35 Burst results for "Dr Howard"

Hospital patient without COVID shot denied heart transplant

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 5 months ago

Hospital patient without COVID shot denied heart transplant

"Hospital hospital hospital hospital in in in in Boston Boston Boston Boston is is is is defending defending defending defending itself itself itself itself after after after after a a a a man's man's man's man's family family family family claimed claimed claimed claimed he he he he was was was was denied denied denied denied a a a a new new new new heart heart heart heart for for for for refusing refusing refusing refusing to to to to be be be be vaccinated vaccinated vaccinated vaccinated against against against against the the the the coronavirus coronavirus coronavirus coronavirus DJ DJ DJ DJ Ferguson Ferguson Ferguson Ferguson is is is is thirty thirty thirty thirty one one one one and and and and is is is is being being being being told told told told by by by by Brigham Brigham Brigham Brigham and and and and women's women's women's women's hospital hospital hospital hospital he he he he is is is is ineligible ineligible ineligible ineligible Ferguson's Ferguson's Ferguson's Ferguson's mother mother mother mother Tracy Tracy Tracy Tracy tells tells tells tells the the the the AP AP AP AP he he he he is is is is not not not not opposed opposed opposed opposed to to to to being being being being vaccinated vaccinated vaccinated vaccinated given given given given his his his his current current current current situation situation situation situation in in in in his his his his heart heart heart heart condition condition condition condition he he he he just just just just wants wants wants wants clarification clarification clarification clarification proof proof proof proof that that that that it it it it would would would would not not not not harm harm harm harm him him him him the the the the issue issue issue issue is is is is side side side side effects effects effects effects he he he he did did did did have have have have an an an an arterial arterial arterial arterial blood blood blood blood clot clot clot clot and and and and required required required required emergency emergency emergency emergency surgery surgery surgery surgery Dr Dr Dr Dr Howard Howard Howard Howard Eisen Eisen Eisen Eisen is is is is an an an an advanced advanced advanced advanced heart heart heart heart failure failure failure failure transplant transplant transplant transplant cardiologists cardiologists cardiologists cardiologists at at at at Penn Penn Penn Penn state state state state university university university university in in in in Hershey Hershey Hershey Hershey he he he he says says says says its its its its policy policy policy policy for for for for transplant transplant transplant transplant patients patients patients patients to to to to get get get get vaccinated vaccinated vaccinated vaccinated because because because because they're they're they're they're not not not not taking taking taking taking the the the the immuno immuno immuno immuno suppressing suppressing suppressing suppressing medicines medicines medicines medicines that that that that are are are are needed needed needed needed to to to to prevent prevent prevent prevent rejection rejection rejection rejection Brigham Brigham Brigham Brigham and and and and women's women's women's women's hospital hospital hospital hospital says says says says research research research research shows shows shows shows transplant transplant transplant transplant recipients recipients recipients recipients are are are are at at at at higher higher higher higher risk risk risk risk than than than than non non non non transplant transplant transplant transplant patients patients patients patients of of of of dying dying dying dying from from from from the the the the corona corona corona corona virus virus virus virus I I I I made made made made Donahue Donahue Donahue Donahue

Ap Ap Boston Ferguson Hospital Hospital Hospital Hos Brigham Brigham Brigham Brigha Heart Heart Heart Heart Ferguson Ferguson Ferguson Fer Tracy Tracy Tracy Tracy Heart Heart Heart Heart Condit Arterial Blood Blood Blood Blo Dr Dr Dr Dr Howard Howard Howa Eisen Eisen Eisen Heart Heart Heart Heart Failur Penn Penn Penn Penn State Stat Hershey Hershey Hershey Hershe Transplant Transplant Transpla Transplant Transplant Transpla Donahue Donahue Donahue Donahu
"dr howard" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:34 min | 7 months ago

"dr howard" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"What is wrong? Why is there something wrong? And that's supposed to take like starting from the super obvious or something that's like maybe a little bit in minuscule. And somebody has like a junkie home, like not only is that a hazard that they might fall particularly if they durable like walking around and moving and different things and sore. But also is a dust. It's an allergen. It's a causing them to cough and sneeze is a disrupting their breathing and stuff like that. So what can we do to make it clean, make a pathway? But small things matter. I learned nothing else in our site like small things matter, right? So even if you get a person to come in to come out organized in the house or whatever, and you're reducing the amount of allergens, perhaps that's up half to a solution. You know, just, yeah, so I agree with you like just moving the clutter and stuff. Making sure that they don't fall. You know, in a brand degenerates, they may become agitated. They may become Jacqueline. That might be something that's not avoidable, but what is avoidable is moving stuff out of the way. So they don't try to fall or sometimes they become so uttered and stuff, you start getting vermin that comes in. And that's never a good thing. You know, if they have trouble cleaning their house, I mean granted, like there's a gradient of why clerk is there, but to a certain, like they have trouble cleaning the house where they eating nutritious food or they thrown away old food or the eating food that is spoiled. Do they have upset stomach? Is that why they're irritated? Remember like I used to be an ABA therapist applied behavior analysis or I used to work with autistic children. And sometimes you'll work with children who are non verbal and, you know, sometimes they would have it's a little bit, but it's the type of stomach disorder or if they eat too many too many things and stuff. It gives them like acid refracting. It really makes a ton of hurt. Long story short, but sometimes they come verbalized and they'll eat too much candy or eat something that was like really spicy and it would just really flare up and you would just see this agitation and so you say like, why is somebody agitated? What am I not seeing that's making this person agitated in that we can easily fix? Because it's done about the length of life to assume it's about the quality of life. Definitely. New comes into your space. They're going to see things that we just tune out because we don't have a place for all of this paperwork or like our best friend is a scientist and she swears that she knows where everything is in these piles of papers and I look at the piles of papers and just basically want to scream. And it takes a longer to find things that it does for me. I'm like, even my craft supplies super, super organized. I could probably grab what I need in ten seconds with my eyes closed because they're all in the same place. Would you also proceed? Oh, I'm sorry. Well, it just makes life easier than I don't have to think about this goes in this drawer. This goes in this one. This goes here. Boom, done. I don't have to. It's just like a habit. And I don't understand people that don't do that, but I do understand people are different, so I don't..

cough Jacqueline ABA
"dr howard" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:34 min | 7 months ago

"dr howard" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"What is wrong? Why is there something wrong? And that's supposed to take like starting from the super obvious or something that's like maybe a little bit in minuscule. And somebody has like a junkie home, like not only is that a hazard that they might fall particularly if they durable like walking around and moving and different things and sore. But also is a dust. It's an allergen. It's a causing them to cough and sneeze is a disrupting their breathing and stuff like that. So what can we do to make it clean, make a pathway? But small things matter. I learned nothing else in our site like small things matter, right? So even if you get a person to come in to come out organized in the house or whatever, and you're reducing the amount of allergens, perhaps that's up half to a solution. You know, just, yeah, so I agree with you like just moving the clutter and stuff. Making sure that they don't fall. You know, in a brand degenerates, they may become agitated. They may become Jacqueline. That might be something that's not avoidable, but what is avoidable is moving stuff out of the way. So they don't try to fall or sometimes they become so uttered and stuff, you start getting vermin that comes in. And that's never a good thing. You know, if they have trouble cleaning their house, I mean granted, like there's a gradient of why clerk is there, but to a certain, like they have trouble cleaning the house where they eating nutritious food or they thrown away old food or the eating food that is spoiled. Do they have upset stomach? Is that why they're irritated? Remember like I used to be an ABA therapist applied behavior analysis or I used to work with autistic children. And sometimes you'll work with children who are non verbal and, you know, sometimes they would have it's a little bit, but it's the type of stomach disorder or if they eat too many too many things and stuff. It gives them like acid refracting. It really makes a ton of hurt. Long story short, but sometimes they come verbalized and they'll eat too much candy or eat something that was like really spicy and it would just really flare up and you would just see this agitation and so you say like, why is somebody agitated? What am I not seeing that's making this person agitated in that we can easily fix? Because it's done about the length of life to assume it's about the quality of life. Definitely. New comes into your space. They're going to see things that we just tune out because we don't have a place for all of this paperwork or like our best friend is a scientist and she swears that she knows where everything is in these piles of papers and I look at the piles of papers and just basically want to scream. And it takes a longer to find things that it does for me. I'm like, even my craft supplies super, super organized. I could probably grab what I need in ten seconds with my eyes closed because they're all in the same place. Would you also proceed? Oh, I'm sorry. Well, it just makes life easier than I don't have to think about this goes in this drawer. This goes in this one. This goes here. Boom, done. I don't have to. It's just like a habit. And I don't understand people that don't do that, but I do understand people are different, so I don't..

cough Jacqueline ABA
Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

Environment: NPR

02:02 min | 10 months ago

Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

"Is well known. The trees help counter climate change by soaking up carbon dioxide. Now there is a growing body of research to point to many ways of dose of trees can improve our mental and physical health. Here's martha bebinger member station. W. b. you are on how and why the tiny sapling robin williams planted thirty years ago towers above her boston home. I raise this tree when i raised my children and look at this look at that. She says there's something about being near this tree. It makes everybody a little bit happy around here when you're looking for strength you can't do better than looking at a tree and there's evidence williams may will be gleaning any number of direct or associated health benefits a longer life. Bitter birth outcomes lower stress levels lower risk of heart disease. Dr howard lumpkin. Is it the university of washington school of public health. Lower risk of diabetes reduced symptoms of adhd proximity to trees is associated with a ridiculously broad range of health benefits. I wish we had pills. That were this good for health. A few countries notably japan and south korea have invested in a practice known as forest bathing which is spending time among trees as a preventive health measure but prescribing time in nature is still pretty far outside mainstream medicine in the. Us from can says that. Maybe because there's a lot we don't know what doses needed. Do you need to walk. Among trees is sufficient just to look at the trees from outside your window. Do you need big trees or do small trees do the trick we you know. We're not able to tease the forest from the trees. Peter james at harvard medical school aims to answer a lot of those questions. He's merging health data captured by phones. Real time surveys about wellbeing and mood and street. View mapping data to dig into. What's exactly within view. Is it trees. Is it flowers and how those things are related to help behaviors and health outcomes.

Martha Bebinger W. B Dr Howard Lumpkin University Of Washington Schoo Robin Williams Boston Heart Disease Williams Adhd South Korea Diabetes Japan Peter James Harvard Medical School United States
New York Gov. Cuomo’s Family Is Said to Have Received Special Access to Virus Tests

The Guy Benson Show

02:02 min | 1 year ago

New York Gov. Cuomo’s Family Is Said to Have Received Special Access to Virus Tests

"Is an update on the scandal in New York involving the governor. Andrew Cuomo. I know a lot of the media. Might sort of feel like this story's over. Certainly Democrats in New York many of them would like the story to be over. They've had their say. They've called for resignations and that sort of thing, and now it's kind of losing steam, at least in their mind. But not here. And there's a new wrinkle to this and a pretty significant one of that. Let me give you a flashback quote. From one of Andrew Cuomo's Emmy Award winning press conferences almost exactly one year ago. This was early days Really bad in New York last year problem PPE for frontline workers problems with testing. Of course, that was a huge, widespread problem for a novel disease. The governor went on TV for one of his press conferences again Award winning That's quote. We still see people coming out who don't need to be out even for essential workers. People have to be careful and again. I've been trying to communicate that everyone. Everyone is subject to this virus. It is the great Equalizer. I don't care How smart How rich How powerful you think you are. I don't care how young how old this virus is the great equalizer and quote that was late March. 2020 And with that little reflection on the great equalizer. Let me read you. This story from the Albany Times Union broke yesterday, high level members of the State Department of Health in New York. Were directed last year by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and Health Commissioner Dr Howard Zucker to conduct prioritized coronavirus testing on the governor's relatives. As well as influential people with ties to the administration, according to three people with direct knowledge of the matter. Members of almost family, including his brother. His mother, and at least one of his sisters were also tested by top Health Department officials some several times

Andrew Cuomo New York Emmy Award Albany Times Union State Department Of Health Governor Andrew M. Cuomo Health Commissioner Dr Howard Health Department
New York Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker Gets Grilled At State Hearing On Nursing Home COVID Deaths

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

New York Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker Gets Grilled At State Hearing On Nursing Home COVID Deaths

"And relating to the coronavirus. Actor Howard Zucker was questioned by state lawmakers at a hearing yesterday, and he testified that his order and march to readmit residents to nursing homes after being released. Some hospitals did not contribute to more covert deaths. I was in the facilities 98% of the people I had in the facilities it came in from the community was already be it was there long before we even knew it was spreading them. He was asked his decision. It was to hold back on releasing the number of nursing home deaths. Zucker responded that details and specifics are subject to an ongoing investigations got Pringle reporting. An Air force base in suburban Phoenix will be distributing bottled water to

Howard Zucker Zucker Pringle Phoenix
New York City's health commissioner rejects de Blasio's request to tap into COVID-19 vaccine reserves

Morning Edition

01:28 min | 1 year ago

New York City's health commissioner rejects de Blasio's request to tap into COVID-19 vaccine reserves

"City's health commissioner, has rejected Mayor de Blasio's request to use its reserves of Copan 19 vaccines as first doses. In the letter to the mayor, Dr Howard Zucker says the idea contradicts federal guidance. But the mayor says the decision would leave New Yorkers unnecessarily vulnerable. How do we say we're going to leave? Hundreds of thousands of people with no protection at all. And focus those doses on Leon. People already have gotten some protection. When we know That we can get them a second dose. Eligibility for the covert vaccine expanded this week, but not for the four million New Yorkers with underlying conditions. Gothamist Sydney Pereira reports on why they're still waiting. These at risk groups could qualify for a vaccine under federal guidelines, and in mid January, governor Cuomo said they were under consideration. Since then, state officials have been silent on a final decision. That leaves most under age 65 with common conditions like severe asthma, multiple sclerosis, diabetes or cancer in limbo, Grubach Shiva Cody, a Columbia University epidemiologist, says The evidence on which conditions to prioritize is complex and vaccine shortages aren't helping state regulators. But if the vaccine supply is very limited, and they will have to be Pretty picky. The governor announced Tuesday that local leaders could expand eligibility to restaurant workers and taxi drivers.

Mayor De Blasio Dr Howard Zucker Copan Governor Cuomo Leon Pereira Shiva Cody Multiple Sclerosis Asthma Columbia University Diabetes Cancer
"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"Our everyday life pandemic or no pandemic. I do i think. Prior to the pandemic there was a modest amount of telemedicine going on it mostly related to this trend important one to try to create healthcare system. That's more convenient than the patients in for certain kinds of services especially if most of what was going to happen was a conversation between the healthcare professional patients. The concept of having to interrupt someone is doing closed down their computer and go down at elevate on drive across town. Wait for doctor and see them and then going back and doing the same thing possibly twenty minutes conversation when that all they had to do necessarily get on the phone for twenty minutes and not have to waste all time that was getting to be something significant in some patients in particular really valued now became not just an important amount of venus and became a matter of safety way of trying to keep healthy people of possibly a slightly unsafe environment than trying to minimize the spread of a very bad infection. I think as a result of those two things in combination more and more patients and for that matter more and more doctors have become familiar with this technique and may not be a panacea. It's not perfect. But for certain conditions people finding it to be very satisfactory both doctors and patients. And i find it hard to believe that will move away from. Hopefully we're not going to need it for the same reason for the insane intensity because right now we like to keep people out of healthcare facilities as much as possible nice if the only reason delete because this is something that people desire and want as opposed to. They need havoc on because of safety features. So in your estimation are the drug companies cooperating with each other through this process or has this been just a race to the top of the stock market. Well i'd probably a little bit of both. I do think i do want credit. The scientific community. As a whole. Because i think when it came to the actual genetic mapping of the virus sharing that information across countries what was being shared between china and here and the sharing of what was going on research. Labs think there was quite a lot of it continues to be. You know the drug companies. I think on the one hand are very interested and going the right thing because this is such an unprecedented situation that they know they need to come to the rescue. I think they've done most of that. I think they've done quite well and shared some information and learnings and for processes in especially when it came to some of their planning for how they would get the virus manufactured because bossom easy to manufacture one hundred million copies of vaccine on the other hand they are for profit entities and they try to protect their know-how and they have shareholders. And they wanna make sure the profitable and there's an enormous amount of money both from the federal government and from the healthcare system itself that is funding us efforts and so they're obviously trying to maximize of. I'd say probably a little bit of both but in this case the fact that they've got these effective vaccines out so quickly i think they deserve a lot of credit one of the one of the other groups. I can't help it talk about for a minute. Are the people who are the first responders and they drive ambulances and they are the paramedics in ambulances has got to be just a nightmarish situation for them. I'm sure you'd like to say something about what they're doing. But in a place as small as the inside of an ambulance how is it physically possible for a healthcare worker paramedic to protect themselves from the guy who's full of virus. That is lying on that table as they go to the hospital. Well if you're wearing p. p. That's the whole point. I mean because we are very close to our patients in the hospital. And so you can go in and out of a room provided that you're protected and provided you're not breaking that. Pp protection you are going to be safe and secure. I think the thing that a so laudable about the first responders is that by contrast in the hospital we control our environment very well automatically know who's covert positive. Who isn't we isolate them. We don our ahead of time when you are a first responder and i was an ambulance attendant for a short while back in college. You're walking into an environment and you can't control that environment. You try to get control but there are people who can be combated. There are people who yelling screaming who are emotionally distraught. These are high risk situations for an individual be walking into strangers home not knowing what collateral issues were be confronting them. The ambulance itself is the least of the risk. The risk is walking into a strange environment. Where you really cannot control what might be coming at you things that you can't plan for clearly. I'm lucky because i get to sit and talk to you guys. And you're experiencing and steve is intensely experiencing this virus in his icu with all of these patients and the overload patients. And you're sitting here thanking the people who are part of your machine which is noted and appreciated. I know that everybody. Who's listening to this. Wants to thank you guys for your message your process you're forethought and your compassion for people around you because there's no way you're paid enough to do this job. Dr howard freeman. Thank you again for joining us. Thank you bill. And of course. Dr steven taback. We can't even imagine what it was like for you today and yesterday and the day before and the month before that to deal with the surge at the hospital. Thank you for making time for this. And i think the message that you guys are giving is an important one howard. How can people follow you. Oh that's stray kind. So every once in a while put out a tweet and that could be beached at howard foam an md. Thanks to our producer and editor. Aj moseley audio. Mastering is by steve. Ricky berg music for we're still practicing is composed and performed by. Celeste and eric dick. Don't forget the hit. The subscribe button. All that does is let you know what our show is posted. We'll see next time. Stay healthy thanks for joining us on medicine. We're still practicing. Cnx week everybody turco media media for your mind..

Celeste Aj moseley eric dick yesterday steve twenty minutes Ricky berg howard today china two things both one hundred million one both doctors first responders steven taback turco media first responder
"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"Robert ross. Host of cars that matter you might be wondering what makes a car matter and i have a feeling you already know the answer. Some cars have changed history. Some you can hear a mile away. Some have lines that make your heart skip a beat if a car ever made you look twice then i think you know the ones that matter join us. I speak with designers collectors and market experts about the passions of drivers and the passions. We drive cars that matter wherever you get your podcast. The phone just rang again and biden is on the phone because your first answer both of you was so profound and now he's asking you. What do we do to make sure this never happens again in our lifetime. Well first of all we have to believe it will likely happen again as so i think the first thing is not head-in-the-sand. We'd rather to acknowledge its very globalized. Economy has been so recently unprecedented levels of international travel. We're not one country. Were a world community and what happens in one. Location is going to affect and spread easily to other locations. We got lucky with ebola a few years ago we only had. I can several cases the handle that very well we also got lucky that could have been even more disastrous than this pandemic right. We got lucky with sars and mers right. I mean that answer stars of nerves and same h one n one by comparison first of all. I think we're going to need to study this and debrief this. I think we have to support the center for disease. Control a much higher level. We have to be very proactive and go through the different categories of things that we prepare for casting. ppe international cooperation detection. So you find things at an early level planning so we have scenarios in place at another virus comes to the american shores about to come to the american shore. What ten things should we do. Who knows what they need do. What's everyone's role is the funding. There is the equipment there. How do we monitor that. We're doing all the things that we say that we're going to do. And we need to have a game plan for every potential trying to virus the ones that a highly the fill the ones that are highly contagious wants to spread by respiratory wonder spread by gi contact. All of these things be a little bit different. But they share the need for resources and planning at the government level this has to be done governmentally and then secondly the needs to be more not less international cooperation. The world health organization is an important component of this. We need to support not back away from the world. Health organization need to help the world health organization be as effective as it can be. We need to collaborate with the centers for disease control or their equivalent in many many other countries around the world. So that's just a start. What i'd like to see taking place that has to be studied by people who is serious about this and understanding and will take an objective. Look what happened this time so that we learn from it. Don't let this happen to us again. Right global standards and protocols that we all you know every country buys into adheres to. We really need need to cooperate and really get organized in advance. Because this didn't have to happen. I mean if china recognized early and and if we all had a global shutdown strategy this could have been arrested within the first couple of months. How do you suspect med. Schools will change their syllabus. After this you we've just lived through. I'm hoping that will be something in the syllabus. In addition to covid very important general themes that must be learned related to this pandemic. so i'll give you a few. That are on my mind one is. I'm not just worried about the covid patience right now. I'm concerned with people with other serious medical illnesses who have a hard time getting at the hospitals at the moment. Hospitals don't have a lot of excess beds throughout the country. Certainly not here in los angeles county right now and so. We don't like to think that we would ever do rationing of medical care. You don't like to think about that in the united states. We like to think that we can do everything for everybody and we have limitless resources. Well and there's a pandemic like this. That's not exactly the case. How do you make sure that you're minimizing. Any negative outcomes might occur to those with other important ellis's during a pandemic. That's one thing. I think that's going to have to be in medical school curriculum in the future. How do you triage people with other ailments when there's a pandemic that's overwhelming like this that's one secondly how do you make sure that we're taking great care of the patients and their families at the same time that were preventing are professionals from getting ill and having psychological trauma to a difficult balancing act. I think last time we spoke about how sad it's been family. Members haven't been able to be their loved ones and vice versa. That's a very hurry. Horrible situation especially if someone is dying and yet we don't want covert to be spread to anybody else. So how do we balance those things and we make sure that. There's still that tenderness nick rate bedside matter and the caring and concern for everybody involved because people going through a lot of stressors and traumas right now so those are the kinds of things. I think that i'd like to see in medical school curriculum. And lastly one of the positive consequences of vh epidemic of the age epidemic was a really horrible epidemic as well and it's not gone yet but at least it's certainly much more controlled than it was the beginning of the of the age era. A one of the nice things that came out. It was amazing. Proliferation of antiviral therapies and other her logic research because prior to that we didn't really have a lot of great treatments for viruses. Really very few and so now we have come so far from where we were just a mere twenty twenty five years ago in terms of understanding of variety and feats viruses. I believe that this pandemic is going to have a similar incredible acceleration enviro research because we need a lot of irises. Still out there. That can harm us. Dr steve you in terms of curriculum would not shock me if you wind up having a pandemic specialists and having a whole aspect of the curriculum where there is a pandemic component to the curriculum for those people who are interested in this will wayne is the thing because right now our expert focal point co vida's or focal point fear of a future pandemic as a focal point. And who knows we may have god forbid another pandemic five years from now but how long has it been since our last one in almost one hundred years so who knows the significance of intensive virology in the study of a pandemics. But i think because our technology is at a certain level. I think you will find it being a strong portion of the curriculum. But i do think with time we will tend to forget and will realize that this isn't so important on a day to day basis once it goes away and we'll get back to the more rods spectrum training for med schools. Do you suspect that both medical training and actually our practice will be permanently changed. As far as telemedicine goes you think that'll be more and more popular and be more part of.

los angeles Robert ross twice both american twenty twenty five years ago few years ago one thing five years one country steve first thing first united states first couple first answer almost one hundred years ebola ellis secondly
"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"People that you come in contact with has covert. Whoa seriously seriously. so now. it's a much more dangerous time to be out in about so. Just hang tough for another three months and they're predicting may be having three hundred million vaccines out by march. If it's by may so what at least it's coming. We gotta just hang tough. And that's got to be the message. And that's that's what i would want to do is try to get that message across. I agree with all of that. I would just add a couple of things i still. Two basic categories of things. We need people do. I is all the things that they can be doing to help. Lessen the chance that they give it to somebody or choir from somebody. So all of those things that seat mentioned. And the handwashing the masks and social distancing that's one category and the second category is getting people to desire and to Vaccination the both of those. Things have to be emphasized postal important. Even we're accent as a vaccine more people. The social distancing in the spring is still going to be important for while even including for people who've been vaccinated inside of that both going to be important for quite a while it's gonna take a multi. Pronged approach reach people on both of these categories. It's clear that having dr tony Hawk about this as a positive influence in lots of people. He said. He's an american hero. Brilliant man everything he says is right. And a lotta people listened to him but he's not the only person that people listen to listen to sports figures and celebrities and their bff and their next door neighbor and their peers and their doctors. And we're going to have to have a multi pronged concerted approach at every level on the internet on television through the medical community. Get a certain message to the people. Start believing the importance of both of those categories behaviors. Because we need both of them. And we're not gonna reach everybody the same way and so. I'm hoping that the biden administration thinking about that because only having the medical authorities speak about it is not one to get us to the level of vaccination and adherence to the mass wearing. That we need. It's a good start but we need more. I think it's gonna take a lot of all of those. That's what i'm hoping.

three months march second category one category three hundred million vaccines biden administration tony Hawk both Two basic categories american may things
"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"You can't just deliver this deputy doctor's office or even every small pharmacy because they don't have the facilities. They don't have the freezing capability that's required to be down negative ninety degrees. But i'm certain to some extent there have been some personnel shoes and all the rest. I think it's going to speed up quite a bit. I hope that we'll get into the circumstance where anything we're running a little behind on the supply of the vaccine right now. We have an abundance vaccine compared to number of people that we've gotten vaccinated so you absolutely right bill. It's not worth to be how we doing getting the vaccine into nursing homes not so well so far and i think again that relates to. We got the vaccine out to the states but we didn't figure out so quickly how to get them from the centralized state locations out to the places where they needed to go relatively easy hostile. Because there's not that many hospitals but there are hundreds and hundreds of nursing homes and it's much more centralized in fairness to those who are in charge of distribution. This is gone very fast. And i think it's going to ramp up and i think this is going to happen faster now. I think there's a lot of pressure being put on those responsible for it but admittedly things are going more slowly than anyone have insisted painted in certainly slower than what was promised at the beginning of the distribution. One of the i think important issues about vaccinating the healthcare workers i is. There's for whatever reason a vaccine phobia in this country and there's so many people who are anti vaccines were afraid of the effects of the vaccine that how do you instill confidence in the population. If your healthcare workers have not received the vaccine themselves and i would rather be the guinea pig for the general public. Obviously this has gone through clinical trials of thirty thousand people but who knows what other side effects may come about. Give it to your healthcare workers. Show the public that we are taking it just as you are set the example and we wouldn't take it ourselves if we didn't think it was safe talk is cheap but walk your talk. Show that you're willing to roll up your sleeve. I think it's an important statement for the public to see the and i. I would agree with that. Of course explained to me how a vaccine works especially this one. You just a shot. The other day howard. So what's happening in your body. Hope what's happened. Is i have a lot of antibodies circulating against the messenger or a. I think what happens. Is that a bit of activated messenger. A is being transmitted to my body. Antibodies are being made based upon the messenger army and those antibodies that i'm making will oppose spike protein. That is the red thing that everybody notices on all the pictures of corona virus in that red antenna the virus as all around is how the virus attached to the cells in my nasal cavity in in my throat. And if i make enough antibody as a result of that vaccine then it will inactivate the spike protein make capable binding attaching itself to myself and therefore cannot pause affection my body and that's in fact what has been shown in studies the studies that were done on these vaccines that are based on this singer. Aaron arna showed this dramatic reduction in the number of people getting sick by ninety five percent. A tremendous reduction in the number of people got very sick. That's i think as important to five even more so and that a lot of antibodies were being made to spike protein as a result of the host of the human who got shot making antibodies to and results in that message is a gradual process You're probably developed a samantha. Bobby's after ten to fourteen days with the first shot but when you get the booster. The amount of antibodies. Immunity goes up very sizably so that the booster ads as an awful lot to the protection and by the way we think that most of this immunity is related. Antibodies but there are other effects on the immune system in addition to the production. Bobby's that can provide even more protection against the virus that might even be longer lasting than the antibody protection so also there are many different levels. Where the person's body benefits from the shot helps protect them in meaningful ways hopefully for a significant amount of time to the virus so if enough of us have a vaccine like seventy or eighty percent of us so the vaccine can't really infect as many people then for the most part you're not safer from the virus you're just the chances of you incurring or interacting with that virus gets lower if we have heard immunity. Your both right. You're safer from the virus because you have immunity towards that virus but if that virus now cannot spread because less people are infected. that's what herd immunity. Does the viruses nowhere to go. It's gotta jump from to host and if it can't get into your body because your body repels it. It's got to go find a body that doesn't repel it where it can continue to replicate and survive and there's enough of us that have that immunity either because we contracted it and are now cured or because we were vaccinated. If there's enough of us just were such that. The virus cannot find another host. It basically goes away then. Let me add what's clear. What's clear from the trials and this is what people i think should take with them strongly. Consider having this vaccine. That's a very these are two very effective vaccines in the trials but happened was there was a placebo group that got inactive solution versus those who got the actual axe nation and out of one hundred people who got sick ninety. Five of those people had gotten the cbo and five had gotten the vaccine the academic scene. That's a tremendous advantage so just to have some perspective. What is the success. Rate of the flu vaccine changes every year has a lot to do with the violence of the flu virus. That comes around that year but in general fu vaccine that about the fifty percent level roughly that does a good job also mitigating meaning. You're lessening the intensity of the infection if you get influenza actually preventing it probably on a good year. Fifty sixty percents in that range. I believe so ninety five percent. That's an extraordinarily effective vaccine for virus. So if you guys were called by the biden administration and they asked you to come help fix the rest of the year. What are some of the things you would recommend to them to try to get things in order. We did very well. I thought in california during the first surge and we had dr fauci talking about flattening the curve and i thought that certainly in los angeles our mayor had done a really good job. Our governor had done a good job in terms of trying to strongly enforce not really shutting down businesses but putting him at bay until it was safe to reopen. I would have them try to figure out a way to kind of fuse. The economics with the epidemiology so that we can still social distance. We can still somehow support restaurants but we sort of have lost our stance. I think because of the lack of political fortitude to actually stick your neck out and say we must social distance. We must stay at home and we need to really enforce that as strongly as we can i think again prevention is is the name of the game and and you have to put out there. The propaganda is not propaganda. And i was say we really need a message that now more than ever. We need to really be vigilant. Because it's more dangerous now whether it's because the virus is more virulent because of the new strain certainly because of the density of the virus. Because there's so many people in the community that have it. When first came out you had maybe a one in a twenty thousand chance of getting it. Now they say one and sixteen.

Aaron arna los angeles california ninety five percent seventy Five thirty thousand people ninety eighty percent sixteen hundreds ninety degrees five first one one hundred people Fifty sixty percents twenty thousand first surge One
"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:55 min | 1 year ago

"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"That strictly for older people or is that a lot of young people. In fact i would say just as many young old are suffering with long-term symptoms. Now eventually i do believe the younger. You are the better chance. You are a complete recovery and minimization or radical symptoms. But it's months now and they're still struggling with things that could have been avoided in probably fifty percent of them at everybody. Really been adhering to social distancing and wearing a mask certainly those who are capable of doing so had they really adhere to. It would have been so many less deaths so much less disability as a result howard. I wonder if we could bring you in and talk about how does a surge work in a surge on a surge for example. You guys were just very nice. And you're mentioning the people who absolutely must go to work and their essential workers in their exposed that way and of course we feel terrible for them but prior to last thanksgiving california's averaging about one hundred deaths a day a few weeks after last thanksgiving we bumped to an average of over five hundred deaths day. Forget about how much testing we were doing or how many people were infected. Just the death rate went up fivefold who knows what february will bring after the effect of the last holiday season. So talk to us a little about. What does this mean a surgeon. How does this work. And how should we about it as listeners. To the show good question well. First of all the irony that california has had some of the most stringent restrictions. Not just in the last few weeks but over the last six months by large we've been headed most of the country and how much we've limited people from being able to gather and all the rest and yet when the worst predicaments though the new begs the question why do we have such a surge. What's the root causes. Some of it may be still bleeding night against people. Don't really understand it know about it. Some people are in denial. Some people don't care. There's a concept called social norms which basically means we take our cues from the people around us and the people around us are taking this seriously number likely to take people round Being flippant about it in disregard things. That's how we're likely to be. We basically move as a group as a social norms. Harvard business review article on the power of using social norms in business and getting people collected within a certain way. Need to be thinking about that right now. So i think going to. Your question has a surge keep happening. I think it results from human frailty and ongoing behaviors that had dismissed the government realities. It's getting worse and people hear about it and they see it on television. They read about the news. They see it on the internet. They hear from their neighbors from the doctors but not everybody changes their behavior. The other thing that works against him. I think is at because there's a vaccine coming there. Is this false sense of security that okay. It's about ready to go away so we can go out and do whatever we wanna do not realizing that until you're vaccinated. You're not protected in so people out there kind of relaxing. Their standards very prematurely. Is it possible that this surge could it have anything to do with the uk mutation of corona virus. Do we test everybody to find out which version of covert they have now even even on an epidemiologic basis has been very little testing of the genus types of the virus. You don't even know how much we have. In general sense let alone individual having it does seem like at least you patient from the uk is more contagious at may have something to do with. How would it become more contagious. As that work. When there's a viral infection there are factors that the virus himself have that contribute to a cell call their viral factors and there are a critical the host factors the backers in the human and the virus can change over time and that shows changes can allow the virus to attach more readily to certain parts of the human anatomy. It can allow it to create more copies to be made of the virus per unit time and can affect what those units do in the body themselves. In terms of the immunologic systems overreacting inches the virus to all of these things can change with subtle changes in the virus. But i think the virus on the uk seems to be more contagious as a result of the patients so relatively more people can get infected from the first person deafness. Well let's talk about the pace of the administering of vaccine how fast it's getting distributed in just a minute. We'll be right back a moment of your time. A new podcast from kirk media currently twenty one years old and today. I'm like magic suspended from her fingertips down to the yourself because the world needs you and your gutter. That asked about me was ready to spit on my drink. Fingers were facing can feel like your purpose in your worth is really being stopped me from playing the piano. She buys walkie talkies. Wants to whom she should give the second humans we never did. We never will. We just find beauty of rock climbing is that you can only focus on what's right now. And so are american life begins. We may need to stay apart but let's create together available on all podcast platforms. Submit your piece that kirk dot com slash moment of your time. Okay we're back with dr howard gelman. Of course dr steven tailback tub gotta ask you guys what's going on with the distribution of these vaccines. It seems like right now. It's sort of hospital oriented in its distribution. I thought that we were going to end up going to gnc walgreens and getting a fast deployment of the vaccine. What's going on right now. The analogy i would give you is when you're on the airplane and they say that if the oxygen mask comes down but the mask on yourself first and then put it on your child and so i know foremost if your caregivers get sick with covid. They're unable to take care of those who are sick. Far more people will suffer and die. So you need to take care of your front line personnel. First and then the next step is to go in a tiered fashion those at highest risk it the elderly or those with multiple co morbidity. Because you can't distribute three hundred million doses in overnight so as it becomes available it needs to be distributed in a tiered and stratified fashion. Where do you see the bottleneck right now. Is it the transportation howard that is causing a slowdown. Or is it. That there's no one there to receive it and administer shot to a patient and it's been a little bit of everything i think the distribution aspect has been very challenging. Because as i said.

fifty percent today dr howard gelman california kirk dot com over five hundred deaths day kirk media first twenty one years old february three hundred million doses about one hundred deaths a day First second humans fivefold first person Harvard dr steven thanksgiving american
Understanding the Virus with Dr. Howard Fullman

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

05:16 min | 1 year ago

Understanding the Virus with Dr. Howard Fullman

"So i are host the quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine. Pulmonary disease critical care in neuro critical. Care my very good friend. Dr steven day back. How are you steve doing. Okay deceive. oh we have one of our favorite experts returning to us today Howard j fomin. He is board certified in internal medicine and gastroenterology and howard served a multi decade tenure at kaiser permanent day as partner ford member president of the executive committee chief of staff and chair of the quality committee. He has supervised over forty three hundred staff and over five hundred doctors. Howard is now seen your operating advisor at atlantic street capital for their medically focused investments. Dr howard foreman nice to have you back thanks to be here high stated it good to see hey steve. What's it like in the icu. With the kobe patients has it gone. It's been very rough at my hospital. The surges hit us really hard. We actually we had a mini surge. Back in may when everybody else seemed to be really struggling at this time it has hit us really hard we have about one hundred and fifty plus cove patients in our hospital and i bought twenty percent of those are in the intensive care unit and those that intensive care unit. They are all on high flow oxygen or intimated. So they're all very very sick. And howard what. Are you hear about kaiser. How are they holding up in all this. I just very proud of everybody. Credible courage by the patients and their families what they're going through doctors nurses respiratory therapist all staff level of dedication i think of the healthcare professionals are just miraculous people. Tired in was there the other day doing data the procedures. And just in what. I do which is way less difficult than being in the icu. For twelve hour shifts just wearing in the ninety five masks in a shield and all the p p being more cautious than ever and trying to make sure that the patients can get in and out so that they're not in the medical center. One minute more than is necessary. Cetera et cetera. Just makes the practice of medicine which is already something that's very challenging even more challenging but my heart goes out to the patients and that that's just a culprit patients Anyone who needs services. The hospital is having more difficult time than usual inside easy being a patient thunder normal circumstances that along under these circumstances. i'm sure they're all kinds of treatments. That have changed since our last conversation. I mean the remdesivir steroids in a number of other treatments that you guys have raised a bad situation. What's working the best these days. Dr steve in actually the one medication that really has shown to decrease mortality everything that we have is decadent on an age old medication. A steroid that's used to decrease swelling decrease inflammation in the body thus far as the only medication that we're using that actually has been proven to diminish with a twenty eight day mortality. We do give them de severe because there has been shown that there's been some benefit in terms of shortening the course of the disease and so it's still part of our protocol and so everybody who's coming in is getting a coverage for we call community acquired pneumonia in case they have bacteria on top of covid. So they're getting the usual medications for that which is usually as for miocene in something called stuff triax zone but the standard therapy provided you have good kidney function that you're not to overwhelmingly sick is the decca drawn remdesivir but it is the decca drawn. That by far has been shown to be very effective. I do believe for those people who are not terribly ill that are just starting to show signs and symptoms of covid that have various co morbidity is considerably overweight have diabetes a monoclonal antibody that has given an infusion. I believe has also been a game changer. Although i've not seen formal data in that way but those are the big three medications that we give. I mean you've got to look at what's going on here in the us and it's gotta frustrate both of you. Knowing how many people are breaking the advice may be needle one column rules because somehow those of us in the us don't like those things called rules. Frankly i've seen a bunch of parties. Go on in my town. There have been a bunch of weekend weddings and dancing. And what have you and it's almost like. What are you supposed to do as a healthcare organization to get the message across. I can't imagine. What would happen. To dr steve here if there was a surge on top of this surge. That's an important point in all of us in healthcare professions of. I wanna start again by saying lots. Lots of people doing their level. Best imply vincent. I feel really badly for people who don't have a luxury to be at home. That essential workers people who were living in very congested areas. Tranquil did very best. They can difficult circumstances. So that's important to make sure we now. The hard work difficult circumstances lots of people living under now everybody's violating these guidelines but there are people who are either inadvertently or something some cases intentionally violence

Pulmonary Disease Dr Steven Howard J Fomin Kaiser Permanent Chair Of The Quality Committee Atlantic Street Capital Dr Howard Foreman ICU Howard Steve Dr Steve Kaiser Ford Pneumonia Diabetes United States Vincent
Doses Of Antibody Drugs Remain Unused As They Present Various Challenges

All Things Considered

03:51 min | 1 year ago

Doses Of Antibody Drugs Remain Unused As They Present Various Challenges

"The federal government says it has delivered more than 300,000 doses of monoclonal antibody drugs to help facilities nationwide. They're designed to treat patients with mild to moderate covert 19. The ideas keep those patients out of the hospital, but Many of those doses are sitting unused, due in no small part to the challenge of administering those drugs. NPR's science correspondent Richard Harris looks at to healthcare systems that have overcome those hurdles and are seeing hopeful results. Monoclonal antibodies present all sorts of challenges. They're given to people who have active infections, but who aren't hospitalized, so it's important to treat them without exposing other patients to risk. The drugs by Regeneron and Eli Lilly are also given by infusion, and that process takes a couple of hours. So when you add all this up, you know it's really a logistical challenge to deliver this therapy to a lot of people. But Dr Howard Long at Houston Methodist Hospital, says they figured out how to do that. They've opened clinics around Houston and doctors affiliated with the hospital are referring eligible patients. That is people who are over 65 or who have health conditions that put them at high risk. So at this point we're doing about 50 to 70 infusions a day, and patients are usually scheduled within a Relatively short period of time. So from the time they call into being infused, it's usually less than two days. The timing is important because these drugs appear to beam or effective early in the course of the disease. Mostly help people who aren't mounting their own strong immune reactions and, well medication sits unused in many locations around the country. That is not the case at his hospital, Hong says. Right now we're constrained more by the drug supply. They use it as fast as they get it. Any doctors nationwide aren't so enthusiastic about these drugs, though treatment guidelines issued by the National Institutes of Health say there's actually not good evidence to know whether they work. That's because the Food and Drug Administration relied on studies of just a few 100 patients to grant these drugs, emergency authorization. So these are very small numbers that under normal conditions nobody would never publish in the journal like New England Journal of Medicine. Yet this is, you know, kind of headline news. Welcome Toko bit time right. But doctors are gaining experience. Houston Methodist is now treated more than 1100 patients, Hong says. We're seeing results that are comparable to what was reported in the clinical trials by Eli Lilly and Regeneron about six or 7% of patients who are treated end up in the hospital or emergency room. He figures that without treatment about 15% of the most high risk patients could end up in the hospital or ER. Doctors affiliated with the Mayo Clinic or also encouraged by their experience. They've dust more than 2000 patients in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Arizona and Florida. Dr. Raymond reasonably has done a preliminary analysis of the 1st 1000 or so patients and finds low hospitalization rates. More importantly, there is some signal that is also reducing death. But again this our preliminary analysis we have to kind of make sure that this are all vetted by pure review. But this is what we're seeing. That's why we're happy. Unlike a clinical trial, this real world experience doesn't have a careful comparison group so doctors can't say for sure that these patients are faring better. Even so, these encouraging findings may be swaying doctors who weren't sure they wanted to refer their patients for treatment. There's nobody says patients are also becoming less skeptical. Initially, there were more declines than accept. But no, we're actually seeing more except than declines, and even though it takes a lot of person power to provide this treatment reasonably and Hong believe they're actually reducing the overall workload. Keeping patients out of the hospital. Richard Harris NPR

Regeneron Dr Howard Long Houston Methodist Hospital Eli Lilly Richard Harris NPR Houston Methodist Federal Government Hong Houston Dr. Raymond National Institutes Of Health Toko New England Journal Of Medicin Food And Drug Administration Mayo Clinic Wisconsin Minnesota
New York health care provider may have fraudulently obtained Covid-19 vaccines, state says

Fox News Sunday

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

New York health care provider may have fraudulently obtained Covid-19 vaccines, state says

"The New York State Department of Health is investigating Claims of Cupid vaccine fraud, a show Kabbalah has the story Health Commissioner Dr Howard Zucker said on Saturday that his office was given reports of Park Hair Community Health network, fraudulently obtaining doses of the vaccine and illegally transferring it among their facilities. Park hair has locations throughout Brooklyn. The allegations suggests that vaccine intended for frontline health care professionals and long term care residents would be diverted to the Public in a violation of the state's rollout plan. In a press release, Zucker said, We take this very seriously and D O H will be assisting state police in a criminal investigation into this matter. Anyone found to have knowingly participated in this scheme will be held accountable to the fullest extent of the law.

Dr Howard Zucker Park Hair Community Health Net New York State Department Of H Brooklyn Zucker
Violent crime keeps rising in Houston. Could COVID be the reason why?

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

01:29 min | 1 year ago

Violent crime keeps rising in Houston. Could COVID be the reason why?

"A streak of violence in houston continued overnight. Ktar k tv reports. Three people were killed and two injured and four separate shootings in the area last night that follows a deadly domestic incident in western. Houston that left. Five people shot and at least two dead houston's murder rate and other types of crimes have been rising in recent months as the pandemic continues to stress. Nearly every part of many people's lives well houston's murder rate is higher than it's been in a decade and here in harris county the murder rate is also a thirty percent since this time last year. Our own brenda boundaries has more on. How much of a role. The pandemic and other factors play into that increase in violent crime logo. Police are reporting sharp rises in violent crime including domestic violence murder and assault. Dr howard henderson is the founding director. Just as research at texas southern university. He's says the pandemic has increased the level of inequality between those who can afford to stay home and those who can't with limited funds limited resources and no positive outlets a win the the day on a break and so the frustration. Vang self out particularly in domestic violence around this country and particularly them henderson matters the pandemic and a reason increasing calls to defend the police make it difficult to predict what is to come. He's as one solution for. Police is to be stationed at high violence hotspots instead of low crime areas which drained resources houston police. Chief recently announced a plan to target crime hotspots with additional officers.

Ktar K Houston Dr Howard Henderson Harris County Texas Southern University Vang Henderson
"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

07:55 min | 2 years ago

"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"Previously in our mouth, who studio and this time visiting US again by Zoom we're honored to have. Dr Howard J foam and join us to catch up on medicine, practice and politics prevention, and of course a bit about our fight against. COVID nineteen so may we suggest that you pull yourself a double. Sit back and join us on medicine. We're still practicing I'm bill, Curtis. I are host. The quadruple board certified doctor of Internal Medicine Pulmonary Disease Critical Care and neuro critical care. My very good friend Dr Steven Taback, however you, Steve Hey bill good to see you. We haven't had dinner together for a while I. Don't remember what it was like. They actually have dinner and enjoy an evening. So you know we have one of our favorite experts rejoining. Rejoining us today Dr, Howard J. Felman he is board certified in internal medicine and gastroenterology will learn more about that. In a minute Howard, served a multi decade tenure at Kaiser Permanente Day as partner board member. President of the Executive Committee Chief of staff and chair of the Quality Committee. He supervised forty three hundred staff over five hundred doctors. Howard is now senior operating advisor. Advisor at the Atlantic. Street capital for their medically focused investments Dr Howard J foam. Welcome back I nice to be here. Stephen nicest to us well Hey Howard. Good to see you so last time we met in our studio in Malibu was only back in February and it seems like a whole lifetime ago in quite a year, and we're only halfway through it and we know. Know there's a lot more to come Howard. I hope you'll forgive me, but I took my nasty pill this morning, so I want to dive into a difficult issue, but as the time of this recording according to Johns Hopkins, Japan although infected early has less than one cova death per hundred thousand population, while the US has thirty nine Cova deaths per one hundred thousand population. Japan more elderly per capita than any other country. They kept their borders open during the Wu Han locked down there, stay home requests by Japanese. Government have been voluntary, as was any of the closing of their non essential businesses. And now for a country with one city that houses more than thirty seven million people. They have less than a thousand deaths countrywide, but the hell is going on I. Don't know that anyone knows exactly all of the differences, but I'll give you. Some and I think that may be different. One is there's probably a genetic component to this disease that we don't quite understand. People were speculating. Why was so much more Italy because Italian get together a lot more than others people wonder with net net might have been some genetic predisposition. She decided kind storms for example, another article morbidity in patient population, so age is one thing you're right. Japanese population is actually older than the US. By other commodities like obesity, which is turning out to be a significant risk factor here is unfortunately. It's still a lot more obesity united. States than there is Japan so just because we've sorted out that the age factor may not explain it, but we have some more chronic illness in the United States spend maybe contributing to it as well and then you know the way we've handled. Handled the public health aspect of this and again I also wanted to be very careful about criticism of even the public health system because I'm sure there's a lot of things we look back and could have done differently, but we also have a lot of public health officers. Some extremely courageous ones and I'll say that I think unfortunately a some of our public does not really believe. Believe in this pandemic, the seriousness that they should, and that may be affecting the outcomes as well. There are certain communities as you know. Where substantial numbers of people were having just seemingly significant disregard, and so that might have been large numbers coming in at a just a bowl of people coming in all the ones that saturated the healthcare system made it hard to take care of. Of someone people possibly people coming in later than they should have because perhaps denial about the significance of the Selma's when it is on severe, and it's not be causing a doctor that I. don't WanNa Fault. The nurses and the doctors and rest of just I've seen what they're doing. My follow it very carefully, and I'm very proud of them, but I think because of the. The differences in population and our public health system is not working well is not resigned the way it should be, and there's not functioning in the way that it has been planned to function the past I. I agree with you on just about every single point i. do believe the healthcare delivery. You'RE GONNA. COMES DOWN TO DOCTORS. Nurses Ancillary Staff, Gore, caring for the patients in this. This country are courageous. Hardworking dedicated one of the things that is not different as the treatment of these patients really are standardized, because we're so global in our information dissemination Rendez severe now is standard, and in d'etre now is standard, and everybody is looking at the literature very clearly on what to do, and what not to do. Hydroxy chloroquine quickly dropped out so there are public health. Health deficiencies but I think in terms of healthcare delivery. Standard of CARE is the standard of care minimizing intimations pruning patients. This is all stuff that's being done in a standardized way, and everybody is sort of catching up with with the literature very quickly. When I look at the two cultures and I don't have the real stats on this two things. I would look at if you're. You're you know with the question of comparing Japanese society in the United States would be again. The populace compliance is the general public compliant with the stay at home order the distancing orders in although it may be suggested if one hundred percent of the people are following the suggestion versus United States where I'm not even sure what the compliance rate is been. You can SORTA. Sampling, but I don't think that we are in the state that we're in at this very second. Because of the public health entities, as it is that we are not as mature as we should be in this country, relative to taking care of each other's well, being the reality is that was a nasty question because you know the expression there lies Damn lies and statistics. We didn't take into account in that question. The number of people who are coming down with the virus, and how transmissible it is in the way, our society is structured one thing you have to know about Japan is personal. Discipline and public respect is at a high level and Japan Steve In. In many of these shows of of thank you for being on the front lines, you and your brethren are just doing an amazing job at dealing with this pandemic, we on the other hand. Our country is not doing an amazing job again. The part of the lies Damn lies and statistics that I was referring to. Is that frankly a lot? More people are catching the virus as a per capita statistic than in Japan and the reason for that is because we're sloppy and I'm just wondering for those of you in the medical profession. Does that Piss you off? Can speak to that and two things one. Yes, it makes me angry, but also makes me incredibly sad, because you like to think of the United States is really the leader of the world, and we've led the world in so many positive ways, but this notion of respect for your fellow citizen, a sense of discipline, a sense of greater level of sophistication that we should be afforded because we are a free society, it should make us more advanced in our thinking. It should make us more sophisticated in our response to stress. We've very proud of our country. In terms of the sense of self expression, and the almost duty to speak up. We don't always do that so well, but certainly compared to countries around the world but I think we've lost a little bit of the concept of the value of expertise in the concept of pulling together as a group when it's important and sometimes hard for people to change that mindset. So often in that autonomy mindset in.

US Howard J. Felman Japan Dr Howard J doctor of Internal Medicine Pu Dr Steven Taback Curtis Malibu Steve Johns Hopkins Kaiser Permanente Day Stephen nicest Wu Han Advisor Quality Committee advisor Cova
Dr. Howard Fullman: COVID, Probiotics, and the Impact of Coronavirus on the Future of Medicine

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

04:19 min | 2 years ago

Dr. Howard Fullman: COVID, Probiotics, and the Impact of Coronavirus on the Future of Medicine

"We're honored to have. Dr Howard J foam and join us to catch up on medicine, practice and politics prevention, and of course a bit about our fight against. COVID nineteen so may we suggest that you pull yourself a double. Sit back and join us on medicine. We're still practicing I'm bill, Curtis. I are host. The quadruple board certified doctor of Internal Medicine Pulmonary Disease Critical Care and neuro critical care. My very good friend Dr Steven Taback, however you, Steve Hey bill good to see you. We haven't had dinner together for a while I. Don't remember what it was like. They actually have dinner and enjoy an evening. So you know we have one of our favorite experts rejoining. Rejoining us today Dr, Howard J. Felman he is board certified in internal medicine and gastroenterology will learn more about that. In a minute Howard, served a multi decade tenure at Kaiser Permanente Day as partner board member. President of the Executive Committee Chief of staff and chair of the Quality Committee. He supervised forty three hundred staff over five hundred doctors. Howard is now senior operating advisor. Advisor at the Atlantic. Street capital for their medically focused investments Dr Howard J foam. Welcome back I nice to be here. Stephen nicest to us well Hey Howard. Good to see you so last time we met in our studio in Malibu was only back in February and it seems like a whole lifetime ago in quite a year, and we're only halfway through it and we know. Know there's a lot more to come Howard. I hope you'll forgive me, but I took my nasty pill this morning, so I want to dive into a difficult issue, but as the time of this recording according to Johns Hopkins, Japan although infected early has less than one cova death per hundred thousand population, while the US has thirty nine Cova deaths per one hundred thousand population. Japan more elderly per capita than any other country. They kept their borders open during the Wu Han locked down there, stay home requests by Japanese. Government have been voluntary, as was any of the closing of their non essential businesses. And now for a country with one city that houses more than thirty seven million people. They have less than a thousand deaths countrywide, but the hell is going on I. Don't know that anyone knows exactly all of the differences, but I'll give you. Some and I think that may be different. One is there's probably a genetic component to this disease that we don't quite understand. People were speculating. Why was so much more Italy because Italian get together a lot more than others people wonder with net net might have been some genetic predisposition. She decided kind storms for example, another article morbidity in patient population, so age is one thing you're right. Japanese population is actually older than the US. By other commodities like obesity, which is turning out to be a significant risk factor here is unfortunately. It's still a lot more obesity united. States than there is Japan so just because we've sorted out that the age factor may not explain it, but we have some more chronic illness in the United States spend maybe contributing to it as well and then you know the way we've handled. Handled the public health aspect of this and again I also wanted to be very careful about criticism of even the public health system because I'm sure there's a lot of things we look back and could have done differently, but we also have a lot of public health officers. Some extremely courageous ones and I'll say that I think unfortunately a some of our public does not really believe. Believe in this pandemic, the seriousness that they should, and that may be affecting the outcomes as well. There are certain communities as you know. Where substantial numbers of people were having just seemingly significant disregard, and so that might have been large numbers coming in at a just a bowl of people coming in all the ones that saturated the healthcare system made it hard to take care of. Of someone people possibly people coming in later than they should have because perhaps denial about the significance of the Selma's when it is on severe, and it's not be causing a doctor that I. don't WanNa Fault. The nurses and the doctors and rest of just I've seen what they're doing. My follow it very carefully, and I'm very proud of them, but I think because of the. The differences in population and our public health system is not working well is not resigned the way it should be, and there's not functioning in the way that it has been planned to function the

Howard J. Felman Dr Howard J Doctor Of Internal Medicine Pu United States Japan Advisor Wu Han Dr Steven Taback Curtis Kaiser Permanente Day Malibu Stephen Nicest Executive Committee Chief Of S Quality Committee Johns Hopkins Cova Selma Wanna Fault
"dr howard" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

08:38 min | 2 years ago

"dr howard" Discussed on Defocus Media

"Figures salaries your doctor in the prestige. That goes with this and you can have a decent work life balance. I mean I if I can talk to people about optometry I can convince people. It's a great profession. We just need to get out there more. And by the way Lasko doing a great job with optometry gives me life and really trying to be proactive. About showing people the Path and a lot of other people really doing a good job at trying to help promote the professional. We're the best kept secret in in In medicine as far as I'm concerned and we don't want to be the best kept secret absolutely. I hope I answered you question. It absolutely did one last question. Some up everything to end everything you know. We have to work together but when it comes up commentary. Is this this one term? That folks really get nervous about. It is known as private equity. I continuously here that private equity is GonNa ruin up summitry. This is one of the topics that you guys were talking about at this meeting elaborate on that in regards to the conversation dialogue that actually took place. Yeah yeah a lot of people are worried about it you know and I think for good reason I'll start with the end and then we can backtrack okay what I worry about. The most is now. You're going to have several thousand practices aggregated. And what private equity does not throwing stones talking reality? They're gonNA make their money and move on what happens to these couple thousand whatever number you. WanNa put on it. Three thousand four thousand every time. A- that's another one like tuition you know or that keeps going up every time. I hear what is going to happen to those practices. They're going to knock the door of the S. Laura's in these kind of people may be espy's I don't see them buying those huge numbers of practices. I don't see that happening. I really worry about the end of this story. I think it's great a lot of our colleagues. The upside starting at the beginning people who were going to walk away from their practices or struggle selling them are now in many cases they deserved and they should have gotten for their valuable practice that they've built so from that standpoint. It's very appealing to people and I see why it's grown the way that it has the other reason for just being straight up with each other here is most optometrists are not good business. People and as a result of that private equity person comes all business minded. They see so many ways to increase the profitability and lower. The cost might not be thinking. We really loved to see but they can do that. Pretty easily in the majority of these optimistic practices. So look what. It's good in some ways. It's not good for everybody. What I would hope to see is before you get so excited about and seen numbers in your head. Think about how long you built that practice. Think about the patients you serve in the way you've served them. You better be comfortable. If you're selling that practice in somebody else making those decisions and doing it in a different way for my colleagues. You've done it. You've been happy about it. I salute them but I talked to a lot of people who just don't even recognize their practice anymore and it's incredibly difficult for them. We can't make private equity go away. What we can do is try to be really selective about decisions we make and then. Here's the other piece. I hope this will be the case. I hope my friends at at vision source and my friends at I. Doc and my friends at name all those out there who have private equity behind them as well can find ways for our young graduates when they come out to move into some of these practices to help fund something like that to help them be better business people than everyone wins. We have a more profitable practice. These aggregates these alliances will continue to grow. I don't think a lot of people talked about it but I think our saving grace perhaps could be these large alliances that aggregate practices together that can create a better or at least a competitive option to selling your practice a private equity who God bless him and a lot of my friends are involved in it now but the people at the top making those decisions. Don't care a whole lot about optometry. They care about profitability and. I don't blame him. That's what their business is. But I would love to see and it's already starting to happen. Our friends at at vision source our friends at I. Doc and others stepping up and creating at least alternatives. And they're starting to do it. And I think it will have an impact. Absolutely I bet. Device Darrell have worked in private equity backed businesses. And we see the pros and cons of these situations. I think because private equity in this nation is still really new within the marketplace. Changing so fast once you think you know what private practices like. It's totally different than a few years. And honestly with Corona Virus Right now. That might totally change the landscape a private equity practice. Looks like in within this next year because suddenly it's not so profitable to have an optimistic but doesn't see patients or is doing telemedicine exams at a fraction of what they were typically doing out so right but you know what these people are smart by the way what they see is that and this is a good lesson to learn for all of us from this. Experience of private equity are practiced can be more profitable. We can find ways to lower our costs not by using quality product but lowering our overall cost increasing our profitability. That's so obvious. Otherwise all these private equities would not be coming into this space and investing what they're investing. It's a great lesson learned and honestly I think it's a great segue to tie back to where we started in business accurate right we talked about. We have to improve our own business acumen because as a result of that we will have more profitable and successful practices and when private equity knocking on the door. At least we have a choice to make you know what I see my practice continuing to grow. I'm okay worry I'm or you know what this makes sense. I'd like to go the private equity route but I feel like it's in some cases it's little out of balance because we don't all have that good smart business acumen we can bring to the table. No fault necessarily our colleagues faulted the educational process. But I tried to explain that. Perhaps their challenges inherent there. But that doesn't mean we can't solve it and with this industry collaborative with withheld our friends at de Focus media. And all your smarts in the people who listen to you we can get the job done and increase the profitability and success of our practices if we want without the help of private equity. I think we covered some of the key issues facing all about Tom. Chaney Notch all solved summary of everything that everyone's concerned Thomas Great now and. Luckily the questions concerns been pinpointed and so now working toward solutions Applaud the work that the industry collaborative is is doing in the pledge that you guys have made for a together colleges across the industry across professionals to try to get some solution these major issues by the way you made the commitment to Darryl sign for you. I don't know if he told you that I love you. I knew I loved you today. Thank you guys really and I appreciate everything you're doing and try to educate all of us. I salute you for your efforts. You know young people in this profession. You're the future of this profession and I will tell you and I maybe this is a good way to end. The future of this. Profession is in great hands. I hang out with them every single day and I know that's the case. I'm so excited about where we're going and what we have in front of us and help people like you bring in these key issues to the table and giving us a forum to discuss it we will solve it so thank you guys very much thanks for participating in the industry collaborative and. I'm happy to come back anytime if I can be of any help to you and your listeners will for anyone that's listening right now. They want to be a part of this or ask you more questions or no one at next is a location which probably going to be tended. Now do all the stuff they can place you. Just give us some feedback in regards to that. You're so good man. I appreciate that very much. So yeah so. We were hoping the meeting in October. My hope is that will still happen in October. We would love anybody who wants to participate in the truth of the matter is Darrel Gary and I started this thing that helped we'd have ten or twelve people show up to the meeting. We had almost seventy show up representing forty four different companies. And we want everybody who wants to participate. So here's what I'll tell you. H At NETCO DOT. Edu Give me a shout. Let me know you WANNA participate. We'd love to have your brains. Your your energy your resources. Whatever you could bring to the table and by the way resources didn't just mean money mint your time and your brain power. So thank you and I'll say it one more time for cell p you are c. e. l. l. h. at any Co Dot E. D. U. Let me know you're interested? Thank you for that opportunity. Daryl and Jen. Yes thank you we have has to Dr Howard facilit- ability you guys. Thanks for listening to us. They.

Lasko Thomas Great Laura Wan Darrell Dr Howard c. e. l. l. h. Darrel Gary Darryl Daryl Tom Jen
"dr howard" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

10:12 min | 2 years ago

"dr howard" Discussed on Defocus Media

"After I'm done in this perpetual GonNa hold the toward today. We gotTA KEEP READING OR COW. Nine you guys. You guys do that for sure. I really wanted to this. Podcast interview really. Just break down those ten topics and let's take it for with the you know the business accurate. Let's just go through of these. So folks can really understand you know the importance of these topics have brought to the attention of the ICARUS Task happy to do it and business. Activists are great one to start with. Because when I took the job I heard from a lot of my friends and colleagues about man you have to solve this problem. We are graduating. This is what people would say to me. The best clinicians we've ever graduated every year. They continue to get better. But you guys are doing a crappy job when it comes to helping them prepare for the business of optometry and you know what I say. Yes I agree. The challenge and the problem is that we're not going to solve it anytime soon in the four year curriculum and just very briefly and I won't get into too much of the weeds here but I think it's important to understand that you know we try to do business education in second third and fourth year but put yourself in the shoes of a student. It wasn't too long ago for you. Gaza hope you can appreciate this. Your first second third year you could care less about. I mean you know businesses important to you but the focus is taken your national boards passenger exams. You're not thinking about the business of optometry and even when we try to do courses it's sort of a lasting anybody's going to study for the last thing. They're going to pay attention to now fast forward to get to your fourth year. And then you're you think this is critical. I need to know it. And now we're separated all over the country at our externships so given the current format of optimistic education. It will be at least in the short term extremely difficult to say. We're going to solve the problem of business. Accu men during the four year program so we talked a lot at the meeting in Boston about the idea of. How can we create perhaps a postgraduate programme? It could be right immediately following graduation and intensive four day three day. Whatever the right time to introduce no matter what environment you're going to be in in Uh tree and we are all in so many different environments that you have the basics of business of optometry one great suggestion that came out of that meeting that we hope to be able to pursue. So you know it's easy to sit on the outside and say what you guys doing here but you're doing a crappy job here that's why this dialogue is so important. So people understand the challenges people who can make a difference and I gotTa Salute People like J. and J. S Laura Luxottica. My friends had jobs in. You know a few others who really stepped up at and said what can we do? How do we solve it and at that Meeting Daryl? You know we had the sitting in the room academy sitting in the room lasko sitting in the room. Seco sitting in the room. That was huge to see that kind of support and collaboration. And what's to get the job done so starting a business document? It's a key one. I don't meet anybody who says you're doing a fantastic job. Teaching people the business of optometry we have to do better and with withheld also just one other quick thing about that. Think about these industry partners and incredible marketing people. They have incredible sales people. They have incredible. It people hr all the functions. That would be really helpful for US TO UNDERSTAND BETTER. So they have those resources. So that's a key. One of all of them. I think that's the one that really felt like could be addressable. Could be adjustable pretty quickly. And this partnership could really change things. A lot about that. That optometrist reproducing and how comfortable they are with the business of optometry. Yeah I think we can take a lot from industry in regards to just running a business I mean. I know one of our colleagues from lunch. Date Rape Ratio in K. K. And she did that program over at s lawyer this past summer and that was before she actually started practicing and she said that changed our entire perspective regards to just practice in general and now it's actually taking her to the next level just in our first year out of school now and think about it gives you more confidence too right. I mean you guys got out there and you've got a lot of confidence in doing what you're doing but smart people but without the confidence and understanding at least some of the basics of the business of optometry. I think it starts to narrow at least in people's minds what their options are and we don't want that we want them to feel like they've got all the options I know when we talk about independent private. Whatever you like to call that type of practice where we're on our own. You're you are on your own and you do have to make some of those same decisions and financial is a piece of it but I continue to hear over and over in my times in industry. It's also about confidence in running a business so we can help with that. Perhaps we even open up the opportunities for more of our colleagues to say I kinda like this independent private practice option. Sounds pretty good. Yeah absolutely absolutely so this. Move on and number two impact of technology on optometry. I mean. That's a huge thing. We're seeing as mentioned earlier right. Yeah but you forgot the second. Half of that was equally as important. The impact of technology on optometry and the impact of optometry on technology really both are critically important and I say that because we can let this influence us and sit back and say Oh my God. This technology is changing us. How's it going to change us? What are we doing an after? Give credits mark for our and the job some people because we had this discussion several years ago and the idea was to try to stimulate some creative thinking some innovation from inside we sat through the wonderful global leadership. Summit jobs puts on every year at Vision Expo and we continue to see all these people from outside of our industry coming in with all the disruptive things I wanNA see some people from inside this industry coming up with ways to disrupt and change in evolve. Whatever terms make you feel okay about it? It's critical so I was very intentional. I didn't mean to pick on that one but it was very intentional to say both of those pieces because I want to try to push the envelope a let's optometry should dictate some of these technologies how they evolve what they do and and being. Boston's really interesting being in Boston across the street from mit down the road from Harvard. Right next to be you and BC mask an incredible and also mass general. John ear the stuff that's going on in. This city is amazing. And one of the advantages. Actually we have a being at Echo to say is that we're in the heart of that and and we're really trying to take full advantage so it's critical telehealth. There's always a silver lining. I hope maybe a little too soon to be talking about silver linings with regard to this pandemic but if there is a silver lining. I think it's a couple things we're learning that we can teach and teach effectively virtually certainly on the didactic side and we're also learning. The telehealth could be an incredible vehicle. When used appropriately? And I you know I want to be clear that not suggesting that we start treating everybody through south in fact our institution has been working hard invalidating and I think that's really important. We're working with a lot of these telehealth companies to help them validate their technology but optometry needs to be involved. I love my friends at the. Aol Love my friends. Who are in in an optimistic. You know leadership but we have to be involved in the discussion. We want a seat at that table. And I'm not trying to be with that but I feel like at times things. We do distance us from having a seat at that table so that that was the point of that. The reality technologies changing our profession. When I talk to young colleagues were still in school. They're excited about it. They're not intimidated by it. And I love that because my generation you know we're it makes us nervous kind of things kind of be as they are right so it's inspiring as I said earlier to be around the students but we need that that that's the key message and that's why I want the industry to partner with us in this area is. We need to have a seat at the table. We need to be influencing it. Nobody better to do that than us. Because we understand it better than anyone does so that that was really the point that we got a lot of support for this idea of you know how about is going to lead when it comes to technology side even if you're not innovating it at least influencing it. I think that's critically important because if we're not careful it takes us without us and now we're just taking a ride versus sitting out front seat at the very least in the passenger seat. I love to see us in the driver's seat but we'll work towards that. I like the way I've always can you? All three of us have kind of seen. I love how you guys push the envelope on things too and is why. I'm always happy and flattered and honored actually to participate in this discussions. You have a lot of love for you because you were like a I dig Bajor podcast. I hope you're going to remember that I was with yours at the beginning and it was a lot of fun then and I'm still really actually proud in thrilled to see how this has evolved and how much people enjoy and not surprising listening to the things that you put out there and and the fact that you want to tackle some of the important issues that the that are on everyone's mind so but yeah. I. I'm I'm proud of that as well. The fact that we were in a little bit together at the beginning and I appreciate that opportunity absolutely not not needless to say this little alert luxottica thing was going on here. It was my charming personality. However I do appreciate. That was a pretty big issue at the. You know the one thing that I've always liked invest in terminology. Keep it real this. You know. There's no. There's no sugar coating you know. You're you're always telling us the truth. You telling us the facts of for me. Also I take it a step further you actually show up to every single thing as well and industry. You're not just showing interest in one thing. You know being a part of the National Optimistic Association you know I always see that every single event for me Dan. A black doctor black physician to see someone outside of minal race. Come in and support every single time vision expo every single day to me. That's amazing it shows your passion for the industry to that. I will have to say that means as much to me as anything you've said to me and can we..

Boston Gaza US National Optimistic Associatio Accu Uh tree Rape Daryl private practice BC Harvard J. John Laura Luxottica Aol partner mit
"dr howard" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

14:35 min | 2 years ago

"dr howard" Discussed on Defocus Media

"Welcome to a newsy media. Podcast video. Cast I'm Jennifer and I'm here with errol glover. We've got a guest. That is a dear friend of the podcast in. We're always excited to get a chance to check in with them Dr Per cell. And he's dealing with a lot right now just like all of us are in this time of nineteen and getting his perspective on a lot of things going on both around the virus. And what's going on in the greater community about Thomas? I was going to be an excellent thing this evening. So excited this guy. Talk to you. Dr All thank you so much. I appreciate it looking forward to talking about a lot of important things we have going on. Let's just get caught up with your life what's happening right now in your world as president of Nico while we're to begin. Well let me start by saying a year and a half almost three quarters into the job and I cannot wait to get to work. Every day I love being an academia. It has been such an inspiration for me being around students who are so excited about optometry in the industry side and I love my time in industry. Twenty five years there. You do hear a little bit of moaning and groaning here and there and when you hang around students all day. It's all about the greatest profession ever. They're all going to be the best Thomas they could ever be and they're so excited their dream come true. It's what they've always wanted. It's incredibly inspiring. So I am really enjoying every minute of it. Obviously with the issues at hand it has created some significant complexities. But you know what people step Bob. It's really interesting and I'm sure you guys have seen this in your world to You really get to know people in times of difficulty and I could not be any prouder of our faculty. Our administration. Our students in the way they've managed through this and I'm happy to talk through more the details but you know I love. I'm enjoying it if we just set aside for a moment if we possibly can Kovic nineteen and we just talk about Optimistic Education. We have challenges an optimistic education. There's no doubt but the reality is. It's an amazing profession that enables us to do and practice in so many different ways. And you know I recognize that. It's hard to see the end of the tunnel right now but I know we're gonNA come out the other side. We're going to be as strong as ever and we're going to continue to move this profession forward in the way we always add so. I'm loving it. It's it's very different for me. I mean I'm not the traditional optometry school president twenty five years industry. Ten Years in private practice in in America had five years at Nova southeastern so. I hope that my background is bringing the right kind of perspective at the right time but I've surrounded myself with a great team of people and that's that's what it's all about just like this amazing team that they focus media right. Yeah thank you. Thank you so much for the guy words there but Tell me just a little bit more about that transition because industry academia me. It's just like two different worlds completely being You know I had the honour paying it out which not too long ago down at Seco and I know you were talking about you know when your industry in India when Thursday who your true friends are bad this is talk about that transition because I know that was one hell of a transition ago from and have a comment you said because I did joke at the meeting and it by the way I really appreciate you guys being there but I did joke about the fact that we don't have that credit card anymore you do. Tend to find out of your friends. Wanted to party with me before I wanted to hang out with me at the bar and now down to my inner circle you know all getting inside. It has been a significant transition. But I've learned a lot and and and I think you heard me say this daryl but I'll say it here and that is that I had responsibility for twenty five years to engage with the schools and colleges in my teams are always responsible for that relationship and I visited all the schools and I really felt like I had a really good handle on what was going on in the metric education. Then I made the transition over and what I realized really quickly was how little I actually knew. And in fact perhaps more importantly had I known more about what the real issues were both the strengths and the opportunities in optimistic education. I think I could have been much better partner and that was the emphasis behind this meeting that you attended as I said I really appreciated you guys being there were. We tried to bring together the media the employers and the industry. And I'll talk about that if you'd like me to. But one of the interesting components of that was employers. If you think about this minute the schools and colleges and perhaps rightly so and you could make an argument for it. Although I'm not in that camp have really held the employers at arm's length you know we're not gonNa let you are doors. You know if you want to do some of their students you have to do it off campus. And when I first came and looking at that it was odd to me. Think about this. You know dummy any other program that is developing a product. Our product happens to be a student and we keep our employers. The people ready to hire them as far away as we possibly can. I mean really intuitively. It makes no sense but look I get I get the politics of it but it really makes no sense. We believe that we should expose our students to all the opportunities out there. We want to expose our students to disruptive things that are going on out there. I think we do an injustice to our students if we don't expose them to that while they're in school. I mean you let them out after four years and that's the first time they're going to engage with things like as an example telehealth who would have ever imagined that everybody would want in the game. Telehealth took unfortunately this incredible pan-demic which is riff. Ick has impacted so many of us in such a horrific way to have everybody now is saying well. Let me learn more about this. Tele helping to sound really interesting. We've been able to maintain our clinical activities and I'm so proud of our teams what they've done in emergency situations. We can see patients. We can use our telehealth systems. We can we can take people from going to emergency rooms because we all know the situation with emergency rooms no matter where you are in the country in New York Washington. Couple areas that that are a little worse than others But the reality is we all know the situations in emergency rooms right now we can minimize that and telehealth but as a great vehicle at the very least it helps us to triage so the transition has been actually a lot of fun. I learn every single day because I get to work with some people who dedicated their careers to academia and are so focused on. And that's another thing that I think when you're not in academia it's easy to throw stones right. I'll come on is guys are producing people. They have no clue about business. They're you know they're really not what we would expect them to be. But think about this for a minute you know. My Dad went to Netco in nineteen fifty four he graduated. It was a four year program fast forward to twenty twenty. We still have a four year program yet the pressures on our faculty and I'm not making excuses for them. I'm just sharing the reality of what I've learned what they have to teach today in the same window of time it's wonderful because our profession has progressed in and the scope of practice has expanded and is a wonderful thing. Don't get me wrong. I'm just trying to point out the pressures at puts on our faculty to prepare these students for the future. We talk a lot on our institution and I'll stop about preparing today's optometrist for tomorrow's optometry. That's what we're about. That's what we focus on every single day and the pandemic yes. It's it's an obstacle to our progress. But we're not gonNA let that slow us down and we haven't lost. I think this is a great time to talk about some of the unique things as you're doing or the students of New England College about commentary because of the diverse background. You're bringing into your position as president. So what some of the things that stands out about what you've been able to do with the school while give an example and it's probably going to be a little controversial but I think it gives you some perspective of what we're trying to do so an old friend of Mine Neil Blumenthal. He might know the name. I knew kneel before you started worby Parker and Neil and I worked together at a philanthropic group called vision. Spring that a good brandon and alumni of of neck. Oh Jordan Castle started wonderful group that goes to parts of the world and make sure people are cared for with more of a hub and spoke type of concept and no neil for a long time. He was coming to Boston to speak at Harvard about his company. And I've he approached me and said would you like me to come tobacco and talk to students about the story of war. Parker and I thought it was a fantastic idea. Why not but I. I did what I've learned to do now. By the way one thing you learn in academia is shared governance which is something in industry. Don't know So I had to learn. Come back to that one. But in any case I went to student council and I said look we have this opportunity to bring the founder of And when he guys sake they thought it was a fantastic idea they were all out it so we made this announcement bringing him in. I'll fast forward to say the room was packed not a seat in the room people sitting in the stairwells etc. I mean people really wanted to hear what he had to say but I got a lot of very nasty comments. About how dare we allow someone like that to enter into our buildings and let me be clear because you know the end was a good story. Neil got up there and told the story and it's a wonderful story and what was very clear was three things number. One is an incredible entrepreneur and most optometrists are not necessarily wired up that way and it was so interesting to hear how he did this and what thought process went into it and what he thinks about every day Number two clear is incredibly philanthropic or park gave away their five. Millionth pair of glasses Several months ago so they probably have far surpassed that now but the third thing and I think equally as important was how literally knew about optometry and he was very quick to admit that and thought it really lead to some great conversations. Which whether we like it or not whether you think this good news scenario or bad if you now into war Parker you're GONNA feed see full exam lanes with comprehensive exams going on there and I am not taking any credit for that at all. I'm just suggesting by by having the dialogue and engaging in our students ask great questions and he listened and I think the end result of this was a reinforcement at the very least of. Yeah you know like the idea. He still likes this idea of manipulating around in some of these These more virtual means but he understood the value of a comprehensive exit. Now you may not love the world. Parker's doing comprehensive exams in their in their facilities. But the reality is I personally think it's better than trying to push some online refraction that we all know we worry about. The health of our patients is so just one example. And I think it gives you an overarching example of the things that we're trying to do to expose our students. Students are so smart are meeting. We did this industry collaborative that I think. Darryl had alluded to earlier we had a panel of students and we basically asked them all to tell a bit about themselves and then we open it up for questions. Set aside about an hour for that panel and literally. We could've gone on for three hours and I was so impressed with. How are students handled it? They when they did know something they didn't answer it. They showed their passion. I'm not sure what our audience expected but they were absolutely blown away by the caliber of the optometry students. Today and I will tell you. Go to any comedy school in the country and you will see an incredibly committed a smart.

worby Parker president Neil Blumenthal Thomas Dr All Nico Jennifer errol glover Bob Seco Kovic New England College daryl private practice partner Boston Darryl America India Netco
A Mysterious New Illness Affecting Children

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

01:08 min | 2 years ago

A Mysterious New Illness Affecting Children

"New York doctors are warning about a mysterious illness affecting children. That may be tied to Cova. Nineteen quoting the New York Times. Fifteen children many of whom had the corona virus have recently been hospitalized in New York City with a mysterious syndrome. The doctors do not yet fully understand but that has also been reported in several year Paean countries. Health officials announced Monday night. Many of the children ages two to fifteen have shown symptoms associated with toxic shock or Kowalski. Disease a rare illness in children that involves inflammation of the blood vessels including coronary arteries. The city's health department said none of the New York City patients with the syndrome have died. According to a bulletin from the health department which described the illness as a multi-system inflammatory syndrome potentially associated with cove in nineteen the disease caused by the virus reached late Monday night. The State Health Commissioner Dr Howard as Zucker said state officials were also investigating the unexplained malady. The Syndrome has received growing attention in recent weeks cases have begun appearing in European countries. Hit hard by the corona virus in

New York City New York Times Cova Kowalski Commissioner Dr Howard Zucker
Coronavirus updates: U.S. cases top 1,000 with many clustered in New York

America in the Morning

02:14 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus updates: U.S. cases top 1,000 with many clustered in New York

"The number of coronavirus cases continues to grow across New York state the majority of them are in Westchester county just north of New York City correspondent Steve casted bomb tells us some of the steps the state is taking to try to stop the virus from spreading further the largest cluster of coronavirus cases in New York state is in new Rochelle a suburb north of New York City the number of people with covert nineteen connected to synagogues community in the town broke through the one hundred mark and public officials expect that figure to continue growing new Rochelle is a particular problem so yesterday governor Andrew Cuomo announced that a containment area with a one mile radius of the focal point is being set up all schools in other locations in the containment area where people would gather in groups are now closed for at least the next two weeks we're also going to use the National Guard in the containment area to deliver food to homes to help with the cleaning of public spaces satellite lab is being set up inside the containment zone so that people don't have to travel outside of new Rochelle to get tested something that potentially spread the virus New York state health commissioner Dr Howard Zucker said it may seem extreme to some people but it's necessary given everything they know about this cluster we have to remember that that we are sitting with the first point on the curve of first couple points in a curve in and I would be wonderful to be able to go in the future look back and see how this curve is going to evolve but we don't know that and so the most important thing to do is to take all the precautions we can governor Cuomo said it's necessary in order to protect lives this will be a period of disruption for the local community I understand that but for now the community isn't completely locked down meanwhile more schools have been canceling classes were switching to online teaching across the state the governor is urging employers to allow people to work from home and it appears that many already are because the subway has been noticeably less crowded in the city and late yesterday the New York City half marathon was canceled over twenty five thousand people were going to run in the world's premier half marathon on

Westchester County Rochelle New York City Andrew Cuomo National Guard Commissioner Dr Howard Zucker New York Steve Casted Governor Cuomo
With Results for 3 Possible Coronavirus Cases Pending, CDC Allows NYC to Conduct Tests

Hugh Hewitt

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

With Results for 3 Possible Coronavirus Cases Pending, CDC Allows NYC to Conduct Tests

"But in New York City officials may soon have the ability to test it on their own the state health commissioner Dr Howard Zucker says the biggest risk right now is flow last week alone a thousand eight hundred eighty nine new Yorkers were hospitalized with lab confirmed influenza virus having originated in China doctors doctors urging new Yorkers not the stereo type or single out their Asian neighbors he really should just stick together not attack

Commissioner Dr Howard Zucker China New York City
"dr howard" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"dr howard" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Dr Howard Zucker as we have said over the past few weeks the risk to the public the New York state is currently very well the department is in daily communications often several times a day with our colleagues at the CDC to most recent patients being evaluated are under age of forty and recently spent time in China per CDC guidelines patients are being kept in appropriate isolation health experts say the virus doesn't appear to be transferred through casual contact it first originated back in December and will on China officials say four passengers onboard a cruise ship or hospitalized out of caution for possible coronaviruses royal Caribbean ship docked early this morning and being alone with more than two dozen Chinese nationals on board B. B. among the anxious relatives waiting for family members to get off the ship now my mom's on there so I'm a little bit you know I'm a little bit nervous bands mare tells NBC for that for passengers had come from China and one of them had a fever three others under close observation the other Chinese nationals on board are being flown back to China the mayor says none of the passengers spent time in Wuhan since the corona virus outbreak which is believed to have originated there I'm Kristin marks for seventy seven W. ABC news Brooklyn borough president Eric Adams demanding an immigration and customs enforcement agent be held accountable after a man was shot during the deportation arrests he says ice agents need to be outfitted with body worn cameras something the NYPD's adopted the same video surveillance that police officers are required to add we should be wondering what happened and a day of technology we should know exactly what happened just erupted last night outside with monitise hospital demanding answers in regards to yes to the shooting happened in graves and as agents went to arrest gas for Evan Dando Hernandez who was a prior assault conviction in the city I says his girlfriend's son re each for an arresting officer's gun which went off striking the man's wrist and ricocheting into his face Bernie Sanders speaking at a breakfast this morning in New Hampshire ahead of tonight's democratic presidential debate taking aim at two of his opponents including people to jazz speaking to an audience at a breakfast of that Sanders painted P. bridges as a candidate who is attracting billionaire donors I'm reading some headlines the bullet church has most exclusive billionaire donors of any Democrat that was from Forbes the hill judge tops billionaire Donald with he also went after former New York mayor Mike Bloomberg who he said has a record to run on but is spending hundreds of millions of dollars to buy the election how do we feel about living in a so called democracy when a billionaire multi billion of fifty five billion can someone unlimited sums of money Steve casting down in Manchester New Hampshire Dow closing down two hundred seventy seven points Rangers owns the Sabres your forecast Ramsey mas weather center tonight clear to partly cloudy lo thirty two tomorrow mostly sunny.

Dr Howard Zucker
"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

09:43 min | 2 years ago

"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"Do so limit some of the advertising for biologics and some of these incredibly the expensive drugs. There's no reason why though should be television in my opinion. I think it's ridiculous for patients. Come in and say I think I should have the simulator talking to somebody in the media right. I do the one we concur. So you're outnumber so I guess I guess what I what I don't don't understand is Getting political for just a second. I'm not sure how many lobbyists are in Washington related to the subject subject. But it's more than a handful. It's probably I mean strikingly. It's probably thousands of people that are lobbying Being these concepts in Washington and it works because it's whatever the market will bear. Why would the same medication be? Fifty percent is much in Canada and maybe twenty or ten percent as much much in Mexico. So why do we keep hearing silly stuff if you don't mind me saying free healthcare for all free tuition for all. Why aren't we hearing more specific solutions? Like let's stop wasting money by giving so much money into the stock holder to the pharmaceutical companies. I think it's because you you know from my perspective. That solution is very complicated. How are you going to speak to the populace about what you're talking about in terms of talking to the shareholders minimizing? You know their their return so that it reflects something that is more reasonable. We just did it. Pretty quickly. Didn't seem that complicated. Well it's more complicated that it's easier when you're trying to get elected to say free healthcare for everybody because everybody wants to hear about that. Everybody would like to believe that. That's something that can it can be attained. And I think the average person in this country would say okay if somebody says it can be done. I'M GONNA go with that person without thinking realistically is. Is that really something that can take place. So there are platitudes. And then there's reality one of the purposes of this. Show this to talk reality right. I mean that's what we're orders tried to educate the public try to discuss these difficult and complex issues. But this this this you know this Utopian Society were free the healthcare for everybody free tuition for everybody. Maybe there's a way to make that happen. I'm not sure but to just say that in a very blanket statement that this is there's something simple that's not going to require a lot of engineering would be a misrepresentation. So how would I have to ask you. You know I'm as an example title. I'm told that pretty much all men there's a race between our lifespan and the likelihood of our prostate causing a problem right and We're all supposed to deal with that. And now the question is do I get hit by a bus before that or or is that actually going to show up so if the prostate is is going to be a problem if I want free healthcare fine I still want my prostate surgery to be done by Davinci Vinci robot with someone. WHO's trained to do that sitting on the other side of the room and using the absolute cutting edge technology? Isn't that the case. So is that a lot more expensive SUV to conduct that tennis surgery. Well I actually no not that much more somewhat more So I'm very familiar with adventure robot and actually the first Davinci robot in southern in California Kaiser permanent. He was at my medical center. So we actually develop the program For robotic surgery on prostate. Cancer very proud of the record that are surgeons created they're fantastic amazing outcomes with high cure rates and low low side effect rates. How do you do it? You I mean isn't part of outcomes those you want. It's not necessarily the surgery that's better. It's the side effects. So I mean good outcome means high curate. Eight and low side effects and in the case of prostate cancer the use of Davinci robot by a skilled surgeon. WHO's familiar with how to do? The operation does and with proper for case election making sure people who really benefit from it or the ones getting the surgery. The results are extraordinary. And you would want that at should want that and most Americans have access is to that. So that's an area by the way we're we're actually doing quite well and United States cancer care in general would doing quite well. We've actually cut mortality for several cancers in the United States Lung Cancer Answers One and melanoma has been actually cut in less couple. So you know Steve earlier was talking about cancer. Now is often more like a chronic illness. It's not necessarily an acute illness in the way we used to think of it or an episode illness. It's actually something where we can actually suppress. Maybe not always cure cancer but we can keep people alive and relatively healthy for long periods of time until perhaps HAP- something better comes along That perhaps can even cure them of their condition. So I there's no doubt that when it comes to more significant problems like let's say prostate cancer or CARDIOVASC- disease in the United States. We largely do pretty well. And that's an example where investing in the right resources and investing the right training to get people prop the proper people. Doing this in the right equipment has real benefit to patients. Forget there's some insurance companies that will not allow you to have the Davinci if there's something that's more something that's simpler and less expensive and we're there will always be at least a two tier system in this country with those people who have the means that are going to get the best. The brightest the latest technology and will travel the country to doctor shop to technology shop And so to say that everybody is going to be painted with the same brush that everybody is going to be able to receive the same level of care not very realistic. I don't think in probably in any country any industrialized country. But certainly the disparities are always going to be greater in the United States. Yeah I agree I agree with that. That maybe Lancer before there's a little bit Utopian but I do think generally if people have insurance the United States they generally have access to pretty good care. What's more deplorable number? The people we have announced states who don't have access to insurance exactly think about if you're one of those fifty sixty million people who doesn't have access to care what that really means and so there's not one on road to universal care multiple roads but they don't all have to be public they can be private and public and I think the concept that it's all just going to get paid for by a massive asked if expansion of Medicare for the reasons stated I. I don't think that that's very politically tenable and not supported. Probably by the average American I do also want to say you know you're asking about the systems around the world. We've been discussing the healthcare system in isolation as though it exists vacuum and nothing else matters. It's all how fund medicine listen and and medical care but a big part of outcomes and health care. Have a lot to do with would've called social determinants of care which means how much poverty do you have. How much food insecurity security do you have? How much housing insecurity if you look at Los Angeles where we have massive homelessness? What's the effect on the health of those folks so no matter whether they have healthcare coverage and not and presumably many of those folks do not? But if you don't have a house you don't have a home plate. You don't have shelter. You don't have food. That also has a pretty damn big impact on healthcare outcomes and other other countries that are handling that issue better. I think if you look at the data we spend the most on healthcare. We don't necessarily have the best healthcare outcomes we also spend the least on social support. Now that takes different forms in different countries season. I don't consider myself an authority to be able to tell you which system is better but I do believe paying attention to these. Other aspects of people's lives has a major impact on the healthcare outcomes. And it's interesting because I think if you ask the general population the number of people who would say you know what I I think. There should be healthcare for everybody that everybody should have an equal and high level of health care. I think the vast majority of people in this country would say yes. I think that would be a good idea and yet we don't live our lives that way. We don't structure our country and our policies that way and I think in some ways we're kind of stuck because of the history of of Ah of our expectations as we bring this to a close. What grade would you give us now? In America for our outcomes. I'll be generous generous. I'd say overall it gives us a B and Canada. I would give Canada a beyond outcomes and a C. Plus or see on service says like Germany. I'm going to get a higher grade. I'd like the German system a lot one of my favorites. Dr Howard Jay Foreman. We thank you for joining us. And of course Dr Steven Tailback thank you for hosting this And next time if you'd come back and tell us a little about Atlantic street capital and some of the cool investments in the medical industry that you're working on and and how that's going to change the outcomes for the American people happy to bill. Thanks thanks for joining us. Come back and visit medicine. We're still practicing. We'll see you again next time. If you like what you hear please tell your friends and let us know how we're doing by leaving a comment. It really helps. If you give us a five star rating aiding and we really appreciate it. You can also subscribe to the show on Apple podcasts. Stitcher or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. This episode owed was produced and edited by Mike. Thomas Audio Engineering. By Michael Kennedy. And the theme music was composed and performed by. Celeste and Eric Dick. Thanks thanks for listening. Room Kirk Oh media media for your mind..

United States Cancer Canada Davinci Washington Davinci Vinci Michael Kennedy Apple Mexico Utopian Society California tennis Los Angeles Thomas Audio Engineering
"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

08:19 min | 2 years ago

"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"So we're back with Dr Howard J foaming and of course our host host Dr Steven Tack? Let's go back to the question. I asked before the break comparing outcomes at the. Va to Kaiser and maybe the rest of the country. What do we know about it? Well I I have a tremendous amount of respect. For the Veterans Administration an important mandate and date taking care of a veterans. Nothing could be more important than that you know. We owe so much to our veterans and I will say that I have gotten some of my I training at va hospitals and on the faculty ucla and partly teach at at the Wadsworth the hospital. So I've seen some fantastic medical care and some very devoted did doctors and nurses who try really hard to take care of the patients and do so well. They had made a tremendous investment in electronic medical record before anybody else did they. They had one of the most devolved electricity medical records and did that across the country and that was a big gamble an investment on their part. That actually did pay off quite a lot. But I think To to a significant degree the Va may be under resourced especially given the number of people coming out of the military in recent years and as well as the prevalence of some very important conditions including post traumatic stress disorder which is extremely prevalent amongst our veterans and nobody has a good answer to it and Even even our mental health system outside of the is inadequate the United States with the way insufficient resources. And I think the trying to figure out how to take care of so many people who have so much illness within the budgetary constraints that they have one applaud the Va.. Because I think they're taking very dispassionate. Look at the way. They're providing providing care and trying to re engineer the way they give care and I think they're going to improve over time but it's GonNa take Some work and probably some higher levels of budgets. Get us there so with all the challenges that they've got the reality of course as they are funded with the same type of mechanism that Medicare is funded correct there except except the. It's a little different in the sense that you know Medicare gets funding from payroll taxes. Now has people are working. And that's what they have Whereas the VA gets gets its funding from whatever legislative load is ever legislatively approved by Congress? So Congress could change the level of the funding quarter-by-quarter and and do so at a much higher level where. It's a little more difficult to do that with Medicare which is related to your payroll taxes but any physician. I think that has been trained in the United States has spent a fair amount of time and a VA system And I think everybody has been impressed by the level of service that is being delivered in a very as you sit stated in a very very under-resourced environment. There's only so much money to go around. And so many veterans with such complex care issues From Agent Orange and psychiatric issues relative to post traumatic stress disorder. That I think they do a great job. I would have to echo that but also echo the fact that they are sadly under-resourced and we've always felt that as we were in med school in in doing our rotations through the Va.. Doesn't I also would say about the is that Steve Steve alluded to but stated very very directly that the Veterans Administration does a fantastic job training doctors around the country and has made a huge contribution that way and lot of research is under the VA hospital so I applaud the Va.. I think they do an excellent job. They try very hard. Nothing could be more important than their work. We shall be very grateful and respectful up to the work they do but we also should make sure we're being supportive so that they can do even better. Okay well let's let's talk about. A couple of different specialties. Heart for for example. We've gotten a whole lot less. Invasive in a lot of our heart procedures are outcomes a whole lot better these days than they were even five years ago markedly improved and it's not just our outcomes relative to mortality but our outcomes in terms of trauma both physical and psychological to the patient if you can put a heart valve galvin with minimal invasive procedure as opposed to cracking. Somebody's chest open. That's huge or actually a good friend of mine has recently had valve replacement Because she had terrible case of Andrew Card itis and valve destruction And she lived long enough now with her heart valve to be able to take advantage of the technology that allowed the Cutaneous fouth placement. So there's so much going on that improves. Quality of life that minimizes the invasive procedure. In the pain and suffering. And it's not just outcomes and certainly outcomes mortality have improved but the other side of of Diminishing the trauma. The patients have to undergo for procedures has markedly improved as well and I'd like to add to that that patients who in the past would not have been able to receive any kind of treatment for certain condition because that treatment would have been too invasive into risky for them given their condition can now get a Less invasive approach and not just beat have less trauma but actually survived that maybe when they wouldn't have even been a candidate for the procedures while so that these are huge developments and cardiology is one great example of that doing that In such important ways of strategies in private practice and in practice in medicine in general general is get your patients to live long enough to catch up with so the technology will catch up with your disease. And it's really true. I mean if you can keep somebody alive with today's cancer treatment long enough so that when a cure is now available for their particular type of cancer you've done tremendous service so it's you WanNa you WanNa keep the game going long enough so oh that finally you can get to the to the cure. Hopefully within within our lifetime These careers would become available for a whole host of of medical illnesses. So getting back actually the the outcomes for heart for example where I'm going to tie in your previous subjects where you talked about preventive one of the things that you guys have done? mm-hmm clearly with technology of preventative. Care for heart. Is You're managing people's blood pressure more than ever right in part but part of that is medication vacation so I have to go back to cost for just a second. Because and now this worked for all medication I know but comparing pharmaceuticals related to controlling blood pressure sure look at the cost of those pharmaceuticals here in the US versus just about every other country on the planet. Explain to me why there's such a difference. Well first of all. I think it's important to point half. There's an enormous difference Pharmaceuticals developed in United States manufacturing. United States are often way more expensive offensive here. The United States than those same drugs made an hour factors involved here sold in Europe. But there's a lot of other elements it's not I it's not a functioning market So awesome well. This is not the usual laws of supply and demand we give the pharmaceutical companies long patents. Which means the only supplier even when the drugs go uh-huh too generic this sometimes only one generic manufacturers so it's really almost the same as when they were on brand who becomes a duopoly? We let them have direct to market advertising even for biologic. I A logic medications for complicated illnesses which no other country does and we have insurance. Pay For a good amount of the cost of the so. The individual digital person doesn't see it. They don't necessarily pay it so when you add those factors up. That's a recipe for escalating and very skyrocketing costs which is what we have the United States. And by the way when you talk about where the money's going that's a big part of where the money is going. We now are spending more pharmaceutical costs than we are on physician fees in the United States. And that's true for Medicare and every other insurance and they're going up at a much higher rate part of the answer is start making pharmaceuticals more act like a more mark more like a true market market where the supply and demand and competition. Think you can have the patents be a lot less Long Bill Lot shorter would be one thing. If I were a pharmaceutical company how could I make sense offensive the economics of getting drug past the FDA make plenty of money in with shorter patent cycle. You make it easier for the for the generic manufacturers to get Going into two for multiple wants to make drugs and make it give them incentives to.

Veterans Administration United States Medicare Va heart valve Congress Dr Howard J cancer Dr Steven Tack Andrew Card engineer FDA Wadsworth the hospital Steve Steve Europe
"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

11:20 min | 2 years ago

"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"If we have certain tests that benefit people. We should do a better job of advocating make sure patients get those tests and those tests and do this test so let me talk to you about another create create a poll market for tests rather than the doctor. Saying this is what we expect. Expect from you know that. Just an tests and diet and exercise and vaccinations and all those little things because all of these things have an impact in this is where there is a difference between us and the rest of the world. Because we're we're very much in a drug taking culture you know we get anxiety. We'd take a drug we causing housing's. Id We can't get drug. We eat badly. We take a statin. We need to get into a conversation this country to figure out what we stand for what we want to be in the has to be at the doctor actor level at the patient level the insurance level not just anyone level because we cannot continue on the current course without bankrupting the country and still not getting the outcomes that we deserve their was there a poster child country for the citizens understanding that they have to treat themselves differently. Now I don't think so. I think this is a pervasive problem in the industrialised austrial is world but there are better systems in terms of how they're delivering care than ours certain ways so one of the examples I was going to give the are now using evidence based medicine and to kind of work against and to act as a barrier to care In the private sector where I've been for the past twenty eight years of late in of late meaning in the past probably seven eight years if I wanted to order a cat scan on a patient who I think has a pulmonary process that warrants. A cat scan. Nearly every insurance turns company including Medicare will automatically deny that scan and mandate appear to peer review under the auspices of this is evidence base as we want a test that you are doing this based on some sort of evidence that will allow you to have the scan they then forced me to speak to appear and invariably it'll be a specialist in ob Guy Ni or a specialist in endocrinology. Not that they're not well trained in what they do. But I'm a pulmonary critical care specialist list. I would think maybe not. Maybe they're right but I would think that I have a better handle on what I need based on my at the gestalt of my patient. And hopefully which is evidence-based spaced but under this auspices under the auspices of trying to do things that are evidence based what they have really done to set up a barrier. Because I get on on the phone I'm on hold for fifteen minutes then. I have a peer to peer discussion. Maybe with somebody for another ten minutes fifteen minutes. How many doctors doctors are going to take twenty thirty minutes from their day for every cat scan that they order so there is no peer review structure at Kaiser? No medical necessity acidy within Kaiser. Permanente means whatever the doctor thinks you need you get it. And that's how we operate we trust doctors. We know that they're always trying to do the right thing. and give them Utopian. There's no CFO someplace that walks. The halls and knelt creates nightmares for the doctor's. Now actually the doctors really can give unfettered care and they do what they think is right for the patient. We try to make make sure that they do. Things is evidence based as possible but we don't control the head of quality what. How did you oversee that? If your tenant is the doctor can do what he here she feels is correct. How're you then policing the doctor? That might be deviating from what we'd be spending so we wouldn't call policing but but we certainly share show data so Every doctor would know. Let's say my panel of patients diabetes. This is the average hemoglobin C. And if I'm getting really low and really really impressive Hemoglobin A.. One CS but somebody else is not achieving that there would be peer to peer instruction and comparison. We would share what we're doing so we learn from each other. There's often awful awful lot of healthcare education that goes on to share these best practices and we make put systems in place to make it easy for people to do the thing that benefits. It's the patient the most. So by and large I don't think that the utilization patterns are so much higher necessarily within a system like ours where people can do what they want. But hopefully there's less variation and people are doing things that are much more scientifically evidence based but I I will say that And I think the way Steve that you you describe a little bit ago you know having doctor you know of your stature you know all of the education that a specialist has having to waste their time. That's is not the answer to this. It's not and by the way I remember in the old managed care era. It wasn't peer to peer. Who was actually probably speaking to somebody who didn't have a medical education was reading from a book and you had to just describe with the more that it used to be and I don't think that's the answer? I don't think we should be `gate-keeping. Well this isn't real evidence. Evidence based medicine with this. Setup is a barrier so that most physicians or at least let's say fifty percent of physicians will say I don't have time for this right and so they won't make the call. How how much money is that going to save the insurance entities at the at the end of the day billions of dollars every right? I is that just because Kaiser is kind of existing bubble and they don't have to work with the same parameters as a private hospital. Yeah basically they've created their own bubble now they for better or worse they rise and fall by their decisions economically and medically but they only have themselves to answer to and of course you know every organization has has to be fiscally responsible you as they say no margin no mission so no matter who you are. You can't spend more than you taken because that's not something heckled last forever but but You know we will only scratched the surface on the kinds of things that can be done. We've taught at the moment about prevention. But I'll give you some other examples. The amount of chronic disease that we have the United States is overwhelming at this point diabetes obesity. Hypertension I'm sure Steve can speak to what he sees it. Every day in the intensive care unit people who are now with bad illness because they had these kinds of Mo co morbidity and yet so many folks who have these kinds of problems have not been properly care for before they get desperately ill. They haven't been put on a a proper diet. They haven't been put on a basic medication that is inexpensive and works and helps prevent problems but it takes systems that takes information and takes data data and with the physicians. It's showing them what's working. What's not so that they can get better and better at it and giving them resources around them to help them achieve that? So you mentioned something to me before the show that I'm GonNA throw back at your doctor. You said that The US spends more per capita or per patient than any other country And our outcomes it comes. Don't necessarily show it so I have to ask you. Where's that money going right? Well first of all. That's a very complicated question so to some UM extent we're not spending our money optimally on what works so we're spending disproportionately money on things that in some cases may not happy beneficial may not work was spending a lot of money on people who have very very advanced disease older people people with very severe conditions and so at that point we should start rationing care now. I don't believe in rushing at all but I do think that there are times where we making perhaps different kinds of decisions and not not based on the money but based upon. What's the right care at that time? But at the moment we have lots and placed on. What's care for their for their condition? Revival the for their for their condition at the time. And so we have. I'm sure you know Steve would tell can tell stories. Many many patients intensive care units. Who whose condition is very very profound than some people wind up in the intensive care unit for months at a time and that can be extremely expensive either fishery keeping someone around? Who's WHO's passed their time and I'm not I'm not I don't really believe in that? I I don't I don't believe that I can say when someone is passed their time but I think sometimes doctors can do a better job of of talking to patients and families about how they can what they're conditioners and talking through but it's alternately up to the patient and the family what should be done and only up to them but sometimes doctors are resistant to having those conversations so I think on the one hand I don't believe in rationing and I don't think we should ever ever be the Make our decisions based upon money including including an end of life but on the other hand. I think we need to make sure that we're educating talking to our patients properly. Better conditions at all times when the healthy when they're not healthy but you going back to your question question about. Where's all the money going? So if you look at the Economic Incentives we pay a lot of money to a doctor to do a major operation. But we don't pay them very much money to have to do a physical exam and have a woman's examine a patient so how is a doctor in a primary care. Practice opposed to keep their practice going when doing an extensive history and physical brings them such little money compared to what somebody can make doing a major procedure. That's it's not a good distribution of the way we use money. Are you implying that doctors are being paid more than they should in this country. I well I put it this way. We definitely make a lot more per unit everything per unit time etc than most of the rest of the world. I'm not I'm not even the physicals. Even the doctors make the United States than most other countries per unit time per unit everything. But I but I'm not an apologist for that I I see what it what it takes to become a doctor to be adopted. The stresses of being adopted the value. You would have no. I don't think we're overpaid. I JUST WANNA see people be paid well in American healthcare for all of the work they do not just a procedure work. I'd like to you see Dr be paid well for the cognitive kind of reallocate. How they're paid? I think that would be. I think that would help to degree. Have we reached a certain place in America. Where if reimbursement were to go down any further? Are we going to be able to get the the best and the brightest in field that we think warrants the best and the brightest rightous number. One one thing that should be addressed from public policy standpoint. If you want people to go into any field that they like make make sure that they can afford to do so and try to avoid having to be so much in debt by going to medical school that would be one example by far we have the highest tuition in the world compared to somebody else and that's that's a problem that's something can be dressed as a public policy standpoint and should be you know what I'm GonNa ask us for just a minute. We're GONNA take a quick break but when we come back I want to pick up that subject and then I WanNa talk to you about comparing to bubbles the bubble of Kaiser where they're managing their process. But I'm also GONNA WANNA compare that with the va that's also in a bubble and ask you about their outcomes. We'll be right back. Hi I'm Robert Ross. Host of cars that matter you might be wondering what makes a car matter and I have a feeling you already know the answer. Some cars have changed history. Some you can hear a mile away. Awesome have lines that make your heart skip a beat if a car ever made you look twice then I think you know the ones that matter join me. As I speak with designers collectors Curzon market experts about the nationals drives and passions. We drive cars. That matter. Wherever you get your podcasts.

Kaiser United States Steve CFO Hypertension Medicare diabetes Curzon market Guy Ni Robert Ross Economic Incentives America
"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

08:44 min | 2 years ago

"dr howard" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"Has held positions of medical director and Chief of staff partner and board member at Kaiser Permanent Day and by the way he supervised about forty three hundred staff in about five hundred doctors. Dr How're you doing. I'm well bill nice to see you nice to have you join us. Apparently when Howard was twelve elven New York he watched as his grandmother was treated for cancer and he knew then that he wanted to become a doctor. Dr Foam earned his medical degree at northwestern and he completed his gastroenterology fellowship at none other than UCLA by the way their football team is the bruins but then he became clinical professor of medicine even at USC their team is the trojans he also served as an associate clinical professor of medicine at Ucla Bruins so before we get down to business this. Let's start with this. The Victory Bell Football Series Howard. WHO's your team? Bruins are Trojans bill you know such a divided and polarized country and and I think we need to start bringing people together right here in Los Angeles by making sure that we can be equally proud of both bruins in the trojans but I do have to say I'm personally still a Trojan fan because my two boys matriculated there Yeah because I trained at USC so welcome to the show. And we're proud to have you. Thank you Steve. Two great teams with two great traditions. And we're lucky to have such fantastic sports here in Los Angeles including being a football fan. You're also also senior operating advisor Atlantic Street capital now focused on medical investments right. Yes we'll talk about that in a little bit. But you were chair of the quality committee at Kaiser that leads us to our hot topic today. So Steve Let me ask you first. How are we supposed to juggle the cost of medicine? insurance company limitations and hospital economics. If we'RE GONNA try to enhance patient outcomes that is the big dilemma is that we have tremendous standards in terms of healthcare in our expectations that we were going to provide the the best and the greatest and the newest healthcare available to who are patients. And yet we have this notion that this is GonNa come from vaporware that somehow it will be provided to us and and yet we're really at a crossroads a realizing that our Medicare system is straining relative to the dollars that are available Research Searching Development is taking place in the private sector but then the rest of the consumers are feeling the pain because they're having to pay extreme costs in as as far as their medications are concerned and the entire system sort of feels as if it's a row about ready to collapse how can maintain high quality cutting edge medicine and still manage the economics and those two things are so diametrically opposed and so much of our gross national the product is already being spent relative to healthcare and yet we're drowning Medicare's rationing insurance companies are rationing they're hiding the rationing that's going non but there's rationing going on nevertheless so can i. Can I ask this Howard. Does Kaiser have a unique view of how to manage this problem. I think Especially from the point of view Kaiser Permanente we feel that there are some relatively more simple approaches to health care where it's not all just about spending money on the latest when greatest technology or pharmaceutical For example Prevention we in the United States are much more engineered To have patients get great treatment when they're sick but not really engineered to make sure that they get all the preventive care that they should get and there are literally and insurance wise and everyone who say engineered and every one of those ways we first of all. We don't talk about enough. We don't talk about prevention now. We don't advocate enough for it. And we don't have financial incentives centers that favorite prevention or financial. Incentives favor taking care of people. When they get sick we spend a lot more money per unit time for doctorates CETERA? When someone on a sec then giving them advice on how to prevent them from any sick so if we just could get every single American to do the tests and take the treatments from preventive standpoint that we know work that right there would improve health and that right there would reduce costs and that was certainly something we accuse a permanent? They felt very strongly about and had trump have tremendous data. Show that we've been doing. Those things are very very substantial way making sure that populations of patients get their mammograms. Hypertension screens take basic medications occasions. That work for their condition. But you have to make sure that large numbers of patients in the population do it because of all small population percent do it. You won't get the same benefits so one of many countries around the world and in fact we're starting to do it better in this country. No country does a perfectly however In in fact still that's a problem that that's a problem that is actually international nature but Some countries that are doing better at it include Germany the United Kingdom even the National Health Service where people have their criticisms at times about service and whatnot in the NHL NHL does give care. That's very evidence based But no one country has got a monopoly to give great prevention. That's just a huge opportunity for us and everybody else as well let me give you a negative example from this country. We wish I'm noticing Historically we do screening blood tests on patients every year Complete blood count a comprehensive metabolic panel looking looking at kidney function liver function Your Lipid profile your cholesterol your LDL your HDL etcetera etcetera. And historically this has been paid aid for by insurance companies has been paid for by Medicare currently Medicare and then subsequently other insurance companies have followed that we we will do a blood count if you have a blood disorder. So if you're anemic we will justify doing a blood count if he had kidney failure. We'll just we are justified in running your creatine in your kidney function test if you have thyroid disorder than we will pay for that. But if you don't have that you don't have any of these disorders. We no longer pay for routine screening laboratory data. So does that mean that. The insurance companies have not adopted the principle that preventive care actually ends up costing them less than long run to not pay for the screening blood tests will save millions for private insurance companies as well as for Medicare. So how. You're you're you're focused on how we create better outcomes for patients. Isn't this part of the problem. And what do you suggest do we do about it. Yeah so I can at Kaiser Permanente we didn't control doctors ordering habits. A doctor can do anything That they think is appropriate for a patient and we didn't and tell them not to order tests and whatnot but in particular. We strongly encourage them to do things that are evidence based so. If there's a test to be done that would help detect something early. We actually want doctors to do do that. And and have a very good record of accomplishing that. I mean again. We didn't restrict people from practicing the way they felt was best based upon their view of the clinical evidence in the in the patient's patient's condition however it's similar to what happens in government when governmental When when they're tough times and government budgets challenge they tended slash ask things they took the cup? Because that's the only way they can balance the budget so as we get closer to Medicare insolvency and insurance companies are having problems with costs. They they start getting into to cost savings mode and those those cost-saving modes and not necessarily evidence base. So that you stuck maybe cutting out the baby with the bathwater a little bit and don't intelligently try to to figure out what you should do and what. You should not do. What I'm advocating for is to try to use scientific evidence as much as possible to make thorough assessments of these various technologies analogies are tests and then use the evidence that comes forward and make sure people do get these tests are do get these therapies as opposed to basically you want to use this you want to use this information to convince the healthcare economic controllers the insurance companies to think differently about the pro? I do but I also understand. It's it's it's easy to just blame the insurance companies and I'm not here to be an apologist and then you way for Insurance companies or explain what they do again. I'm very proud of what we did in Kaiser Permanente because because we were not just an insurance company also provider of care and we have a really good record of policy but I do think that the opportunities for improving health certainly exists at the insurance level. The exists at the physician level but they also existed the patient level so.

Kaiser Permanente Medicare Howard bruins USC Los Angeles Steve Ucla Bruins Kaiser associate clinical professor o UCLA clinical professor of medicine medical director Dr Foam cancer
The Big Dilemma Facing the U.S. Healthcare System

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:57 min | 2 years ago

The Big Dilemma Facing the U.S. Healthcare System

"Are we supposed to juggle the cost of medicine? insurance company limitations and hospital economics. If we'RE GONNA try to enhance patient outcomes that is the big dilemma is that we have tremendous standards in terms of healthcare in our expectations that we were going to provide the the best and the greatest and the newest healthcare available to who are patients. And yet we have this notion that this is GonNa come from vaporware that somehow it will be provided to us and and yet we're really at a crossroads a realizing that our Medicare system is straining relative to the dollars that are available Research Searching Development is taking place in the private sector but then the rest of the consumers are feeling the pain because they're having to pay extreme costs in as as far as their medications are concerned and the entire system sort of feels as if it's a row about ready to collapse how can maintain high quality cutting edge medicine and still manage the economics and those two things are so diametrically opposed and so much of our gross national the product is already being spent relative to healthcare and yet we're drowning Medicare's rationing insurance companies are rationing they're hiding the rationing that's going non but there's rationing going on nevertheless so can i. Can I ask this Howard. Does Kaiser have a unique view of how to manage this problem. I think Especially from the point of view Kaiser Permanente we feel that there are some relatively more simple approaches to health care where it's not all just about spending money on the latest when greatest technology or pharmaceutical For example Prevention we in the United States are much more engineered To have patients get great treatment when they're sick but not really engineered to make sure that they get all the preventive care that they should get and there are literally and insurance wise and everyone who say engineered and every one of those ways we first of all. We don't talk about enough. We don't talk about prevention now. We don't advocate enough for it. And we don't have financial incentives centers that favorite prevention or financial. Incentives favor taking care of people. When they get sick we spend a lot more money per unit time for doctorates CETERA? When someone on a sec then giving them advice on how to prevent them from any sick so if we just could get every single American to do the tests and take the treatments from preventive standpoint that we know work that right there would improve health and that right there would reduce costs and that was certainly something we accuse a permanent? They felt very strongly about and had trump have tremendous data. Show that we've been doing. Those things are very very substantial way making sure that populations of patients get their mammograms. Hypertension screens take basic medications occasions. That work for their condition. But you have to make sure that large numbers of patients in the population do it because of all small population percent do it. You won't get the same benefits so one of many countries around the world and in fact we're starting to do it better in this country. No country does a perfectly however In in fact still that's a problem that that's a problem that is actually international nature but Some countries that are doing better at it include Germany the United Kingdom even the National Health Service where people have their criticisms at times about service and whatnot in the NHL NHL does give care. That's very evidence based But no one country has got a monopoly to give great prevention. That's just a huge opportunity for us and everybody else as well let me give you a negative example from this country. We wish I'm noticing Historically we do screening blood tests on patients every year Complete blood count a comprehensive metabolic panel looking looking at kidney function liver function Your Lipid profile your cholesterol your LDL your HDL etcetera etcetera. And historically this has been paid aid for by insurance companies has been paid for by Medicare currently Medicare and then subsequently other insurance companies have followed that we we will do a blood count if you have a blood disorder. So if you're anemic we will justify doing a blood count if he had kidney failure. We'll just we are justified in running your creatine in your kidney function test if you have thyroid disorder than we will pay for that. But if you don't have that you don't have any of these disorders. We no longer pay for routine screening laboratory data. So does that mean that. The insurance companies have not adopted the principle that preventive care actually ends up costing them less than long run to not pay for the screening blood tests will save millions for private insurance companies as well as for Medicare. So how. You're you're you're focused on how we create better outcomes for patients. Isn't this part of the problem. And what do you suggest do we do about it. Yeah so I can at Kaiser Permanente we didn't control doctors ordering habits. A doctor can do anything That they think is appropriate for a patient and we didn't and tell them not to order tests and whatnot but in particular. We strongly encourage them to do things that are evidence based so. If there's a test to be done that would help detect something early. We actually want doctors to do do that. And and have a very good record of accomplishing that. I mean again. We didn't restrict people from practicing the way they felt was best based upon their view of the clinical evidence in the in the patient's patient's condition however it's similar to what happens in government when governmental When when they're tough times and government budgets challenge they tended slash ask things they took the cup? Because that's the only way they can balance the budget so as we get closer to Medicare insolvency and insurance companies are having problems with costs. They they start getting into to cost savings mode and those those cost-saving modes and not necessarily evidence base. So that you stuck maybe cutting out the baby with the bathwater a little bit and don't intelligently try to to figure out what you should do and what. You should not do. What I'm advocating for is to try to use scientific evidence as much as possible to make thorough assessments of these various technologies analogies are tests and then use the evidence that comes forward and make sure people do get these tests are do get these therapies as opposed to basically you want to use this you want to use this information to convince the healthcare economic controllers the insurance companies to think differently about the pro? I do but I also understand. It's it's it's easy to just blame the insurance companies and I'm not here to be an apologist and then you way for Insurance companies or explain what they do again. I'm very proud of what we did in Kaiser Permanente because because we were not just an insurance company also provider of care and we have a really good record of policy but I do think that the opportunities for improving health certainly exists at the insurance level. The exists at the physician level but they also existed the patient

Kaiser Permanente Medicare Kaiser Research Searching Development United States Howard Blood Disorder NHL Hypertension Thyroid Disorder Germany National Health Service United Kingdom
Sam Brockie, US And Sweden discussed on Get Real with Dr. Howard and Susan Howard

Get Real with Dr. Howard and Susan Howard

00:19 sec | 3 years ago

Sam Brockie, US And Sweden discussed on Get Real with Dr. Howard and Susan Howard

"A Sam Brockie back on US soil he awaits the verdict of an assault trial in Sweden the Harlem rapper landed in Los Angeles last night after spending a month in a Swedish jail for allegedly beating up a nineteen year old Swedish man a Sam Brock he says that he acted in self defense a verdict and sentencing will be issued on August

Sam Brockie United States Sweden Los Angeles Sam Brock Assault Harlem Nineteen Year
Researchers announce a breakthrough in HIV cure

News, Traffic and Weather

00:36 sec | 3 years ago

Researchers announce a breakthrough in HIV cure

"Potentially promising news an HIV research ABC's Erin to Turkey has more scientists have successfully treated and suppress the virus that causes aids but have not been able to eliminate it researchers at the university of Nebraska Medical Center and Temple University so they may have now found a possible cure after the Iraq hated HIV from the DNA of mice we're celebrating the idea that HIV has the potential now to be eliminated Dr Howard Gandelman conceded but worked in mice may not work in humans but he said he's hopeful the potential breakthrough combines an experimental drug with a gene editing

ABC Erin Turkey Temple University Iraq Dr Howard Gandelman University Of Nebraska Medical
HIV, Dr Howard Kendall And University Of Nebraska Medical Center discussed on Todd Schnitt

Todd Schnitt

00:21 sec | 3 years ago

HIV, Dr Howard Kendall And University Of Nebraska Medical Center discussed on Todd Schnitt

"Researchers at the university of Nebraska Medical Center say they've eliminated HIV in mice we never thought even with their vaccines and the trials for so many years that HIV could be eliminated lead researcher Dr Howard Kendall been says if they can completely cure patients could Medicaid and heal for the rest of their

HIV Dr Howard Kendall University Of Nebraska Medical Researcher
President Trump, President And Jim Ryan discussed on Get Real with Dr. Howard and Susan Howard

Get Real with Dr. Howard and Susan Howard

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

President Trump, President And Jim Ryan discussed on Get Real with Dr. Howard and Susan Howard

"Immigrations and customs enforcement. Yes, I is rates targeting families withstanding deportation orders have been put on. Hold says President Trump ABC's Jim Ryan reports from Dallas, the ice raids and mass deportations were to start on Sunday in many of the ten targeted cities. Police chiefs and other officials publicly promised to refuse to cooperate. Now a day before the rates were to start. President Trump has tweeted that at the request of the Democrats. He's delaying the process for two weeks. The president added that he will resume. However, if Democrats don't agree to asylum ball

President Trump Jim Ryan Dallas Two Weeks
"dr howard" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"dr howard" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Now, I called you desperately on a weekend. And I said Dr Howard I have the worst flu I've ever had. I've never I've never felt this way. I've never suffered this way US. Some questions about my my nutritional background. I struggled with chronic bronchitis. Growing up. There were regular chest. Congestion issues, and sinuses and allergies and so forth that I was dealing with for a long time. In fact, when I was a kid I would get bronchitis. Nearly every time the weather changed. If it went from real cold to real warm in a fast short period of time. In fact, this spring here in New York, we had one of those days in could tell my body wanted to to go. There didn't get there this time. But you you talk to me about the difference in a spark in a flame in the way infection works in the body. And you said what which is easier to put out a big roaring fire or little tiny spark. And then, of course, the answer's the spark. But you did impressed. You remember the oh, man he made such an impact in you. You basically did say basically, your flu is a big giant roaring fire right now, you've got it. You've got to get that doused. But once you do the balance of nature with the nutrition from the fruits and the vegetables can put out those sparks much more quick. And I found that to be true because in the next year and a half or so since I've been on the product I have not had any serious reoccurrence of bronchitis. And when I when I feel like something's starting to go up to dosage take a few more fruits and vegetables for few days under the directions, you gave me and it has worked every single time, including his recently just a couple of weeks ago, and Dr Howard some some of your best success stories are people that have used it. And now they tell other people about it. And we've got someone like that who's calling us from coconut creek, Florida. Rachel are you there? It's good to have you with us today at bouncing h radio. Rachel, what was your story? What why did you come into contact with balance of nature? I have COPD currently on oxygen twenty four seven. Found increase my dope. Nine of the the daddy the nine of. For every day. I found that carried the day that I could take by accident for.

bronchitis US Dr Howard Rachel flu COPD Florida New York