12 Burst results for "Dr Ian Lost Vader"

"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Pellet. Well around the world covert cases topping 169 million deaths exceeding 3.5 million more than 1.78 billion doses of the vaccine have been given And here closer to home, at least for me. New York City passed a milestone in the outbreaks, easing as the 70 average for positive tests fell below 1% for the first time this year. Let's get into all that and more with Dr Ian Lost Vader, clinical professor of medicine at N Y U Langone Medical Center. He joins us now on the phone from Long Island. Doctor lost Vader. Good to talk to you today. How are you? Him always a pleasure happening Friday, doing very well. Happy Friday. I'm wondering how you're seeing this play out in in in your own experience that and why you the seven day average for positive tests falling below 1% for the first time this year. Actually a dramatic reduction and hospitalizations. There's still a few covert bids on then why you so it's not zero. But as you say, it's below 1%. And certainly the number of new cases and cases that need to be hospitalized are down dramatically. And you know we're seeing that me in the United States, which is encouraging cases coming down, and we have obviously a number of people who've who had it and have been immunized to work. Approaching herd immunity, you know, around the world? Definitely. I don't think this is over yet by any stretch of the imagination. Well, I'm wondering if you think It will will get to the point that the president has made a goal 70% of US adults having one shot by the fourth of July, and we're just over 60%. At this point, that's a that's a goal that he's put out. Are we gonna make it? You know, I hope so. I think so. We still have a small group put a strong group of vaccine hesitant people who've you know, watch videos on YouTube and on the Internet and And are are hesitant. They done on a variety of videos and other information they get. You know, we do try and reassure people. Nothing is 100% for sure. I can tell that we're certainly not going to get through 100% with vaccine hesitant people, but I think we'll be in a much safer zone. If we get to that 70% and I think getting that By July. 4th is reasonable. Yes, yeah, the latest numbers from the CDC telling us that 62% of the population 18 years of age or older have received at least one dose of the vaccine. I'm wondering about how incentives can play into this. You heard me Mention earlier in the show. California is just the latest state offering vaccine lottery $116.5 million in prizes available. This seems to be working, doesn't it? You know it is to a degree. I don't think this has been done before. I'm unaware of any death scene and sentence that we've done in the recent past that I can think of. But whether it's in New York State with free university, State University or city university tuition, you know in in a raffle. Or prize money. You know what it is a public health crisis, and I think I think it makes sense to do it. It's certainly going to capture many. I don't know if all the vaccine hesitant people, but I think as long as it Z Positive step forward. I support it. I am one of the tens of millions of people in the United States through this weekend. We'll be traveling to visit family and it will be the first time that I've seen my grandmother in since March of last year. She's 98. Everybody's vaccinated. We're excited to all see each other. But I gotta tell you, it feels like for me because we're all vaccinated that things are going to be just like they were before the pandemic, and I'm not expecting us to do anything differently. Are we making a mistake by doing that? No, I don't. I don't think so. And by the way, Congratulations on good genes. Seven grip for 98 Very impressive. I must say so. That's that's a positive. I think the data really is reassuring in terms of being with vaccinated people in groups, even if you haven't seen them for a while. I think it is safe. I dealing, you know if you can sit outside, that's the weather is nice if you can. There are still keep that six ft apart, Maybe a gentle hug and then and then step back a little bit, You know, just to be safe, but I think the data is very clear that Staying together with fascinated groups endorser outdoors as the city, she said, is certainly find to do And even though we occasionally find a little bit of virus in the nation of parents, you know what swabs like the Yankees, you know that we've talked about. I think it's going to be very safe, and I think the emotional Positivity of being with family fear. 98 year old grandmother to see her grand kids and family has such a positive. Energy that I think that that Florida outweighs the very small risk of getting an infection. Yeah, we're certainly excited about it are two year old gets to see her for the first time. You know, more than half his life, Doctor lust better. If we were doing this interview 67 months ago, we'd be talking about potential spike and in cases following Thanksgiving or following Christmas just in the last minute that we have and will come back with you. Do you expect to see a similar spike in cases because they are down dramatically, But after this holiday weekend I don't think we're going to see as big a spike because of the widespread vaccinations, I think in the U. S were on a good trend. Globally. I'm not so sure at all that this is over. I think we're having under reporting of many cases from many countries, but I think we're good in the United States. I don't think we're going to see a meaningful spike after the holiday weekend. Certainly globally it is by no means over. All right, well, we're going to come back to you. In just a few minutes. Doctor he and lost Vader, clinical professor of Medicine at N. Y U Langone Medical Center. He joins us this afternoon on the phone from Long Island. As I mentioned, New York City has passed a milestone in the outbreak, easing as the 70 average for positive tests have fallen below 1% for the first time this year. Also, European regulators have cleared Fizer and buy on text vaccine.

United States 169 million Friday $116.5 July. 4th 62% N Y U Langone Medical Center 100% N. Y U Langone Medical Center New York State Long Island Ian Lost Vader 70% two year 18 years today fourth of July 98 70 New York City
"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"64 barrel after earnings. Disney Down 1.9% Expedia Down 8/10 of 1%. I'm Charlie Pellet. That is a Bloomberg business splashed. All right, Charlie. Thank you so much. Want to get right to it? A few quick headlines, though the U. S gonna pay almost $2 billion for an additional 100 million doses of the Fizer buying tech vaccine. We heard a lot update from the president yesterday about having enough vaccines for all Americans By the summer. Meantime, we just had a headline crossing the CDC urging schools to reopen, saying it is critical. This is on the CDC website. Let's get back to one of our favorite guests. When it comes to Cova, Dr Ian Lost Vader, clinical professor of medicine at N Y U Lango on the phone in New York City. And how are you? Great hope you guys had a good week and hope things they're stable over there. Yeah, Fingers crossed so far on kind of maybe upbeat about knowing that there's going to be enough vaccines for all Americans, but I know that's not the case around the world. How do you see it? What is it that you think we need to have front and center right now, when it comes to Cove it in the vaccine rollout. So we're certainly seeing more vaccine enthusiasm, and we certainly have more patients who would like to be vaccinated, then really, vaccine is available. We're still in a situation where on Sunday we find out our state allocation for the week, so there's no question what's limiting vaccines now eyes not really enthusiasm, but it's the availability of the vaccine. That should hopefully on that reflection many locations, including the Javits Center, another mass vaccination sites, so I think we have better infrastructure to give the vaccine. We just don't have enough At this point. I believe when J and J gets approved, hopefully in the next month or you know 4 to 6 weeks. I do foresee a time when we will have extra shots when there really will be a surplus of vaccine, and I know people who were anxious to get it tomorrow or next week. Can't believe that, But I think that that will be coming in a few weeks. So does that mean that the 200 million more doses that were ordered an announced yesterday by the by the Biden administration from Fizer and Motor? No. Does that mean Might not necessarily be needed because we could see vaccine approved emergencies authorization from J and J before then. That's my bet is that we will probably at the end of this month at an FDA meeting. Probably get approval for emergency use for J and J. You know what? I have no inside information, but I would be very surprised if that doesn't happen. And so I think between a couple of 100 million doses of Fizer plus Moderna that we have and more doses, I think we will have more than the 300 Million. Ah, population. TOC cover that. But we're not there yet. So I think we still have to plan to get them on. Give them out. Hey, what's the latest When it comes to kids in vaccines like you? No way use the term 300 million because that's the you know, roughly the U. S population that includes a lot of people who have not been approved to age groups that have not been approved to receive the vaccines that are available now, right? I can't foresee people under 18 really getting that I mean they were not in the study group. Certainly everyone older than that should get the vaccine. And then I think if there's leftover vaccine or we get more research, then it might be appropriate to do that part of the problem. Really, with giving all of this out, or a lot of the vaccine sites or having breakdown of their Elektronik records, you know, confusion and so forth. Which really to me, argues for something I've talked about for years on the show, which is the need for universal national electronic health record, because those Working well, and to have Microsoft or other companies try to an emergent Lee figure out programs. We really should have been doing this for a long time for exactly these situations. But so I think there's several limitations, and I think we will eventually probably find kids younger than 18 appropriate, but they're kind of the least worrisome, and that's why we're opening schools K through 12 Z. That group is the least that we Are worried about in terms of bad outcome. Look, I got a hit on this. You said that the need for electronic medical records. I spoke yesterday. Israel's Cove in 19 national experts team share Ron balancer on. But he said that one of the reasons Israel has done so well is because of the technology that they have their the access to technology They've had for years the electronic medical records that they've had for years. It is not like the United States at all. There are a lot of reasons that's really a separate show, and we should talk more about it. But there are political and economic forces and private companies and a whole host of reasons why we don't have a National Elektronik record, even though it would be helpful if there's some privacy concerns, but which can be worked around. But I think this illustrates exactly why you need that. On. There will be other reasons Other problems down the line. We should talk about it in more detail on another show on Dnipro's incomes to it agreed. I want to get back to that cause I agree. And, you know, Listen. We have a story in the Bloomberg that talks about Microsoft a soften some of the stumbles that they had on New Jersey's covered 19 vaccine book Looking soccer. I know folks in New Jersey. Where it has been so frustrating. And so there's technology out there, But it just feels like it's you know, a patchwork quilt in some ways in very inefficient and we should do better. And we should have known better. Yeah, exactly exactly. What do you be looking for for next week? You know, Vaccine delivery. I think the states need to do better to get it out to various hospitals and ultimately, clinics and and and drug stores. I think that we can do that. We can really do better at bending the curved. Unfortunately, cases are beginning to flatten and go down. And I think we are rounding a corner or will be in the next few weeks. You know, one last thing 30 seconds here. Are you comfortable? You know, Barclays. They're talking about bringing people back. Restaurant's gonna be opening up. In New York City. Limited capacity just quickly. Are you okay with that Think based on our case volume, I think it is reasonable to proceed with both the restaurants at you know, 25% or more and definitely schools. I'm comfortable with that. Yeah, Me too. I know my daughter would love to get back to school. Hey, Ian, Thank you so much. And yeah, we gotta put on the calendar some time to talk about a medical records system across the country. I'm really kind of bringing the medical system and record system into the digital world. Doctor in Los Bater, clinical associate professor of medicine at N Y U Lango Medical Center on the phone in New York. Are you ready to have kind of your medical records all somewhere? I know. I think I am ready for years so hard to go from one doctor to.

Ian Barclays New York City Charlie Pellet New York Microsoft 25% 1.9% 4 8/10 N Y U Lango Medical Center Ian Lost Vader 300 million tomorrow Disney Sunday Fizer and Motor next week 30 seconds CDC
"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Carol Master with Tim Stenkovic Bloomberg. Quick, Take You just let me a story about New York House avoided a repeat of April in terms of virus cases and hospitalizations. It also says Kobe is closed again. We've got to get a better feel of that. Yeah, that just is basically that it's surrounded by states that are worse off, so it could only be a matter of time. Yeah, exactly. Right. Borders kind of don't necessary Stop Cove in. We'll get to that. And I'll get back to Dr Ian lost Vader in just a moment. Let's get a check on your top business stories. Hey, Charlie. Well, hello there. We're looking at records on this Friday here, with the with the Valley s and P and NASDAQ close the session highs. Treasury yields jumping after this morning's report showed US unemployment game's slowed in November that has bolstered expectations for more federal stimulus right now, all major indexes for US equities the S and P. 500, the Dow Jones industrial average, the Russell 2000 and the NASDAQ composite index have surpassed their previous closing records S and P Up 20. That is a gain of 6/10 of 1%. The Dow was up 162 up 5/10 of 1% as stank is up, 48 That is a gain of 4/10 of 1% 10. Years down. 17 30 seconds 10 Year Yield. 100.96% Gold is down 2/10 of 1% 18 30 60 ounce and West Texas intermediate crude up 1.1% $46.15 a barrel right now on WT I Beyond. Tech says it is on track to produce 50 million doses of covert 19 vaccine with partner Fizer this year, easing Concerns that they might miss production targets. The companies say they have made the majority of the promised supply for the year. Fizer shares their up just about 1/10 of 1% beyond take a higher now by 1%. Checking one of the other major names in this group Madonna. It is up now by 2.7% states across the country are drawing up distribution plans for covert vaccines. Once the FDA gives its authorization, Dr Andrew Peck, caches of professor of molecular microbiology and immunology of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, you imagine here in the U. S. There will be immediately shipments of vaccine to centralized areas that are going to begin their vaccination programs in those hot My priority groups Those groups have always been. I've already been prepared for this. Most of them are medical centers who are used to vaccinating their workers. So plans have all been put in place. Priority groups been put in place for the logistics of rolling out who gets the vaccine. And when the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is supported by Michael R. Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg LP, and Bloomberg Philanthropies again, recapping equities higher The 10 year Yield 100.96% s and P up 22 up 6/10 of 1%. I'm Charlie Pellet. That is a Bloomberg business Flash. All right. Appreciate that update. Charlie pellets, So let's get back to Doctor in Los Bater Close clinical associate professor of medicine at N. Y U Lango Medical Center still with Tim and me on the phone in New York City. So Dr Less Spader. Tim just shared with me. A story on glee were just talking about it a little bit. How New York has one of America's lowest per capita rates of covered 19 hospitalizations, but it's surrounded by states. That are far worse and that that's pretty much dangerous sign and perhaps a sign of what's to come do what are you seeing and what your expectations, So that's really a similar question that I and my colleagues have raised. We certainly know we're seeing. Some pockets of outbreaks, you know, in Brooklyn and some out in Long Island on definitely a fume or hospitalizations for Cove it but nothing like March in April, and we're certainly not seeing the huge surge that's going on in the Midwest and out West on we ask, you know why is this not happening? And I think You know, I'm guessing, but I think there are a few possibilities. One is. I think New Yorkers have been very meticulous and wearing masks outside of a few areas, too. I think we've had a lot of patients who were sick and have gotten sick during. Really, um March in April, and we're seeing a lot of the antibody positivity and number of patients who either had mild symptoms or sometimes severe symptoms. And I think the estimate is at least 20% of people, at least in the New York City area that have positive antibodies, and we typically think herd immunity is somewhere in the 50 60 70% range. I think when you have a large population that is Anna body positive, and they're even maybe more than that. Because the antibodies state and you're left with cellular A T cell immunity. So I think there are a number of people who've actually had this on DATs. Why? I think we're not seeing it spread quite like wildfire as we're seeing. Out west in in the Midwest, but fortunately we are. We are seeing a slight increase, but not a huge increase in the number of hospitalizations. Do you think that's going to remain like this? I mean, obviously, you can't make predictions, but but given what we saw over Thanksgiving, the way that people were traveling, given what people's plans are, perhaps for the Christmas holiday in late December holidays I mean, this could go up. Kim. It's an excellent point. And we do expect with sort of less social distancing over Thanksgiving and and and the December holidays that we will see a bump is certainly in in positive cases, usually 23 weeks. After after that time, so there's definitely going to be a bump in the number of cases. Will there be a bump in the number of hospitalizations? Probably somewhat, You know, again, we do have to remember the vast majority of people who get this. Certainly young people are people below 70, you know, make it sick, but they do fairly well, they don't all get Hospitalized now, if older people or people with lung disease, hypertension, obesity, etcetera diabetes. If they'd been exposed, and they really shouldn't be exposed because they should know really, to isolate and not socialize. But if they've been exposed, we do expect certainly a bump in cases. But I think New York has been so far the tryst this area at least relatively spared because a lot of people have already I had it. But according to covet the cover tracking project single day case records were set yesterday in Vermont, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania. I'm just thinking, I feel like as Tim said earlier, like everything around New York. Doctor last better just seems to be increasing. Absolutely. And those areas you know Vermont, Maine, Upper New England was really spared during the march and April time period. So I think we're seeing and this is what happened in 1918. You know, there were areas of the country as it went around the country in these different waves that thought, Oh, gosh, we're going to escape it. And of course, they didn't escape it because this is what happens in pandemics. But my sense is we're not gonna have anywhere near that same leaf Aladi as It's the Spanish flu in 1918, You know, we have vaccines that are going to be administered within the next few weeks. But I do think those other areas that were not hit or having, you know, terrible surges. Hopefully, they've had time to prepare, knowing what happened and knowing what they need with personal protective equipment, ventilators. Hopefully they're prepared for that, and hopefully their population knew. You know not to push the envelope. If you're a risk, don't socialize. Don't go out. I've got patients who literally had been in homes in Massachusetts for you know, eight months now, only going out, you know for shopping because they're afraid of exposure. Obviously not everyone can do that. But but sensible people in those areas hopefully have been isolating. Yeah, exactly. Hey, thank you so much as always. Stay safe. Be well and I will talk to you next week. Doctor in less Bater, clinical associate professor of medicine at N. Y U late. Going Medical Center on the phone in New York City was great. Yeah, he was great. I mean, I wonder to just about the way that people are avoiding colonoscopies. Right? Right. Well, everything routine. I mean, this is something we've talked about him, and that's gonna be certainly probably an issue over the next couple of months. All right, let's get back to a world of national news over to Nancy Lines in D..

Tim Stenkovic Bloomberg New York City Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Charlie Pellet Bloomberg LP clinical associate professor o Midwest Medical Center New York House Michael R. Bloomberg US Massachusetts New York Stop Cove Fizer professor of molecular microbi Kobe
"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"At Bloomberg, calm the Bloomberg business APP and at Bloomberg Quick, Take This is a Bloomberg business. Blam Blumberg World headquarters. I'm Charlie Fella. Treasury yields jump. We've got stocks trading in a record after this morning's jobs report showing gains slowed in November of the that is bolstering expectations from or federal stimulus. All major indexes for US equity is the S and P 500, the Dow Jones industrial average Russell 2000 and that as that composite index off all top their previous record. Close is right now we've got the S and P up 22 of 36 89. That is a gain of 6/10 of 1%, The Dallas Up 177 points up 6/10 of 1%. NASDAQ is up 57 again of 5/10 of 1%. 10 Year. Yield. 100.96% Gold is down 3/10 of 1% lower by $5 accounts at 18 35 West Texas Intermediate Crude up 1.1% 46 15 a barrel so again recapping here Stocks clothing holding close to session highs. We are looking at records s and P up 23 again of 6/10 of 1% and this headline. Easy Use Barney. A says Brexit talks are paused. I'm Charlie Pellet that there's a Bloomberg business Flash. All right, Charlie. Thank you so much. You're listening to Bloomberg business. We carol Massar in our Bloomberg Interactive brokers studio. Low it instead of IQ. Bloomberg. Quick. Take get chocolate more about the virus because we just mentioned about buy on tick what they said that they're on target with Fizer to make their production targets. We just have a story about Anthony Fauci. Slamming the U. K's drug regulators saying that it rushed to clear the coven 19 vaccine from Fizer and biotech. And then you got states trying to figure out okay. How many doses am I going to get him? Yeah, I mean, the issue. Among the many issues is that there's no sort of standardized rollout program for this, And I just envision a scenario where I mean, some states don't even have the technology right now. Toe. Keep a large number of these Fizer doses cold for a significant period of time. Yeah, So there's so much that we still have our that we need answers to let's get into all of this with Dr Ian lost Vader Black back with us as he is on every Friday clinical associate professor of medicine at N Y U Lango Medical Center with us on the phone in New York City. Hey, Ian. Nice to have you here with him in myself. Um, So what stood out for you this week? Because we've got a lot of headlines to go through. For sure. Happy Friday. Count him. Hope. Hope you guys are staying safe and doing well, Yeah, definitely Some challenges. You know, we're seeing More cases locally, you know, here in the tri State area? Certainly nothing comparing to the to the Midwest and out West where you know the record recording a large number of hospitalizations and deaths and taking, you know, certainly more extreme measures of shutdown locally that we are very excited because we gotten word that We should be expecting the flies Your vaccine delivery about mid December. Probably around December 15 you you specifically and and why you, Langan? Is and why you lingo is expecting. We got a call from, you know, one of our senior administrators. And you know, they're sort of working out exactly how that's gonna be, you know, distributed my senses. These come in. You know large boxes and dry ice and have to be kept, you know, frozen so around the country, and certainly here distributional be an issue, but each box has approximately 5000. A little under 5000 doses. And there are is so in the range of 1500 practices, you know, the faculty group practice and, of course, hospitalists and so forth. So I think, um it's gonna be a little bit of a logistical challenge, you know? Fortunately, um It's not an emergency on it's going to be on a voluntary basis. Interestingly enough, really, it's mandatory to have your flu shot, which is only about 25% effective, but it is really everyone who was seeing patients is supposed to get a flu shot. But it's not yet mandatory. Certainly for coded. I think most people least the colleagues. I speak to our very enthused and or, you know, ready to line up to get it. It is going to be two vaccines, two shots. Approximately a month apart. So what about you, doctor? You're gonna get it. 100%, you'll be among the first in line. If they'll let me. I mean, look, you are your your medical provider. You're on the front lines. I mean, this is this Is this shipments meant for you, right? Absolutely yes on. That's the understanding. I actually thought the very first people who would get it would be the in hospital physicians the hospitalists in critical care specialist because they are literally bathing and covert, you know, in the patients that are in the hospital and isolation rooms and so forth. Many of those patients are very sick and needs, you know, very close care of the You know the intensive care nurses And so forth. But my understanding is it's really going to be apparently available to all of the you know, Frontline health professionals, which is great. So before the end of December or early January, if most of us can get it again, it's two doses. So a month later you get the second dose. I think people are very enthused about it. I'm gonna ask you a question. It keeps kind of coming up at home. Why do they need to be kept so cold? In this for preservation. This particular Formulation is, you know, minus 73, you know Centigrade, uh, on that makes it very difficult shipped on dry ice. The Madonna vaccine. Not that we're playing, you know, Favorites here is doesn't need to be kept quite is cold. That's not going to be probably approved or distributed until later. Both story effective both very similar technology, this messenger or in a technology, which is new. On. I think people have some concerns. But really all of the data we've seen seems to be very encouraging. No vaccine is 100% safe. There are right. And certainly with the flu shot, you know, we do see G on Brace syndrome and this transfer smile itis. There are Side effects so, but we're really not seeing that much from this particular class of vaccine. So so let's say you do that proved in the UK Let's say you do get this this vaccine and you get it close to mid December. You get another month for your second dose. How do you anticipate that your behavior is going to change in the spring and in the late winter? That's a great question. Uh, a certainly I think you know for me when I see patients I put on an n 95 mask goggles when we do procedures like colon else could be. You know, we're gowned up wouldn't love. Um, And so it is stressful and uncomfortable walking around all day with a mask and goggles. Um And so I think certainly I would think about switching to a surgical mask which fits a lot looser. You know, you don't feel quite as restricted on guy I think is more people get vaccinated. The level of tension will go down. There is a little bit of anxiety when you're seeing patients and you realize this person could hurt me. I'm here to help them, but they could potentially hurt me. That takes a toll when you've been doing that month after month. Yeah, no doubt about it. Incredibly stressful. Hey, sit tight, and we'll come back in just a moment. Dr. Ian Lost Vader, Clinical associate professor of medicine at N. Y U Lango Medical Center on the phone from New York City. It is, I think that's a whole other layer. Tim. Just the stress. About keeping yourself safe, but other people safe. It's just it's tough. These doctors.

Bloomberg Fizer flu Bloomberg Quick clinical associate professor o Bloomberg Interactive brokers New York City Charlie Fella US Blumberg World West Texas Intermediate Anthony Fauci Barney Dallas Midwest Charlie Pellet Charlie Dr. Ian Lost Vader
"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Prices Come way down. We remember those horrible stories about EpiPen while the prices now come, way, way, way down. We kept insolent costs for many seniors at just $35 a month. As I said, saving them an average of nearly $500 to $1000 a year just on insulin. Saving $1000 a year on insulin Since I took office, we've reduced Medicare part B premiums by 12% putting nearly $2 billion back into seniors pockets that 12% is great by any standard. 12% is peanuts compared to what we've done with favorite nations. It's I think it's probably the biggest story that we've ever had motive, too. Prices. There's never been anything like this. This is Something that has been talked about for many years, but nobody had the courage to do it. Because of the power of Big Pharma. We ended. The gag clauses that prevented pharmacist from telling patients had to buy less expensive drugs. You know, pharmacists could not talk to patients about how to buy drugs. How about that one? Think that's right. Now they can and should we approved a record number of affordable generic drugs? For three years in a row, and we put a very heavy, very heavy emphasis on generic drugs. And the pricing. There has become very good, but that pricing will also go down very substantially. No administration is ever fought harder or achieved more. For our patients and for our seniors. But for America when you think of it for America because other countries were paying a fraction of what we were paying In some cases, a small fraction. I mean, it was it was what the numbers were just staggering. The difference between going to I won't name nations, but I could name five of them right off the top of my head That It is so incredible to think about. For years. What was happening? We've been working on this for two years, statutorily. We had to go through a process. When you think that our nation for the exact same Fill out of the exact same bucks, often made in the exact same factory. Same company. And you take a look at the cost was so much more Many, many times more. In four short years, We've instituted the most dramatic series of drug pricing reforms in decades. And you'll see that it all comes to fruition right now, Starting in January, 1st and the American people benefit from our actions for Many, many decades. And it should be very immediate. Now. I presume they'll sue, but it's a suit that they should never be able to win. They should never, ever be able to win. So now I'd like to ask Secretary Hayes are to provide some more details as to the action and then same I'd like to have you come up and say it works few words and A great job. Appreciate it. Thank you, Secretary. Are you been listening to President Trump? He is in the White House at the Roosevelt Room and talking about his lower Or his initiatives I should say for lowering drug prices. Specifically, he's really says he's getting at the variations paid for drugs by Americans versus those that are in other countries. So you talked about this has been very controversial when it comes to the drug industry, and that is the most favored nation status. And so essentially, he says. Medicare is going to now look, the prices that others Develop nations pay and that they meaning the United States. We will now pay the lowest price. So talking a lot about the drug industry. Lucky for us, I think Doctor in less Bater is still with US clinical associate professor of medicine at N Y U Lango Medical Center. So in we do know that the president I think over the summer he actually signed for executive orders that were aimed at lowering drug prices. The pharmaceutical industry is not too happy about some of them. Hey, also talked about ending the unapproved drug initiative that's for those pharmaceuticals. There's hundreds of them that entered the market prior 1938 before the FDA really implemented those safety reviews, so What you take away from what the president said. I think the president raises a number of very correct points. You know, For years we've known that Americans have always paid more for the exact same medications that are available, you know, more cheaply overseas, and it's very opaque. How the drug companies determined prices. From country to country on you. And I even a couple of years ago interviewed a pharmaceutical CEO trying to get a sense about how do you even judge how do you, uh Charge of certain cost, and we never got a straight answer. You know, part of that, obviously. Regulations. It costs a lot to bring a new drug to market FDA regulations and studies. You know, it can cause billions of dollars T bring a new medication, but there's something very in this one. Americans have to pay more. And so I agree with the president. You know on this and you know, obviously, drug companies need pharmaceutical companies need to make a reasonable profit. You know how we determine that is really another question. How much and I'm always curious about this. People would make the argument. I've had a brother who worked in the pharmaceutical industry for several decades. And what's interesting is they say, Yep. It's the rnd the amount of time they spend on a lot of drugs that never actually come to market. There's also the concerns about legal liabilities is that part of the reason why it's so much more expensive in the US versus elsewhere. I believe that's true. Certainly litigation not only from L practice but for pharmaceutical issues, much more in the United States, So I'm sure that is a factor. But really at the end of the day, it's just patently unfair that one customer should have to pay significantly more 2345 times a much, um, and maybe that burden needs to be shared around the world as well. I think it's long overdue that the question It's addressed why Americans have always had to pay more and for medications center generic Whether it's insulin or other generic medications. Drug companies can basically charge whatever the market will bear and that may not be appropriate. We may just need to say some things. Or health care issues. You know if you want to pay more for a Cadillac or whatever brand go right ahead. You know, that's a luxury, but for essential medications. We probably should be a making them in the United States and beat, you know, regulating how much can be charged for them. Hey, just very, very quickly. 30 seconds. The PBM, the pharmaceutical, the pharmacy benefit managers have they made the situation worse, just quickly. It's another layer then, and it's unclear exactly what they do. Theoretically, they're supposed to negotiate the best price. Unclear if that really happens, all right, always always great and double duty talking about covert talk about drug prices, and you can do it all. Thank you so much. Have a safe weekend. A good weekend, and then we will talk to you again next week. Really appreciate it. Dr. Ian lost Vader. Clinical associate professor of medicine at N. Y. U Lango Medical Center, joining us on the phone in New York City. And again we just did hear from President Donald Trump at the White House, talking about lower drug pricing for Americans talking about most favorite nation status on talking about now where Americans the goal is.

president United States President Trump FDA clinical associate professor o White House EpiPen Secretary America Big Pharma N Y U Lango Medical Center N. Y. U Lango Medical Center Medicare Dr. Ian New York City CEO Hayes Bater
"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:33 min | 1 year ago

"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"At Bloomberg Quick Take This is a Bloomberg Business Black World Headquarters. I'm Charlie Pellets, stocks were slipping his traders way. A conflict between the White House and the Fed over emergency lending programs, along with assurances of the government's got plenty of room to help the economy. Right now, the S and P is lower little change down nine. That's a drop of about 2/10 of 1% on track for losing week. Looks like we're gonna have a loss this week of roughly 3/10 of 1%, depending on how things shake out in the next couple of hours. We've got the 10 year. The yield of 100.82% gold is up 4/10 of 1%, 18 73, Beyonce and crude West Texas Intermediate up 1% 42. 18 a barrel again. Recapping equities air trading mixed NASDAQ higher by 11 Up 1/10 of 1% s and P lower bite through 2/10 of 1%. The Dow was down 5/10 of 1%. I'm Charlie Pellet. That's a Bloomberg business Flash. All right, Charlie. Thank you so much really appreciate it. So a ton of virus headlines. Today we had New Jersey's health commissioner. Saying she expects the state to get a coven 19 vaccine in late December. We have said Roche being able to deliver its anti body treatments in the first quarter. 2021 We just talked about The strain on hospitals that we're seeing the number of U. S hospital beds occupied by Coven 19 patients rising this week to the highest since April, and if you look overseas Canada, England, Austria. Also seeing some stress is it's been a rough day. Rough week when it comes to the virus Joining us as he always does every Friday and grateful that he does is Dr Ian Lost Vader. He is clinical associate professor of medicine at N. Y. U And why you Lango Medical Center. He's on the phone in New York City and good to have you back with us. How's it going? We said pleasure, Carol. Happy Friday. Yeah, Thanks. Thanks. You're going. Okay. Um, you know, we're seeing a lot of regular patients, and certainly a lot of covert follow up patients. Um, the number of cases in New York so far is or the number of hospitalizations. I should say it's not skyrocketing. So I think based on Anybody positivity, which is estimated about 20% and kind of our rough or rough go in March and April, although cases are up and hospitalizations are up. It's certainly not thank goodness overwhelming the system here, so I think the Midwest And out. West is having definitely more of a challenge than we are, and we'll just have to see how you know how we do with that. What do you make Doctor? Less better of kind of the rolling back. We're seeing it with New York City schools, you know, sending kids back home to do virtual learning? We're starting to see rolling back in terms of the bars, but I still have surprised that things are even kind of open in that front. What makes sense to you what doesn't what needs to be done right now, In your view. So I think part of it. Increased case positivity, which is really what they're basing, you know, Closing the schools on maybe, uh, incorrect or may be misleading And I think Every state has a different threshold, So it's not like there's a certain standard of when you need to think about doing these things and really how even effective they are. I think politicians sometimes feel they have to do something. When really, sometimes that that thing is not really the best. We are doing a lot of testing. I'm seeing many of my patients. Reader, visiting or potentially traveling or just curious. And so there are a large number of tests being ordered you the swabs of the answer, Jin test. I'm seeing a lot of false positives. So initially, someone may go for a nasal swab in Auntie Gin. You know, we know no test is 100% accurate, Then they get a follow up piece. Your test. That's negative, So I think we have to be very careful with this. Positivity rate as a threshold, and I think the data about closing schools and certainly elementary schools really supports keeping them open for a variety of reasons for the kid's education for their mental health for the parents, mental health, Um and so I think we are jumping the gun here incorrectly in closing schools. Ah, you couldn't argue. Perhaps high schools were were does seem to be a little more communicable eyes in the elementary schools. And I think the whole concept here of closing bars at 10 P.m. also is is her is very confused. You know the virus doesn't say who? It's 9 59. I better go in. So you know when you think about it What we really want to do is discourage potential super spreader events like bars or gyms or where people are shouting encouraged people to sit outside. I think people can safely outside with heaters, eat and drink. On. I think the school should remain open unless there really is. Or or an outbreak in that specific school of a higher number of cases, So I think it should really the individual. What do you think about? What do you think about kids coming home from college for the holiday? So you could because, you know, I'm sure you've been watching the numbers and then and I know we report on it. But, you know, I feel like I want to know. It doesn't sound like we've had, you know, isolated cases of this school in that school, But for the most part, it seems like it's gone fairly. Well, Yes, you know, I think it varies from school to school. There are schools University of Michigan, where they really did have to restrict any in person classes because it was rampaging through Right through the campus, Vanderbilt under control, and that's not the point at one school or another. I mean, that could be based on a lot of factors, but those kids get tested on a weekly basis, and I think they have a much better handle on things. I do think ideally of kids can get tested in school before they come back, and if they're negative, I think that would be a lot more reassuring. We do anticipate a Thanksgiving bump based on traveling and kids coming back. Families getting together. You know there there is a risk and we know the cases are increasing, and they're probably going to go up a little bit more within a week or two after Thanksgiving. Just based on people returning home. Yeah, exactly. No, it's you know, it's interesting. I've been watching. Kind of, you know, talking to different parents and what schools are doing and I've been very lucky, my my daughter's school, They kind of shut things down ahead of Thanksgiving and said You're going to stay home for a week after Thanksgiving, and you gonna have to take a test before you come back, You know, because because we all understand there are going to be people who are, unfortunately to still kind of get together on mouse. One thing I want to ask you and then we'll do a break and come back, but I got about 45 seconds. The task force the White House Coronavirus task Force meeting again making some comments. What was the significance of that? In your view? I mean, important to keep America up to date, but I just wonder what your takeaway was. I think it is important to try to answer questions. I know there was a little bit of a hullabaloo about announcements Overall. I think we have positive information with the vaccines. I think there is still some questions from Desert here and other other issues that have come up is outlined in Bloomberg. We can talk about that on the second part, but but I think updating people is good. But you have to do follow up questions. All right, and we are gonna get into room disappear. You set me up really, really nicely. We're gonna come back with Dr Ian lost Vader. He is clinical associate professor. Medicine at N. Y. U Lango Medical Center, joining us once again on the phone in New York City,.

New York City Bloomberg Charlie Pellets Bloomberg Business Dr Ian Lost Vader Fed New Jersey White House Beyonce clinical associate professor o Charlie Pellet Midwest schools University of Michigan Charlie West Texas Intermediate N. Y. U Lango Medical Center Black World Headquarters
"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A drop there of 2.1%. I'm Charlie Pellet. That is a Bloomberg business Flash. It is indeed. All right, Charlie. Thank you so much. Really appreciate that. You're listening to Bloomberg. BusinessWeek want to get back to Dr Ian lost Vader, Clinical associate professor of medicine at in you Langone Medical Center on the phone in New York City. Dr. Lewis Better thought it was interesting Charlie in his report, talking about from the team over at Johns Hopkins. This whole idea of kind of what worked over the summer doesn't work now. I mean, the conditions have changed, especially as it gets colder were inside more. There's gatherings and let's kind of throw on top of it. Pandemic fatigue. Yeah, exactly. Your your Ah, Both of you are quite right that as it gets colder, it's much harder for people to eat outdoors or socialize outdoors. Ah, and there is a pendant like fatigue to some degree. In retrospect, I believe it was actually Jeff Gun Black, who had said. I think back in February. Let's just close the country down for four weeks is that might have made a big difference. But people were in certainly in New York City for For several months, and they were really emotional and psychological consequences not to mention economic and I think that's the difference between Asia or certain parts of Asia. If we can believe those numbers where you can lock down the city of 40 million, say no one in no one out very tough to do that in free societies and an open society, so we're back to a simpler methods until we get a vaccine. Do you not believe the numbers out of China? No, we have to be smart and cautious. But do you not only think it's hard to know what I think? In a way? It doesn't really matter because we have to deal with what we have to deal with here, which is, you know, airplanes coming in and out and people traveling around and honestly, the screening people with just shooting a temperature at them to check their temperature is a very inefficient people can be Ah, harboring the virus for for several days and be infectious without really having symptoms. So and masks is well back in 1918. Everyone were cloth mouse. We had 50 million worldwide dead. We actually, Ah, unfortunately, have much lower numbers. It's about, um over a million worldwide so not to compare one virus to another. They're definitely different viruses, but I think it's harder in an open traveling society to lock it down quite as effectively and therefore we have to rely on Individuals taking responsibility with masks and losing weight and maybe taking some vitamin D and being healthy and using intelligence, you know, to protect themselves. Well, what's interesting, too, and I just want to follow on that cause we did. We did have uninterested story. Earlier this week on the Bloomberg Thatjust talked about a record 200 days with no local case. Making Taiwan the world's envy, basically saying, you know that they have the world's best fires record by far enough, and I do the caveat of you said. You know if we can trust all the numbers, But what's interesting is they did talk about Closing borders early, tightly regulating travel. They do talk about rigorous contact tracing which I feel like it's been tough to really get off the ground here in the United States. They also they talked about Taiwan's deadly experience with SARS and how it scared people into compliance. And I wonder if how big a factor that is based from what Asia had to deal with, and that knowledge having gone through that before vs You know, maybe our lack of that experience here in the United States? No, I agree. Like Taiwan is a relatively small island through and they can, really They're surrounded by water. They can certainly feel their borders. And and can function independently. Certainly for a period of time. I think it's less realistic in Europe in the United States to do something like that. I certainly support kind of a universal mask mandate. I think we're kidding ourselves to say that will Stop things in his track. But I think simple things like that If people would get on board with certainly slow things until we do get the vaccine, and hopefully people will will be encouraged. I'm concerned exactly as you report That people have hesitancy They think Operation works. Speed is 2 2000, as outlined in the Bloomberg article. I'm not sure that's really true. I do think a lot of companies have benefited financially enormously. This happens in war. Those military material suppliers always do well on, I think in this covert war Some drug companies maybe unfairly have been rewarded. But I do feel safety precautions have been pretty careful, all right, and I'm just just real quickly. Just got about 20 seconds. Are you guys seeing at N. Yu Lango and seeing an increase in cases coming into the house bill covet. Slightly, but not a huge surge. So there are pockets in New York, Brooklyn and others were you know there are gatherings for that mouse. So we are seeing a slight uptick nowhere near what was previous, but they're still you know, we're still early in the winter. All right. Always great to check with you. Check in with you Have a good weekend, a safe weekend doctor in La Spader, Clinical associate professor of medicine, and then you Langone Medical Center, joining us on the phone from New York City coming up. We're going to check in with one of the most read stories on the Bloomberg It's also from Bloomberg. BusinessWeek, and it talks about Ah, well known quite firm and how they're taking your election bets. And then, of course, Other timely with the election. Of course, just around the corner. Let's get a check on world. The national news headlines with that. Let's check in with Nancy Lines of a DC Hey, Carol. Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden is in Iowa, holding a drive in rally in making a last minute.

Bloomberg New York City Charlie Pellet Taiwan Clinical associate professor o Asia Langone Medical Center United States Bloomberg Thatjust BusinessWeek Joe Biden China Iowa Dr. Lewis Better Europe Johns Hopkins New York
"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And also be careful. This kids come back from school, You know that. Ah, number of young people, maybe a symptomatic, and so we do have to be careful. Ideally, if people can be tested before they visit elderly relatives, either with the Energon spit test or a nasal swab. There are a lot more available. You know, All of those things will Help a bit and the vaccine data I think we can talk about, I think is very encouraging. So let's let's go there, Doctor get an update on the vaccine. We've had some starts some stops and starts again. What's the latest from your perspective? So he was at a conference on Ah video conference last week. And a lot of the and this one of the speakers was really the head of our, uh, infectious disease department and head of a lot of the vaccine trials that are being done. And it does look like the preliminary data shows that the vaccines really give you very high neutralizing Anna Body tigers. You know, this whole has yet to be published, but it does seem very encouraging. Uh, that the vaccines should be pretty effective in giving you those high antibody tigers. And also it does seem that key cells, which are really longer acting memory cells also do seem to have Higher levels. We don't know exactly how this will, you know, translate into hospitalizations and deaths. And, you know, none of the studies Air Really, Howard to tell us that all they're going to tell us is Does this really reduced the acquisition of Cove it But I think that's a very important step and s O. I'm very encouraged by the vaccine data, but obviously The trials have to be completed. And then it has to be FDA approved and then it has to be disseminated. So unfortunately, we're still several months away from, you know, really getting those vaccines out. So OK. I love this is because I love talking to because this is what I learned things. Sorry, I can't get it out. It's Friday. But thank you Google because I had Teo Google Antibody, Tighter T I T r explained that explain that for our audience. You're so you know, we weigh measure. The body's response, which are typically be cells make these proteins called antibodies and there the body's response to Foreign invaders, whether they're bacteria, viruses, fungi, or, you know the that's the normal response. And typically, they bind Teo the invader. With a foreign object and, ah, that can neutralize them and then allow other cells to digest them and rid the body, You know, office. So what you want is the vaccine to encourage the the humans to form antibodies, so they bind to any covered 19 virus that comes in And typically, these vaccines. Do a variety of ways. Whether the so called viral vectors or message or innate like the you know, Madonna and Visor trials and what that does these air materials that go into the cell message ornate. It makes Spike Protein, which is the common Corona. That means crown. Most spike proteins are made just that not the active virus, So no one is going to get covert 19 from these vaccines. It just causes Yourselves to make the the worrisome or problematic. Spike and one antibodies form to that Those should block the live virus. If you get it from attaching to cells and closing damage, and that's really what they're going to measure. How high is the response? And it actually looks like you get higher responses and people who had the covert 19. Yeah. Hang on a second. I feel like I'm almost ready to take my am cats, but not completely. But I love it because this is I want to understand this and obviously gonna hire Antibody tighter on that talks about the efficacy of some of those vaccines were to come back with Dr Ian Lost Vader over 10 you Lango Medical Center. It's the medical segment. You gotta listen.

Google Teo Dr Ian Lost Vader Spike Lango Medical Center FDA Corona Howard Madonna
"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:39 min | 2 years ago

"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Charlie. Thank you very much. Alright, Charlie. Jason, I run to this next guest. Wait. Look to it every week me Dio really do I do want to just put out there as we get ready to talk with doctor in Los Bater, a stoning a disturbing statistic and you could read about it. In depth on the Bloomberg but the U. S. Will top 200,000 deaths from the novel Corona virus in coming days. So talk about a milestone. So let's talk about that and talk about where we are in the virus in in the race for a vaccine doctor in Lost, Vader is back with US clinical associate professor of medicine at in Ulan Go Medical Center on the phone in New York City. Um, Dr Less Baynard. Truly, Jason, I look forward to these weekly conversations. How are you? My pleasure. Always always great to be with you guys. And I hope you have a Healthy, weekend safe weekend and definitely it's uh, it's a challenge. With all the data coming in. It's hard to coordinate it'll, but we'll try and make sense of it. So you know, and I wanted to ask you about something because there's a great article when you put it on Twitter, and there's a full personal disclosure here. Great piece in time magazine that was flooded among my family because My aunt in Atlanta who is a nutritionist at Emory. She is part of a vaccine trial, and she's interviewed in this story, and it's the Moderna vaccine, and it gave me you know, some measure of hope in terms of her being interviewed and one of them and what they're talking about. In terms of all these vaccines moving forward now there are a lot of cautions in this piece as well. It talks about, You know the need for two shots and the fact that you know there's all these different things going on. We don't know exactly what is going toe work. What combination of things are going to work, the efficacy and the safety? What's the thing that you've heard of late? That's the most important when it comes to vaccines in You know, this is really uncharted territory. We haven't dealt with a pandemic of this size really? Since 1918 you know the so called Spanish flu and we've had the swine flu, another epidemics and pandemics. But this is really uncharted territory and we're learning as we go. In terms of the different manifestations in the diffuse clotting and and so forth, and how some people have a very mild case and other people succumb. So I think we're learning a number of things. One is that even people who have the disease and who developed antibodies do have lower antibody levels along the way, and I've had a number of patients with very high antibody levels, who who do relatively well with the With the infection. And over time we've we've checked their antibodies, and the level's definitely seem to drop. Now. We don't know how far down that will go. And we don't know if they have a cellular A T cell response that will protect them. But this really does argue for everyone getting a vaccine. We also don't know which is really going to be the most effective vaccine isn't a messenger or in a, you know. Is it a different technique that we're really going to have to see? We're just starting to get the data from the phase Three trials with Um, you know, tens of thousands of patients getting getting tested and overall looks like a this point that that it does seem fairly safe. There was that one case with AstraZeneca, and there may be other cases that will learn about Overall, it appears the vaccines are fairly safe. And from what I'm hearing fairly effective now, how long that will be, or will people need? Ah booster shot, which they probably will. I think we're going to have to kind of see how that goes. But, of course, in the interim You know the cases or are in, you know, have continue And And, of course, unfortunately, the deaths now, too, you know, over 200,000. We did anticipate these numbers. These numbers were just based on the trajectory. They shouldn't be. You know, Of course they're upsetting, but they shouldn't be shocking because we thes numbers were all really estimated along the way. So I think we're making some progress. So I do wanna ask about a vaccine that because I'm thinking Okay, I'm at some point getting retaking a vaccine should We wait for the one that is the most effective is there complications But with taking multiple vaccines, like I want to understand this as an individual. I think the great questions Carol is as always, I don't think we have those answers. And And is it possible that people may need two different kinds of vaccines? In other words, a messenger Orin and perhaps another one. I think it's way too early to determine that, And I think the first priority you know, will be those front line workers and healthcare workers who who needs some protection when they're in cantering patients. And I do suspect that ah eventually is more and more people get vaccinated. It will be clear. You know whether combinations of vaccines work or whether you will be protected. I think we'll be able to check antibody levels along the way, and I think that will give us a bit of a clue. But I think the feeling is even if you have some exposure with the vaccine, even if you have some antibody response. That should Help in reducing the Sudarat e of the effects of the virus. And again we don't know whether this will come back as a seasonal corona virus, which other Corona viruses you know our common cold viruses or seasonal flu viruses. But vaccinating everyone, just like we vaccinate everyone for the flu should give some degree of protection. Do we ultimately were to come back and talk, but just 30 seconds do we? Ultimately as a population as a country, build up an immunity that we don't need vaccines in the future? No. You just said we're gonna probably have to be taking these Yeah, That's my sense I for people who have the disease. They may be better protected. But we don't even know that because we do see antibodies that are high and you begin to drop down over time. We don't will they go to zero? We don't know. Yeah. All right. We're going to come back in just a couple minutes on the other side of some news with Doctor in less bitter A go to guy or go to Doc Clinical associate professor of medicine at in use Langone Medical Center. He is on the phone from New York City. I want to talk to him about re openings. You know, we heard the sort of one step forward two steps back going on on Wall Street We saw yesterday in New York City, delaying its opening of schools, so Stop and start stop and start as we try and figure this out. Carol, that is our world. No doubt about it. We're gonna come back with Dr Ian lost Vader. As Jason said over.

Jason New York City clinical associate professor o Carol Bloomberg Ulan Go Medical Center US Charlie Dr Less Baynard time magazine Dio Twitter Charlie. Los Bater AstraZeneca Langone Medical Center Um Dr Ian Emory
"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:40 min | 2 years ago

"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And Carol As much as we would love to move on from the virus. The virus is not moving on from us. We continue to see spiking cases across the country when I feel like it was brought front center by Anthony found T write. He's the US government's top infectious disease specialists, Jason He want lawmakers that virus cases could rise to 100,000 day. If behaviors do not change. I'm very concerned that I'm not satisfied with what is going on. Because we're going in the wrong direction. One of the voices that we talked to weekly is Dr Ian Lost Vader. He's clinical associate professor of medicine at in You Land going Medical Center, and he told us where we are when it comes to fighting the virus. Most doctors that I speak to certainly are very concerned on hospitals are concerned as they should be, to some degree, you know, I think by by not really mandating, you know, mouse and social isolation, really? By giving that as an option, which you know, with multiple states and in a free country. That's certainly one approach. We're really in a way. Uh, following the Swedish model, which is letting nature take its course. And when that happens, there's certainly a significant risk is, Dr Fauci says cases at this point are about 40 or 50,000 day. We know there really much higher. Because we're really on ly picking up about one in 10 or only diagnosing one in tender, Probably 10 times more people who have cove it then then are actually being picked up by test. So we're talking hundreds of thousands a day of new cases. And of course, that translates into potentially ah higher surge on hospitals and health care facilities. And this is what we're seeing across the sun belt. And it's not even it's not even just the surge with hospitals, which is a concern, but really, ultimately higher death rate and then what I like to call post Kobe syndrome. Even people who get through it often have a lot of other symptoms and ongoing health care issues. So it's it's quite worrisome. And let's talk about that in anticipation of our conversation. I was talking to others about exactly what you're getting. Teo, you you were the 1st 1 Jason. I can kind of almost remember the day where you talked about the blood clots, you know. Throughout the body, and this was just not something you see, often talk to us about the implications of that and the problems that seem to be maybe staying with some patients even after they recover. Exactly So this on, Dr Fauci said. This, he said, this is a virus with protein manifestations, meaning multiple ways of manifesting. We typically think of The virus is perhaps is an ammonia or fever, chills and aches. But this virus is unique. We really can't think of of something similar where multiple organs are affected strokes in the brain and Kidney disease, liver disease, very high liver function test G, I disease, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and not only that, besides killing people With blood clots, and some of the latest data show that the virus seems to increase platelet aggregation of the stickiness, platelets and platelets. Normally, you know, we need to cause some clotting when you get an injury or a cut. But when there's a mass of increasing platelet stickiness, you get clots everywhere. And that probably explains a lot of the you know severe consequences that we see is a result of these infections. And presumably that ultimately has an impact on a hospital and doctors abilities to treat a whole host of things, including new cases, but also this long tail as it were. Ian of Covert. Exactly Right. So we have the you know the acute Ah, injury or the acute illness And we're still a bit perplexed. Why there is, uh ah, number of patients who have mild tea, no symptoms, And this's that large young group of people who are asymptomatic they former reservoir. They're often feel fine and he'll invulnerable. They're not wearing mouse there, potentially transferring this to other people who are older. Which is why you know, universal masking is certainly a reasonable request for all and then in susceptible patients. You get this really cascade of effects that make People more short of breath have clots everywhere. And then even if people survive after hospitalization, many have a long term psychological expert physical effects. In a Fizer vaccine showed some promise. And what's interesting is Wall Street investors. They tend to react pretty enthusiastically rather quickly. When it comes to virus news, put it in context. When do you realistically still expect a vaccine? So, you know, I think this is encouraging news. Spicer's one of a number of companies during a J. J, uh, AstraZeneca. You know who really moving forward. A lot of these studies were going to go into phase three with wider number of stations. The visor studies is fairly small. You know, 45 patients or so, but it certainly is encouraging, but we don't know. Is in a larger number of patients. How many will develop antibodies that are neutralizing how long those antibodies will last? And will the virus mutates? So I think it is encouraging that we're making progress. It is a unique a way of making, uh, vaccine with messenger or in a, which gets into your own cells and Uh, forms these proteins. Their typical of the Corona virus covered 19 typically the spike protein and then your body forms antibodies to that, so you're not subject to the risk of a live virus. And we think that this is hopefully a better way. It is a relatively new technology. But again there are a lot of hurdles before. Not only is it proven effective, but it can be ramped up, manufactured and distributed. And probably there'll be several vaccines using similar technology, hopefully with similar efficacy, so I think at some point on I'm thinking early. 2021 but I think it can be a very bumpy road until we get there where it words widespread. That's doctor in Lost Vader, Clinical associate professor of medicine at in You Langone Medical Center.

Dr Ian Lost Vader clinical associate professor o Jason He Dr Fauci You Land going Medical Center US You Langone Medical Center Carol Anthony Kidney disease social isolation liver disease Teo diarrhea asymptomatic Spicer
"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:38 min | 2 years ago

"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Carol As much as we would love to move on from the virus. The virus is not moving on from us. We continue to see spiking cases across the country when I feel it was brought front center by Anthony Fauci right. He's the US government's top infectious disease specialists, Jason He want lawmakers that virus cases could rise to 100,000 day. If behaviors do not change. I'm very concerned that I'm not satisfied with what is going on. Because we're going in the wrong direction. One of the voices that we talked to weekly is Dr Ian Lost Vader, He's clinical associate professor of medicine at GNU Lango Medical Center, and he told us where we are when it comes to fighting the virus. Most doctors that I speak to certainly are very concerned on hospitals are concerned as they should be, to some degree, you know, I think by by not really mandating, you know, mouse and social isolation, really by giving that as an option, which You know, with multiple states and in a free country. That's certainly one approach. We're really in a way. Uh, following the Swedish model, which is letting nature take its course. And when that happens, there's certainly a significant risk is, Dr Fauci says cases at this point are about 40 or 50,000 day. We know there really much higher. Because we're really on ly picking up about one in 10 were only diagnosing one in tender, Probably 10 times more people who have cove it then then are actually being picked up by test. So we're talking hundreds of thousands a day of new cases. And of course, that translates into potentially higher surge on hospitals and health care facilities. And this is what we're seeing across the sun belt. And it's not even it's not even just the surge with hospitals, which is a concern, but really, ultimately higher death rate and then what I like to call post covert syndrome. Even people who get through it often have a lot of Other symptoms and ongoing health care issues. So it's it's quite worrisome. And let's talk about that in anticipation of our conversation. I was talking to others about exactly what you're getting, Teo. You know you were the 1st 1 Jason. I can kind of almost remember the day where you talked about. The blood clots you know, throughout the body, and this was just not something you see, often talk to us about the implications of that and and the problems that seemed to be maybe staying with some patients even after they recover. Exactly So this on doctor found she had said this, he said. This is a virus with protein manifestations, meaning multiple ways of manifesting. We typically think of Viruses perhaps is an ammonia or fever, chills and aches. But this virus is unique. We really can't think of of something similar where multiple organs are affected strokes in the brain and kidney disease, liver disease, very high liver function test G, I disease, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea. And not only that, besides, uh, killing people with blood clots, and some of the latest data show that the virus seems to increase platelet aggregation of the stickiness of platelets and platelets. Normally, you know, we need to cause some clotting when you get an injury or a cut, But when there's a massive Increase in platelet stickiness. You get clots everywhere, And that probably explains a lot of the you know severe consequences that we see is a result of these infections. And presumably that ultimately has an impact on a hospital and doctors abilities to treat a whole host of things, including new cases, but also This long tail as it were in of covert. Exactly Right. So we have the you know the acute Ah, injury or the acute illness and we're still a bit perplexed. Why there is a CZ Ah, number of patients who have mild tea. No symptoms, And this's that large young group of people who are asymptomatic they former reservoir. They're often feel fine and feel invulnerable. They're not wearing mouse there, potentially transferring this to other people who are older. Which is why you know, universal masking is certainly a reasonable request for all and then in susceptible patients. You get this really cascade of affects that make people more short of breath have clots everywhere. And and even if people survive after hospitalization, many have a long term psychological text, physical effects. In a Fizer vaccine showed some promise. And what's interesting is Wall Street investors. They tend to react pretty enthusiastically rather quickly. When it comes to virus news, put it in context. When do you realistically still expect a vaccine? So, you know, I think this is encouraging news. Spicer is one of the number of companies during a J. J s Tra Seneca. You know, we're really moving forward. A lot of these studies were going to go into phase three with wider number of stations. The visor studies is fairly small. You know 45 patients or so, but it certainly is encouraging, but we don't know. Is in a larger number of patients. How many will develop antibodies that are neutralizing along those antibodies will last and will the virus mutates? So I think it is encouraging that we're making progress. It is a unique a way of making, uh, vaccine with messenger or in a which gets into your own cells and, uh, forms. These proteins that are typical of the Corona virus covered 19 typically the spike protein and then your body forms antibodies to that, so you're not subject to the risk of a live virus. And we think that this is hopefully a better way. It is a relatively new technology. But again there are a lot of hurdles before. Not only is it proven effective, but it can be ramped up, manufactured and distributed. And probably there'll be several vaccines using similar technology, hopefully with similar efficacy, so I could get some point on. I'm thinking early 2021 but I think it could be a very bumpy road until we get there. We're It words widespread. That's Dr Ian Lost Vader, Clinical associate professor of medicine at in You Langone.

Dr Ian Lost Vader Jason He Anthony Fauci clinical associate professor o You Langone US liver disease Carol GNU Lango Medical Center social isolation Teo asymptomatic J. J s Tra Seneca Spicer
"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:39 min | 2 years ago

"dr ian lost vader" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Carol as much as we would love to move on from the virus. The virus is not moving on from us. We continue to see Spiking cases across the country. When I feel it was brought front center by Anthony Fauci, right, He's the US government's top infectious disease specialists, Jason He want lawmakers that virus cases could rise to 100,000 day. If behaviors do not change. I'm very concerned that I'm not satisfied with what is going on. Because we're going in the wrong direction. One of the voices that we talked to weekly is Dr Ian lost Vader, his clinical associate professor of medicine at GNU Langone Medical Center, and he told us where we are when it comes to fighting the virus. Most doctors that I speak to certainly are very concerned on hospitals are concerned as they should be. To some degree, you know, I think by by not really mandating no mouse and social isolation, really by giving that as an option, which you know, with multiple states and in a free country. That's certainly one approach. We're really in a way. Uh, following the Swedish model, which is letting nature take its course. And when that happens, there's certainly a significant risk is, Dr Fauci says. Cases at this point are about 40 or 50,000 day. We know there really much higher. Because we're really on ly picking up about one in 10 were only diagnosing one in tender, Probably 10 times more people who have covert then then are actually being picked up by test. So we're talking hundreds of thousands a day of new cases. And of course, that translates into potentially higher surge on hospitals and health care facilities. And this is what we're seeing across the sun belt. Yeah, it's not even it's not even just the surge with hospitals, which is a concern, but really, ultimately higher death rate and then what I like to call post Kobe syndrome. Even people who get through it often have a lot of other symptoms and ongoing health care issues. So it's it's quite worrisome. And let's talk about that in anticipation of our conversation. I was talking to others about exactly what you're getting. Teo. You know you were the 1st 1 Jason. I can kind of almost remembered the day where you talked about. The blood clots you know, throughout the body, and this was just not something you see, often talk to us about the implications of that and and the problems that seemed to be maybe staying with some patients even after they recover. Exactly So this on. Dr Fauci has said that, he said. This is a virus with protein manifestations, meaning multiple ways of manifesting. We typically think of viruses perhaps is an ammonia or fever, chills and aches. But this virus is unique. We really can't think of of something. A similar were multiple organs are affected strokes in the brain and kidney disease. Deliver disease. Very high liver function test G. I disease, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and not only that, besides killing people with blood clots, and some of the latest data show that The virus seems to increase a platelet aggregation of the stickiness, platelets and platelets. Normally, you know, we need to cause some clotting when you get an injury or a cut, But when there's a mass of increasing platelet stickiness, you get clots everywhere. And that probably explains a lot of the you know severe consequences that we see is a result of these infections. And presumably that ultimately has an impact on a hospital and doctors abilities to treat a whole host of things, including new cases, but also this long tail as it were. Ian of Covert. Exactly Right. So we have the you know the acute Ah, injury or the acute illness And we're still a bit perplexed. Why there is, uh ah, number of patients who have mild tea, no symptoms, And this's that large young group of people who are asymptomatic they former reservoir. They're often feel fine and he'll invulnerable. They're not wearing mouse there, potentially transferring this to other people who are older. Which is why you know, universal masking is certainly a reasonable request for all and then in susceptible patients. You get this really cascade of affects that make People more short of breath have clots everywhere. And and even if people survive after hospitalization, many have a long term psychological effects physical effects. In a Fizer vaccine showed some promise. And what's interesting is Wall Street investors. They tend to react pretty enthusiastically rather quickly. When it comes to virus news, put it in context. When do you realistically still expect a vaccine? So, you know, I think this is encouraging news. Spicer is one of the number of companies Madonna Jane J. Uh, AstraZeneca. You know, we're really moving forward. A lot of these studies were going to go into phase three with wider number of patients. The visor studies is fairly small. You know, 45 patients or so, but it certainly is encouraging, but we don't know. Is in a larger number of patients. How many will develop antibodies that are neutralizing how long those antibodies will last? And will the virus mutates? So I think it is encouraging that we're making progress. It is a unique a way of making, uh, vaccine with messenger or in a which gets into your own cells and, uh, forms these proteins. Their typical of the Corona virus covered 19 typically the spike protein and then your body forms antibodies to that, so you're not subject to the risk of a live virus. And we think that this is hopefully a better way. It is a relatively new technology. But again there are a lot of hurdles before. Not only is it proven effective, but it can be ramped up, manufactured and distributed. And probably there'll be several vaccines using similar technology, hopefully with similar efficacy, so I think at some point on I'm thinking early. 2021 but I think it can be a very bumpy road until we get there where it words widespread. That's doctor in Lost Vader, Clinical associate professor of medicine at in You Langone Medical Center.

Anthony Fauci clinical associate professor o Jason He Dr Ian You Langone Medical Center GNU Langone Medical Center US Madonna Jane J. Uh kidney disease Carol diarrhea social isolation Vader asymptomatic Spicer