17 Burst results for "Dr Hong"

"dr hong" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:20 min | 9 months ago

"dr hong" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Executive Carrie Lam Ed, saying that this surgeon Corona virus cases is severe. And there's no sign that is under control. That's exactly right. Brian. The number of cases exceeded the magnitude of previous waves. Hong Kong has reported out of daily record 108 infections of covert 19. Bloomberg's Yvonne man, says chief executive Carrie Lam, So she's very concerned situation. Is very severe, she says. At this point, there is no sign that this virus is under control, and the big concern has been the local cases out. Of those 108 about 40%. Our local cases that are unknown origin, So that's still the big issue right now. Lam says She's expanding indoor mask wearing tomb or areas, not just public transit also says distancing measures will be expanded, including restaurant restrictions. Jim Closures remaining in place for the weak civil servants are back working at home. Residents in Melbourne that now face a fine of 140 us If they're caught not wearing masks, the state recorded a sizable increase day today. Over the weekend, the state of emergency will be extended through August 16th and Victoria US virus cases have arisen to 1400.2% day today, above the 1.9 daily average last week. Tokyo has set another record of cases. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti is warning the city is on the brink of another stay at home order and calling for leadership at every level of government. I think that there are people who are just exhausted, they were sold a bill of goods, they said. This was under control. They said this would be over soon. And I think when leaders say that People react and they do the wrong things. They stopped distancing themselves. They stopped washing their hands. They stopped wearing masks on Florida Congresswoman Donna Shalala says Miami should be shut down again as well. The real thing we need to do is we need to close down again. I said four months ago. We don't do this right. We're gonna have to close down again. That's our worst nightmare. And we're going to have to do that. And this Well, this well. New York is going head into phase for tomorrow. President Donald Trump on Fox. A wide ranging interview with Chris Wallace says that US has the best mortality rate in the world challenge several times. Why Wallace on several different issues. This being one of them by the wants to fund something clever. He does not look. He signed a charter. With Bernie Sanders says nothing about the funding will really it says Abolish it, says it. Let's go. All right, Get me the charter plane. Let's go. Let's go and has directed hospitals not to send case results for the CDC, but to his administration, saying cases are up. Many of those cases shouldn't even be cases. Cases are up because we have the best testing in the world and we have the most tested and he calls Dr Fauci an alarmist and I each director Francis Collins defends Doctor Fashion says Vaccine research is going very well. At this point. Our colleagues had started to design a vaccine, which just 62 days later, was then being injected into the first. Phase one trial participants that data, which was just published three days ago, looks extremely good. And Collins says a mask wearing debate is bizarre. And oh my gosh, A good news story out of all of this and old tradition and business has returned to a suburb of San Francisco up in the North Bay. Remember ice cream trucks. Well, A business called Kona now have to colorful trucks that deliver shave ice. It is online by order, but they say that they hope it brightens up someday is the beautifully Ah and I've seen pictures of a painted truck goes through a neighborhood and delivers shave ice in San Francisco. I met Baxter. This is Bloomberg. Brian. You know, I saw an interesting new business over the weekend. You probably have seen this happening. But Airbnb you Khun, You can rent out pools in people's homes. Yeah, I didn't know that was happening. That seems very interesting. Another way to stay Cool. Yeah, along with schools have been closed for the most part so you can have a swim lessons or that kind of stuff. Yeah, It's an interesting development. Yeah, eat ice cream and then go swimming. Sounds like summer. Thanks very much. Let's get Alex Wolf. Head of Asia Investment Strategy tape. Morgan Private Bank. Looking at global investment flows, Alex. Um what about improving European and Asian economies? That seems to have the bending of the curve here does that attracts some money away from the United States or Does it support the U. S because it sort of mitigate some of the set back there. Yes, it's already attracted. Both mentioned that being a better public health response and they've been able to control the virus contained the virus. Much more quickly. But then also the other big factor is a dollar was weakening dollars. The expectation of the leaking down that general puts his clothes. Out of you asked that the rest of the world and so is predominantly your pool inequities and into China, particularly urination pointed into Chinese equities. Alex also very focused, of course on earning season this week. What if some of the case sectors we look for here as we look at the economic recovery of which companies or which corporate they're going to fare better from this pandemic? Yeah, we're going Tio quite a devoted on the spurs, And after that, it gets reported that they are quite low. A lot of adventures. But the expectation that you're going to look a lot of what 34 times is for for the future. I think we're looking at a compact pretty much across the receptor. What will be how well how they perform because he's from out of the way. More company property looking at their personal ones. No, no, that would be I Do you think that work from home stocks leap back into favour this week after suffering on a comparative basis a little last week. What Working bee work back and the airline to the other. Return to work kind of stock than others the way they were and how they think it's going to continue. Yes, as Dr Hong Kong, But of course with us, Uh and we're seeing a lot of places that were working at the time to work back to work from home. Could be a sort of a passable job and the work home stop broadly across the technology, but but but well Claiming at home things like that good about, Okay. Alex would talk some or a lot comes down to management is Alex Wolf, by the way from J. P. Morgan Private.

Alex Wolf Carrie Lam Dr Hong Kong Bloomberg Brian Francis Collins US Carrie Lam Ed Chris Wallace San Francisco President Donald Trump Executive Bernie Sanders Melbourne Eric Garcetti Los Angeles chief executive Florida New York Yvonne man
"dr hong" Discussed on expediTIously with Tip "T.I." Harris

expediTIously with Tip "T.I." Harris

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"dr hong" Discussed on expediTIously with Tip "T.I." Harris

"This best. I I need money but I've never picked up a gun and walked into wells Fargo and demanded it. You know so you have choices you can make even when you're under pressure In so I think people took individual Individual stakes in this and did what they did so there was cheating in there. Were children that were cheated. And that's why the film title is one child left behind because one child behind in my opinion is too many in our education system but the flip side to that was out of the twelve hundred teachers. That were investigated. Thirty-five indictments came out of twelve hundred auto. Those thirty-five Twelve decided not to take plea deals and pled not guilty in went to trial. Roll the dice and went to trial of those twelve to a sitting here today and And the other would have happened with the other team so Dr Hong was also indicted. So she she passed away she. I'm so sorry to hear the other out the rest of us. We went to court and we were found guilty so we all went to jail for Judge Baxter said to Scare us the interesting part about the cases after after the jury came back and found guilty They offers offers another plea deal which is unusual because we lost. So why do we take the way we're getting out of jail and the plea deal was that we would give our rights and appeal that we gave up our rights on appeal? Then they would do something else for us so all of us went out of that twelve to were incarcerated Miss Katainen in another teacher and to play after he got out. Because you know jail was something that's difficult so they they play. They accept guilt in there. I it was conviction was a post conviction plea which never have heard of appointment absolutely unheard of early understand that this was not really they had more than one one opportunity to interplay with in this case which is unheard of so. I it was before the case even goes to trial. Come in talk to us. Tell us what you did. And because we are under the presumption that this is a racketeering case you have to be involved with someone else so tell us about everyone. You were involved in of the wise. If you're not telling us by everyone you work with then clearly. You're not being honest. That was step one. If you came in and took a plea it was no jail time right. You GET PROBATION. Everybody who took a plea in the front end probation and go on about your business if not you go to trial for them to get to the end of trial now does not unheard of four right for the jury comes back right one side or the other. Be like okay. So let's see if we can work this out and not roll the dice but for after the jury to come back is absolutely unheard of not only that but after the jury comes back and again not asking for the amount of time that they ended up ultimately getting if you did in fact take that plea after the fact. We're GONNA take a pause in the conversation man. You know what I mean just so we can't get into this right now. I day to day lives could be a bit stressful now. More than ever. You know what I mean but there's a way to feel better emphasis own. Feel better I in that way is feels premium. Cbd FEELS IS PREMIUM CBD delivered directly to your doorstep feels F. E. A. L. S. is premium. Cbd delivered directly to Your Door. Still feels naturally helps reduce stress anxiety pain and sleeplessness now On long flights. You know what I'm saying to Africa I think of when the memo later man you know what I'm saying. We get on the flight. We took a little fields premium. Cbd And the it was exactly what. I needed man you know. I mean how long flights is much my lady do but this flight was much better or should I say it was much shorter. 'cause I I remember taking fields. I remember those enough and I remember touching down waking up diggle say and so. The flight was short as a more man. And if you're walking around with a little more eggs added us to give feels attract. It'll be jet what you need to take a breather.

Cbd Dr Hong Fargo Judge Baxter racketeering Miss Katainen Africa F. E. A. L. S.
"dr hong" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"dr hong" Discussed on KOMO

"Patrol and to- are on the scene. Your next report at ten four Jay Phillips. Komo news. Komo weather. Art Sanders here. Good evening. Mostly cloudy tonight, slight chance of showers after midnight, lows in the upper thirty s highs near fifty and mostly cloudy tomorrow, mostly cloudy Friday, mid fifties. Saturday, patchy morning fog, otherwise partly sunny in the morning, then becoming sunny highs lower fifties Sunday and Monday, patchy morning fog, then mostly sunny, highs near fifty Tuesday, mostly sunny, fifty Wednesday, mostly cloudy, a slight chance of rain. Highs around fifty overnight lows near forty that's your latest weather from the KOMO forecast team. And here's lifebeat with marina Rockinger on KOMO news, allergies. You might think only of springtime or even fall. But for some people, colder weather still brings problems with allergies. Thanks to being cooped up in the house allergist. Dr Sandra Hong says microscopic pests can be a big issue, the dust mites can actually and being in your pillows, your mattress box springs carpeting, and if you have a humidifier if you keep it going at greater than fifty percent, humidity that will actually have them grow. Faster. And so you'll have a lot more of them. Dr Hong suggests using special covers for pillows mattresses and box springs and prepared to give your washing machine, a good workout, and it's really important to make sure that you wash all of your linens in your bed, including this stuff. Gambles and pop water over one hundred thirty degrees in dry and hot intellectually get rid of the dust mites. Pets can be a big problem as well during wintertime as they spend more time indoors like us, which of course, leads to more dander in our homes..

Komo KOMO Dr Sandra Hong Jay Phillips Art Sanders marina Rockinger one hundred thirty degrees fifty percent
"dr hong" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:26 min | 2 years ago

"dr hong" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"It's a show about living in today's world famous happening Franken you brings an amazing eclectic mix to the airwaves got that. Right. And one of the reasons she's earned legions of loyal fans is very simple. When you listen to the Frankie Boyer show. You just never know. What's going to happen? Listen. Frankie boyer. Welcome. Nice to have you with us right here. On biz talk radio. Asians. We now think of crazy. Wait. Well, this woman from Singapore. That is a professor, and she has an incredible story. This story is about it's called failing up. You heard me, correct. A professors artists flunking, determination and hope and it is such a pleasure to to welcome to the program. Barbara professor, Barbara Hong. And it's Dr Hong Dr welcome by the way, your book. There is there is something in in the world of of books. It's called the Kirk is star. And your book was awarded this star. There's like two percent of all books in the country in the world. Get this star in your book is is is received twentieth. So congratulations. Thank you. So one of the great myths is that we all think every Asian is running into Gucci's and Louis Vitton. And you know, it's just like this stereotype that we have as Americans. And yet your background could not be further from that life lifestyle. You had an abusive alcoholic father in alliterate mother. They were all of you kids in the slums of Singapore. You are. Are you were you were asked to do sweat labor at a young age to help make bills pay the bills, which your father drink? He was so abusive in and sick. And so how does one go from that background to become a Kirk star author and a doctorate from Columbia University in special education. In addition to three master's degree in instructs, instructional practices policy in leadership, and as a learning specialist from the same institution three time recipient of the prestigious senior Fulbright scholar award the first honorable visiting scholar to Taiwan municipal university of education. I mean, your your credentials are impeccable. Thank you. Humbling. Thank you for inviting me to show. Again, let you mentioned before stereotype of Asians to begin with. If that they all can learn they all can study at topping math and science, you know, and especially from Singapore. Oppy pecan picture is the wealthiest country and of caused the movie crazy Asian does how. But again growing up, you know, in a seventy is pretty typical Singapore is not always reach. And again, given, you know oughta background off my father being alchoholic mother being illiterate. She cannot write her name. She's never been to school before. And none of my siblings finished tenth grade. So the biggest dream that my mom has is. Well, if one of us in a office because that's a condition that would be the best job that we can dream off. And. Oh, that's so. Sweet. Yeah. Of course, you would be comfortable. Yeah. So again school is not a piracy because it's about daily living. If we. It's about survival. It's about we cut a dozen of clothing symbolic like the loose threat from the buttons and things like that. That's how coatings are. So neat in a stall because somebody has to cut away those threats and every dozen we cut we get thirty cents and that makes on all day, and we get nails, and again, a pot from that just going to school is a routine, and of course, I flunked my. Several grades but keep getting more out because it's just a social promotion, and I don't get to go to a better school because I was born at a time when is called stop at to what a government were punished. A parents a thousand dollars if they give up to more than two children. That one by accident. They will forgive you. But I with the fourth one. So that's why my mom told me when I was seven years old that she tried a bought me twice. But was not successful. So she ingrained in me that you don't really have a brain to study. You know, I've already destroy a brain while you were in my warm, so don't try to study so hot and just having that notion of a cell fulfilling prophecy, you don't have anything to believe in yourself to school is not very good. So when I flunked my tenth grade, which is equivalent of twelfth grade in America to Cambridge exam. Actually, I don't know if I fail. I didn't even show up for the exam. Why bother to try, you know, right? And then there was a class of repeated essay. Wow. If I'm going to repeat as system most humiliating thing in my life because everybody would have more on and wore a different uniform, but I would be in the same uniform. Everybody knew that I didn't pot. The exact sure. And so that shame was so so heavy on me. And I told myself I would only allow myself to cry for twenty four hours and repeat three hundred sixty five days. It could be the longest ran a sixty five days of my life off the shortest one in the long ram up things. And there was this teacher. He was an administrator actually because nobody wanted to teach a bunch of repeat it. So he had no choice as a vice principal he came into class. And he started teaching and a oughta subject, it was mess. I mean, if you're failing student that the last subject you wanna you wanna let right right, right. It's the way he taught he did not just teach math. He taught me he taught me to believe that I can do this. And that's the way he talked about it. I call him my first exit dental angels something's not life people accidentally became angels. They don't even know along the way. Right. Yeah. But he was the first teacher that and of course, I finished and I got an eight in Cambridge mass. Unbelievable. And and so it was at that point that you realize the power of education, and the importance of some would mentoring you in helping you. Well, more important. I learn what it means to be persistent attribute behind it. It wasn't the eighth grade that I was going for like, you know, I mean, I was just happy to pass. But is that if you make mistakes? It's okay try again, look at why you fail. Don't give out which is why feeling even if you're failing and falling you going forward. Do not avoid things that you don't like Beth elaborate because you learn how did you wind up? Dr. How did you wind up? With the incredible amount of education that you have today behind you. How did that when when was it's at you? Transitioned. Well, after I finished that great with this teacher. I went on where I learned attribute again, I was just surviving in school. But I realized it was about that persistent not giving up lending from era, and I went and I became a best all round student in the next grade. You know? And then when they called you your mother's nickname to you for you was cabbage head. Yeah. Cabbage because the cabbage looks like a brain and anti. It's not the most nutritious thing. So it's like a she. Yeah. Like a dumb head, you know, and again understanding where my mother's coming from. She's never been to school. She was four years old. She she doesn't know anything added. Then what what what you know? Right. Right. And so when I am at about twenty three years old. My dad was still very abusive, you know, physically and sexually that I just save up money from tutoring kits and I flew to America and Hawaii was my stop and attend a church school Brigham Young University. And then professor go on and off sites mentoring me again, it was a class that I did not like and I did everything to avoid him. We're out of time. But I I will I wanna get you back on again. Because professor this is such an important story and your message the book is called failing up a professor's odyssey of flunking, determination and hope and professor what's the best.

Singapore professor Frankie boyer America Franken Dr Hong Dr Barbara professor Louis Vitton visiting scholar Columbia University Kirk alliterate Taiwan municipal university of Brigham Young University administrator principal Barbara Hong Hawaii Beth three hundred sixty five days
"dr hong" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:24 min | 2 years ago

"dr hong" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"The lifestyle show. It's a show about living in today's world. I think something is happening. Franken euthusiasm brings an amazing eclectic mix to the airwaves got that. Right. And one of the reasons she's earned legions of loyal fans. Very simple. When you listen to the Frankie Boyer show. You just never know. What's going to happen? Listen for yourself terrorism, Frankie Boyer and welcome. It is so nice to have you with this radio on biz talk radio. When we think of Asians, we now think of crazy rich, Asians, don't we? Well, there's a woman from Singapore. That is a professor, and she has an incredible story. This story is about. It's called failing up. You heard me. Correct. A professors odyssey of flunking, determination and hope, and it is such a pleasure to to welcome to the program. Barbara professor, Barbara Hong. And it's Dr Hong Dr welcome in by the way, your book there is there is something in in the world of of books. It's called the Kirk is star. And your book was awarded this star. There's like two percent of all books in the country in the world. Get this star in your book is is is received one of them. So congratulations. Thank you. So one of the great myths is that we all think every Asian is running into Gucci's and Louis Vitton. And and you know, it's just like this stereotype that we have as Americans. And yet your background could be further from that life lifestyle. You had an abusive alcoholic father in alliterate mother. They were all of you kids in the slums of Singapore. You were you were you were asked to do sweat labor at a young age to help make bills pay the bills, which your father drink. He was so abusive in and sick. And so how does one go from that background to become a Kirk is star author and a doctorate from Columbia University in special education. In addition to three master's degree in instructs, instructional practices policy in leadership, and as a learning specialist from the same institution three time recipient of the. Prestigious senior Fulbright scholar award the first honorable visiting scholar to Taiwan municipal university of education. I mean, your your credentials are impeccable. Thank you. Tumbling. Thank you for inviting me to show. Again, let you mentioned before to stereotype of Asians to begin with is that they all can learn they all can study get topping math and science, you know, and especially from Singapore. All people can picture is this the wealthiest country, and of caused a movie crazy Asian does how you picture, but again growing up, you know, in a seventy. It's pretty typical. Singapore is not always reach. And again, given, you know all background off my father being alchoholic mother being illiterate. She cannot write her name. She's never been to school before. And none of my siblings finished tenth grade. So the biggest dream that my mom has is. Well, if one of us could work in a office because that's a condition that would be the best job that we can dream off. And. Oh, that's so. Sweet. Yeah. Of course, you would be comfortable. Yeah. So again school is not a priority because it's about daily living. If we. It's about survival. Yeah. It's about we cut a dozen of clothings and all the loose threads from the buttons. And things like that. That's how clothing us so neat in a stall because somebody has cut away those threats and for every dozen we cut we get thirty cents and that makes out of a day, and we get nails and again apart from that just going to school is like a routine, and of course, I flunked my. Several grades but keep getting move up because it's just a social promotion, and I don't get to go to a better school because I was born at a time when it's called stop at to what a government were punished. The parents a thousand dollars if they give up the more than two children. So that one by accident, they will forgive you. But I with the fourth one. So that's why my mom told me when I was seven years old that she tried a bought me twice, but was not successful. So she ingrained in me that you don't really have a brain to study. You know, I've already destroy your brain while you were my one. So don't try to study so hot and just having that notion of a self fulfilling prophecy, you don't have anything to believe in yourself to school is not very good. So when I flunked my tenth grade, which is the equivalent of twelfth grade in America. Cambridge exam. Actually, I don't know if I fail. I didn't even show up for the exam. It's like why bother to try, you know. Right. And then there was a class of repeated essay. Wow. If I'm going to repeat assist, the most humiliating thing in my life because everybody would have more on and wore a different uniform, but I would be in the same uniform dimiss everybody knew that I didn't pass the exit. Sure. And so that shame was so so heavy on me. And I told myself I will only allow myself to cry for twenty four hours and repeat three hundred sixty five days. It could be the longest to sixty five days of my life or the shortest one in the long ram of things. And there was this teacher. He was an administrator actually because nobody wanted to teach a bunch of repeat it. So he had no choice as vice principal. He came into class. And you started teaching and of off the subject, it was mess. I mean, if you're failing student that's the last object. You wanna you wanna lend right, right? But it's the way he taught he did not just teach math. He taught me he taught me to believe that I can do this. You know? And that's the way he talked about it. So I call him my I accidental angels. There's some things in our life people accidentally became angels. They don't even know along the wage, right? Yeah. But he was the first teacher that and of course, that yeah. I finished and I got an eight in Cambridge then for mass. Unbelievable. And so it was at that point that you realize the power of education and the importance of some mentoring you in helping you well, more important. I learn what it means to be persistent the attribute behind it. It wasn't the eighth grade that I was going for like, you know, I mean, I was just happy to pass. But is that if you make a mistake is okay try again, look at why you fail. Don't give out which is why the tide is feeling even if you're feeling as falling you're going forward. Do not avoid things that you don't like that's the leverage because you learn how did you wind up? Dr. How did you wind up with the incredible amount of education that you have today behind you? How did that when when was it at you? Transitioned. Well, after I finished that great with this teacher. I went on where I learned attribute again, I was just surviving in school. But I realized it was about that persistent not giving up lending era, and I went and I became a best all round student in the next grade. You know? And then when I called you your mother's nickname to you for you was cabbage head. Yeah. Cabbage because the cabbage looks like a brain. And a cabinet is anti. It's not the most nutritious thing, though is like a cabin. She. Yeah. Like a dumb head, you know, and again understanding when my mother's coming for she's never been to school. Given away was four years old. She doesn't know anything out of Dan. What what what you know? Right. And so when I at about twenty three years old, my dad was still very abusive, you know, physically and sexually that I just save money from tutoring kits and I flew to America and Hawaii was my, you know, stop and attend a church school Brigham Young University. And then a professor go on, and you know, like mentoring me again, it was a class that I did not like and I did everything to avoid him. We are out of time. But I I will I wanna get you back on again. Because professor this is such an important story. And and your message the book is called failing up a professors odyssey of flunking,.

Singapore professor Frankie Boyer America Franken euthusiasm Dr Hong Dr Barbara professor Louis Vitton visiting scholar Kirk Columbia University Taiwan municipal university of alliterate Brigham Young University Dan administrator Cambridge principal Barbara Hong
"dr hong" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

07:30 min | 2 years ago

"dr hong" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Knowing that kids under five years old. Are six times higher at the higher risk of death without any opportunity to get transplanted. Well, so Claire how did we end up with a happy ending to this story through her sickness? She her look for continued to felt for her. And in part of that they can develop some fluid that built up in her abdomen that fluid. Intern stretched out her belly. So that my liver would fit time she was so sick. They told me she was not leaving the hospital until she had a transplant, and I immediately signed to Dr Hong it's me. It's me. They continued my the rest of my work up that they had put on hold when she was too small 'cause he agreed that the belly was large enough to accept it. And it was a goal. Well, Johnny maybe to a couple of minutes on the the technical challenges of the operation, and obviously mom was probably operated on it freighter hospital and her daughter was at children's. How did you orchestrate all that our programs integrated both the adult and pediatric while it from the outside. It may seem very complex. I think we have a really well oiled well trained group of expertise that could carry this task, you know, just part of a day job. And so I think one most important thing that we remember is patient safety, which includes our daughter. Thank you. Thank you. Both very much JoAnne. Maybe I could I could turn to you. Not only. Did you donate your kidney to a very close friend? But your story has probably stimulated countless other donations. I mean, I you probably had no idea that that there would be such an incredibly positive effect of this. Maybe for those listeners who aren't familiar with with your story. You could recount that for us. Well, I started that when Derek was sick. He needed a transplant for me. It was a no brainer. Of course. I'm going to step up, and how long have you known each other? And for about fourteen years at that time. Well. And he was sick. We are so different. And my and I knew that I needed the one thing that you really need is the same blood type. My children are in a he's a be positive. I thought I was clearly an ace is they're donating blood and found out. I was also be positive. So that was the beginning steps as far as. Knowing. To give a part of me or an Oregon there with no fear. I have to say it was the best opportunity ever given to me in my life to be able to be to give my kidney to him. I always compare it to everybody knows somebody who has had cancer and someone close to them, and and you feel so helpless. You can't do anything. And here I'm able to offer a part of me to to save his life now because we are so different. I thought that. I guess our team thought that I was going to be appeared Matt or part of a chain. And I kept joking saying that, you know, don't be fooled by my size. I have big feet and pick. Thrones. I'm pretty sure big argon stew. No, one believed me accept me. And then when Tonya called me and told me that the team mad and that I was approved for direct match. I made a repeat it because it was just the best moment of my life. So when I had that conversation with Derrick he had asked if I was interested in going public with it. And I looked at him with. Disgusting. Look, I think you're so secretive about this. Why would you wanna go public and who would care? It was truly a fulltime job. After that. I went out to refine to everybody that. That we're interested in the story. Well, there's no question that you have provided courage. Both of you have provided incredible courage to those people who are struggling with whether or not they should be an organ donor. What was the operation like? Do you? Remember those couple of days in the hospital. I do remember the couple of days. It was I'll start by saying it was much easier than giving birth to a child. The only pain I remember is you know, getting in and out of bed. Of course, they're using your stomach muscles. So those first couple of days, you're getting out of bed pretty gingerly and other than that, the recovery was very quick. A week later. I was my first outing back to the house to see Derek and. What's the operation performed with the with the Lapper scope, and then there was a small incision to take the kidney out is that how it was done. Correct. So there's like a three and incision that starts above. My belly button. Goes just around it and below it. And then the doctor snatches your kidney from there. Claire, maybe maybe you could talk a little bit about what the US probably so focused on your daughter that the operation may be a blur. But what is it that you remember from the surgery? I remember going into surgery with absolutely no fear. I knew I was in the best hands, and they have instilled that in me from the day. I met everyone on the team. So I I really wasn't scared going into surgery at all my only fear was how my daughter would do because she was so sick going in. I was healthy going and I wasn't scared. I definitely had pain after nothing that I couldn't tolerate especially because I knew my daughter's going through the same thing, and she has been so brave throughout all of this that she can do it. I can do it too. Sure. Johnny the and this was the perfect situation from the standpoint of a suitable liver because you could take it immediately from from the arteries supplying blood and oxygen to that segment of liver from Claire that you were gonna put into her daughter. Correct. That's correct. And I think the key was the timing of it too. Because Brielle won't have enough that much time to survive without a Libre transplant was the perfect size this point and with really very minimal time that the organs outside the human body during preservation, and you had waited for Brill for a period of about four weeks, and there had been no deceased donation opportunity. Correct. Or was it longer than I was from December all the way into. April transplanted while trying to maintain her at home and not in the hospital until the very end when she was way too sick days left to live and she's doing great now. She's amazing. She's full of energy and life. And it's more hard on me trying to keep up with her because she's nonstop and the happiest kid you've ever seen fantastic. And we certainly know that Derek is doing well because we see around Milwaukee virtually all the time. Yeah. A living legend. Well, thank you all very much. We'll have a short break. And then our rep obsession with doctors Hong Zimmerman. Can change everything..

Claire Derek Johnny Dr Hong Intern Oregon JoAnne Hong Zimmerman cancer US Tonya Derrick Matt Milwaukee Brielle Brill fourteen years five years four weeks
"dr hong" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

06:07 min | 2 years ago

"dr hong" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Big part of whether it be. Liver or kidney transplantation? Absolutely like, Dr Hong said, we want to optimize our patients experience with transplant and give them the best opportunity to have a good outcome. After transplant, but we also want to provide them access to the treatment of transplant. So we are actually privileged to have a bento health team that's devoted completely to transplant. So we have two full-time psychologists, and and three full-time social workers and an alcohol and drug abuse counselor who all devote time to assess our patients who might need transplant and determine what factors might provide challenges for them and having a good outcome after transplant, but also protective factors things that will help them from a mental health perspective be able to have good success after transplant and our goal really is to maximize those protective factors and provide interventions from a mental health perspective that helped reduce their risk of having complications after. Transplant. Maybe you can give us an example, Stephanie so that the so that our listeners understand in a in a real life way from the standpoint of a recipient who is say going to receive a kidney transplant or from someone who is going to donate the kidney. What would be the things that you would talk to them about that would that would be complicating the donation process. So if patients have a history of significant substance abuse or psychiatric complication that is oftentimes just related to the magnitude of medical care. They have received the problems that have have. Ben involved in their organ failing. For example, it could be it could be a factor of them managing their chronic illness and having difficulty with emotional adjustment to that. And maybe some of them have coped with that by abusing substances to check pope. But maybe they've had a longtime history of substance use, and that may have actually contributed to their organ failure. And then we want to make sure that they have the resources that they need to manage future stressors. And like Dr Hong said be good stewards of that Oregon and not have such high risk of relapse to substance use or to other poor coping mechanisms after transplant. So that's why we have the interventions in place to help maximize their functioning after transplant, and that's what Sarah is able to do for us as an alcohol and drug abuse counselor, which is very unique to our program instead of kind of ruling people out based on their history. I was significant. Substance use and saying, okay, go get help somewhere in the community and come back to us when you've been able to demonstrate a period of abstinence, we can actually provide intervention directly in our program, and then allow them to move forward with the evaluation process and potentially have better access to that care at some so Sarah, tell tell us exactly what you do in your role is so important. Yeah. My role is really important. Typically patients who have a substance use disorder use drugs alcohol to cope with life. So now, they're in this really scary situation. They're not feeling well, all this stuff is happening. So we have to give him new coping skills drugs alcohol are no longer an option for them. So that's why I come in. I offered through different groups in transplant. One is a relapse prevention groups a three hour twelfth session group where I get to teach them both relapse prevention skills and new coping skills, healthy coping skills, and then what's really unique as we have a continuing care program where it's an hour a week and both pre and post transplant patients can come and just get that continued support and help through life because things don't end after the meeting room. There's a big adjustment post transplant. I think we'll hear over the cost of this program. The impact of of this of the disease that results in the failure of an organ and the impact of the. The transplant processes is. So huge. It must be virtually impossible to cope with this without some type of help Dr Saad, maybe I can turn to you now. And if we can go go back a couple of steps to the practical aspect of a patient who is on dialysis. Maybe you can explain this to our listeners because unless of of a family is affected by kidney failure. They may not know what dialysis is an obvious question would be why not stay on dialysis forever. Why do we actually need a kidney in two thousand seventeen? Thank you for inviting me. That's a very good question. If we look into chronic kidney disease and ones that patients starts going on dialysis. There are several modalities that patients can do for what we call. It really placement therapy. The most common one is what we call it hemodialysis and the standard one that the patient school to the dialysis unit. The hope to machine for four hours digging deep blood clean, the return it to them. And then they do that three times a week. There are other hybrids for that. When they do something on a short daily hemodialysis, and some patients will do another modality is known as better, Neil, dialysis. We accumulate basically hemodialysis is three times a week. That's correct for four hours. That's just an incredibly life changing event. Absolutely. Not only that. But you if you take into account that the patient has to drive to the dialysis unit has to have some vitals checked before going on the machine, then you put them on the machine, and then you recover them after the are on the machine, then they have to drive home. And then you start accumulating these toxins in their body. And then in four hours, do you try to do the job that's been done forty forty eight hours by their kidneys. While they are working, and we'll also take into consideration that how much of a kidney function dialysis is provided to the patients at. The best between ten to fifteen percent. That is when you have the most ideal is in place..

Dr Hong kidney disease Sarah Dr Saad Stephanie Ben Oregon Neil four hours fifteen percent three hour
"dr hong" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"dr hong" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Transplant program, and is a graduate of Marquette university where she received her PHD she has been with the department of surgery and the transplant program since two thousand thirteen Sarah psycho is a transplant alcohol and drug abuse coordinator. And Sarah will explain why this is so important in transplantation. She. Received her masters degree from the university of North Carolina and has been with the transplant program since two thousand fourteen. So would that ran a lengthy introduction. Dr Hong can you give an overview of where we stand in solid organ transplantation, and the challenges that are posed in in two thousand seventeen. Oh, thank you. Good afternoon to everybody. Well, it's you know for patients with end stage organ failure. All right. It's quite dire from them and the only treatment for them is to have their organ replace. So in the United States. There are about one hundred thirty thousand on the waiting list. There are more who need a transplant. But this one hundred thirty thousand are those who made it to the transplant list. And unfortunately, we only have approximately thirty thousand Oregon's available both from live donors or deceased donor. I such wonderful our goals us as professionals in the transplantation is to improve the patient's chances to get on the trash Butler's, the same token being good stewards of the precious resource donated organs, which are reading the gif of light so dockers announce Casey and Sarah cycle will explain the role of press with mental health in in this in our practice. That's a great segue to Stephanie. You can maybe explain why I think many of our listeners will will not understand why mental health is such a.

Sarah coordinator Sarah psycho Marquette university university of North Carolina Sarah cycle dockers Dr Hong United States Oregon Stephanie Casey Butler
"dr hong" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"dr hong" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"I mean, there's not like there's no like pill. You can take like there's a gravity pill, there's yeah, that's a huge consider. Well, there's a couple of things you could do. I mean, you you, there are immune boosters immune stimuli that might help overcome this effect to some degree. People have considered artificial gravity as a countermeasure seen two thousand one A Space Odyssey. If you could rotate the vehicle and get gravity back, it might help mitigate some of those affects, but but also I, I mentioned that we can pull sells out of you and me stimulate them to microgravity. They wouldn't respond. And yet the astronauts are very healthy on orbit. So we don't necessarily know if that phenomenon is reproduced inside the body because the cells in the body are not just floating in a pristine microgravity environment. They're moving their moving through the blood and they're migrating in and out of tissues and they're looking for targets to respond to to to keep you healthy. So it's a, it's a where we're where we're bringing this home to is it's a very complicated consideration. Every system is complicated in particular, the immune system, all these cells and the environment they have to to function and and keeping them functioning properly maintain our health. It's a complicated consideration. I think that's actually a good place to start wrapping up because this is the end of our hazard series. This is this is the last episode and the theme that I've sort of heard throughout this entire series so far is we've, we've sectioned off each of the hazards and really gone deep into what those hazards mean. But throughout by talks with all of the experts, all of you guys. What I've really learned is that everything is connected. You can't just look at just the immune system. You gotta think about what the gravity is doing and what the bone and muscle is doing and what you know what's? Why, how does fluid shifts go into this going far away? Everything is everything is connected. So. You know, one thing we talked about actually with another Dr. Eric Antonsson we just talked to them, so it's all fresh on my mind that particular talk. But we were talking about how all the experts are getting together and providing input. So when you are getting together and talking about this deep space exploration, what are some of the key things that you try to that you try to make sure that we are implementing into our future spaceflight plans, so you're absolutely right. And we actually have a name for that phenomenon in what you're describing is interdisciplinary science, translational science, and we have collectively learned that as a team over the lifespan of ISS as the nutrition folks have Dr. Scott Smith slab JSE have looked at inflammation and bone markers and nutritional status, and they've, they've been talking to the immune team down the hall, and we've been looking at immune mediators and we're starting to connect the dots between these systems. We've learned what exercise can do to immune. What fluid shifts can can do to the moon system. And so what inflammation does to a variety of systems. And so we have a name for that phenomenon and and as as you so aptly put, we're, we're working together now collectively more than we ever have before to address clinical risk to crew members as sort of a unified team of investigators across all these disciplines. You asked what will do about this going forward. And so you're seeing more joint solicitations for science projects or translational solicitations instead of NASA or an agency looking to do a cardio study an immune study. You're seeing broader solicitations now where where the agencies that fund are encouraging investigators to look at translational aspects of their system or their findings, and also interdisciplinary interpretations of data and and immune study that was completed years. Ago, we now have folks pulling some of that information. Dr Hong Lu in NASA radiation is pulling some of the immune data from a study several years ago where he had radiation data. So he's looking at, say inflammation and correlating that with radiation. See if there's a relationship there..

Dr Hong Lu NASA Dr. Eric Antonsson JSE Dr. Scott Smith
"dr hong" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"dr hong" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"I mean, there's not like there's no like pill. You can take like there's a gravity pill, there's yeah, that's a huge consider. Well, there's a couple of things you could do. I mean, you you, there are immune boosters immune stimuli that might help overcome this effect to some degree. People have considered artificial gravity as a countermeasure seen two thousand one A Space Odyssey. If you could rotate the vehicle and get gravity back, it might help mitigate some of those affects, but but also I, I mentioned that we can pull sells out of you and me stimulate them to microgravity. They wouldn't respond. And yet the astronauts are very healthy on orbit. So we don't necessarily know if that phenomenon is reproduced inside the body because the cells in the body are not just floating in a pristine microgravity environment. They're moving their moving through the blood and they're migrating in and out of tissues and they're looking for targets to respond to to to keep you healthy. So it's a, it's a where we're where we're bringing this home to is it's a very complicated consideration. Every system is complicated in particular, the immune system, all these cells and the environment they have to to function and and keeping them functioning properly maintain our health. It's a complicated consideration. I think that's actually a good place to start wrapping up because this is the end of our hazard series. This is this is the last episode and the theme that I've sort of heard throughout this entire series so far is we've, we've sectioned off each of the hazards and really gone deep into what those hazards mean. But throughout by talks with all of the experts, all of you guys. What I've really learned is that everything is connected. You can't just look at just the immune system. You gotta think about what the gravity is doing and what the bone and muscle is doing and what you know what's? Why, how does fluid shifts go into this going far away? Everything is everything is connected. So. You know, one thing we talked about actually with another Dr. Eric Antonsson we just talked to them, so it's all fresh on my mind that particular talk. But we were talking about how all the experts are getting together and providing input. So when you are getting together and talking about this deep space exploration, what are some of the key things that you try to that you try to make sure that we are implementing into our future spaceflight plans, so you're absolutely right. And we actually have a name for that phenomenon in what you're describing is interdisciplinary science, translational science, and we have collectively learned that as a team over the lifespan of ISS as the nutrition folks have Dr. Scott Smith slab JSE have looked at inflammation and bone markers and nutritional status, and they've, they've been talking to the immune team down the hall, and we've been looking at immune mediators and we're starting to connect the dots between these systems. We've learned what exercise can do to immune. What fluid shifts can can do to the moon system. And so what inflammation does to a variety of systems. And so we have a name for that phenomenon and and as as you so aptly put, we're, we're working together now collectively more than we ever have before to address clinical risk to crew members as sort of a unified team of investigators across all these disciplines. You asked what will do about this going forward. And so you're seeing more joint solicitations for science projects or translational solicitations instead of NASA or an agency looking to do a cardio study an immune study. You're seeing broader solicitations now where where the agencies that fund are encouraging investigators to look at translational aspects of their system or their findings, and also interdisciplinary interpretations of data and and immune study that was completed years. Ago, we now have folks pulling some of that information. Dr Hong Lu in NASA radiation is pulling some of the immune data from a study several years ago where he had radiation data. So he's looking at, say inflammation and correlating that with radiation. See if there's a relationship there..

Dr Hong Lu NASA Dr. Eric Antonsson JSE Dr. Scott Smith
"dr hong" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"dr hong" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"They're not looking at it from completely cry perspective the way i am able to get it because i'm so much closer to the projects but that's also why i partnered with somebody in tech and finance and operations because she's looking at all the background numbers that traditional developer we're look at but i also just want to encourage young people and designers to really step out of their comfort zone and think about these lucians because traditional real estate won't so i guess going back to your question how do i convince them we don't have to at this moment because we are in client but going forward in our business plan we would joint venture with other developers which means that they'll already have a platform that they can see a numbers that are transparent we're working on pretty good margins right now and that's tractive so i think as soon as i site is up i don't think raising money in convincing people will be a problem like at all it's just a very obvious lucien in something that i wanna encourage creatives to come out and saw because it's not just single millennials that need housing it's so families it so so couples it's a bunch of different demographics be good to sell for many of them you're about to get defer site in london when is planned to be ready and up and running still yes the first is in london because that is where we're from so because it is our first sight and it is innovative it's revolutionary in it's not bread and butter it does take a while to get things going it's innovative no one really knows how to wrap their heads around these things and anyone will tell you that you do have to find your lines to line with before things are kind of set in stone so that being said we can't guarantee a certain time line but i think a realistic time line for us polly would not be intil end of next year and that's simply because our product is ready to go but we now need to produce all of them and they are all prefabricated so they're being made in the uk and then it's about the legal processes because we do not want to be under the radar we don't want to be a legal we're not a guardian business real business scalable business so yeah that's the projection at the moment that was dr hong defender of design house liberty explore the.

developer lucien london uk
"dr hong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"dr hong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The american secret services didn't understand how the north koreans were able to produce such nearperfect counterfeit copies of american currency until they took a closer look at the source of their own printed money and they realized the north koreans had done the same there is an italian company that makes the actual physical machine that prints out the money and north korea called up the company and ordered one of them and the town company shipped north korea the actual printing machine the exact same one it purchased the printing machine and started to print out us dollars once office thirty nine had granted itself the ability to simply print us dollars north korea's overseas diplomats spread the money around and sold it to criminal networks abroad some estimates are anywhere hundreds of millions to as much as billions of dollars for years dr hong says the us was chasing the problem it would upgrade its currency and then the north koreans would come out with another high end copy that continued she says until the us treasury put holograms on american bills and then the north koreans appear to turn to a new way to bring in cash hacking north grease also decided the cost of trying to keep up with it is so high and that frankly there's far more efficient ways for them to pursue other types of activities cybercrime is simply much more cost efficient pyongyang is the prime suspect for a number of huge hacking thefts that hit headlines more than a billion dollars in crypto currencies have been stolen from japanese accounts in just over four years it is clearly a corrupt economy and that's why many people call it a the soprano economy or a mafia economy are witness says money continues to flow through north korea office thirty nine funneled and still funnels money directly to the bank accounts of the elite from meth production to supernotes and now to hacking the criminal activity has changed over the years but the effect is the same this is the state's way of protecting itself from economic shocks ensuring the comfort of the political elite they're not broke but what about the millions of.

koreans north korea hong us pyongyang treasury billion dollars four years
"dr hong" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"dr hong" Discussed on KQED Radio

"American secret services didn't understand how the north koreans were able to produce such new perfect counterfeit copies of american currency until they took a closer look at the source of their own printed money and they realized the north koreans had done the same there is an italian company that makes the actual physical machine that prints out the money and north korea called up the company and ordered one of them and the company shipped north korea the actual printing machine the exact same one it purchased the printing machine and started to print out dollars once office thirty nine had granted itself the ability to simply print us dollars north korea's overseas diplomats spread the money around and sold it to criminal networks abroad some estimates are anywhere you know hundreds of millions to as much as billions of dollars for years dr hong says the us was chasing the problem would upgrade its currency and then the north koreans would come out with another high end copy that continued she says until the us treasury put holograms on american bills and then the north koreans appear to turn to a new way to bring in cash hacking north korea's also decided the cost of trying to keep up with it is so high and that frankly there's far more efficient ways for them to pursue other types of illicit activities cybercrime is simply much more cost efficient pyongyang is the prime suspect for a number of huge hacking thefts that hit headlines more than a billion dollars in crypto currencies have been stolen from japanese accounts in just over four years it is clearly a corrupt economy and that's why many people call it a the soprano economy or a mafia konami are witness says money continues to flow through north korea office thirty nine funneled and still funnels money directly to the bank accounts of the elite from meth production to supernotes and now to hacking the criminal activity has changed over the years but the effect is the same this is the state's way of protecting itself from economic shocks ensuring the comfort of the political elite they're not broke but what about the millions of.

koreans north korea hong us pyongyang treasury billion dollars four years
"dr hong" Discussed on Podcast

Podcast

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"dr hong" Discussed on Podcast

"What i found the spare onto rozier breezy though city meshing key glowed on wacky kamov he don't got new york don't think you can say on a young soft factors liq dimension a saliba get across meme superstitious dhamma palo best onto tonal tarsus video to supplement leave other hosiery zelezny but casino teela canker shores gary don king chevik karnicki oh does this office on december not inside lesotho's do newly duck tub accu sf sitter mobile are cashable from prestigious cibo is it realistic about sweet qatari because you're the sokaia what i knew hakan rideau the salih tim pank cole tyler meter duck joe lou octa dot the shoe lupu survey eighty girls shown this little home alone doc ula shallow columns last put in dr hong can stein deuce slot may full till bhakti deserve has vida they supposed on was was sequel family besser nausea busey applicant or setter mercado batty is with the theory sean hobble to earth show though lameta jack empha manila newydd are long avec song colossus kelso ha is it as rotel i got the nerve pass don lusa did a new book tub amash move the evidence defeat of zazi pasture brought onto all what y'all automatic queue harder so leave that will be bowel girl i i kissed apple real defy postal disability imaginaire poche new disagree admit dot vic saudi absolutely it does give us a beyond eve how you qe darva be stash gravity silver band giga mich what do.

york lesotho hakan rideau dr hong mercado batty don lusa zazi pasture apple gary don king
"dr hong" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"dr hong" Discussed on KOMO

"The amount of snow expected here in seattle pop an inch or so flights low twenty seven degrees meaning and other slick commute tomorrow morning if he can take a threeday weekend hey why not things should improve through the weekend to warm into the upper forty or the lower 40s rather during the day an upper thirty's overnight right now thirty seven and sunny in seattle at komo news komo news time one 55 how would you feel about owning a gene company oh yeah actor ryan reynolds is branching out into the liquor business the dead pool starmaking what could be a bit of a tongue in cheek announcement on twitter yesterday saying in the long and in no way disastrous marriage of showbiz and alcohol so happy to announce i'm the proud owner of a gene company and there's that have a local connection to its aviation gin which might see on local store shelves they are based out of portland oregon liquor companies saying that reynolds will play an active role in its daytoday business no word yet on if there's going to be any aviation gene product placement in the upcoming dead pool to movie it's 156 at komo news time for marina rockinger and life beat when was the last time he did a deep cleaning in your home besides some modes of laundry and a few dish as well allergies dr sandra hong says you might wanna think about picking up the dust dragon vacuum a bit more often especially if you've noticed continued issues with sinus infections are asthma attacks research published in the journal of allergy and clinical immunology shows just how problematic it can be what we found was close to 100 percent ninety nine percent of individuals had found at least one of common allergens in their helmet researchers found homes with pets and pests like mice rats and dust mites were most likely to have issues along with older homes that have problems with mold dr hong says it's essential to keep exposure to such air tents under control especially for people who are prone to get sick one area to concentrate on is the bedroom where.

seattle ryan reynolds twitter marina rockinger sandra hong komo portland oregon asthma journal of allergy twenty seven degrees ninety nine percent 100 percent threeday
"dr hong" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"dr hong" Discussed on KOMO

"In guaranteed cash this november find all the details at tulalipcasinocom extra a to a four i'm kierra jordan on komo news forecast calls for breezy this afternoon was gross as high as forty miles an hour the same thing for tonight going to be rainy as well both this afternoon tonight on and off forty seven degrees about a steady temperature for this evening rainy breezy tomorrow winds gusting up to thirty six miles an hour showers in clubs likely on thursday and friday 52 tacoma at olympia right now fifty four and overcast skies here at seattle these yellowed basketball players accused of shoplifting in china all their way home to la after president trump appealed to china's president abc's alex stone only hours after president trump appeal the chinese president she said adding that three players were released from custody in china one of the players angelo ball brother of la lakers player lonzo ball all three or freshman they were accused of shoplifting louis vitton storable in china to play basketball ucla says it takes any violations of the law seriously and it alex stone abc news now life beat you read some pineapple and realize your mouth feels each are you never root vegetable and you've got tinguely feeling it could be a mild allergy just dr sandra hong says oral allergy syndrome is pretty common especially in people who may suffer from hay fever actually outdoors for instance ragweed carrots can give them problems in salary if they are allergic to birch tree pollen they can also have trouble with things like watch and so when they bite into it they can actually hit tingling of their lives they can have inching dr hong says the proteins and some rod produce and nuts are very similar to those outdoor pollens causing that itchy mouth scratchy throat and swelling of the lips cheeks and tung symptoms will typically go away on their own and treatment is not usually required in some cases once the affected food is cooked the protein breaks down no longer causes symptoms for most people making eating cooked so for instance and apple biting into apple can give them problems but the rate apple juice pies applesauce without any difficulties whatsoever for life beat i marina rockinger komo news winging it is.

kierra jordan olympia seattle shoplifting china trump abc president oral allergy syndrome apple komo basketball la la lakers dr sandra hong tung forty seven degrees
"dr hong" Discussed on KELO

KELO

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"dr hong" Discussed on KELO

"All these years you still get sore you try dancing with a linebacker sometime ward back from pain with tiger balm it works where it hurts hurricane earned one of the most powerful storms in history careened into florida sunday inflicting severe wind damage massive power outages and flooding on both coasts of the sunshine state well the mega storm is responsible for at least twenty six deaths in fifteen counties hardest hit the florida keys and chris cuomo was there to survey the aftermath the first key key west disabled byrom oh no power water gas no hope for better any time soon a better than expected outcome but each step closer to coach joe key where armas evil i made landfall devastation blocks of debris downed power lines and mutilate memories campus d tossed more severe than anywhere else in florida first responders a task force to in florida doing search and rescue have never seen anything like this how do you make sense of all these houses are gone and then this house is standing big pine key not a big pine to be seen here houses splintered gone boats everywhere reminding streets were rivers for hours ground littered with personal effects looks like you had a crew flesh earlier poor and rich here here you're mother nature she does what you want with dr hong search efforts year another house blown off its slab and collapsed a search dog gets excited the saw an anxious looks come out thankfully nothing worse than spoiled.

florida chris cuomo joe key armas dr hong