leaving. Their brain isn't gonNA create some really bad side effect and if that doesn't happen most people are at least willing to give it a full try. What do you think about what's going on in the CBD World With Charlotte's Web and a lot of these other big companies that are having multiple lawsuits filed against against them? What's your opinion about that You know actually. I'm not up to speed on the latest Lawsuits data so have the claim ignorance in that regard Abelino. TVD has the benefit. I mean we've talked about your past. Yes it has one just such a massive potential a benefit and we use it primarily for traumatic brain injury recovery so if there is an attack it's probably generated by the pharmaceutical suitable lobby. And and those that are concerned about losing the medical leverage of recent patents which is unfortunate because the clients lions are going to get patients are gonNA get stuck in the middle of that war and then be prevented from accessing very usable treatment but then that happens when we get creative and and find out how we can either work around it or come up with novel agents agents that are similar but ultimately the end of the day just continuing to like like you are essentially being the champion for novel Natural Affective Therapeutics and being an advocate for our civil liberties so that people can get the treatment that they need always so well-spoken. Dr Dan Ingle. Oh and thank you so much for that. Compliment always love having you on the show and conversing about everything related to health You know you're just you're you're phenomenal. uh-huh that's always going to be with you for sure. All right well listen. We're going to go to break and have a happy holiday Take Take Care of yourself. Stay safe and we'll talk to you probably in the New Year all right Brennan. Okay take care all right. Everyone stay tuned. More coming up. You're listening listening to one life. Radio.

Dr Dan Ingle T. M. S. TVD google Natural Affective Therapeutics depression Abelino OCD Charlotte ADHD Brennan
"dr ingles" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

NutriMedical Report

10:48 min | 1 year ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

"Welcome back so awareness. Last thing I wanted to expand on where you think things are going because we got the election coming up less than a year we have the world. Id We have climate change occurring hiring we have. The banks are cutting funding for. Let's say countries in Seoul's America's the aren't plan acropper famine. Next year we have worldwide identification happening in the world of ID program we have the on the verge like right out of Jack. Ryan Dom clown clancy's miniseries are the season never to a Russian nukes and lower island by the way people. How did you know that you go as well? I'm a very logical person. I think God has a way of. Dan Slammed ocoee my brain. Because I'm very good at researching on the supernet call it. But I have Intel contacts and call somebody in the Pentagon and more tonight night. I got people in San Comment Gurney Renaissance. They contact me off from right after the show and then third supernatural. God's given me a remote site which is not like these remote viewer viewer idiots after draw pictures right. If you're it means if got prompts me to pray on something. He gives me standing visuals rate while I'm wide awake. I don't have to take Iowa Ska marijuana or so mind altering thing like a magic mushrooms. He just shows me stuff so over two years ago. I'm sitting at my desk. I'm right now and got to diggle. You need a priori knowledge. Okay I'm gonNA show you something. All of a sudden I saw giant Russian submarines telling the sidewalls the or knock river in Venezuela. I said Oh my gosh. That doesn't look good then. He showed me missile. Silos firing off high-speed Next Generation Hypersonic Cruise missiles from Venezuela Omega so contact after my friend who had on the show for years John Spring was on Tuesday yesterday and this guy was the initial whistle blower Iq to twenty of the Cuban missile crisis. which took a flight in one year later in nineteen sixty one of you to flight over Cuba shoulder? Dan missiles were there and nine hundred. Eighty three in Grenada so I asked him to use his intellect figure out. What the heck's going on and get his sources and if a couple months later my gosh do you go? You're right now in our T.. We're human watching for years in Nicaragua. But they got damsels in lower she island directly souls of east coast of the United States about one hundred fifty miles north of the coast Venezuela Taylor owned by Venezuela. Guess what I started watching on the weekend Jack Ryan and guess what. The main theme is Russian nukes in Venezuela besides mine for Tantalum which is a strategic mineral for high tech companies. You got understand this God. Show me supernatural. People say well how did he know things as God wants to promise to know so all by the way he's warm e. Don't start praying for stuff if I don't want you to go there because you do I'm GonNa let you see it and you're going to carry that burden. I don't WanNa know all hell breaks loose. And then when he does he's going to tell me when I should praying in and get the knowledge limited. I'm scared I I'm frightened to death but whatever you know and people want to say well they don't WanNa take seriously. I said you'll take me seriously when you hold up your hand and see a flash of xrays because you're going to be hit with a thermal blasts and turn to an atomic vapor people Nagasaki on the wrong side of the building facing the nukes. Oh no Dr Ingle. That won't happen. I said really the Russians against many nukes Nukus so many times over. You can't even imagine it. And now they got nukes a mock seven to mock nine. Fast Mach. Seven is smoking man. What does mock what seven miles miles? That's right forty nine hundred miles to mock nine which like seven thousand miles an hour. WHOA that means under twenty minutes? They can hit Norfolk Virginia Washington. DC might not be a bad thing. Yeah with all the district Norfolk's roller nuclear submarines reindeer and everything right so well people even if they have a high altitude explosion of the weapon. And I'm an expert on the MP. Okay I'M GONNA get Dr Pye on the program from the National Academy of Research on trying to protect our UHF transformers. I even know technology. Actually turn off fires. I have three technologies have put my videos recently how to turn. Fires was off using Three technologies was using liquid nitrogen micro pulse with linear accelerator. got into the other skin or technology to turn off the auction boundaries. Zone for your kid oxygen from the others positron spectroscopy. We have a positron beam that connects you strip the electron from fire so can't won't maintain the fire. It could even use positron beam technology on wind storm systems or even turnoff earthquakes and volcanoes using frequency modulation two calls micro micro quakes everyday. People say how all stuff I said as I told you I'm Clark Kent. That's not possible diggle. I said that's why I want to scholarship and made eleven being seven thousand people to do a PhD nuclear plasma physics at Mit with people even had a master's degree already. I meet them. Dr Daego of what is it. Me said that's why depend are visited me. Twenty eight years ago wanting me to be his understudy. He's can get this damn guy and turn them against the most Sti- God the world will shake fear. Thank God people prayed for my my story rotten soul. Thank God now people need to understand. What do you see facing us Jerry? 'cause we're we're I I am terrified but WanNa see this hearings today and I can't I believe the demon rats are comments today. I'm terrified we're heading toward an election and literally a year from now. I'm terrified reading even the month before the election to the world. Oh I D I'm terrified buyers. Changes kringle heavy increase volcanoes earthquakes all over the world. We're getting rain for Paul Shift aren't we. Yeah we have not. Do you know that. An April twenty nine twenty nine less than ten years now apotheosis. You don't WanNA profits names in ancient Egypt. Sharon is a Destroyer all your star. It's Nastro three times the size of the one that destroyed the dinosaurs sixty six million years ago and at one percent. Chance of it or refill striking. I you know I read something about that. And we had a halloween. We had a a a city crasher. There was large enough to destroy a artsy like Paris or New York City that whip by year's lesson four thousand miles is like insider communication satellites communities or twenty thousand. This is less than four thousand miles above the earth. And then no warning on a damn sucker punch ray buys wine other guys in Space Command. That was your doctor for years. Let me tell you I guarantee a lot of them. Have what's called rectal Spasm the direction contract enough up near their throat when that happened. I guarantee you see what just happened on the satellite. We didn't see that coming did we. And it gets on the news and people. Don't connect the dots and realize like we don't know what the Hell we're doing. And by the way if we had a bioweapon some guy has laugh Fleiss file in the back of his of his apartment in Chicago and he decides I lost the Ruhani from Iran's it's time to take your Vilo what Mr Whatever Muslim and spray it out the window of a boss in say Chicago to adopt underground subway way. People die by the millions. I didn't work game simulations with FBI AT CDC in the Center for Disease Control Not a minor thing. If you'll say you now what we were killed everybody we killed everybody. Our game simulations did you. I know that there we weren't just a little incompetent or somebody survive. We kill everyone and people are ain't GonNa last. It's so so frustrating when I put myself my life and my soul on the line to do this to have idiots. What argue US please? I don't care if you've got great five. If you've got good evidence and logic please I want to hear from you but if you just WanNa do at Hamad protects. Who'd gone started doing at Homs are I want to say it's painful to hear you talking thing while you're opening deborah diverse? You need to shut up and listen if I had been difficult because this is really serious. We're what is on this hearing today. I watch four hours. I was having what's called the connection. You WanNA conditions like intellectual inside out. I couldn't believe it watching this. I couldn't believe it I thought where am why is this a banana. Republic Venezuela is Cuba's the Soviet Soviet Union. When it fell? This is not good. Is it no. It's not. It's horrendous shifting breath and we've got about five or six minutes. Do I want you to do two things right now. And this demonstrates Eagle Eagles enter ten to fifteen percent of the time. I want you to ask the toughest one or two questions you can ask. He had no of the man answering. It is inspired elderly. Has God whispering answering his ear ask right now. Any question about enters health geopolitics astrophysics metallurgy. Quantum mechanics artificial intelligence. Anything you want. Go ahead ask anything no rehearsal. Just go ahead and do it completely without rehearsal. This has got me Ask any question. Ask a question from the you know. No rational human being has the answer. And I'll give you the answer. Climate change can affect thirty year mortgages time. Change time is causes suicide. You talk about the time. Change the our change line global warming lamp. All who's doing the climate change. Let me give you some some facts. Facts is not serious or even supernatural. We have since the last twenty years inserted particle of strontium Barium aluminum aluminum in the air and the project which is heart project. We actually now changed the air into a plasma so we have scaler trans dimensional ways. We can induce earthquakes and volcanoes using harmonic resonance as to your weather systems drotz superstars and even think all tropospheric conversion which means we can drop the temperature on the ground. Two hundred degrees to turn into liquid.

Venezuela Dan Cuba Seoul Intel San Comment Gurney Renaissance Nicaragua Ryan Dom America Nagasaki Chicago Venezuela Taylor Pentagon Clark Kent Mit United States Jack Ryan Iowa Dr Ingle
"dr ingles" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

09:42 min | 1 year ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Okay dr dan ingle. How're you doing today bernadette. How about you. I'm great and it's always great to have you on the air with us today. We're talking about the continuation of future of medicine with psychedelic with dr dan ingle he is a medical doctor and is the author of the concussion repair emmanuel a practical guide to recovering from traumatic brain injuries. His clinical practice combines functional medicine integrative psychiatry neuro cognitive restoration and peak performance methods. He is the medical director of the revived treatment centers of america and he also serves as medical advisor to on it labs and true rest float centers. His website is dr. Dan ingle dot com. That's e. n. G. l. e. always a pleasure okay. Let's talk about psychedelics some more dr ingle um. I'm so <hes> and people love this topic. By the way we've received several emails from people really liking that we are exploring psychedelics here on my radio so what psychedelics are being used specifically for psychotherapy and how are they being used in treatment well the two that are primarily used right now that that are going into phase three trials in order to become legal to the larger landscape of the people that need them are suicide in india. May those are the ones that are leading the charge and then you have ketamine and cannabis that are used in a variety of different <hes> arenas because their legal ketamine can be used sega therapeutically particularly with people with treatment resistant depression and cannabis because it's being used more recreationally now is also being put into the clinical arena so that people can go through inexperience of getting in touch with material and still have that facilitated by therapists well. It's fascinating it is and it is helping so many people. Is it not in clinical trials n._b._a. Is debased treatment that we know for chronic p._t._s._d. Or post traumatic stress disorder order okay and and so for people that have no idea what m._d. M. a. is can you explain it to them and i'm sure most people know i mean you know silla sivan or magic mushrooms as you know was i what nineteen sixties timothy leary is when it became popularized store at least <hes> you know became known to so many americans yeah that was when it became there was a a life magazine article from gordon watson and that showcased its therapeutic benefit and it was being held in a <music> ceremonial context for hundreds if not thousands of years in this area of northern mexico and then it got studied came onto the landscape and then it's really took off and india may is a synthetic versus silla sivan which is a natural medicine goes cross-strait from the ground synthetic and many people know india may by its street name ecstasy and unfortunately if you get ecstasy on the street by somebody that you don't know and you don't know what's in it people can have very mixed results trying to get the same thing as therapeutic grade in a therapeutic setting so in demand typically as that chief component and what people know as ecstasy z. and is it a popular street drug. It has been in the past. It's not as popular as it once was but it's still quite popular yeah wow well so what are some of the potential dangers of these on conventional therapies. Well people don't know what they're doing then they can get into sticky situations for example if people are using suicide than or m._d. May or even ketamine and a host of others these medicines that are either legal or going to become legal. There's a very different a different experience recreationally versus therapeutically people think they're working with the same material and therefore they're going to be able to recreate the same results on their own but it's like apple airplanes different therapeutic setting with people that know how to get into d trauma work and and allow with that material that come up become intimate with understand all of its complexities and then worked through a therapeutic art of healing that way the trauma is actually healed and integrated with more awareness of what's happening versus people that just try and do this on their own recreationally can start to uncover trauma trauma and that gets them even more scared because they don't have people around them to help them navigate it or know how to heal it. Last thing we want to do is create more trauma. We actually want to use with these tools that are very powerful and not everybody's safe to use these because it's there is a process of on boarding people in the preparations preparation face to even identify if people are ready to have an experience safe to have an experience and then they are then the whole therapeutic landscape opens winds up and the you see the benefits. The studies are so good and the wreck in the therapeutic arena and trying to compare recreational use to therapeutic uses. It's just not a fair comparison well. I do feel that we need some solutions because depression anxiety suicide are all just off the charts. That's on the rise for whatever <hes> many reasons which we've discussed but you know i we saw article that posed the question can virtual reality replace psychedelic drugs. What are your your thoughts on that. I don't think that they can if there's there's part of what happens. In in the the remembering that so so much of trauma is related to disconnection and the trauma that doesn't heel therapeutically over time spontaneously as oftentimes as a relate <hes> a- as a result of feeling disconnected so to use an artificial landscape to try and get to reconnect experiences like human-to-human human kind of therapeutic process can recreate the. I don't think you're ever going to fully be able to recreate the experience of healing that supported by another human. I said i do think v._r. Work virtual reality work has amazing potential. I just don't think you can replace humans. I don't either and having had the experience. I can't imagine that virtual reality could even come close to replicating the experience that i had personally when i <hes> experienced suicide and back several years years ago <hes> and it was the most profound in and this is this is the thing that that a lot of people don't understand it <hes> that so many people that have these experiences france's <hes> really <hes> they they experience using the word experience too much but it isn't experience and it is something that is and not replaced by a machine or anything else and it is it is life changing it is beautiful and it is something that people think so. What's what's the word. I'm to finish my sentence for me dr ingle i'm trying to. I'm trying to get this out. You know what i'm trying to say right. It makes me think of an analogy that i've heard and using the pass which is there's a difference between learning about sex and having said oh there you go having sex with a person or having sex with an artificial entity feet so it it can have different experiences of depth and like that awakening moment his you have now you have a felt experience experience of the therapeutic potential and when people don't have that it's really hard for them to fully understand the whole landscape that we're talking about which is why we're looking forward to the further legalisation and implementation of these medicines in the clinical setting the people can have faith <hes> well thought aww orchestrated therapeutic process and that was the perfect analogy as well <hes> and so what is it gonna take to make this legal. What do you think needs to happen. How how how can we move forward. Maybe a little quicker than than the pace. That's being sat right now. There's there's a couple of things happening. Being one is that there's this huge grassroots movement and that's where you see a lotta people writing about their own personal reports publishing books doing being documentaries <hes> these private organizations like maps is privately funding this <hes> therapeutic movement of the psychedelic renaissance the government is running their own trials and as with government agency they tend to run slower than oftentimes the populace desiring and and yet we still wanna have safe checks and balances. We're having the studies propagated and stimulated by personal interest and people actually from the private sector funding these trials and then with something like india may which is largely funded by the maps organization and then phase three trials which is is largely funded by the heftier h. e. f. t. e. r. dot org organization year. We're seeing that people want this data and want this level of support and availability for new novel therapeutics that we know work and so this movement in research is gaining steam and we're also seeing the <hes> expected inclusion of he's medicine into the accurate landscape in the clinical arena getting ready for these medicines is to become available one of the reasons that we've seen like thousandfold increase in the number of ketamine clinics in the last ten years. Yeah no these medicines are coming so let's refine the protocols clinical infrastructure in place and ready and then when they do become legal. We're going to be able to offer them to the people that need them well. I have a lot more questions but we're going to break and we'll be back. Stay tuned. Everyone dr.

ketamine india dr dan ingle dr. Dan ingle dr ingle cannabis life magazine timothy leary medical director e. n. G. l. sega gordon watson america medical advisor depression apple M. a. mexico france
"dr ingles" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"For cancer depression and addiction and so today we're talking about data of psychedelic assisted psychotherapy and so what is the current data show as far as using psychedelics. It's just psychotherapy doctor Dr Ingle well. It's pretty impressive and it spans multiple different medicines <hes> if we were talking about suicide then for example there was an excellent <hes> study in Johns Hopkins in two thousand six that worked with people they didn't never worked with any kind of medicines before they had some kind of experience with meditation and self enquiry but no medicine work and in one experience experience three quarters of those people said that it was one of the top five most meaningful experiences that ever had and they continued continued to feel that way over a year after the experience happens yeah and I'm one of them right. That's like really clear for San Perspective now. That's just one example of somebody who's going in so to speak for something of optimization but if you go into the healing arenas suicide and phenomenal nominal in that it's very good for treatment this depression. That's why it's in phase three trials right now. It's also good for addiction. Recovery people get concerned about these medicines being thing addictive and many of them are actually anti addictive for example suicide and has an eighty percent cure rate for smoking addiction addiction in two sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy using it and now there's nothing else that's close to that kind of addiction recovery rate for nicotine or smoking addiction and clearly so many Americans are are suffering right now. I'm reading from notes from our last show..

Dr Ingle Johns Hopkins San Perspective nicotine eighty percent three quarters
"dr ingles" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Disorder, whether it be an emergency physician who seeing patient after an overdose or an obstetrician, who's working with a pregnant patient with opioid use disorder and Paul Wallace. There is talking about buprenorphine a drug that can be used to treat patients with addiction disorder. Let's go back to the phones. Go to Stephanie, who's calling from Meriden New Hampshire? Stephanie, you're on the air. Hi, how are you? All I thank you for this. I've been in our N for forty years. Now, some kind of kind of backup a little bit. And I was there when physicians aren't giving enough meds, and then they're starting to get sued because they weren't paying attention to the medicine, and then they changed it into the fifth vital sign, which they need to talk about. And so then they started prescribing. These drugs because they were told that they'd be sued if they didn't. And now they're in this position in between where they're like, what do we do? You know, do we order or don't we order in, you know, a couple of mid students, and people were talking that we don't know what to do? So we just ask someone else what do we do? And it's really frustrating to have to watch them. The physicians go through this, when they're being told what to do. We'll stephanie. Thank you for your call. Dr ingles. Let me turn to you. First of all, Stephanie mentioned that medical students for years were were trained to talk to view pain as the fifth vital sign, and that being really central to this conversation. What did she mean by that, about about fifteen years ago, there's a big movement to make sure that nurses, and particularly facilities were attending the patient's pain and the complexity behind kind of why that happened in our in our healthcare system. And. And lots of kind of conspiracy perspectives, but on the less I was training during that time. I remember it vividly. I think particularly nurses were really their job is to advocate for best care for the patients and they were asked to assess patients pain multiple times while they're in the hospital, and we as physicians charged with acting on it, and the fifth vital sign, you know, just like your heart rate, your blood pressure became kind of fundamental to your job as a physician is to treat the pain. Unfortunately, I think many of us took kind of a naive way perspective on how to do that. And we basically just used opioids and obviously as we've learned treating pain is much more complicated process than just giving patients pill certainly learned the hard way. Well, Dr Kelly Clark before the before the break, we heard from another caller who is resin. I believe it was talking about how he sees amongst his colleagues now, kind of increasing fear of prescribing, opioids and the, the other caller had said as a nurse. She sort of she's feeling bad for doctors watching them trying to figure out the best way forward point taken. But every time we have one of these conversations, I also hear from people who are part of, you know, who are suffering from chronic pain, and they have a concern that as our understanding of pain, and addiction evolves, that perhaps, it'll be more difficult for the chronic pain, community, to get the treatment that that they need. So is that part of should that be part of how this new approach, what this new coach looks at? Such a great question. I would I would argue that the, the pain community already has problems getting the care that they need. But what may become more difficult to the future is getting the care that they're used to meaning opioids and hopefully what can happen is that we will be able to do all of the modalities that help a person deal with their chronic pain. You know, the, the evidence there is not evidence that using opioids and chronic manner, for, for chronic back pain, saves lives or improves functionality, in fact, can actually make baseline pain worse. But what we do have is excellent evidence that using the three FDA approved medications that we have rope you at used disorder which are methadone nor fiend naltrexone actually save lives. They improve functionality. They are all around the kinds of evidence for, for ongoing medication use that. We want to see. But what we have gotten through our stigma is a language calling the use of those medications for addiction medication assisted treatment.

Stephanie Meriden New Hampshire buprenorphine Paul Wallace Dr Kelly Clark Dr ingles FDA methadone naltrexone fifteen years forty years
"dr ingles" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

"We'd be we'd be folksy to Greece. Three. Gotta get back. I gotta do becoming the gate with the trouble. Doe. And it is big guy Rondo back. They got a good companies now. Yeah. That's gonna be big day dance on them lands. Lance and make them interesting because there's this other guy number two. Oh, that's the same. From the court. Name will be spoken on. Dr ingle. Evil. Why Leonard well he sat out again last night and didn't play the raptors loss to the Pacers. It's the fourth straight game y has sat out for what they're saying is rest the raptors are still eleven in three without number two in the lineup. This season heard you say that Shannon onto your breath. We're joined once again Eddie house, but I give. Yes. I mean, we gotta get your opinion. We're talking about here. What is going on here? I told you so. When the trade went down when the Spurs hand was finally so forced they had to shift number two up north to Toronto. I said, good riddance. And I said good luck Toronto because trust me on this. Number two is a weird, dude. And number two quit on the Spurs last year because they wouldn't let him get away. With what Toronto is now forced to let him get away with. They wouldn't let number to get away with faking or at least exaggerating a quote unquote injury, which was no more than a bruised thought by and yet the truth was he just wanted to rest for stretches last year, and he wound up playing nine out of eighty two games for Spurs team. Still had Tony Parker and still admonishing playing at a high level. And that team could have made a run last year. If it had its quote unquote, best player who flat. Out quick and forced his way out of town and up to Toronto. And now Toronto is stuck with him. And he SPN reported yesterday. They're doing everything in their power to accommodate this guy because they want this guy to resign long-term with Toronto. And I'm going to say good luck with long-term because he has figured out. He can beat the system he'll play three or four games at a high level, and he'll get he'll get some Indy p consideration you'll get a little buzzed going and all the sudden he just doesn't feel like playing and my man Tony Parker called him out late last year. Yeah. Tony parker. Had a ruptured quadriceps muscle ruptured it toward into in the playoff game against Memphis year bat and Tony Parker. Rush back because he thought they had a chance to win last year and he jeopardized his career rushing back. And so finally he came out late in the year in April and said my injury was a hundred. Times worse than that, gone, computer? Okay. But it was a bruised thought by in again, he now he's seeing ghosts. Now, he's imagining he's more hurt than he is. But he's also figured out. I can just beat the system here because I can play whenever I really feel like it. And you know, what somewhere Michael Jordan is just rolling his eyes over this. Because this guy is getting away with near murder way to go. Toronto easier Zoe that you need to stop heart..

Tony Parker Toronto Spurs raptors Rondo Greece Dr ingle Eddie house Lance Shannon Pacers murder Michael Jordan quadriceps muscle Leonard Zoe bat Memphis
"dr ingles" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on KCBS All News

"KCBS news time now six twenty as our Newswatch continues. Well, as California wildfires continue to increase in size and breath. One might think it would cost a lot of. Money to fight. These firefighters it does. But a new report from a nonprofit firefighter group says that the budget that was used to fight a fire that leveled over fifty homes a couple of years ago in the Big Sur area was boosted by unnecessary amounts of money long. After the fire was contained in fire. Crews could have used a more effective strategy conserving hundreds of millions of dollars for more on this report were joined on the KCBS ring central Newsline with Dr Timothy Ingles. Be. He's the executive director of firefighters United for safety ethics ecology. Thanks for taking the time to talk with us today. Dr Ingles be give us a rundown of your report. While the report goes into the job Rana's fire that burned mostly on a Los Padres national forest. Your Big Sur in two thousand sixteen and it was one of those infamous long duration wildfire suppression seizures it just went on day after day month after month where the four server spent hundreds of millions of dollars on actions that literally made no sense. When the fire started it did threaten homes burned fifty seven homes like you said were at risk. And actions are probably justified at that point finding the fires aggressively as possible, but then the fire moved away from all those tabloid areas burdens a wilderness, and they just kept bombing with air tankers and retardant bulldozing into the wilderness for the next of two and a half months for nothing using the most expensive at least effective tools for fighting fire and wilderness. It's just inappropriate. It was acceptive and just no accountability for that. Expensive wildfire suppression incident in US history. Yeah. Yeah. Now. Now, you report intimates that that the the fires are Cal fire fire. Authorities in in this case worried about using it or losing it when it comes to their budgets. I mean, do you think that that's a problem was is this an isolated incident, or is this is something that may be a problem moving forward, of course with our with our new normal with the fire season. Well, the so Ron us was exceptional agenda. The most expensive firefighting history extreme example, but it's really Representative of a wider systemic problem before service simply lacks any fiscal restraint or fiscal accountability. When it comes to firefighting, and congress doesn't require it it authorized into the deficit spending to go over its budget. And then at the end of the year. As for what's called supplemental appropriations add more money to the budget and congress apply the kind of blank check, mentally. You're going to ask any hard questions are you spending? My y'all ready. Here's a lot more. And that's what happened in two thousand fifteen they gave the service an extra seven hundred million dollars more than it asked for in their budget. Now twenty fifteen was a very active wildfire season, twenty sixteen not half acres burned before but they managed to spend almost all of that extra money in kind of a use it or lose it mentality because they've been so mellow Silverado. Spire was kind of the only thing only game in town really stand in crews, and especially higher all these private contractors who are clamoring for work. Yeah. Yeah. Fascinating stuff and moving forward. Maybe we need some oversight on this. Doctor Timothy Ingles. We executive director of firefighters United for safety ethics ecology. Thanks so much for taking the time and really explaining this situation to us. Thank you..

Doctor Timothy Ingles KCBS congress Big Sur Ron US California executive director Rana Los Padres Representative seven hundred million dollars
"dr ingles" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Here is chief meteorologist Dan Brune. Off that sends up again it's going to warm us up in the. Mid nineties dislike felt yesterday we have a pretty strong ridge of high pressure that's been dominating our weather here, for the past several days and it's going to remain in. Place pretty much this week it's not as. Strong as it could be so we're not going to, see any hundred degree temperatures but it'll feel like, it when he factor humidity forecasting a high of ninety six today with the south. Wind gusting the twenty five so that'd. Be nice in the shade another, breezy and, mild night again overnight tonight upper seventies and then Tuesday pretty much all the, way through Labor Day weekend sunny and hot highs in the mid to upper nineties slight rain, chance on Thursday and Friday north and. East of the Dallas area. But I'll watch Thursday morning, those could sneak his. Closes maybe debt McKinney indicator so a few days away. I'll be watching. The meantime enjoy this morning sun's coming up Denton near at seventy seven seventy nine here pet care Live in. The Mercedes Benz of plano newscenter eleven minutes after seven o'clock the country continues, to mourn the death of Arizona Senator John McCain passed away Saturday following a battle with brain, cancer John McCain at a war hero. Called him the maverick of. The Senate served his country, for more than six. Decades and joining us now live to discuss Senator McCain. Is Jeffrey Ingle. With SMU so what do you think history will say about Senator McCain Oh I think he's going to say that he had a life full of service from the navy to of course Vietnam but I think it's great it's like. We'll be thirty odd years spent in the Senate demonstrating that one can be highly, partisan but also willing to reach, across the island beach compromise there's no doubt. That he's always looking to find what was the best solution for the American people his. Death by the way it comes nine years to the day. After the death of Senator Ted Kennedy from the same disease Ted Kennedy gone John McCain gone are there any giants left in the United States Senate They. Are few and far between. You know to, be, to be, a giant, of the Senate one. Needs really two things I of course longevity but Secondly You need to. Think of yourself as a national figure and that means essentially being willing to go against your party or at least your party lead your party, into compromise the. Great thing about Senator Kennedy and Senator McCain and, other lines of the Senate as we call them is that they were not only in, but also partners they were able to be friends with their colleagues, which really allowed them to do work even when it, was not necessarily their party line the reaction from the White House and in particular with the president that one Twenty-one word tweet expressing condolences to the family. Saying nothing about McCain himself and this report in the Washington Post that Trump overrode his his aides who wanted to. Put out, a longer statement about that is this the kind. Of thing that's going to. Hurt the president, or, beyond that I don't know that there's anything anymore. That's going to hurt the president let me say that his actions in this stand his criticism of John McCain throughout the campaign and throughout the, last several years. Is nothing short of despicable McCain is a person, who of course served his country and was given the opportunity in Vietnam we should not, forget to go home if you would simply betray his colleagues and, comrades and he spent five years in prison because he, would not do that value to service over himself and I think that's something that President Trump should take a harder look at maybe take a lesson from. All right how about John McCain's replacement in the Senate has at going to work Yeah. That's going to. Be a very good question because in the special election that they're going to have essentially it's going to come. Down to. A person who is like McCain if you were a western Republican. The classic Goldwater sense and or somebody who is like Trump and this. Is really going to be another bellwether of whether or. Not the Republican party conservative the current ideological civil. War it's. Undergoing we appreciate. The time Dr Ingle as always thank you so much it's SMU professor. And presidential history expert Dr Jeffrey Ingle we want, to let you know really quickly I just got word from Keller Keller ISD that some. School bus routes. May be delayed this morning, after several school buses were vandalized over the night the district says. They're actually having to replace five to. Seven buses right now because they were so badly, damaged Fort Worth police are also evaluating other eighteen to twenty buses for possible damage I no word. Yet on who vandalized them or exactly how it again if you live in Keller use Keller ISD school buses some. Of those routes may be delayed this morning all right good to know No thank you MandA believe it or not where only thirty one, days, away from coupons and corny dogs the big Tex choice award winners, have been announced we'll have a, live report on that coming out Mike Rogers back with you for my friends add zero razz the best carpet cleaning company you will ever use I know, this from personal experience because, they're the best I've ever used by. Far and I've used a bunch over. The years so what is it about, Zerorez how do they do it it's really more about what. They don't do they are not going to come into your house and use a bunch of soaps and detergents and chemicals and shoot. That into your. Carpet and all like almost every other company does because a lot of those chemicals don't come out and when. They dry. They just pull in even more dirt stains the traffic patterns the. Odor's to they tend to reappear the zero resume together hand uses a. Patented system it's called empowered water essentially it's electrically charged. Water not only does it clean but it's sanitizers. As.

Senator John McCain Senate Senator Ted Kennedy Dr Jeffrey Ingle Trump president Vietnam SMU Keller Keller ISD Republican party chief meteorologist Dan Brune Dallas Keller ISD school Arizona Denton Washington Post Keller Benz Fort Worth
"dr ingles" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"The ACA is stuck in purgatory beyond comprehensive repeal, but subject to a war of attrition that jeopardizes its gains. Radical changes for reproductive healthcare proposed regulations for titled ten a perspective article by Janet Bronstein from the university of Alabama at Birmingham, school of public health on June. First, the department of health and human services proposed new regulations for the title, ten family planning program. If enacted, these regulations will radically alter the mix of healthcare providers and the range quality and effectiveness of services offered to support the reproductive health and childbearing decisions of low income people. In addition, the new regulations will constrain the ability of clinicians within the system to follow professional recommendations for respecting patients, autonomy and ability to make informed choices about childbearing and healthcare title ten of the public health service act provides grants to ninety one state health departments and. Prophet health agencies that subcontract with about four thousand service sites that offer contraceptive services cancer screening treatment for sexually transmitted infections and referral to primary care to about four million clients. Each year, the enabling statute enacted in nineteen seventy explicitly states that title ten funding cannot be used in programs where abortion is a method of family planning. The primary stated purpose of the new proposed regulations is to clarify this restriction in order to draw a wall of separation between the title ten program and any activities that could be considered to support abortions. A remembrance of life before rove v Wade a perspective article by Julie Ingle finger and editor for the journal. Jane was a young nursing student whose name and face Dr. Ingle finger still remembers five decades later. Jane was from the Virgin Islands and had come to New York for nursing school. Dr Ingle finger was a fourth year medical student doing an elective rotation on what was called the renal metabolic ward. It was nineteen sixty eight and dialysis would not be funded in the United States for another half decade. Dialysis shifts were long, and they exchange stories as students do about how school was going, what they'd seen on the floors and what plans they had Jane. The nursing student was in fact the dialysis patient and her odyssey had included far more than nursing school, four months before Dr. Ingle finger met her Jane. Realized she was three months pregnant, despite always using contraceptives, she had a fiance, but neither of them had the means to provide for a baby. So they reluctantly decided that terminating the pregnancy was the only choice. So Jane did with thousands of young women were forced to do in the nineteen sixties. She underwent a back alley abortion though she had worried about going through with it. Other young women she knew had used the same abortion doctor and had been fine. Unfortunately, afterward Jane was not fine at all. She developed sepsis and multi organ failure. She survived after weeks of hospitalization and near death episodes along the way, enduring a hysterectomy and severe acute kidney failure with bilateral necrosis acute dialysis saved her life. However, Jane's kidney function thereafter was essentially nil. And she continued on thrice weekly, Diane. Uscis a few weeks later. Another complication developed acute bleeding with a Hema thorax. Dr. Ingle finger was the medical student on that dialysis shift to Dr Ingle finger chatted with her at the start of the dialysis run, but her status deteriorated rapidly. There was a code though the team tried everything they could to resuscitate and stabilize her. She did not make it. Why is Dr Ingle finger telling Jane story. Now the lack of legal and safe abortion before the rove e Wade decision of nineteen Seventy-three killed and maimed thousands of young women should that decision be overturned and abortion again become illegal. There will be countless more young women like Jane. Our images in clinical medicine features a thirty one year old man with a history of psoriasis, recurrent hypnotic, encephalopathy and anemia who presented to the emergency department with confusion. He was found to be in cephalopoda thick, and his hemoglobin level was six point, seven grams per deciliter. Additional laboratory tests revealed an elevated indirect Billy Ruben level of eleven point four milligrams per deciliter. An elevated lactate dehydrogenation level and an undetectable hap- globe, in level, a peripheral blood smear showed numerous a campus sites or spur cells a finding consistent with spur cell anemia, a form of hemolytic anemia that can occur in patients with d. compensated psoriasis spur cells acquire spiny projections on their surfaces as a result of altered lipid metabolism and an excess of cholesterol in patients with

Jane Dr. Ingle Dr Ingle Julie Ingle department of health ACA hemolytic anemia rove Janet Bronstein psoriasis Birmingham United States university of Alabama Virgin Islands e Wade Billy Ruben editor
"dr ingles" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"A way to capitalize of fun like those that have been invoked earlier but thank you very much dr yes i would echo dr ingles these comments i think i'm not sure no it insurance means anymore uh but but but the idea that i think you know funding iin each bp back to their prior levels as insurance to make sure the people that need to be there uh when the balloon goes up are there in in in april to do what they do with the contingency fund could be a very important piece of of ensuring that uh the uh the unknown unknowns are are insured against an an and they will certainly occur um so i you know i i would just echo with dr angles beside infant and i would say that our best insurance is making sure that we have adequate people and relationships at networks and experts available at the at a moment's notice to respond thank you mr mcgregor i would just add as well it if mechanism such as these when when you first mention it i thought more of you know in the event a protecting against the cost of a pandemic wants to hits i'd be more inclined towards financing mechanisms that again allow us to be more prepared in advance and not having to deal with the ah you know the tragic aftermath and maybe you know maybe just maybe w w we would royal bank is proposing is something that could be more of a global kind of effort in that cannot only benefit the you ask but can benefit other countries as well and by benefit other countries it actually contributes to prepareness we can have here thank you dr it's good to be last of agree with the all of the comments made by my colleagues i would offer sort of two hopefully helpful perspectives first of all as as a one of the members stated if if we could mitigate the problem in hand and avoid the disease that would solve a water problems of and so that gets back to a of proactiv axa nations and also both locally in at a global level looking at those vectors in trying to present to identify early on him prevent those diseases before they spread of in the end it's pretty clear to me and i know you guys get this that there is not enough money to go around to make this law work doctor steve include children's hospital of.

mr mcgregor royal bank
"dr ingles" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The one you describe for patients with burns a four pandemic influenza for other kinds of outbreaks through isn't necessarily a commercial market for those products dr tom ingles be of johns hopkins so companies faced very difficult challenge planning a lot of uncertainty if the government can provide more clarity both in the early phases in the research and the development phase and then potentially in the acquisition phase if that's the role for the government for a particular product companies can then plan can decide to make investments in his face as opposed to other commercially commercially valuable up tunisia they might pursue otherwise so i think it's gonna continue to be very important role for the government the play for products that we want that aren't otherwise produced by the commercial markets i would certainly echo that that comment from dr ingles be it is the mechanism that needs to exists to have companies innovative companies like the one you mention and others that are members of the alliance for biosecurity and and more broadly bio to be able to continue innovating in the space there needs to be sustainable funding in the space around mcgregor i'm and i would make jews to add is it's interesting to hear from a number of colleagues in the space that when you look at institutional investors in the like where there used to be more of an attraction for them when the funding was more certain that attraction is gone away and little to no value is placed on mcm work in the current context because of a because of the lack of sustainable funding the cassidy you gentleman i enjoyed your testimony all of you a couple of things on enjoyed it so much because you agree with me uh perhaps you one of you spoke of correct perhaps the need to have professionals healthcare professionals to be able to go across winds and have liability projection i a practising position when katrina there was north of pod at the new orleans airport the female people would not allow him to set somebody broken bones because he was from out of.

pandemic influenza tom ingles johns hopkins tunisia katrina new orleans mcgregor
"dr ingles" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Bernie in senator casey end to the other members of this committee for your work on on this some focus on emergency preparedness in also to our testify us here today in two thousand and fifteen when i was lieutenant governor minnesota was hit by an avian flu outbreak with which ended up costing somewhere in the neighborhood of a billion dollars was the largest and most extensive animal disease response in the history i think of this country and of course it hit on poultry growers incredibly hard so dr drives and i was really relating to what you were talking about the about how this safety net that we have is about people and not stuff because certainly as we responded to this catastrophe may we needed stuff but we also really needed the people in the relationships that made our response work and function incredibly quickly which was such a such a important part of it so i'm quite interested in the um this idea of a one health approach and how we can build that kind of approach on into our thinking about emergency preparedness and i'm i know that i'm senator young from indiana has raised this question just last week and probably the only bigger two weeks or even talking about it for much longer but yeah raised this question of whether we need additional approaches or resources to do this and so maybe i'd like to just turned to dr ingles the and also dr dries ner could you talk a little bit about what tweets you think we might need to the poppa legislative session pop bre legislation to address this question as one health approach what we ought to be doing better there yes first of all i completely agree with the values and principles of one health and think you're absolutely right that third strong connections between animal and human health disease surveillance outbreaks zoonoses and i do think that those principles you'll find those principles and federal agencies people believe there's a lot of acceptance and belief in one health but i think you are also right that it isn't really house in particular program it there aren't large efforts underway to try and bring one health together i i do think that the knack there is national biodefense strategy that's now being written or completed by the white house and it its purpose is to bring together animal health plant health and human health for biodefense and this.

Bernie minnesota senator indiana white house lieutenant governor dr ingles billion dollars two weeks
"dr ingles" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Them in a uh with russians but i'm just going to chart with a couple of observations the first just to kind of place pandemic in a local context is just worth looking back at what happened during 1918 in baltimore where institution is in 1918 there were six hundred thousand residents of baltimore over the course of one month one in four people became ill with influence two percent of those people died so in one month more than three thousand people in baltimore died from influenced by dr ingles be johns hopkins center for security director every sector of the workforce in the city was a communications was impaired trade with other parts of the country was impaired ethnic groups were scapegoated it was devastating the healthcare system overall it was a major major event in the life of baltimore so it's tempting to think that today we would be able to escape charge but a model from our center in terms of particulars concluded that a pandemic of the scale of nineteen eighteen at its peak would require seven times number of ventilators then we have on hand in terms of the number who would require that kind of medical care and the my last point it before we turn to questions uh is there no matter how you slice it how the people on the front lines respond to a pandemic will miss consequences we have to talk about the goal is we have to talk about bilateral issues there so important but we also have to focus on the state and local systems the doctors and nurses the public health agencies that are doing so much of the work to prepare our country so with that we have someone who's really been focused on that to start our scotland and what i want to ask congress have vowed maybe take us through the pandemic efforts at a high level new york city just explained they work how's.

baltimore dr ingles johns hopkins center director healthcare system medical care scotland congress public health new york one month two percent
"dr ingles" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"dr ingles" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Specific regions research network in 2016 to create a national platform for the study of special pathogens uh uh 2018 marks one year anniversary of the 1918 influenza pandemic john increasing milestone and it's important uh rate the significant investments made and prepare it up and said time however he and challenges remain in our preparedness we will continue to develop new and better ways to prepare for respond to and recover from nato late pandemic in john's outbreaks but also outbreaks of other emerging infectious diseases and release of highly infectious agents rather accidental or intentional thank you prime two his just have time for i think a couple of questions and you talked a little bit about the health care program that occurs manager federal government dr ingles be topped with tom ingles bagged concentric already policy director did you say a little more about what the government would what are we all learn experience of he bola and we try to take care of highly contagious patients because it's so relative for the pandemic influenza preparedness i think john ways the conest a little off guard with we deal with an every day and hospitals we have infectioncontrol nurses we have systems in place to monitor in track infectious diseases within our hospital situations but bringing something forward as unique as this put a challenge on to how is it transferable and what are the other levels of care related to infectious diseases when we don't really know the cause or something that we've never dealt with has really put it really put a challenge and the sort of a wake up call it a visit when i was a nurse in the hospitals many years ago we had continuous education classes almost on a weekly basis of something or another uh those programmes had not been a place in hospitals where we were bringing people back together in rihan reiterating their knowledge base on certain things and i think what.

nato john tom ingles director influenza pandemic influenza rihan knowledge base one year